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  • 1.
    Andersson, Maria
    et al.
    Uddevalla Hospital, Palliative Care Nurse.
    Gustafsson, Elisabeth
    Bengtsfors Community,Home Health Care,.
    Hansson, Kristina
    Dals Ed Community,Home Health Care.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    External mirroring of inner chaos: Blogging as experienced by the relatives of people with cancer2013In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 16-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Relatives of a person suffering from cancer risk being affected both physically and psychologically. Blogging has become increasingly popular as a forum for communicating experiences, but few studies have focused on what blogging about a relative's cancer journey means to the author. Aim: To illuminate relatives' experiences of blogging when a family member is in the end-of-life phase of cancer. Method: Telephone interviews were conducted with 12 people about their experiences of blogging during and after their family member's illness. The data was analysed using qualitative content analysis. Findings: Blogging facilitated everyday life, introduced the relatives to new friends with similar experiences, helped them in their grief process, and helped them to preserve memories. The negative aspects were being misunderstood and publicly criticised as well as the feeling of providing readers with 'reality show' entertainment. Conclusion: Blogging was seen as a complement to professional care that contributed to the prevention of ill health.

  • 2.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    The struggle of health care providers to reconcile as human beings in end-of-life care2018In: 39th Annual International Association for Human Caring (IAHC) Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA May 30th through June 1st 2018., 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Vidrörd av livet i dödens närhet: Att varda som människa och vårdare i vårdandets gemenskap2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the study is to create a theory model of "becoming" as a human being and health care provider in the caring communion at the end-of-life. The theoretical perspective of the study is caring science as it is developed at Åbo Academy University in Finland outlined in Eriksson's theory of caritative caring with focus on caring ethics. The thesis consists of four sub-studies reported as scientific articles and a summary section. The study has an overarching hermeneutic research approach. The sub-studies I-IV are reinterpreted from viewpoint of the overall question. Empirical assumptions could then be discerned from the substance of the four substudies, which raised questions. The answers to these questions were sought in dialogue with selected texts by Kierkegaard and resulted in a theory model. The theory model results in following theses: 1. To "become" as a human being is to remain in an endless guilt. Guilt is a form of love. It is guilt that give strength and willingness to act in love and mercy when caring for patients at the end-of-life. The guilt as love allows becoming as a human being to be at home in love and mercy. 2. The human being's courage is characterized as the willingness to obtain contact with the life of fellow human beings. This courage develops over time to stand for itself, with a foundation of belief in human beings, and resulting in a selfless, loving way to help the patients grieve and reconcile at the end-of-life. 3. To be "touched" can be illustrated as an inner awakening; an inner movement towards consciousness for the examination of the love for one another, and to love unselfishly. 4. The human being's evolution in its own understanding of life occurs in the care of another human being who is at the end-of-life, as well as to be at home in ethos, love and mercy. Becoming in this context means that the human being evolves to become responsive to the heart's inner voice; an inner strength and joy which opens to the eternal and holy. 5. To overcome external obstacles is characterized as serving human beings in a selfless love; a caring in love that has requirements that need to be expressed by what is true, beautiful and good for patients at the end-of-life. An awareness and understanding of what it means to become as a human being and health care provider in caring community can help health care providers to easily focus on the patient.

  • 4.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level. Åbo Academi University.
    Berggren, Ingela
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Kasén, Anne
    Åbo Academi University.
    Wärnå-Furu, Carola
    Åbo Academi University.
    Söderlund, Maud
    University of Gävle, Åbo Academi University.
    A Qualitative Metasynthesis From Nurses’ Perspective When Dealing With Ethical Dilemmas and Ethical Problems in End-of-Life Care2015In: International journal for human caring, ISSN 1091-5710, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 40-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This metasynthesis aimed to translate, interpret, and present a synthesis of qualitative studies from nurses' perspectives dealing with ethical dilemmas and ethical problems in end-of-life care and to gain a deeper understanding of the phenomena. Nurses and other care professionals need to gain a deeper understanding and alleviate the suffering of patients through evidence-based practice end-of-life care. The metasynthesis, inspired by Noblit and Hare, generated an overarching metaphor, The Loving Eye. The Loving Eye illustrates how nurses are deeply involved with patients as human beings and connotes an inner responsibility to struggle for patients' best interests and wishes at the end of life. With The Loving Eye, nurses can see and feel patients' need to be confirmed, comforted, and healed approaching the end of life.

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Hedemalm, Azar
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Berggren, Ingela
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Assessment and decision-making of Swedish primary care nurses in relation to the use of interpreters2017In: Journal of Health Visiting, ISSN 2050-8719, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 454-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Communicating with immigrants in primary care can be a challenge for nurses who must assess language proficiency and decide whether to use an interpreter. The aim of this study was to examine primary care nurses’ experiences of assessment and decision-making in relation to the use of interpreters. A qualitative inductive research design was chosen and nurses with experience of professional interpreters were recruited for focus group interviews. The study results showed that primary care nurses respected immigrants as human beings and recognised their right to decline an interpreter in sensitive situations. The purpose of primary care nurses’ experiences of assessment and decision-making in relation to the use of interpreters was ensuring patient safety, the importance of reciprocal information and respect for patient autonomy.

  • 6.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Karlsson, Christina
    Tallbackens Demenscentrum, Trollhättans stad.
    Barbosa da Silva, António
    Ansgar College and Theological Seminary, Kristiansand.
    Berggren, Ingela
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Söderlund, Maud
    Åbo Academy University, Department of Caring Science.
    Community nurses' experiences of ethical problems in end-of-life care in the patient's own home.2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 831-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To gain a deeper understanding of community nurses' experiences of ethical problems in end-of-life care in the patient's own home. METHOD: Ten female nurses from five different communities with experience of end-of-life care were interviewed. A hermeneutic approach inspired by Gadamer was used to analyse the qualitative data from the interviews. FINDINGS: In the first step of interpretation, two themes emerged: Uncomfortable feelings and Lack of cooperation and in the second step, one theme Lack of security emerged. Finally, the overall interpretation revealed the theme Feelings of loss of control in end-of-life care in the patient's own home. CONCLUSION: The nurses exhibited commitment and a desire to do good when caring for patients in the end-of-life phase, even if they sometimes experienced feelings of lack of control. This implies that, when confronted with care-related issues, they have the power to both act and react. This study aimed to increase understanding of ethical problems that arise in end-of-life care in the patient's own home and revealed the need to take the patients', relatives' and nurses' perspectives on health and suffering into consideration to ensure good end-of-life home care.

  • 7.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Karlsson, Ingrid
    Capio Läkarhus Almö, Myggenäs, Sweden.
    Follow-up visits to older patients after a hospital stay: nurses' perspectives.2019In: British Journal of Community Nursing, ISSN 1462-4753, E-ISSN 2052-2215, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older patients with multimorbidity and extensive healthcare needs are at risk of frequent readmission to hospital after discharge. With a Swedish report entitled 'Follow-up 48-72' as its basis, the present study aimed to describe nurses' experiences of follow-up visits to older patients with multimorbidity 48 to 72 hours after discharge from hospital. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 nurses experienced with such home visits to older patients, and the material was analysed by qualitative content analysis. The results indicate that such visits by nurses can relieve patient anxiety, as patients are often unsure of the next steps, in terms of medication and care. According to the nurses, these visits created trust in the nurse-patient relationship and ensured patient safety. Follow-up visits soon after discharge from hospital should become a part of routine nursing, especially for older people with multimorbidity.

  • 8.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Kasén, Anne
    Faculty of Professional Studies, NordUniversity, Bodø, Norway .
    Health care providers becoming as human beings in end-of-life care: a tentative theory model2017In: The 15th World Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC): Abstracts, Hayward Medical Communications, 2017, p. 853-853, article id P02-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim is to elucidate dimensions in a tentative theory model of health care providers becoming as human beings in end-of-life care. Health care providers as fellow human beings are vulnerable and caring for patients at the end-of-life is usually something that not goes without a trace for health care providers. The awareness of death can give meaning and understanding of one's own life. Health care providers' existential situation has received small extent of attention. Design, methods and approach: A caring science perspective based on Eriksson's theory of caritative caring, was used to reveal dimensions of health care providers becoming as human beings. The material consists of two substudies with interviews, one meta-synthesis and three focus groups interviews with a total of 1635 nurses. In the interpretation of the material a hermeneutic overall approach was chosen. Result: The theory model indicates that health care providers in a caring communion in end of-life allows contact with life and oneself as human beings. It is an inner awakening for health care provider as human beings, an inner movement to the awareness to be able to love unselfishly in the caring of patient. When health care providers get contact with life and oneself as human beings they struggle to be reconciled with their own life situations. Becoming, as human beings can be revealed as an understanding of life and feelings of inner strength and happiness as human beings and as health care providers in end-of-life care. Conclusion: The dimensions of the theory model can give a deeper understanding of health care providers becoming as human being. In caring community health care providers can experiencing difficult situations where there inner as human beings will be touched and existential questions raises about health and suffering, dying and death. Becoming as human beings and health care providers in caring communion is to be at home in ethos, love, charity and reconciliation.

  • 9.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level. Department of Caring Science, Åbo Academy University.
    Kasén, Anne
    Åbo Academy University, Department of Caring Science and Faculty of Professional Studies, Nord Universitet, Bodø.
    Wärnå-Furu, Carola
    Åbo Academy University, Department of Caring Science.
    Reflecting on one's own death: the existential questions that nurses face in end-of-life care2017In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 158-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When registered nurses care for patients at the end of life, they are often confronted with different issues related to suffering, dying, and death whether working in hospital or community care. Serious existential questions that challenge nurses' identities as human beings can arise as a result of these situations. The aim of our study was to describe and gain a deeper understanding of nurses' existential questions when caring for dying patients. Focus-group interviews with registered nurses who shared similar experiences and backgrounds about experiences in end-of-life care were employed to gain a deeper understanding about this sensitive subject. Focus-group interviews were performed in hospice care, in community care, and in a palliative care unit in western Sweden. A qualitative hermeneutic approach was employed to interpret the data. Nurses' existential questions balanced between responsibility and guilt in relation to their patients, between fear and courage in relation to being professional caregivers and fellow human beings, and between hope and despair in relation to the other's and their own death. Nurses in end-of-life care experience various emotions from patients related to things physical, spatial, and temporal. When nurses encounter these emotions as expressing a patient's suffering, they lead to challenges of balancing between different feelings in relation to patients, as both professional caregivers and fellow human beings. Nurses can experience growth both professionally and as human beings when caring for patients at the end of life.

  • 10.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Sandén, Inger
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    En grupp sjuksköterskors beskrivning av goda vårdsituationer i palliativ vård2007In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 50-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Wikström, Ann-Charlott
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Specialistsjuksköterska med inriktning mot avancerad vård i hemmet2013In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 172-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vid Högskolan Väst i Specialistsjuksköterskeprogrammet som leder till distriktssköterska finns två inriktningar, inriktning mot avancerad vård i hemmet respektive folkhälsa. Utbildningen med inriktning mot avancerad vård i hemmet ger kompetens att arbeta inom kommunal hälso- och sjukvård. Allt fler svårt sjuka människor med många olika sjukdomar och komplexa omvårdnadsbehov vårdas i sina hem. Människor i livets slutskede vårdas alltmer i det egna hemmet omgivna av avancerad medicinteknisk utrustning. I specialistsjuksköterskans arbete ingår att ha förmåga till självständighet, vetenskapligt förhållningssätt, mångkulturellt kunnande och ett professionellt och fördjupat ansvar att leda och utveckla omvårdnaden. I Specialistsjuksköterskeutbildningen vid Högskolan Väst uppnår sjuksköterskorna två examina efter fullgjord utbildning, en yrkesexamen, i förevarande fall distriktssköterska och en generell examen, magisterexamen. Högskolan Väst har anpassat utbildningsbehovet efter hur omvärlden förändrats för att tillmötesgå kompetens inom specialistsjuksköterskeutbildning med fokus på avancerad vård i hemmet.

  • 12.
    Tveter, Helena
    et al.
    District nurse, Bengtsfors Community, Bengtsfors, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Parents' experiences and perspectives of a postnatal home visit by a district nurse in Sweden2017In: Journal of Health Visiting, ISSN 2050-8719, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 82-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition to parenthood can involve major adjustments for a couple. New roles are to be learned and new relationships formed, and already existing relationships may need to be realigned. There is a dearth of recent literature about parents' experiences of home visiting by a district nurse and more research is required to explore parents' views of the home visit to help make it meaningful and build a trusting relationship between parents and health professionals. This Swedish study aimed to describe parents' experiences and perspectives of a home visit by a district nurse after the birth of their first child. The study results showed that parents can feel uncomfortable before the home visit and not fully understand the purpose of the visit, but that the respectful attitude of the district nurse encouraged parents to focus on their strengths, and made the visit a positive experience. 

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