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  • 1.
    Forsman, Anna K
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University, Faculty of Education and Welfare Studies, Vaasa, Finland.
    Fredén, Lars
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences. University West, NU-akademin Väst.
    Lindqvist, Rafael
    Uppsala University, Department of Sociology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wahlbeck, Kristian
    The Finnish Association for Mental Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Contribution of the Nordic School of Public Health to the public mental health research field: a selection of research initiatives, 2007-2014.2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 16 Suppl, p. 66-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of public mental health has been defined by an expert group convened by the Nordic School of Public Health (NHV) as encompassing the experience, occurrence, distribution and trajectories of positive mental health and mental health problems and their determinants; mental health promotion and prevention of mental disorders; as well as mental health system policies, governance and organization. The mental health priorities of the Nordic Council of Ministers in 2010 signalled a mutual Nordic exchange of knowledge in the following thematic areas: child and adolescent mental health; working life and mental health; mental health in older people; strengthening the role of primary care in mental health service provision; stronger involvement of users and carers; and reduction of use of coercion in psychiatric care. Efforts to realize these priorities included commissioning the Nordic Research Academy for Mental Health, an NHV-based network of research institutions with a common interest in mental health research across the Nordic countries, to develop, organize and follow-up projects on public mental health. The research initiatives included mental health policy analysis, register-based research and research focused on the users' perspective in a Nordic context, as well as EU-level research policy analysis. The public mental health research conducted at the NHV highlighted the complexity of mental health and emphasized that the broad determinants of mental health need to be increasingly addressed in both public health research and practice. For example, health promotion actions, improved access to health care, a healthy alcohol policy and prevention of suicides and violence are all needed to reduce the life expectancy gap - a red flag indicator of public health inequalities. By exchanging knowledge and best practice, the collaboration between the Nordic countries contributes to the welfare of the region. The expertise and traditions developed at the NHV are of significant importance in this work.

  • 2.
    Gunnarsdottir, Hrafnhildur
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level. University West, NU-akademin Väst. University of Gothenburg, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Section of Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Section of Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Povlsen, Lene
    University of Southern Denmark, Unit for Health Promotion Research, Esbjerg, Denmark.
    Petzold, Max
    University of Gothenburg, Health Metrics at Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Relative deprivation in the Nordic countries-child mental health problems in relation to parental financial stress2016In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 277-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:  The Nordic welfare system has been acknowledged as favourable for children, successfully contributing to low child mortality and poverty rates. Nevertheless, mental health problems among children and adolescents are common and the economic situation of the family has been highlighted as an important determinant. In spite of similar social, political and cultural structures, the Nordic countries differ; Iceland was most affected by the global financial crisis in 2008. The aim of this study was to examine potential differences in parental financial stress and the associations to child mental health between the Nordic countries as well as age and gender differences.  METHODS:  The study sample consisted of 6330 children aged 4-16 years old included in the 2011 version of the Nordic Study of Children's Health, Wellbeing and Quality of life. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire was used to measure mental health problems.  RESULTS:  In Iceland, 47.7% of the parents reported financial stress while ≤20% did so in the other countries except for Finland (33.5%). However, in case of parental financial stress the OR of mental health problems comparing children to parents with and without financial stress was significantly lower among the Icelandic children (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.15-2.24) than among the others: Denmark OR 3.07 (95% CI 2.15-4.39), Finland OR 2.28 (95% CI 1.60-3.25), Norway OR 2.77 (95% CI 1.86-4.12), Sweden OR 3.31(95% CI 2.26-4.86). No significant age or gender differences in the ORs were observed.  CONCLUSIONS:  Besides socioeconomic situation, relative deprivation should be considered an important determinant of child mental health.

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