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  • 1.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Meeting The Demands Of PhD Supervision By Changing Supervision Practice: A Supervisor's Reflection On Didactic Change2023In: Journal for New Generation Sciences, ISSN 1684-4998, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 52-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a PhD supervisor's reflections on a didactic change in supervision. The change included adding digital collaborative supervision activities to meet expectations, demands, and prerequisites for PhD supervision. Small-scale changes in supervisor didactic practices, such as online monthly group meetings and online retreats, can be useful for the progress of PhD students and for improving the working situation for supervisors. Collaboration is a key feature that ensures shared responsibility, meaningful focus, and better use of both traditional and new supervision meetings and activities. Furthermore, PhD students appear to have positive outcomes regarding social life, academic belonging, academic skills, academic leadership, and academic friendship. The findings from this small, pragmatic quality improvement project provide useful insights for PhD supervision. Reflections on a supervisor's experience from a didactic change with digital, collaborative supervision can provide useful learning relevant to other PhD supervisors, PhD students, and graduate schools.

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  • 2.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR); Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Work integrated learning for a working life in academia: Experiences from working with PhD-students during the covid-19 pandemic2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 35-36Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Work integrated learning in academia and wellbeing for PhD-students

    Few PhD-students have a clear plan for their coming career after completion of their PhD-studies. There can be dreams of starting new enterprises, combining research with innovations in practice, or to pursue a career in academia. In health and welfare research schools there are many PhD-projects involving single PhD-students, as well as part-time PhD-students whose project is connected to their workplace. Research shows risk of low wellbeing and high levels of stress among PhD-students, together with feelings of isolation and impostor syndrome (Seeber and Horta, 2021, Schmidt and Hansson, 2018). Such negative feelings negatively impact the outcome of the PhD period and may also affect the future career of the PhD-student. To promote and sustain PhD-students health and wellbeing, there is a need to test activities that can decrease experienced negative stress during the PhD-period as well as enhancing academic competencies like academic leadership, academic writing skills and pedagogical skills. In addition, successful academics should have excellent competence in their field, collaborate with stakeholders and engage in impact activities. Thus, the PhD period needs to provide work integrated learning in academia to provide learning opportunities to develop those skills. Research conce rning PhD-students’ wellbeing and progress shows that the supervisor has an extremely important role for completion of the PhD and for the wellbeing of the student (Buirski, 2022). However, there are limited resources set up for PhD supervision and mentoring, which can create stress and mismatch in needs and capacities between the supervisor and the PhD-student. During the covid-19 pandemic the risk of losing pace in PhD-projects increased, in addition to disconnectedness with academy due to digital instead of physical meetings. However, this change also provided opportunities for novel and pragmatic ways of structuring supervision and enhancing the self-efficacy of the PhD-students. The purpose is to present learnings and outcomes of work-integrated learning project in academia for PhD-students.The focus is on two novel learning activities: online writing retreats and online monthly meetings, which were tested during the covid-19 pandemic. The aim of the learning activities was to encourage the PhD-students to be the leaders of their projects, to collaborate with others to find their role in academia, and learn the trade of being an academic, while practicing doing so, and promote wellbeing during the PhD period. The project has been performed with Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) in biannual evaluation cycles. The PDSA is a quality improvement tool focusing on the translation of ideas and intentions into action (Reed and Card, 2016). The iterative structure of PDSA is well suited to promote learning of a tested change and help shape organizational culture for the better (Reed and Card, 2016). Evaluation data includes number of participants, types of spin-offs from the learning activities, and participants’ oral and written feedback on the learning activities. The collected data was analyzed from the perspective of usefulness of the learning activities related to theories of work-integrated learning. Online structured digital writing retreats Open to more than the PhD-students supervised by the facilitating supervisor (any PhD-student who considered themselves in need of learning better academic writing structure, master students who wanted to become PhDstudents, other supervisors who wanted to see how a digital writing retreat worked). This activity showed participants the importance and diversity of academic writing. The participants chose their own writing tasks, report on their progress, and plan for their next step – but being their own controller and thus actively practicing self-leadership. At the same time the participants shared their feelings of participating in the writing retreat when reporting their writing progress – thus creating a social, international, and interdisciplinary forum, increasing their networks and enhancing feelings of belonging. This in turn ignited cross-project collaboration, thematic discussions and sharing of scientific literature of importance. As facilitating supervisor, I participated on the same level as other participants, sharing my writing progress and feelings related to academic writing. The 1-hour monthly meetings for PhD students supervised by the same supervisor.

    The meetings were co-designed by the PhD-students, where the first meeting developed from a shared practical problem concerning digital data safety. Coming meetings were then co-designed depending on experienced needs by the PhD-students. The PhD-students were in different phases of their PhD-process; thus, they could bring in varied perspectives and share learning with each other on the academic processes. They could also discuss issues that they considered important, such as being asked to review for a journal or being asked to teach at bachelor or master programs. Such collaborative working discussions across projects and disciplines are important in academia and the meetings were used to solve problems in academic practice and to test scientific ideas. As the meetings also were led in turn by the participating PhD-students, academic leadership skills were practiced in this setting. As participating supervisor, I had a more passive role than in traditional supervision meetings, and the meetings were inspirational and provided opportunities for shared learning.

    Outcomes from the novel learning activities

    The PhD students themselves describe how they have both acquired increased academic skills, and that the online writing retreats have been important in decreasing negative stress, creating a safe social environment which has been important for their wellbeing. The shared learning activities also presented a view of how to work together in academia, which may support the students when thinking of their future career and if this is to relate to academia. As a supervisor, I can clearly see that the activities have enhanced self-efficacy, leadership skills, cross-disciplinary collaboration, national and international networks and decreased dependency on supervisors. The additional bonus of those work-integrated learning activities has been the good progress of the participants’ projects and joy at work!

  • 3.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Lona, Irene
    Divisjon for utdanning og bibliotek, OsloMet – storbyuniversitetet (NOR).
    Lunde, Gerd Hilde
    Institutt for Atferdsvitenskap, OsloMet – storbyuniversitetet (NOR).
    Bedre lesing og forståelse av pensum med støtte av digital sosial annotering / Engl: Improved reading and understanding of the syllabus with the support of digital social annotation2023In: Norsk pedagogisk tidsskrift, ISSN 0029-2052, E-ISSN 1504-2987, Vol. 107, no 3, p. 283-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academic reading is a challenge for many students and there is therefore a need to explore opportunities to support students in reading scientific articles in English, and to understand the new knowledge in a Norwegian context and enable them to use the knowledge in their future professional practice. This article shows how a digital tool provides new opportunities for asynchronous interaction between students about subject content and syllabus, and how this can be used to promote academic reading, professional learning and at the same time increase student interaction.

  • 4.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Department of Behavioural Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Lunde, Gerd Hilde
    Department of Behavioural Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Learning from coproducing digital courses in sexual health in higher education in Norway2024In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Sexual health is insufficiently addressed in health care and higher education, which can lead tolower quality of life and negative health outcomes. To improve the situation, it is necessary to address both theneeds of patients and professionals and collaboratively engage in finding sustainable solutions. The purpose ofthis paper is to explore the feasibility and value of large-scale digital coproduction in higher education.

    Design/methodology/approach – A study of a project that developed seven interprofessional, digital master-level courses covering different topics related to sexual health. The project was performed through digital coproduction in higher education, with over 100 persons with various backgrounds working together online in designing content and novel digital learning activities.

    Findings – Large-scale digital coproduction in higher education is feasible and valuable, but the process demands sensitive leadership, understanding of coproduction processes and willingness to learn from each other. To meet the demands from practice it is important to understand the complexity, ever-changing and unpredictable working life changes which, in turn, demands engagement in continuous learning, training activities and the need for formal education.

    Originality/value – The study provides learning of the feasibility of the value of large-scale digital coproduction in higher education, which is a novel way of working in higher education.

  • 5.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Willems, Aron
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Manglende kunnskap hos profesjonelle om seksuell helse er en trussel for folkehelsen2023In: Dagens medisin, ISSN 1501-4290, E-ISSN 1501-4304Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Bang Svendsen, Stine H.
    et al.
    Førsteamanuensis i pedagogikk, Institutt for læreutdanning, NTNU (NOR).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Institutt for Atferdsvitenskap, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Svarstad Solberg, Ada
    Institutt for sykepleie og helsefremmende arbeid, Institutt for atferdsvitenskap, Oslo Metropolitan University (NOR).
    Skaug Sætra, Henrik
    Proba samfunnsanalyse, Oslo (NOR).
    Gunnman Furunes, Mari
    Institutt for tverrfaglige kulturstudier, NTNU (NOR).
    Utdanningene svikter i arbeidet med seksuell og reproduktiv helse og rettig­heter2023In: ForskersonenArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Chalachanová, Anna
    et al.
    VID Specialized University (NOR).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping (SWE); Oslo Metropolitan University, Department of Behavioural Science, Oslo (NOR).
    Lid, Inger Marie
    VID Specialized University (NOR).
    Midttun, Anne Linn
    VID Specialized University (NOR).
    Paluga, Peter
    VID Specialized University (NOR).
    Critical exploration of researchers’ experiences within the field of participatory research2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 50-51Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research question: Autoethnographic critical scrutiny as a step towards more inclusive research practices in participatory research?

    In this presentation we would like to discuss a paper draft. The paper examines the autoethnographic accounts of four researchers to highlight and critically explore our experiences within the participatory action research (PAR) (Schubotz, 2020). PAR is based on the principles of close co-operation between researchers and participants with experience-based knowledge, in this case people with disabilities. Hancock et al. (2012) define three justifications for the participation of people with experience-based competence in research: the ethical, the qualitative and the "therapeutic". The recipients of health and welfare services should have a voice in research in areas that will have a direct impact on their life situation. The qualitative aspect concerns that people with experience -based knowledge can strengthen the quality of the research with new approaches by asking relevant questions or by recruiting participants. This can strengthen the research's relevance, validity and focus on the development of knowledge relevant to those concerned. The third rationale is the therapeutic or empowerment rationale, i.e., that the research can have a positive impact on people who receive services and who are involved in the research (Askheim et al., 2019; Hancock et al., 2012). PAR is connected to democratic values, co-creation of knowledge and the believe that this form of co-operation can influence practice. Participatory action research creates space to develop new research communities where the researcher and the researcher's agenda are pushed aside to create space for the research community that develops as a result of interaction between researchers and participants with different backgrounds (experiences) (Nind, 2014 a; Northway, 2010). PAR is a context-bound research that is most often based on dialogue-based collaboration, and which aims to develop new knowledge or insight that can primarily be recognized in the context in which it takes place (Levin, 2017). It should also be based on local challenges that participants in the research encounter in their everyday lives (Lawson et al., 2015). Collaboration with people with experience-based knowledge in research can be the key to creating opportunities to co -create an inclusive democratic society. All the authors have been doing PAR in different research projects. In various academic meetings, we often discussed methodological approaches, our research role, things not working as expected, or when we felt unsure of whether or what we were doing was right or wrong. This paper will try to bring to light and exemplify some of the tensions and challenges we have met in our research practice with PAR. Based on four autoethnographic accounts and theory on autoethnography as a background, the article will reflect upon, critically analyze, and discuss researchers' roles, power, and epistemic privileges in PAR. The autoethnographic approach is based on the researcher's reflections and critical examination of their identities, roles, power, or penalties within one or several cultural contexts (Hughes & Pennington, 2016). It is a critical reflexive action research in which the researcher takes an active, scientific, and systematic view of personal experience concerning cultural groups identified by the researcher as similar to the self (i.e., us) or as others who differ from the self (i.e., them) (Hughes & Pennington, 2016, s.8).51

    Establishing data:

    Four of us wrote two reflections each containing autoethnographic thoughts that reflected tensions in our research practice, for example challenging privileged academic discourses or traditional researcher roles. The logs had roughly the following structure: describe the setting (where, when, why) and your reflections/tensions. Then we read all the logs and wrote down our reactions, keywords, and reflections based on our own research experience. We wrote whether the examples sounded familiar or whether they were unfamiliar or differed from our experiences. All researchers presented the reflections they had written based on the logs, and we summarized central themes based on all the logs.By reading the other authors reflections and at the same time reflecting on their texts using our own experience and taking notes, writing keywords to their texts, started the analysis process in familiarizing with the data (Braun & Clarke, 2014). The analysis was conducted by summarizing the material through the active process of identifying similar themes in the texts, using all the keywords and reflections (Braun & Clarke, 2014). The main themes identified so far were power and power (in)balance, researcher’s role, and epistemic privileges in PAR. Next, we discussed these themes, scrutinizing structures and processes that can influence the research or unconscious processes and power relations tipping the research in one particular direction (Alvesson & Sköldberg, 1994, 2017).

    Reflections so far

    The autoethnographic texts touch upon power and power balance in relationships between researchers and participants with experience-based knowledge. The power connects to decision-making for example who is making decisions, what kind of cooperation and co-production of knowledge is happening, and how deadlines sets premises for collaboration. The topic of power may be described on a micro level, what the researchers intend to do in the meetings but may also be connected to the framework of the research projects such as projects goals and progression within the project. Projects depend on a certain pace and effectiveness to fulfil the goals. This has to do with financing and funds that can run out. This effectiveness might be challenging when we do research with people with experience-based knowledge, especially if there is a gap between researchers' starting position, theoretical background and expectations, and co-researchers' needs, interests, or expectations. Although researchers are aware of their power and try to adapt the process so that co-researchers can experience a real contribution, it might seem that the researchers have the final word in the end, and we should discuss whether and how we should address that. Co-researchers must usually adjust to the academic world rather than vice versa.

  • 8.
    Fjetland, Kirsten Jæger
    et al.
    VID vitenskapelige høyskole (NOR).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. OsloMet – storbyuniversitetet (NOR); Jönköping University (SWE).
    Vikman, Miriam Dubland
    VID vitenskapelige høyskole (NOR).
    Folkman, Anne Katrine
    VID vitenskapelige høyskole (NOR); Universitetet i Stavanger (NOR).
    Praksisfellesskap i endring i norsk grunnskole?  / English: Expanding teachers’ community of practice? Exploring teachers’ experiences of interdisciplinary collaboration in Norway: Læreres erfaringer med tverrfaglig samarbeid om elevers faglige og sosiale mestring2023In: Nordisk tidsskrift for pedagogikk og kritikk, E-ISSN 2387-5739, Vol. 9, p. 215-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on political and professional guidelines to strengthened interdisciplinary collaboration in schools, the purpose of the study was to explore teachers’ experiences with practices of interdisciplinarity in an ongoing project including all primary and secondary schools in a medium-sized Norwegian municipality. Research methods included online forms with quantitative and qualitative questions related to exploring teachers’ experiences. The results of the study give implications to development in the national project A team around the teacher. The results highlight the multitude of teachers’ collaborative relationships, as well as the variation related to teachers’ role and duration in the project. The results of the study show that increased presence and support from the educational psychological service (PPT) and public health nurses in teachers’ everyday work, as well as the establishment of school-wise, interdisciplinary teams (lag), contribute developing communities of practice with more relevant support for academic and social coping for individual pupils. The results of the study are discussed using systems theories. Interdisciplinary collaboration is explored as social support in the teachers’ community of practice and as co-creation at system level. The conclusion points to challenges linked to different interdisciplinary collaborative practices between schools and teachers’ negotiation of the project’s knowledge base, which challenges the management of the development work in the project.

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  • 9.
    Folkman, A. K.
    et al.
    Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Stavanger, Stavanger (NOR).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Department of Behavioral Science, Oslo Metropolitan University (NOR); Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University (SWE).
    Being and becoming critical friends as a sustainable support function in academic work2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 99-100Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As we strive to teach our students to think critically about health and well-being in professional work, based on cooperation, life-long learning, and sustainability in working life, we need to meet the challenge of applying strategies to achieve this in academia as well. Stolle et al. (2018) underline the need to better understand CF as a research tool, to improve ourselves as self-study researchers versus teacher educators. We need to collaborate, to establish safe ways of working and negotiate shared understandings to develop and growth in professional academic achievement. Addressing sustainability challenges is most effective when coproduced by academics and non-academics in a way that provides solutions and contributions to the related scientific body of knowledge (Schneider et al., 2021). This presentation explores CF as a sustainable support function based on our experiences in a co -produced research project in a Norwegian municipality. The research question is: What characterizes CF as a sustainable support function in a follow-up research project in a Norwegian municipality?

    The case: The municipality has an ongoing innovation project “The team around the teacher and the pupil (2019 –2023)”. This project has a public health- and preventive perspective based on experienced challenges in the local school setting. The focus of the project is to strengthen the pupils’ learning environment and learning outcomes, by involving the reorganization of interdisciplinary and interprofessional resources to promote coping, belonging and good mental health in all the primary and secondary schools in the municipality (Folkman et al., 2020). The research group was interdisciplinary and worked in close collaboration with the municipality´s project leaders. The project also included master students’ projects. The engagement of master students in a co -produced research project provides the students with work-integrated learning experience of research with practice. 

    Theory: Co-production of knowledge must explicitly recognize multiple ways of knowing and doing (Schneider et al., 2021). CF involves trusting relationships, productive tensions, and two-way learning as mechanism (Knowles et al., 2018; Stolle et al., 2018). The connection between reflection and CF (Stolle et. al, 2018), aligns with core participatory mechanisms that enable ‘dialogue and iteration’ and authentic involvement (Knowles et al., 2018; Norén & Wallin, 2018). Conflicting agendas require that parts reflect on the principles of respect and solidarity to ensure a broader collective goal and that each agenda can be met while maintaining the integrity of the overarching goal of the research (Page, 2022). Reflection is a meaning-making process highlighting relationships (Stolle et al., 2018). 

    Method and analysis: The research question led to an integrated analytic process (Strøm & Fagermoen, 2012), based on the project documents, reports, and articles from the project. The deductive analysis involved the interpretation of the data to explore characteristics of CF as sustainable support in work integrated learning. Two themes emerged through the analysis process: CF and knowledge production in the project and CF: mandate and role. 

    Results

    CF and knowledge production in the project: There was a period of initial negotiations between the project leader and the research group, as the project leader wanted to develop a research design suitable to support the objectives and aims of the project. Therefore, work ascritical friends, started by critical questions from the research group about the operationalization of research objectives in the project and the pre-planned measures of intended results. There were negotiations of understanding in the processes of developing a contract and research plan and considering knowledge from both parties. This time-consuming process was ongoing through the follow-up research, as new perspectives and results emerged. However, this also led to a closer collaboration with more school staff and leaders in the municipality, which was beneficial for understanding the results from the project.

    CF: mandate and role: Co-production in the research process took place in a field of tension, where the project leaders and the researchers acted as critical friends to each other. The underlying tension, based on the project leader`s mandate, role and knowledge of the context, and the research groups roles and competence in research methodology, proved to enhance the learning for both parties and encompassed continuous need for dialogue. However, through CF the research of the project was also used to inform and improve the project, and then provide additional collaborative research topics. The controverses advanced a dynamic co-creative learning process, linked to knowledge of practice-based evaluation research in this context, but also a nearer friendship that obliged.

    Discussion

    Our results show, that that CF in co-production between practice and research can contribute to promoting the legitimacy of the research contribution in the field of practice the project deals with, supported by Schneider et al., (2021). For researchers’ objectivity and integrity in the research process is essential, but this can be experienced as conflicting with project leaders’ views and need for measurable outcomes. Reflecting rooted in a scientific inquiry, can serve as generating new meaning and learning opportunity for both parties (Stolle et al., 2018). The results underpin the importance of understanding one’s language and respecting each other’s knowledge when co-producing together with academia and practice (Schneider et al., 2021). To push our thinking and learning asking critical questions, can be limited by being “best friends” (Stolle et al., 2018), thus hav ing different views are an asset. Agreement must be reached about different roles, responsibilities and knowledge, and how the objectives of each stakeholder can be achieved (Page, 2022). The participating students could have been even more involved in the CF dialogues. They were invited to result presentation meetings, but work-integrated learning would have been enhanced if they had been able to participate on more equal terms. 

    Conclusion

    This paper presents joint learning from a mainly online CF experience, formed by mutual respect and leading to increased learning and increased value of research outcomes. The value of research collaboration and support with CF is increased. This is important in academia and for a sustainable work situation for research ers. The project also provided work-integrated learning for students, but this could have been further enhanced. 

  • 10.
    Folkman, Anne Katrine
    et al.
    Universitetet i Stavanger/ OsloMet (NOR).
    Hee Åker, Tone
    Høgskulen på Vestlandet/ OsloMet (NOR).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Oslomet (NOR); Jönköping University (SWE).
    Forhandlinger i samskapning og utvikling av digitale emner i høyere utdanning: Erfaringer fra en observasjonsstudie2023In: Nordisk tidsskrift for helseforskning, ISSN 1504-3614, E-ISSN 1891-2982, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [no]

    Hensikten med denne artikkelen er å tilføre erfaring om samskaping fra et prosjekt i høyere utdanning, hvor målet var utvikling av digitale emner innen fagområdet seksuell helse. Observasjoner av prosjektmøter ble analysert i en tematisk analyse. Kjennetegn ved prosjektet som ledelsesforankret fremkom ved at det ble stilt forventninger til deltakere om at de skulle jobbe for felles mål i prosjektet. Resultatene viste at samskapingsprosessen var kjennetegnet av kompetanse-og informasjonsdeling mellom deltakerne. Prosessen var i tillegg preget av posisjonering, i den forstand at ulike faglige forutsetninger blant deltakerne gav grunnlag for gjentakende diskusjoner om forståelse og anvendelse av ulike teoretiske perspektiver og begreper. Faglige særinteresser og erfaringer påvirket ledelse og distribusjon av makt i samskaping både i prosjektledergruppemøtene og i referansegruppemøtene. Videre belyser resultater behov for åpen kommunikasjon, felles mål og klare forventninger til deltakelse. Resultatene tyder på at samskaping i utvikling av høyere utdanning kan være krevende for både ledelse og deltakere, men at det samtidig muligheter til å ivareta kunnskapsbasert kvalitetsutvikling i lys av behov i praksisfeltet

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  • 11.
    Gustafsson, K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping (SWE); Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping (SWE).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Oslo Metropolitan University (NOR); Jönköping University (SWE).
    Eriksson, M.
    Region Jönköping County, Jönköping (SWE).
    Rolfson, O.
    University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (SWE); Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Kvist, J.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (SWE); Linköping University, Linköping (SWE).
    A Multifaceted Picture Of Patient Perspectives Of Health Care And Self-Management In Hip And Knee Osteoarthritis: Abstract2023In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, ISSN 1063-4584, E-ISSN 1522-9653, Vol. 31, p. S399-S399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Expressing a desire for surgery already before participating in first-line osteoarthritis (OA) interventions (patient education and exercise therapy) has in previous research shown to contribute to poorer outcomes from the interventions, yet we lack knowledge about patients’ views of health care and self-management of osteoarthritis (OA). This study aimed to explore and describe patients’ perspective of health care and self-management of OA among those expressing a desire for surgery before participating in first-line OA intervention.

  • 12.
    Gustafsson, Kristin
    et al.
    Unit of Physiotherapy, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping (SWE); Department of Physiotherapy, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping (SWE).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Department of Behavioral Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR); Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Eriksson, Marit
    Futurum - the Academy for Health and Care, Region of Jönköping County, Jönköping (SWE).
    Rolfson, Ola
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE); Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Kvist, Joanna
    Unit of Physiotherapy, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping (SWE); Stockholm Sports Trauma Research Center, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (SWE).
    Perspectives on health care and self-management of osteoarthritis among patients who desire surgery: A qualitative interview study2023In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Expressing a desire for surgery before participating in first-line osteoarthritis (OA) interventions (patient education and exercise therapy) has been shown to contribute to poorer outcomes from the interventions, but we lack knowledge on how these patients reflect on health care and self-management of OA.

    Objectives: To explore and describe patients’ perspectives of health care and self-management of OA among those expressing a desire for surgery before participating in first-line OA interventions.

    Methods: Sixteen patients with hip or knee OA referred to participate in a standardized first-line OA intervention program in primary health care in Sweden were included in the study. We used individual semi-structured interviews to collect data, which were analyzed using inductive quali-tative content analysis.

    Results: One theme of meaning “A multifaceted picture of needs, expectations, and individual choices” and five categories were identified as perspectives from the participants regarding health care and self-management of OA: 1) lacking control and needing support; 2) standing alone in an unsupportive environment; 3) going with the flow; 4) having expectations; and 5) taking ownership.

    Conclusion: Patients who express a desire for surgery before participating in first-line interven-tions for OA are not a homogeneous group. They describe a broad range of perspectives on how they reason and reflect on health care and self-management of OA based on their own needs, expectations, and choices. Findings from this study strengthen insights on the importance of exploring the patient’s perspectives and individualizing OA interventions to achieve the lifestyle changes that first-line interventions strive to accomplish.

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  • 13.
    Haraldsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Occupational Safety and Health Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping (SWE); School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Nylander, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University Library, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Jonker, Dirk
    Occupational Safety and Health Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping (SWE); School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Ros, Axel
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE); Futurum –Academy for Healthcare, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping (SWE).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE); Department of Behavioural Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Workplace interventions focusing on how to plan, organize and design the work environment in hospital settings: A systematic review2024In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Occupational Health Service (OHS) is a service that should support employers and employees with theirwork environment. Previous research indicates the need for deeper knowledge about the effect of workplace interventionswith a focus on planning, organizing and designing the workplace to improve work conditions in hospital settings.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate the outcomes, workplace interventions and intervention strategies in hospital settings.

    METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted. CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycInfo, Scopus, and Web of ScienceCore Collection were searched in September 2021. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool was used to evaluate the quality ofthe included studies. Study results are presented through a narrative synthesis. A protocol for this study was registered onthe Open Science Framework.

    RESULTS: Twenty-six studies, published between 2010 and 2021, were included. These included randomized controlledtrials (RCTs), non-RCTs, and mixed methods reports with moderate to good quality. The results support the use of workplaceinterventions to improve work conditions, health, and well-being in hospital settings. Combinations of different interventions,tailored to the specific organization, were used. Important intervention strategies commonly used in the start-up, evaluation,and intervention of successful workplace interventions, were identified. Using a pragmatist complexity approach in workplaceinterventions can improve outcomes by providing clear intervention strategies and combinations of tailored interventions,related to context specific problems.

    CONCLUSION: OHS support in workplace interventions with clear intervention strategies will contribute to improve workconditions, health and well-being in hospital settings.

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  • 14. Hee Åker, Tone
    et al.
    Kårtveit, Heidi
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Erfaringer med innføring av et voldsforebyggende program for personer med utviklingshemming: Fagfellevurdert2023In: Psykologi i kommunen, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [no]

    Forebygging av vold og overgrep er viktig fordi konsekvensene av å oppleve slike hendelser kan gi alvorlige helseproblemer. En viktig del av dette arbeidet er å lede endringsprosesser for å gi personer med utviklingshemming tilgang på effektive forebyggingsprogrammer. I denne kvalitative studien med mellomledere i ulike kommuner belyser vi deres erfaringer med å tilby og implementere VIP, et voldsforebyggende program for personer med utviklingshemming. Vi har analysert med en stegvis-deduktiv induktiv metode, og resultatene viser at ledelsesforankring er viktig for å kunne tilby og implementere VIP-kurset. Det er også viktig å ha et godt fagmiljø hvor det legges til rette for opplæring og utvikling, samtidig som man tilrettelegger kurset både innholdsmessig, praktisk og organisatorisk på en måte som ivaretar individuelle behov og likeverd.

  • 15.
    Hegge, Birgit
    et al.
    Fakultet for helsefag, VID vitenskapelige høgskole (NOR).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Institutt for atferdsvitenskap, Oslo Met – Storbyuniversitet (NOR).
    Ansattes erfaring med uttrykt seksualitet i bofellesskap for personer med utviklingshemming: et komplekst tema2023In: Journal of Care Research, ISSN 2387-5976, E-ISSN 2387-5984, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores expressed sexuality in people with intellectual disabilities and is based on staff experiences in environmental therapeutic work. A total of 20 environmental therapists working in a municipal housing scheme gave their reflections individually, and later in groups. The reflections underwent a two-stage analysis based on qualitative content analysis and resulted in three defined themes: 1) When expressions of sexuality are perceived as offensive2) Feeling inadequate professionally3) Working with sexual topics. The systematicity that is expected in general environmental therapeutic work was not found in work with sexuality. The support that is essential to help residents understand the body, needs or exploration seems to be difficult to put in place. Collaboration with colleagues, residents and their network is put to challenge by uncertainty and insufficient clarity. This concerns not only professionalism and ethics, but also the safeguarding of residents’ sexual rights.

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  • 16.
    Hegge, Birgit
    et al.
    Institutt for helse, VID vitenskapelige høgskole, Stavanger (NOR).
    Svarstad Solberg, Ada
    Institutt for Sykepleie og Helsefremmende Arbeid, Institutt for Atferdsvitenskap, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Utdanningen må sikre barnevernsstudenter kompetanse i barns seksualitet, seksuelle helse og rettigheter2023In: Fontene forskning, ISSN 1890-9868, E-ISSN 1892-7947Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [no]

    Indikatorer for seksuell og reproduktiv helse og rettigheter må dekkes bedre i barnevernspedagogers utdanning. Samtidig er det behov for kompetanseutvikling for de som allerede arbeider i barnevernet.

  • 17.
    Lunde, Gerd Hilde
    et al.
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. University West, library.
    Exploration of patterns of work integrated learning in co-produced online courses in higher education: Findings from the Sexual Health project2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 37-38Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching sexual health to create knowledge useful in practice

    Sexual health is closely related to general health and quality of life, and needs to be understood within specific social, economic, and political contexts. As sexual health is a topic insufficiently communicated about in health and welfare, there is risk of decreased health and quality of life (WHO, 2022). Professionals in health and welfare often lack competencies in sexual and reproductive health and rights (Areskoug Josefsson et al., 2019) and there is a need to reform teaching of sexual health (Areskoug-Josefsson & Lindroth, 2022). Work integrated learning is essential in providing useful competencies for practice, thus in teaching a topic like sexual health work -integrated learning is essential. To not be able to handle sensitive issues, like, sexual health, affects the health of the person in need of support, but also creates stress for the professional if the professional does not have sufficient competence to support sexual health when needed to (Haboubi & Lincoln, 2003; Jaarsma et al., 2010; Lunde, 2013; Wang et al., 2018). 

    The Sexual Health project, developed seven master level online courses in co-production with more than 100 stakeholders (students, patients, professionals, NGO-representatives, academics). Co-production was used in development of the courses and is also used as a theoretical standpoint in the evaluation of the learning outcomes and patterns of work integrated learning. However, there are challenges in bringing co -production theory into practice (Farr et al., 2021), and thus there is a need to evaluate if the co-production process of this project has been fruitful in creating courses of value for practice. Sexual Health is a taboo-topic, and a topic that can sensitive to teach (Selberg, 2021) and therefore evaluation of the courses is of specific importance.

    The project took place during 2020-2022 at Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway, and was founded by the Norwegian Directorate of Health and the Norwegian Directorate for Higher Education. The courses are designed to meet the needs of professionals working sexual health in various ways, and to use the students working context as. The courses were co-produced with stakeholders, as were the learning outcomes and the forms of examination. The stakeholders were participating in the steering group and the eight reference groups but were also active as subproject leaders for the courses. The courses are designed to promote learning for life and through life regardless, of geographic place and at low costs, aspiring to meet the individual person’s professional needs. The intention has been to use e-books to a large extend to ensure lower costs and promote sustainability and to keep down costs for literature, thus enabling students to be able to afford to take the courses. The intent in the courses is to provide flexible learning opportunities, to enable students to take the course with as much time flexibility as possible. The co-production process in developing and evaluating courses was a key concept to ensure valuable learning outcomes for practice. The student interactive engagement is at various levels in the courses; within the course with the course learning material, by using the course material at the students’ workplaces and between students during the course. The course setup provides strategies for finding knowledge, reflection on needs for knowledge and creation of new knowledge by using different perspectives on the provided learning material and to integrate the new knowledge in practice. As for example the students are encouraged to share films, podcasts, and literature from the course with work colleagues. 

    The first courses are currently on-going and being evaluated concurrently to ensure continuous learning within the project, creation of novel learning spaces and promotion of sustainable lifelong learning. The aim of the research is to explore patterns connected to lifelong learning in evaluations of the co-produced online courses and how the students have been able to integrate their working life into the course work and exa ms. Data is collected with a digital learning tool, Feedbackfruits, external reviews from stakeholders and online discussions in the learning platform with the students. The presentation covers research in progress, which is suitable considering the interactive collaboration which the project is based on. Patterns from evaluations from course testers, students and stakeholders participating in project processes are analyzed together with data from the ongoing courses. The preliminary evaluation results indicate that the co -produced online course design is valid to promote lifelong learning useful in working life. Preliminary patterns are stories of experiencing personal and professional growth, expanded professional perspectives, increased engagement with stakeholders and increased digital literacy. All skills important in working life.

    The findings which will be further discussed from theories of co-production and work integrated learning. Findings from the project can be useful when working with course design with stakeholders to promote lifelong learning useful in practice. 

  • 18.
    Masterson, D.
    et al.
    Jönköping Academy for Improvement of health and welfare, Jönköping University (SWE).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Learning from co-creating an online, flexible distance course in co-production in health and welfare2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 57-59Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Co-creation and shared learning between actors and institutions on all levels of society are important for an inclusive society. In order to realise the potential of these participatory concepts in society, there is a requirement to improve reporting and evaluation of the activities involved (Slattery, Saeri & Bragge, 2020). This suggests a need for guidance on how to apply co-creation and related concepts in practice. Work-integrated learning provides an opportunity for learning within higher education to be applied directly into a relevant context, and to problematize the relation between practical and theoretical knowledge of co -production. Learning integrated in the students’ present or future workplace can be built on practical tasks and work situation s to meet needs in practice (Hattinger et al., 2014).The purpose of this paper is to report learning and the pedagogical underpinning, co-creation and evaluation of a flexible distance course which is integrated into the working life of the students. The Co-production in Health and Welfare course is available as free-standing, English, online distance course held at Jönköping University and available to all international students. The course is offered both as a part-time course (7.5 ECTS credits) a full-time course. With each course, we have co-produced with students and patient and public contributors which has improved the learning journey.

    Method

    This discussion paper is based on our own experiences from a selected case of co-creation, supported by literature and pedagogical theories incorporating pedagogy from cognitive behaviourist, social constructivist and connectivist perspectives. Through this reflection, we explain how co-creation with students takes place, how dialogue is encouraged, how this is documented, co-refined and how agreement is reached. The co-creation of course content survey and frequent feedback survey which have been used to co -create and co-evaluate the course are presented. 

    Co-creation of a learning community

    As noted by Keller & Hrastinski (2009), a key challenge of online education is to “create an interactive context, a learning community, with appropriate levels of social presence, providing higher-order learning” (Keller & Hrastinski, 2009, p104). During each course, we set out to create a Community of Inquiry (Garrison, 2007). This framework identifies three factors which interconnect to form the student’s educational experience of a given course. These include the cognitive presence; the teaching presence; and the social presence. These were achieved through a practical and applied group assignment which is encouraged to be applied to their workplace and professional background. In their group assignment, students consider a specific context and issue relevant to their work. In collaboration with their student group, patient public contributors and the course facilitator, students co-produce a tool to be applied on a specific issue within an applied setting. By the end of the course, not only do students complete their learning objectives, but they also have a co-produced resource to take with them into practice. Through their experience of co-producing, students reflect on the process and consider areas for their professional and personal development in future. To ensure that we ‘practice what we preach’, each course is co-created with those who were about to embark upon this learning journey. Students co-produce their learning journey via a ‘co-creating course content survey’ to gain an understanding of how students want to engage with the course. This is followed by interactive dialogue in the first live session to refine the learning journey, clarify the objectives and establish the ways of working with students, teachers and patient and public contributors. This is an essential step as without this dialogue, the learning content of the course may not match the students’ needs which can lead to lack of motivation and consequently surface learning (Winefield, 2004).

    Co-evaluation

    To promote interaction between students and the course lead within this distance course, there were a number of tools employed in addition to a traditional course evaluation. There was an open discussion forum (co -production café), two dedicated discussions for the group assignment and reflective assignment and a ‘thought board’ within the student digital whiteboard. The ‘frequent feedback’ survey is live throughout the course and encouraged to be completed at the end of each topic and live event. This provides an opportunity for continuous dialogue with students and allows us to respond to students needs as they develop and within the timescales of the course. At the start of each session, any thoughts, concerns or issues from students or the wider learning community are added to a ‘thought board’. These are reviewed and agreed when to be discussed (at the start/end of each live session, or to be discussed asynchronously within the co-production café.

    Findings

    Through applying the Community of Inquiry framework (Garrison, 2007) and frequent feedback, we have been able to highlight the interconnecting elements of the course design and establish which elements of the course have worked well in forming a positive educational experience and identify areas which required improvement.The vast majority of students rated their experience with the course positively and we see improvements in perceived understanding of co-production during the course. The majority of positive feedback related to opportunities for engagement and interaction within the course, the flexible course structure and course content. Recommendations for improvement related to navigation in canvas, more interactive discussions, less reading material and clearer communication on upcoming activities. The learning presented is relevant to application of theories of work-integrated learning, collaborative learning and distance learning pedagogics. Two practical tools are provided for those interested in co-creating courses to apply and build upon, with examples of how to apply these in practice.

    Conclusion

    This case study highlights the elements of the course design which promoted a positive educational experience through co-creation with students and provides tools for application of co-creation of courses in practice. Co-creating curriculum enhances work-integrated learning, but demands adaptation to novel roles from teachers in higher education. It is hoped that these reflections prvoides guidance and tools for these adaptations to take place. Our focus for quality improvement in future will be co-evaluating the ‘learning community’ with students and patient and public contributors. 

  • 19.
    Pajalic, Zada
    et al.
    VID Specialized University, Faculty of Health Sciences Research Group Sustainable Healthcare and Welfare Technology (SHWT), Oslo (NOR).
    Saplacan, Diana
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo, Oslo (NOR).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Wallin Moen, Helga
    VID Specialized University, Faculty of Health Sciences Research Group Sustainable Healthcare and Welfare Technology (SHWT), Oslo (NOR).
    Naustdal, Iril
    VID Specialized University, Faculty of Health Sciences Research Group Sustainable Healthcare and Welfare Technology (SHWT), Oslo (NOR).
    Wesseltoft-Rao, Nima
    VID Specialized University, Faculty of Health Sciences Research Group Sustainable Healthcare and Welfare Technology (SHWT), Oslo (NOR).
    Alazraq, Nadia
    VID Specialized University, Faculty of Health Sciences Research Group Sustainable Healthcare and Welfare Technology (SHWT), Oslo (NOR).
    Kulla, Gunilla
    Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Forde (NOR).
    Princeton, Daisy
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Langhammer, Birgitta
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Rehabilitation Science and Health Technology, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Tecirli, Gülcan
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health Services and Management, Ankara University (TUR).
    Kisa, Sezer
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    What are the disadvantages of having a foreign background as a female academic and working at a university in Europe?2023In: Social Sciences & Humanities Open, ISSN 2590-2911, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 100551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main goal of this project was to explore foreign female academics’ experiences working at universities in Europe. The Bologna Declaration has enabled the cross-border exchange of academic staff within Europe. Female academics represent an essential and steadily growing group within academia; they are occupying desirable academic positions at unprecedented rates. For women, building their teaching and scientific career at another university is associated with both privileges and challenges. The main goal of this project was to explore foreign female academics’ experiences working at universities in Europe. Methodology, this study had a qualitative design. Twelve female academics with a foreign background participated in the study. Data were collected via a digital workshop and analysed using the story dialogue method. The results show that the participants have faced daily challenges in the form of discrimination, bullying, and injustice regarding their personal, pedagogical, and research skills. All participants emphasized the importance of a structured introduction to a new country and university with a designated mentor. To retain female foreign academics who are an important scientific resource European universities, as employers, must develop and implement clear guidelines for a good, welcoming working environment.

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  • 20.
    Petersen Hetland, Linda
    et al.
    Mestringsenheten i Sandnes kommune (NOR).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Oslo Metropolitan University (NOR).
    Straume, Connie
    Stord DPS, Helse Fonna HF (NOR).
    Biringer, Eva
    Avdeling for forskning og innovasjon, Helse Fonna HF (NOR).
    "That’s how the light gets in": Studentenes evaluering av recoverykurs ved Jæren Recovery College2023In: Tidsskrift for psykisk helsearbeid, ISSN 1503-6707, E-ISSN 1504-3010, p. 210-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Jæren Recovery College offers recovery courses for persons with challenges related to mental health and or addiction. This study examined to what extent the students at Jæren Recovery College reported satisfaction with the courses, and potential relationships between different student groups or course types, and course satisfaction. Data in this cross-sectional study was collected between 2019 and 2021 (N = 211). The students reported high satisfaction with the courses. They experienced the course as source of learning and insight, and as a social arena. The findings correspond with previous research on Recovery Colleges internationally and support the relevance of Recovery Colleges in Norwegian context.

  • 21.
    Salmiranta, Elin
    et al.
    Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University (SWE).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Faculty of Health Science (SWE); Oslo Metropolitan University (NOR).
    Ockander, Marlene
    Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University (SWE).
    Augutis, Marika
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institute (SWE).
    Masterson, Daniel
    Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University (SWE).
    The voice of caregivers of children and adolescents with spinal cord injuries: A scoping review2023In: Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine (JSCM), ISSN 1079-0268, E-ISSN 2045-7723, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context:

    Participation in SCI research with caregivers of children and adolescents with spinal cord injury (SCI) can occur in a range of different ways. This review explores the extent to which caregivers’ participation is connected to what might be called a voice.

    Objectives:

    To explore the voice of caregivers by collating available research with the participation of caregivers of children and adolescents with SCI, and synthesizing how the research has been conducted.

    Methods:

    The databases CINAHL, ERIC, MEDLINE, PsycInfo, and Scopus were searched for articles published between January 2008 and March 2022. Descriptive and narrative information was extracted and factors describing how caregivers participated were identified using an inductive approach.

    Results:

    Twenty-nine articles were identified, of which 28 had affiliations connected to the USA, and 25 to Shriners Hospitals for Children. In most of the articles, the caregivers were invited to participate in the research to complete or develop measures. Information from the caregivers was often captured using close-structured questions and summarized quantitatively with little or no exploration of the perspectives of the caregivers.

    Conclusion:

    The voice of caregivers of children and adolescents with SCI in research is limited by representativeness, the pre-determined emphasis, a lack of involvement in the process, and the reported narrative. By reflecting on voice, caregivers can have their experiences and perspectives acted upon to a greater extent to bring change, ultimately leading to improved care and health for children and adolescents with SCI. 

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  • 22.
    Schindele, Anna ChuChu
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Society, Institution for Social Work, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies, Malmö University, Malmö (SWE), Unit for Sexual Health and HIV Prevention, Department of Communicable Disease Control and Health Protection, The Public Health Agency of Sweden, Stockholm (SWE).
    Källberg, Henrik
    Unit for Analysis, Department of Public Health Analysis and Data Management, The Public Health Agency of Sweden, Stockholm (SWE).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Department of Behavioural Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Lindroth, Malin
    Faculty of Health and Society, Institution for Social Work, Centre for Sxology and Sexuality Studies, Malmö University, Malmö (SWE); Department of Behavioural Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Perceived knowledge gained from school-based sexuality education: results from a national population-based survey among young people in Sweden2023In: Sexual Health, ISSN 1448-5028, E-ISSN 1449-8987, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 566-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    School-based sexuality education is a core component of securing young people’s right to attain health equity regarding sexual and reproductive health and rights. This paper aims to explore how perceived knowledge (sufficient or insufficient) of taking care of one’s sexual health is associated with knowledge gained from school-based sexuality education and social determinants.

    Methods

    The data material is drawn from a population-based survey conducted in Sweden in 2015. The survey had 7755 respondents and a response rate of 26%. To explore the aim descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used.

    Results

    Our results show that perceived insufficient knowledge from school-based sexuality education was associated with higher odds of reporting not being able to take care of one’s sexual health. The highest significant excess risk for insufficient knowledge was found among young people from sexual minorities.

    Conclusions

    Young people in Sweden do not have equal abilities to receive knowledge needed to take care of their sexual health and thus attain sexual health literacy. There is an unequal distribution of perceived knowledge, and LGBTQI+ youth particularly face barriers in using school-based sexuality education as a resource for sexual health literacy.

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  • 23.
    Spaseska, Claudia
    et al.
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Level 2,Melbourne (AUS).
    Lynch, Claire
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Level 2,Melbourne (AUS).
    Joosten, Annette
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Level 2,Melbourne (AUS).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Department of Behavioural Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR), Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Experience of Recently Graduated Occupational Therapists in Addressing Sexuality with Their Clients2022In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 769-783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health care consumers have emphasised the importance of being able to express themselves in a sexual nature, regardless of their health conditions. Unfortunately, literature based on experienced occupational therapists and students, indicates sexuality is poorly addressed, despite being a meaningful occupation. There is limited literature based on Australian experiences or the experiences of recent graduates, therefore this study aimed to explore how comfortable and prepared 11 recent graduates who studied in Australia, were in addressing sexuality, as well as the enablers and challenges experienced. A qualitative research design was utilized, with results demonstrating that undergraduate curricula are not adequately preparing new graduates to feel equipped with the knowledge, skills, comfort and preparedness to address sexuality. Enablers such as education, professional development and supportive workplaces, can aid to facilitate positive change in this area of practice, which may improve client outcomes.

  • 24.
    Suutari, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE); Department of Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, the Highland Hospital (Höglandssjukhuset), Region Jönköping County, Eksjö (SWE).
    Thor, Johan
    The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Nordin, Annika
    The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE)Department of Behavioral Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Improving heart failure care with an Experience-Based Co-Design approach: what matters to persons with heart failure and their family members?2023In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 1-17, article id 294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Heart failure is a chronic heart condition. Persons with heart failure often have limited physical capabil‑ity, cognitive impairments, and low health literacy. These challenges can be barriers to healthcare service co-design with family members and professionals. Experience-Based Co-Design is a participatory healthcare quality improve‑ment approach drawing on patients’, family members’ and professionals’ experiences to improve healthcare. The over‑all aim of this study was to use Experience-Based Co-Design to identify experiences of heart failure and its care in a Swedish cardiac care setting, and to understand how these experiences can translate into heart failure care improve‑ments for persons with heart failure and their families.

    Methods

    A convenience sample of 17 persons with heart failure and four family members participated in this single case study as a part of an improvement initiative within cardiac care. In line with Experienced-Based Co-Design meth‑odology, feld notes from observations of healthcare consultations, individual interviews and meeting minutes from stakeholders’ feedback events, were used to gather participants’ experiences of heart failure and its care. Refexive thematic analysis was used to develop themes from data.

    Results

    Twelve service touchpoints, organized within fve overarching themes emerged. The themes told a story about persons with heart failure and family members struggling in everyday life due to a poor quality of life, lack of support networks, and difculties understanding and applying information about heart failure and its care. To be recognized by professionals was reported to be a key to good quality care. Opportunities to be involved in healthcare varied, Further, participants’ experiences translated into proposed changes to heart failure care such as improved information about heart failure, continuity of care, improved relations, and communication, and being invited to be involved in healthcare.

    Conclusions

    Our study fndings ofer knowledge about experiences of life with heart failure and its care, trans‑lated into heart failure service touchpoints. Further research is warranted to explore how these touchpoints can be addressed to improve life and care for persons with heart failure and other chronic conditions

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  • 25.
    Svarstad Solberg, Ada
    et al.
    Department of Nursing and health promotion, Oslo metropolitan University (NOR), Departmentof Behavioral Sciences, Oslo metropolitan University (NOR).
    Lunde, Gerd Hilde
    Departmentof Behavioral Sciences, Oslo metropolitan University (NOR).
    Helgeland, Kjersti
    Sustainable Passions (NOR).
    Johannessen, Lilja Marlen
    University Library, Oslo Metropolitan University (NOR).
    Wøhlk Gundersen, Malene
    University Library, Oslo Metropolitan University (NOR).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Department of Nursing and health promotion, Oslo metropolitan University (NOR), önköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University (SWE).
    Sexual health in prison with a positive approach: A scoping review protocol2022Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Sexual health isa basic human need, also for those who live in prison. Sexual health includes physical, mental, social and spiritual needs throughout the lifespan. Sexual health is a neglected topic in Norwegian prisons. Prisoners are overrepresented in the statistics for sexual abuse, both as victims and perpetrators. Sexual health is important for quality of life, but in practice the topic is under-communicate despecially related to physical and mental health. This scoping review is part of a largerp roject ongoing in a Norwegian prison. The overall goal to the project is to contribute to a better quality of life, sense of mastery and a better return to life in society for prisoners. There is scarce knowledge of how to promote and sustain positive sexual health of prisoners. Time and life conditions of prisoners vary. A positive approach towards sexual health can for example be to allow focus on sexual wellbeing, intimate relationships and sexual health rights. To gain further knowledge about the topic this project searches to find information and experiences from this field, by conducting a scoping review.

    Objective

    To identify and explore research articles containing sexual health as a health resource for prisoners with the following research questions:

    •What is known about the concept of sexual health as a health resource in prison?

    •Are there examples of positive approaches towards sexual health and sexuality in prisons?

    •How can sexual health promotion be done in prison?

    Methods

    A scoping review with narrative synthesis.

  • 26.
    Svarstad Solberg, Ada
    et al.
    Fakultet for helsevitenskap, Oslomet – storbyuniversitetet (NOR).
    Stojiljkovic, Marko
    Fakultet for helsevitenskap, Oslomet – storbyuniversitetet (NOR).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Fakultet for helsevitenskap, Oslomet – storbyuniversitetet (NOR).
    Sykepleierutdanningen må sikre kunnskap om seksuell helse2023In: Sykepleien Forskning, ISSN 1890-2936, E-ISSN 1891-2710, Vol. 111, p. 1-8, article id 90884Article in journal (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 27.
    Thapa, D. R.
    et al.
    Department of Nursing and Reproductive, Perinatal and Sexual Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde (SWE); School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE) .
    Oli, N.
    Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College, Sinamangal, Kathmandu (NPL).
    Vaidya, A.
    Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Sinamangal (NPL).
    Suominen, S.
    Department of Public Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde (SWE); Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku (FIN).
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Department of Nursing and Reproductive, Perinatal and Sexual Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde (SWE).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE);Department of Behavioural Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR): Faculty of Health Sciences, VID Specialized University, Sandnes (NOR) .
    Krettek, A.
    Department of Public Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde (SWE); Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Göteborg (SWE); Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø (NOR) .
    Determination and Evaluation of Sense of Coherence in Women in Semi-urban Nepal: A part of the Heart-health Associated Research, Dissemination, and Intervention in the Community (HARDIC) Trial.2021In: Kathmandu University Medical Journal, ISSN 1812-2027, E-ISSN 1812-2078, Vol. 19, no 73, p. 69-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sense of coherence (SOC) is a core concept of salutogenesis which relates to individuals' overall life orientation. Stronger SOC associates with better coping strategies, better health, and better quality of life. Although the SOC-questionnaire is validated in many cultures and languages, it has not, to date, been applied in Nepal. Objective To determine and evaluate women's SOC before and after a health education intervention. Method This study was conducted as a part of the Heart-health Associated Research, Dissemination, and Intervention in the Community in the semi-urban JhaukhelDuwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site in Nepal. Jhaukhel and Duwakot were selected as the control and intervention areas, respectively. Participants were women with children aged 1-7 years. Eight hundred and fifty-seven women before and 1,268 women after the health education intervention participated in the study. The statistical analysis was carried out with chi-square tests and one-way uni-variate ANOVA. Result Women's total SOC mean values at baseline were 51.1-57.4 and at follow up 54.4-54.9 in the intervention and control area, respectively. At baseline, SOC was significantly weaker in the intervention area compared to the control area (p < 0.001). At followup three months later, SOC was significantly stronger in the intervention area than in the control area (p < 0.001). Conclusion Nepalese women had weaker SOC than women in high-income countries, but comparable to neighboring country India with similar cultural features. Empowerment of women through community participation and health education strengthened SOC. The SOC-13-questionnaire in its Nepali version is recommended to be further evaluated.

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    KUMJ
  • 28.
    Thapa, Dip Raj
    et al.
    Department of Nursing and Reproductive, Perinatal and Sexual Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, (SWE);School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, (SWE).
    Ekström Bergström, Anette
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Department of Nursing and Reproductive, Perinatal and Sexual Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden;Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, (SWE).
    Krettek, Alexandra
    Department of Public Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, (SWE);Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE) ;Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, (NOR).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Faculty of Health Sciences, VID Specialized University, Sandnes, Norway;The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden;Department of Behavioural Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Support and resources to promote and sustain health among nurses and midwives in the workplace: A qualitative study2021In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 166-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Registered nurses and midwives are in short supply and have among the highest rates of sick leave in the global workforce. The aim of this study was therefore to explore and gain a deeper understanding of how nurses and midwives experience their everyday work, with a view toward promoting and sustaining their work-related health. Nine registered nurses and four registered midwives working in hospitals and community healthcare facilities in Sweden were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed using content analysis. This study is reported in accordance with COREQ. One main category emerged: ‘Quality of organizational and collegial support and opportunities to facilitate recovery, health, and patient care’. From this category, four generic categories describing the overall experiences of registered nurses and midwives could be discerned. Based on these results, it is recommended that employers adopt a systematic health-promotive approach to foster and maintain the workplace health of registered nurses and midwives.

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    Sage
  • 29.
    Thapa, Raj D.
    et al.
    Department of Nursing and Reproductive, Perinatal and Sexual Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, PO Box 408, 541 28 Skövde (SWE).
    Subedi, M.
    School of Public Health, Patan Academy of Health Sciences, GPO Box 26500, Lalitpur (NPL).
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Box 1026, 551 11 Jönköping (SWE); 5 Department of Behavioural Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, PO Box 4, 0130 Oslo (NOR).
    Krettek, A.
    Department of Public Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, PO Box 408, 541 28 Skövde (SWE); Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Box 400, 405 30 Gothenburg (SWE); Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, POBox 6050, Langnes, 9037 Tromsø (NOR).
    A Qualitative Evaluation and Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Short Form of the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC-13) in Nepal2023In: Kathmandu University Medical Journal, ISSN 1812-2027, E-ISSN 1812-2078, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 112-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Sense of Coherence (SOC) relates to an individual’s overall life orientation, and stronger SOC is associated with better health, quality of life, and coping strategies. When our research group used the SOC-13 questionnaire for the first time in Nepal, we identified difficulties in response patterns. The findings necessitated further evaluation of the Nepali version of the SOC-13 questionnaire.

    Objective

    To qualitatively evaluate the SOC-13 questionnaire in Nepali for cross-cultural adaptation.MethodNineteen nurses were interviewed. We used the methodological approach of “think aloud” to obtain a deeper understanding of the interferences of the scales. Transcribed materials were analyzed using a deductive approach through qualitative content analysis. The original translated version of the SOC-13 questionnaire in Nepali was modified by replacing words that were easier to understand.

    Result

    Participants found the questionnaire content general and non-specific but easy to complete. The nurses experienced that the meanings and sentences in some of the items and response alternatives were difficult to understand. However, the overall comprehensiveness of most items and response alternatives was perceived as good. Nurses’ interpretation of the SOC-items in the translated version of the SOC-13 questionnaire in Nepali matched the original English version. Items that were experienced as difficult in the Nepali language were modified to increase their comprehensiveness. Modified items and response alternatives had the same content as before, but some words and meanings were substituted with easier language.

    Conclusion

    The current revised version of SOC-13 in Nepali is valid and useful to explore individuals’ overall life orientation and their abilities to deal and cope with various life events in the Nepalese context.

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