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  • 1.
    Ekström, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Experiences Of Teaching And Learning With Social Robots2022In: ICERI2022 Proceedings, iated Digital Library , 2022, p. 1678-1685Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest in exploring how social robots can be used for teaching and learning and robots are now studied in a variety of subjects. When robots are used for teaching, they are often assigned a role with a social character appropriate for the intended learning activity. This study focuses on a learning activity where a child plays a digital mathematics game together with a social robot in a middle school classroom. The activity is based on the idea of learning-by-teaching, where the robot has been designed as a tutee and the child is assigned the role of tutor. Through interviews and questionnaires, the children’s, and the teacher's experiences of the learning activity were captured. How does the social robot perform as a tool for teaching and learning? How should the activity be organized and how should the teacher act?

    The study shows that the children think that the robot can express itself verbally and ask appropriate questions. They experience it as a social and fun co-player. However, the robot has several limitations, where difficulties in verbal communication are the most characteristic, such as language recognition, timing, and strange comments. In addition, children react negatively to the robot losing attention to the child and not being able to play the game properly. Moreover, the children think that the activity can be carried out both individually and in groups but consider that the teacher must be in the classroom to explain the activity and above all, to support the child-robot interaction both verbally and technically.

    In many ways, the teacher expresses similar thoughts as the children. The robot engages students and through its questions, the robot makes them reflect and communicate mathematics. As the robot gives students continuous responses, students become more persistent in their learning. The teacher also mentions problems with verbal child-robot communication. The students need to speak loud and clear with reasonably long sentences and the right timing. In addition, the teacher experiences technical problems, such as the players losing contact with each other.

    The teacher considers the activity challenging to carry out in a classroom partly because background noise interferes with the robot interaction and partly because the activity is not suitable for all students. The teacher also mentions the importance of introducing the game and declaring the purpose of the activity, since it may be hard for students to focus on the game and the robot simultaneously. If using the activity in teaching, the teacher imagines that [s]he needs to support the child-robot interaction, i.e., repeat and explain the robot's questions and help the child with what, how, and when to answer the robot. Besides, the teacher may also help with mathematics and encourage strategies and detailed explanations. Unlike the children, the teacher thinks that the activity enables opportunities for assessment of the playing students.

    Finally, the study also revealed some ethical dilemmas with using social robots in educational contexts. It was partly about renegotiating prevailing social norms and partly about the deception of assigning a tool human characteristic. Together with the technical and didactic experiences of teaching and learning with social robots, the study provided an insight into a[n] [in]possible future.

  • 2.
    Ekström, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lära tillsammans genom digitala medier2022In: Använd rummet: högskolepedagogiska metoder för aktiva lärosalar / [ed] Veronica Alfredsson, Noomi Asker, Christel Backman & Sara Uhnoo, Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, 1, p. 127-135Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Ekström, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Teaching with social robots2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The school's digitalization is an ongoing process that brings new didactic opportunities, but also challenges. Social educational robots entail a complex teaching situation and affect the teacher's role, actions, and responsibilities in the classroom. Through observations in an authentic classroom context, this thesis aims to provide a nuanced and realistic picture of how teaching with social robots can unfold. Social educational robots have previously been explored in different educational contexts, but few studies shed light on the teacher role. Nor is it discussed what new aspects of digital competence become important when teaching with educational technologies that exhibit social behaviour. This thesis studies teacher actions and intended actions in a learning activity where a child collaborates with a social educational robot. In the activity, the robot is designed to act as a learning companion (tutee), the child acts as a teacher (tutor), and sometimes a few peers participate. The study is based on video observations of teachers' dialogues and behaviours in this learning activity, and a total of 25 hours of recorded video material has been analysed. The observations are supplemented with interviews, workshops, and questionnaires, where more teachers reflect on teaching with social robots.

    The result shows that social educational robots may contribute to relevant learning situations but also introduce new teacher roles, bringing additional challenges. The teacher's most prominent role in this learning activity is as an interaction mentor, in which the teacher assists the verbal and non-verbal interaction between the child and the robot, such as verbal communication fluency, explaining the robot's behaviour to the child, and maintaining attention.The result also identifies challenges that may emerge if social educational robots are used for teaching and learning. One of these challenges is due to the teacher relating to the robot as a didactic tool as well as a social actor, interchangeably. This duality causes conflicts in the teacher's actions, as the two perspectives call for different behaviours. The thesis also shows that using social educational robots entails new demands for adequate digital competence.

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  • 4.
    Ekström, Sara
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Hermansson, Anna
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Ögren Jansson, Marie
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Lundström, Marita
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Micro-teaching i Grundlärarprogrammet: Ett utvecklings- och forskningsprojekt för att stödja lärarstudenter att utveckla yrkesspecifik kunskap i matematik2023In: Abstracts för Decemberkonferensen, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2023, p. 1-1Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vid matematikutbildningen i lärarprogrammen vid Högskolan Väst (HV) genomförs ett utvecklings- och forskningsprojekt (med flera delstudier) för att stödja lärarstudenter att utveckla specifik yrkeskunskap som förbereder dem för undervisningens komplexitet. Kontexten i den här studien är förskoleklassen, den skolform som ska knyta samman förskolans och skolans pedagogik. I en granskning av undervisningen i förskoleklassen (Skolinspektionen, 2015) framkom att endast en fjärdedel av eleverna får en undervisning som motsvarar läroplanens övergripande mål för kunskaper. Det finns därför ett stort behov av att utveckla undervisningen i förskoleklass. Detta gäller särskilt undervisningen i matematik.

    Teoretisk utgångspunkt i projektet är Banduras teori om självtillit i att undervisa (1997). Forskningen behandlar individens föreställningar om sin kompetens och inte den reella undervisningsförmågan. Det finns dock en tydlig koppling mellan lärares uppfattningar om sin kompetens och vad deras elever presterar. I studien undersöker vi lärarstudenters tilltro till deras egen förmåga att undervisa i matematik och hur den förändras när studenterna får genomföra micro-teaching inför sin VFU (Pekdağ et al., 2020).

    Studien inleddes med att studenterna fick undervisning i matematik och därefter med handledningsstöd planera en matematiklektion. Lärarutbildare och studentkollegor gav feedback via ett strukturerat observationsprotokoll i ett intilliggande hybridklassrum. Samma undervisningssession genomfördes sedan på VFU där läraren observerade och gav feedback. Datainsamling har skett genom fokusgrupper för att fånga studenternas upplevelse av micro-teaching och om/hur den förändrat deras tillit till att undervisa i matematik. Teoretiskt analysverktyg är fyra aspekter som stöd för utveckling av självtillit (Bandura, 1997).

    Generellt upplevde studenterna micro-teaching som lärorikt och vill gärna möta liknande upplägg igen. Kontinuerlig återkoppling på ett begränsat innehåll upplevdes positivt. Studenterna tyckte tekniken med micro-teaching var en bra lärsituation, som blandade teori och praktik samt gav dem nya perspektiv på deras egen undervisning, en “levande kunskap”.

  • 5.
    Ekström, Sara
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    New Critical Imaginaries and Reflections on Robots and Artificial Intelligence: How Teachers’ Programming Knowledge Could Affect Future Educational Technology2020In: INTED 2020: 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference Valencia, Spain. 2-4 March, 2020, International Association for Technology, Education and Development, 2020, p. 3475-3483Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational Robots (ER) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) are rapidly evolving to meet the challenges that characterize school environments. The direction in which these emerging technologies will develop, and the effect they finally have on schools, will partially be shaped by how scholars and practitioners imagine future education. A recent study about the views of teachers and educational researchers regarding the use of ER and AI for learning purposes highlighted this issue [1]. This study revealed that, beside an urgent need for teacher professional development, the participants were concerned about human interrelations, individualization, educational management and ethics. However, both groups showed a rudimentary understanding of the differences between these two technologies. More importantly, there seemed to be a gap in the way teachers and researchers in that study approached new technologies in education. Whereas for teachers the purpose of technology was to enhance current teaching processes, for researchers, technology had a deeper transformational potential. Since then, a large national program aiming at increasing schoolteachers’ computational thinking and coding skills has been put into practice at several Swedish universities to support the introduction of computer programming in the K-12 curriculum. To account for these new developments, we wanted to investigate how these teacher professional development programs could reflect on upcoming school technologies. University teachers in charge of the programming courses could provide insightful information about how ER and AI can mold future school practices since they represent an entrance point for teachers into these technologies. Delegates from several universities involved in the development of programming courses for K-12 teachers were therefore invited to give their vision of a future classroom. In order to compare with the previous study, seventeen university teachers were also asked to imagine a teaching situation in a school in which a) social robots and b) robots with artificial intelligence, were a reality. They were further requested to reflect upon which challenges and possibilities could emerge when using ER and AI in post-digital K-12 education. Which differences appear relevant compared to the participants in the previous study? The analysis showed that the university teachers participating in our study coincide in pointing out potential gains in individualizing teaching and relieving teachers from routine tasks. Our informants adhered to the position of schoolteachers and did not predict any fundamental transformations in the current teaching practices. Unique for our participants was their ability to discern between ER and AI and that, while they were largely sceptic toward the cognitive benefits of a physical robot, they trusted the software to achieve similar results in a traditional computer. Given the premises in this investigation “future teachers that already knew how to program”, the participants in our study did not suggest further need for professional development, which contrasts with the prevalent opinion in the previous study. If university teachers believe that programming knowledge is enough to bridge the competence gap, and they do not expect any radical transformation in education, maybe ER and AI could be fully integrated in the teaching practice more easily than it was predicted earlier

  • 6.
    Ekström, Sara
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    New Teacher Roles With Social Robots as Actors in the Classroom2020In: INTED 2020: 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference Valencia, Spain. 2-4 March, 2020, International Association for Technology, Education and Development, 2020, International Association for Technology, Education and Development, 2020, p. 6636-6644Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Robots are entering the classrooms and provide new opportunities for education. Educational robots can either be used for programming, or as new types of social actors where these robots are designed to play different roles such as teachers, tutors, peers or tutees. However, new social actors affect the scene for learning by altering the social dynamics in the classroom, which in turn affects the roles of the other actors. In this study we explore the role of teachers in robot-enhanced classrooms, and ask the question: What new teacher roles emerge when robots enter the classroom as social actors? In this study we explore a setting where a student plays an educational mathematics game together with a humanoid robot on an interactive whiteboard, guided and supported by teachers and peers from the class. Four classes of school children in 2nd and 41h grade participated and played for about 5 minutes each. The game playing sessions were video-recorded, and 32 sessions were randomly selected, transcribed, coded and thematically analyzed using Interaction Analysis. Situations in which the teacher acted were analyzed to investigate when and why the teacher intervened and what types of support that was provided to the student. Results show that the teacher took several roles during the sessions. Traditional roles include moderator organizing the learning and managing social interactions as well as educator supporting the student’s learning by scaffolding mathematical problems and game-playing strategies. In addition, the teacher had to act technical facilitator handling problems and challenges with using the robot, and the role as interaction mentor guiding and supporting the student to manage the social interaction with the robot. The latter two roles are challenging and unfamiliar to most teachers. We conclude that using robots as social actors in education introduce new, challenging teacher roles requiring substantial and specific digital competence.

  • 7.
    Ekström, Sara
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design. Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    The dual role of humanoid robots in education: As didactic tools and social actors2022In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of using social robots for teaching and learning has become increasingly prevalent and robots are assigned various roles in different educational settings. However, there are still few authentic studies conducted over time. Our study explores teachers’ perceptions of a learning activity in which a child plays a digital mathematics game together with a humanoid robot. The activity is based on the idea of learning-by-teaching where the robot is designed to act as a tutee while the child is assigned the role of a tutor. The question is how teachers perceive and talk about the robot in this collaborative child-robot learning activity? The study is based on data produced during a 2-years long co-design process involving teachers and students. Initially, the teachers reflected on the general concept of the learning activity, later in the process they participated in authentic game-play sessions in a classroom. All teachers’ statements were transcribed and thematically coded, then categorized into two different perspectives on the robot: as a social actor or didactic tool. Activity theory was used as an analytical lens to analyze these different views. Findings show that the teachers discussed the activity’s purpose, relation to curriculum, child-robot collaboration, and social norms. The study shows that teachers had, and frequently switched between, both robot-perspectives during all topics, and their perception changed during the process. The dual perspectives contribute to the understanding of social robots for teaching and learning, and to future development of educational robot design.

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    Springer
  • 8.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Ekström, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Kritiska föreställningar och reflektioner om robotar och artificiell intelligens i svensk skola: när lärarnas programmeringskunskaper spelar roll2019In: VILÄR 5-6 december 2019, University West, Trollhättan: Abstracts / [ed] Kristina Johansson, Trollhättan: University West , 2019, p. 9-10Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Robotar och artificiell intelligens (AI) är redan en del av verkligheten och kan komma att göra intåg i skolan inom en snar framtid. I en studie av Hrastinski et al (2019) belyses lärares och forskares kritiska reflektioner om vad användningen av robotar och AI kan innebära för en utbildningskontext. Studien konstaterar ett ökat behov av kompetensutveckling, men påvisar också en viss oro över en förändrad lärarroll, mänskliga relationer, individualisering, pedagogisk ledning och etik. Både lärare och forskare visade upp en begränsad förståelse för skillnaderna mellan de två teknologierna. Dessutom framkom det i studien att det finns en skillnad mellan deltagarnas tankar om införandet av robotar och AI; lärarnas resonemang handlade om möjligheter att förbättra den nuvarande undervisningspraktiken medan forskarna såg en potential till att transformera undervisningen.

    I Sverige har läroplanen nyligen reviderats med följden att alla elever, från förskolan till gymnasiet, ska lära sig datalogiskt tänkande och programmering. Förändringen innebär ökade fortbildningskrav på lärarna, vilket har medfört att många svenska universitet erbjuder programmeringskurser för verksamma lärare. För att studera hur de ökade programmeringskunskaperna påverkar lärarnas syn på användningen av robotar och AI i undervisningen ombads sjutton universitetslärare, med ansvar för programmeringskurserna, att i en enkät reflektera över hur dessa teknologier kan forma framtidens undervisningspraktik. För att kunna jämföra med Hrastinskis tidigare studie, fick universitetslärarna föreställa sig en undervisningssituation där (a) sociala robotar och (b) robotar med artificiell intelligens var en realitet. De reflekterade över vilka utmaningar och möjligheter användningen av robotar och AI skulle kunna medföra i ett framtida klassrum. Hur skiljer sig universitetslärarnas reflektioner från resultatet i den tidigare studien?

    Analysen visade att universitetslärarna resonerade kring potentiella vinster med att individualisera undervisning och befria lärare från rutinuppgifter. Deras framtidssyn låg också närmare lärarnas än forskarnas i Hrastinskis studie, då de inte heller förutspådde någon betydande transformation av den nuvarande undervisningspraktiken. Resultatet indikerade att universitetslärarna generellt sett hade mer kunskap om robotar och AI än deltagarna i den tidigare studien. Trots det var de skeptiska till de kognitiva fördelarna med att använda en fysisk robot istället för en traditionell dator. Utifrån framtidsscenariot med programmeringskunniga lärare i klassrummen, föreslog universitetslärarna inte någon ytterligare kompetensutveckling, vilket står i kontrast till reflektionerna i Hrastinskis studie. Om universitetslärare tror att programmeringskunskaper kan överbrygga kompetensgapet, och de inte förväntar sig någon radikal förändring av undervisningspraktiken, då kanske tröskeln för att integrera robotar och AI i undervisning är lägre än vad den tidigare studien förutsåg.

  • 9.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology,Division of Digital Learning, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    Umeå University, Department of Applied Educational Science, Umeå, Sweden.
    Arkenback, Charlotte
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekström, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Ericsson, Elin
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fransson, Göran
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Gävle, Sweden.
    Jaldemark, Jimmy
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Education, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Ryberg, Thomas
    Aalborg University, Department of Communication and Psychology, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Öberg, Lena-Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Computer and System Science, Östersund, Sweden.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Gustafsson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Department of Applied Educational Science, Umeå, Sweden.
    Humble, Niklas
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Computer and System Science, Östersund, Sweden.
    Mozelius, Peter
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Computer and System Science, Östersund, Sweden.
    Sundgren, Marcus
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Education,Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Utterberg, Marie
    University of Gothenburg,Department of Applied IT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Critical Imaginaries and Reflections on Artificial Intelligence and Robots in Postdigital K-12 Education2019In: Postdigital Science and Education, ISSN 2524-485X, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 427-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is commonly suggested that emerging technologies will revolutionize education. In this paper, two such emerging technologies, artificial intelligence (AI) and educational robots (ER), are in focus. The aim of the paper is to explore how teachers, researchers and pedagogical developers critically imagine and reflect upon how AI and robots could be used in education. The empirical data were collected from discussion groups that were part of a symposium. For both AI and ERs, the need for more knowledge about these technologies, how they could preferably be used, and how the emergence of these technologies might affect the role of the teacher and the relationship between teachers and students, were outlined. Many participants saw more potential to use AI for individualization as compared with ERs. However, there were also more concerns, such as ethical issues and economic interests, when discussing AI. While the researchers/developers to a greater extent imagined ideal future technology-rich educational practices, the practitioners were more focused on imaginaries grounded in current practice.

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    fulltext
  • 10.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Ekström, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Barendregt, Wolmet
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, IT Faculty,Sweden .
    Serholt, Sofia
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, IT Faculty,Sweden .
    Kiesewetter, Svea
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, IT Faculty,Sweden .
    Augmenting Game-Based Learning With a Robot Tutee2019In: Proceedings of the European conference on games-based learning, Reading: Academic Publishing International, 2019, p. 560-568Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the initial design of an educational setup where a humanoid robot is used as a game companionto a child while they play an educational arithmetic game together. Drawing on the learning-by-teaching paradigm, therobot’s purpose is to act as the child’s tutee and ask questions related to gameplay and the arithmetic content of the game. The original version of the game utilized a virtual teachable agent, which was shown to be effective for children’s learning in previous studies. Here we replace the virtual agent with a social robot to explore if and how the embodiment and social-like behaviour of robots can augment game-based learning further. Our aim is to design a robot tutee that will enhance the game experience and stimulate elaboration of the game’s learning material. So far we have conducted two design workshops with 81 schoolchildren in grades 2 and 4 where they experienced the robot and the game in their classrooms. In this paper, we present the results of two post-workshop questionnaires, where the children were asked about desired behaviour for learning companions and their experiences with the robot as a game playing tutee. The first post-workshop questionnaire revealed that children would like to have a robot tutee that behaves as a kind and helpful human peer, but with improved capacities such as being kind to everyone, providing better explanations, and giving more compliments. The second postworkshop questionnaire revealed that the children accepted the tutor–tutee role-division and that a majority of children were able to hear, but less so, understand, the robot’s questions. Implications of these findings for design of the robot tutee are discussed

  • 11.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design. Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Ekström, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Serholt, Sofia
    Division of Learning, Communication and IT, Department of Applied IT, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Children's learning-by-teaching with a social robot versus a younger child: Comparing interactions and tutoring styles.2022In: Frontiers in Robotics and AI, E-ISSN 2296-9144, Vol. 9, article id 875704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human peer tutoring is known to be effective for learning, and social robots are currently being explored for robot-assisted peer tutoring. In peer tutoring, not only the tutee but also the tutor benefit from the activity. Exploiting the learning-by-teaching mechanism, robots as tutees can be a promising approach for tutor learning. This study compares robots and humans by examining children's learning-by-teaching with a social robot and younger children, respectively. The study comprised a small-scale field experiment in a Swedish primary school, following a within-subject design. Ten sixth-grade students (age 12-13) assigned as tutors conducted two 30 min peer tutoring sessions each, one with a robot tutee and one with a third-grade student (age 9-10) as the tutee. The tutoring task consisted of teaching the tutee to play a two-player educational game designed to promote conceptual understanding and mathematical thinking. The tutoring sessions were video recorded, and verbal actions were transcribed and extended with crucial game actions and user gestures, to explore differences in interaction patterns between the two conditions. An extension to the classical initiation-response-feedback framework for classroom interactions, the IRFCE tutoring framework, was modified and used as an analytic lens. Actors, tutoring actions, and teaching interactions were examined and coded as they unfolded in the respective child-robot and child-child interactions during the sessions. Significant differences between the robot tutee and child tutee conditions regarding action frequencies and characteristics were found, concerning tutee initiatives, tutee questions, tutor explanations, tutee involvement, and evaluation feedback. We have identified ample opportunities for the tutor to learn from teaching in both conditions, for different reasons. The child tutee condition provided opportunities to engage in explanations to the tutee, experience smooth collaboration, and gain motivation through social responsibility for the younger child. The robot tutee condition provided opportunities to answer challenging questions from the tutee, receive plenty of feedback, and communicate using mathematical language. Hence, both conditions provide good learning opportunities for a tutor, but in different ways.

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    fulltext
  • 12.
    Serholt, Sofia
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Division of Learning, Communication and IT, Department of Applied IT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Ekström, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Ljungblad, Sara
    University of Gothenburg and Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Interaction Design, Department of Computer Science and Engineering,Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Trouble and Repair in Child-Robot Interaction: A Study of Complex Interactions With a Robot Tutee in a Primary School Classroom2020In: Frontiers in Robotics and AI, E-ISSN 2296-9144, Vol. 7, article id 46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     View references (31)Today, robots are studied and expected to be used in a range of social roles within classrooms. Yet, due to a number of limitations in social robots, robot interactions should be expected to occasionally suffer from troublesome situations and breakdowns. In this paper, we explore this issue by studying how children handle interaction trouble with a robot tutee in a classroom setting. The findings have implications not only for the design of robots, but also for evaluating their benefit in, and for, educational contexts. In this study, we conducted video analysis of children's group interactions with a robot tutee in a classroom setting, in order to explore the nature of these troubles in the wild. Within each group, children took turns acting as the primary interaction partner for the robot within the context of a mathematics game. Specifically, we examined what types of situations constitute trouble in these child–robot interactions, the strategies that individual children employ to cope with this trouble, as well as the strategies employed by other actors witnessing the trouble. By means of Interaction Analysis, we studied the video recordings of nine group interaction sessions (n = 33 children) in primary school grades 2 and 4. We found that sources of trouble related to the robot's social norm violations, which could be either active or passive. In terms of strategies, the children either persisted in their attempts at interacting with the robot by adapting their behavior in different ways, distanced themselves from the robot, or sought the help of present adults (i.e., a researcher in a teacher role, or an experimenter) or their peers (i.e., the child's classmates in each group). In terms of the witnessing actors, they addressed the trouble by providing guidance directed at the child interacting with the robot, or by intervening in the interaction. These findings reveal the unspoken rules by which children orient toward social robots, the complexities of child–robot interaction in the wild, and provide insights on children's perspectives and expectations of social robots in classroom contexts. © Copyright © 2020 Serholt, Pareto, Ekström and Ljungblad

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