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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Sten
    et al.
    Gotland University.
    Tosteby, Jonas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Gotland University.
    Integrated Management Systems: testing a model for integration2011In: 14th Toulon-Verona Conference: Organizational Excellence in Service. Conference Proceedings / [ed] Jacques Martin & Claudio Baccarani., Alicante: University of Alicante , 2011, p. 22-35Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Management systems are widely used for creating order, minimising risks and for assuring performance. Management systems are in many occasions integrated since this has been found to be beneficial. In this paper a model for a fully integrated management system (IMS) based on the three axes of level, extent and scope of integration is tested for relevance. The studied system permits the integration of all relevant process dimensions. The research is only in a pilot stage, but the initial results are promising and indicate that there are advantages in using the process view as a base for identifying critical aspects to be managed. A review of the current situation for system integration is studied and the model is subjected to some tests using Sweden as a case. The background study shows that system integration still is limited, especially when comparing with a fully integrated IMS. The feedback from the organisations interviewed is positive and supports continued work with development of the model.

  • 2.
    Anderberg, Staffan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Methods for improving performance of process planning for CNC machining: an approach based on surveys and analytical models2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Process planning as an enabler of competiveness is often overlooked, but being one of the principal function in the product realisation flow it holds a key role by combining both product and production requirements into a production concept with respect to the current manufacturing system. As such the capability of process planning to a large extent dictates production cost, lead times, product quality etc. With the introduction of new demands on production, such as environmental impact and process capability, process planning must be able to manage these demands effectively. Accordingly, it is vital to study the effects that up-coming demands have on the act of process planning. The research methods employed in this work include surveys (questionnaires and interviews), industrial case studies and experiments to provide data for models developed. The main finding of this research is that there is a lack of quantified process planning performance knowledge in the industry, which leads to verification problems as to whether changes that are made render anticipated effects. Results of surveys also indicated a low level of digitalisation of product data and limited use of computer aids (CAM, feature-based CAM and PLM) in Swedish industry based on 144 companies' response. A concept to improve process planning performance through operation classification based on process capability indices (Cp/Cpk) was suggested. The role of process planning in designing cost efficient and energy efficient machining operations has been maintained throughout the thesis by showing how tool selection and machining parameters selection influences the possibilities to achieve these objectives. This work has also showed that no inherent contradictions appear to exist between achieving cost efficient and energy efficient machining operations. This thesis has contributed to an enhanced understanding of how process planning improvements can be achieved through a holistic perspective of the process planning function, where both technical and methodological aids are included. It is however essential to understand the current situation of the process planning organisation, its internal/external relations, level of digitalisation, competency level etc. before major changes of the process planning function are undertaken in order to be successful.

  • 3.
    Beno, Tomas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Anderberg, Staffan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Green machining: improving the bottom line2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to present how Green machining can be established in the metal working industry for taking immediate actions towards a more environmental friendly manufacturing, but also to address areas for research in order to advance towards a more sustainable manufacturing industry. An often overlooked approach is to use the knowledge about the specific cutting energy and its dependency upon machining parameters in order to establish a machining strategy that leads towards a more energy efficient production, but also contributes to increased productivity and thereby improving the bottom line as well. The paper has a production preparation perspective and thus presents the areas where a green machining strategy is applicable.

  • 4.
    Broberg, Patrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Evaluation of a method to radiometric calibrate hot target image data by using simple reference sources close to ambient temperatures2010In: Infrared Imaging Systems: Design, Analysis, Modeling, and Testing XXI / [ed] Gerald C. Holst, Keith A. Krapels, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To perform radiometric calibrations of image data, reference sources are needed in order to acquire data at two or more radiance levels giving the calibration parameters. Due to sensor drift for detectors in the infrared region the parameters have to be frequently recalculated during an extended signature measurement if the accuracy is to be maintained. In signature measurements where the incident radiance levels from hot targets are exceeding the background by many orders of magnitude the reference sources need to emit radiation at high radiance levels. Such reference sources are more complex and so is the handling of these sources. The calibration procedure tends to become impractical in field trials where several spectral bands are involved, which increases the need for reference data and the number of reference sources. A method to radiometric calibrate hotspot target data by using only a few simple reference sources close to ambient temperatures has been evaluated in this paper. Reference data has been collected both in laboratory studies and in field trials at various weather conditions. The accuracy and the precision of the method are presented. The uncertainty due to sensor drift is estimated. Error sources connected to the calibration method are discussed.

  • 5.
    Broberg, Patrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Towards Automation of Non-Destructive Testing of Welds2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    All welding processes can give rise to defects that will weaken the joint and can lead to failure of the welded structure. Because of this, non-destructive testing (NDT) of welds have become increasingly important to ensure the structural integrity when the material becomes thinner and stronger and welds become smaller; all to reduce weight in order to save material and reduce emissions due to lighter constructions.

    Several NDT methods exists for testing welds and they all have their advantages and disadvantages when it comes to the types and sizes of defects that are detectable, but also in the ability to automate the method. Several methods were compared using common weld defects to determine which method or methods were best suited for automated NDT of welds. The methods compared were radiography, phased array ultrasound, eddy current, thermography and shearography. Phased array ultrasound was deemed most suitable for detecting the weld defects used in the comparison and for automation and was therefore chosen to be used in the continuation of this work. Thermography was shown to be useful for detecting surface defects; something not easily detected using ultrasound. A combination of these techniques will be able to find most weld defects of interest.

    Automation of NDT can be split into two separate areas; mechanisation of the testing and automation of the analysis, both presenting their own difficulties. The problem of mechanising the testing has been solved for simple geometries but for more general welds it will require a more advance system using an industrial robot or similar. Automation of the analysis of phased array ultrasound data consists of detection, sizing, positioning and classification of defects. There are several problems to solve before a completely automatic analysis can be made, including positioning of the data, improving signal quality, segmenting the images and classifying the defects. As a step on the way towards positioning of the data, and thereby easing the analysis, the phase of the signal was studied. It was shown that the phase can be used for finding corners in the image and will also improve the ability to position the corner as compared to using the amplitude of the signal. Further work will have to be done to improve the signal in order to reliably analyse the data automatically.

  • 6.
    Broberg, Patrik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Runnemalm, Anna
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Detection of Surface Cracks in Welds using Active Thermography2012In: Proceedings18th World Conference on Non-Destructive Testing: 16 - 20 April 2012, Durban, South Africa, South African Institute for Non-Destructive Testing (SAINT) , 2012, p. 1-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface cracks in welds can be detected using several non-destructive testing methods; among the more popular ones are eddy current, penetrant and magnetic particle testing. For an automatic inspection cell, the traditional techniques have limitations. Here we have investigated the possibility of using active thermography for detecting surface cracks in welds. This technique features advantages such as non-contact and high speed. The weld is illuminated using an infrared light source. Due to higher energy absorption in a surface crack, the defect will be identified as a hot spot when imaged by an infrared camera. Artificial weld defects (notches) are investigated by use of active thermography. Results from an inspection of real longitudinal cold cracks in a weld are also presented. The results show that active thermography looks promising for detection of even small cracks and notches, as long as they are open to the surface.

  • 7.
    Broberg, Patrik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Sjödahl, Mikael
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Runnemalm, Anna
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Comparison of NDT-methods for automatic inspection of weld defects2015In: International journal of materials & product technology, ISSN 0268-1900, E-ISSN 1741-5209, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate different NDT-methods for weld inspection in an objective manner. Test objects are produced with known variation of flaws: internal pores, surface and internal cracks, toe radius and weld depth. The NDT-methods compared are: phased array ultrasound, radiography, eddy current, thermography and shearography. The results show that radiography is the better method for volumetric defects in thin plates while ultrasound is better for flat defects and thicker, non-flat plates. Thermography was shown to have a good ability of detecting surface defects. A combination of ultrasound and thermography results in a detection of all the non-geometrical defects investigated in this study.

  • 8.
    Broberg, Patrik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Sjödahl, Mikael
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Runnemalm, Anna
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Improved Image Quality in Phased Array Ultrasound by Deconvolution2012In: Proceedings18th World Conference on Non-Destructive Testing: 16 - 20 April 2012, Durban, South Africa, South African Institute for Non-Destructive Testing (SAINT) , 2012, p. 1-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High contrast and resolution in phased array ultrasonic images are of importance for accurate evaluation. The spread of the ultrasonic beam is one cause of the images being unsharp. One technique for reducing the influence of the beam spread, and thereby improving the image quality, is by deconvolving the data with the point spread function of the ultrasonic beam. By assuming that the material is homogeneous, the point spread function of the beam can be simulated using diffraction theory. Results from a deconvolution performed on data acquired from a side drilled hole in a steel calibration block are presented. It is shown that a significant improvement in sharpness and contrast can be achieved.

  • 9.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Eriksson, Lina
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    A health-related quality management qpproach to evaluating health promotion activities2011In: Proceedings QMOD Conference on Qualityand Service Sciences 2011, 2011, p. 188-197Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Are successful organizations working accordingly to what co-workers require for being healthy?2011In: 14th QMOD conference on Quality and Service Sciences ICQSS 2011: Cottbus, Germany, August 29 - 31 2010, 2011, p. 1-14 pdfConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper was to compare methodologies from successful organisations with underlying dimensions of the value 'Leadership Commitment' and the value 'Participation of Everybody. The purpose was also to identify similarities and differences between these methodologies and the underlying dimensions.

    Methodology

    The analysis emerged from the results of several recently conducted case studies: descriptions of methodologies used by successful organizations and underlying dimensions elaborated from the value ‘Leadership Commitment’ and from the value ‘Participation of Everybody’. The identified methodologies were then analyzed in relation to the description of the underlying dimensions required by the co-workers with the intention of comparing them and identifying similarities and differences.

    Findings

    The results show that the underlying dimensions required by the co-workers to remain healthy are also present as methodologies in the successful organizations except the underlying dimension ‘Continuity’. The dimensions correspond with the methodologies which confirm that working with them is very important for managers when striving to encourage healthy co-workers and to create efficient organizations. The analysis also shows that the successful organizations are using methodologies not present in the underlying dimensions. These methodologies include mutual respect, customer focus, continuous improvements, a holistic view and awareness recruitment.

    Research Limitation

    The result is based on two case studies conducted in Swedish organizations.

    Value of paper

    The results can be of value for managers striving to improve the health of co-workers and create more efficient organizations.

     

  • 11.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Eriksson, Lina
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Change of the Quality Management culture through health-promotion activities?2014In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 1236-1246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is great demand for workplace health-promotion programmes that improve co-worker health and provide a return on investment, which is due to the continuous escalation of care costs and the prioritisation of co-worker health by businesses. Early research found that organisations that have achieved good co-worker health with low sickness absence through their conscious and well-structured work were also working according to Quality Management. Health-promotion interventions are possible in every organisation, but before starting a health-promotion programme it is necessary to analyse the organisation and especially its culture. The purpose of this paper is to measure in what way health-promoting activities influence the Quality Management culture, particularly the health-related values 'Leadership commitment' and 'Participation of everybody'. A comparison between the Quality Management culture before starting a health-promotion project and the results a year later is presented. The results show that health-promotion activities do not affect the Quality Management culture, at least not from a year perspective. On the other hand, the results show that health-promotion activities can affect co-workers' perception of their health. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  • 12.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Oqueka, Jens
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Investigation of path compensation methods for robotic friction stir welding2012In: Industrial robot, ISSN 0143-991X, E-ISSN 1758-5791, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 601-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Friction stir welding (FSW) is a novel method for joining materials without using consumables and without melting the materials. The purpose of this paper is to present the state of the art in robotic FSW and outline important steps for its implementation in industry and specifically the automotive industry.

    Design/methodology/approach – This study focuses on the robot deflections during FSW, by relating process forces to the deviations from the programmed robot path and to the strength of the obtained joint. A robot adapted for the FSW process has been used in the experimental study. Two sensor-based methods are implemented to determine path deviations during test runs and the resulting welds were examined with respect to tensile strength and path deviation.

    Findings – It can be concluded that deflections must be compensated for in high strengths alloys. Several strategies can be applied including online sensing or compensation of the deflection in the robot program. The welding process was proven to be insensitive for small deviations and the presented path compensation methods are sufficient to obtain a strong and defect-free welding joint.

    Originality/value – This paper demonstrates the effect of FSW process forces on the robot, which is not found in literature. This is expected to contribute to the use of robots for FSW. The experiments were performed in a demonstrator facility which clearly showed the possibility of applying robotic FSW as a flexible industrial manufacturing process.

  • 13.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Soron, Mikael
    ESAB Welding AB .
    Ilar, Torbjörn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Friction stir welding with robot for light vehicle design2010In: Proceedings from the 8th International Friction Stir Welding Symposium: Timmendorfer Strand, Germany 18-20 May 2010, The Welding Institute , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing weight is one of the enablers to design more environmentally friendly vehicles. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) supports low weight design through its capability to join different combinations of light weight materials, e.g. different aluminium alloys, but also through its possibilities in producing continuous joints. StiRoLight is a recently started project for robotised FSW for joining of light weight materials emphasising on the vehicle industry, an industry with a long-time experience of robotic welding. The first task involves investigation of force feedback for maintaining the desired contact force. Another important aspect in robotised FSW is the compliance of the robot, which may result in deviations from the pre-programmed path as a result of the high process forces experienced during the welding operation. The further exploration of three-dimensional FSW seams and definition of the process windows will be part of further research within this project.

  • 14.
    Hagqvist, Petter
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Sikström, Fredrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Lennartson, Bengt
    Chalmers.
    Emissivity compensated spectral pyrometry for varying emissivity metallic measurands2014In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 025010-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel method for converting electromagnetic spectral radiance information into emperature measurements is presented. It allows for varying spectral emissivity of the metallic measurand during the course of the measurement. Such variations are due to e.g. thermal oxidation or temperature dependent emissivity. Based on the assumption that emissivity changes with time and temperature in a continuous manner, it is further assumed that an emissivity estimate at one sample instance can be derived from the estimated emissivity found at the previous samples together with updated spectral information. This leads to successive recalculations of spectral emissivity together with corresponding temperature values. The proposed algorithm has been proven to give accurate temperature estimates from a measurement based on data captured by a standard UV-Vis spectrophotometer even for an oxidizing Ti-6Al-4V specimen in a temperature range between 900K and 1400K. The method however, is not limited to these wavelength- or temperature-ranges.

  • 15.
    Hagqvist, Petter
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Sikström, Fredrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Lennartson, Bengt
    Chalmers.
    Emissivity compensated spectral pyrometry-algorithm and sensitivity analysis2014In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 025011-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to solve the problem of non-contact temperature measurements on an object with varying emissivity, a new method is herein described and evaluated. The method uses spectral radiance measurements and converts them to temperature readings. It proves to be resilient towards changes in spectral emissivity and tolerates noisy spectral measurements. It is based on an assumption of continuous changes in emissivity and uses historical values of spectral emissivity and temperature for estimating current spectral emissivity.

    The algorithm, its constituent steps and accompanying parameters are described and discussed. A thorough sensitivity analysis of the method is carried out through simulations. No rigorous instrument calibration is needed for the presented method and is therefore industrially tractable.

  • 16.
    Hansson, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Klefsjö, Bengt
    Luleå University of Technology, Division of Quality and Environmental Management.
    Sustaining quality management implementation in small organisations: Experiences from quality award recipients2008In: International Journal of Management Practice, ISSN 1477-9064, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 31-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Jellbo, Oskar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Sjöström, Rikard
    PLANs forsknings- och tillämpningskonferens 2006: effektivitet och samverkan i försörjningskedjor2006Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Kämpe, Malin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Albertson, Peter
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Design for Manufacturing: för produktionsanpassad konstruktion på Volvo Aero2011Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the Bachelor’s Thesis was to create a tool for the gathering of experience data for the product development process. It should contribute to a systematic operation approach at Volvo Aero Corporation. It should also contribute to improve productivity and producibility on future concepts. The problem described in the Bachelor’s Thesis is based on a pre-study performed at the company during the autumn 2010.

    The general task was defined as develop a structure for re-use of manufacturing experience and to create a test version of the tool for evaluation. After consultation with the selected Business Development-group from department 9931 Project-, Concept- and Manufacturing-leaders, the task was limited to gathering information of diameter dimensions from the Diffuser Case component at Volvo Aero. The creation of the tool had its starting-point in current production and the information available there.

    The Design for Manufacturing-tool has been created in Microsoft Excel and it’s developed in a way making it possible to gather and present information from different systems and sources. The tool presents the information in a pedagogical way that makes it user-friendly. The structure of the tool has been developed in consultation with the Business Development-group and the 35 columns of information is classified in three different groups: basic facts, capability and cost, operation time. By this classification the information level of detail increases from left to right which enables a more structured and systematic way of working. The knowledge, experience and data gathered represent information about the requirements the company currently produces. Over time, the Design for Manufacturing-tool is to be filled with more information from strategically chosen components which coincide with the direction the company has chosen for the development of new components.

  • 19.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Mänsklig kvalitetsutveckling2009 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Quality and aesthetics in classical music2010In: Proceedings EURAM 2010, Rome, 19-22 mai, 2010: Back to the future, Rome, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Quality and health in a learning organisation2009In: Proceedings of the 12th International QMOD Conference in Verona, 27-30 August 2009, Verona, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to shed light upon the connections between quality management, employee health and organisational learning. As we wanted to focus on the learning aspect, we chose to carry out the study in organisations for which learning and knowledge is the main activity. Therefore, the school sector was considered a suitable object for study. Methodology/approach The study is based on a quantitative survey using a structured questionnaire. Items measuring health status and prominent values of quality management developed from previous research were included in the questionnaire. The teachers in a random sample of 20 schools in the province of Västra Götaland in south-western Sweden received the questionnaires. The number of completed and returned questionnaires was 229. The items were checked for reliability with Cronbach’s Alpha tests and the correlation was measured with Pearson’s correlation test. Findings The Conbach’s Alpha tests showed that the reliability of all the indices measured was sufficient. Moreover, correlations were found between all the indices of quality management values and the health index. This indicates that the health status of the school employees is related to the level of adoption of the studied quality management values. In order to ground the findings in a relevant theoretical setting they were related to the theories of organisational learning. A framework depicting the findings from an organisational learning perspective has been developed. Research limitation/implications The findings of this research strengthen the knowledge of the connections between quality management and health. The framework combining health implications of quality management with organisational learning constitutes a useful vantage point for further research. As health promotion is closely related to pedagogical issues, this should be a promising area for future research. The study was carried out in Sweden and the possibilities for generalising the findings to other countries are not certain. In addition, the relevance of the study for other organisations than schools remains unproven. Accordingly, more research in this direction in other countries and different sectors should be welcome Originality/Value of paper Previous research has indicated links between quality management values and employee health. However, this has mainly been studied in an industrial manufacturing setting and no studies have been directed towards the school sector. Consequently, the findings of this research study are valuable for the general understanding of the relationship between quality management and health. Furthermore, the connections to organisational learning represent a novel approach which could build bridges between quality management and health promotion leading to a more holistic understanding of quality and health in organisations. For managers, the findings are useful as guiding lights in their quests towards higher quality and better employee health.

  • 22.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    The learning process of health service procurement2011In: 14th QSS and Toulon-Verona Conference, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Trust and quality management: Perspectives from marketing and organisational learning2012In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 13-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the concept of trust is elaborated upon and compared with the traditional values of quality management. Trust is approached from the areas of relationship marketing and organisational learning where it is a frequent element. The purpose is to create a framework of trust based on previous research, particularly in the areas of relationship marketing and organisational learning, and to analyse whether trust should be regarded as a core value of quality management. Properties of the concept of trust in quality management, relationship marketing and organisational learning are described. Concerning trust as a quality value, it is found that dissimilarities with the current values make it an unsuitable candidate for inclusion in this group. However, examination of the underlying components of the current values of quality management is encouraged with the conviction that trust will prove to be an important element in this endeavour. A tentative framework based on the two dimensions of aspects of trust and components of the relationshipis proposed. This framework broadens the view of trust and its implications for quality management. The proposed framework should be helpful for managers in providing a more structured view of the different aspects of trust in business relationships.

  • 24.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    et al.
    Linneuniversitetet, Department of Marketing,School of Business and Economics,Kalmar.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Lind, Linda
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Health Leadership in the Wellness Industry2015In: Complete proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Management Leadership and Governance ICMLG 2015 Auckland, New Zealand. / [ed] Coral Ingley & James Lockhart, Reading: Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited , 2015, p. 17-18Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Learning for quality in the SPA-industry: a quality café study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This paper reports a study carried out in the Swedish SPA-industry. The purpose has been twofold. The first purpose was to explore quality dimensions for SPA-hotel staff. The second purpose was to investigate the usability of the quality café method for quality development. Thus, the second purpose is methodological to its nature.

    Methodology/ApproachThe quality café is a novel method which is based on the world café method combined with quality management tools. Seven quality cafés were carried out at seven different SPA-hotels. The participants were employees from different departments of the hotels. The results are related to a theoretical framework based on organisational learning theory.

    FindingsThe quality café method is found to be a useful tool for gaining in-depth knowledge pertaining to quality management. Moreover, quality dimensions for SPA-staff  have been defined as clearness, security, participation and meaningfulness. Based on the dimensions questionnaires have been developed.

    Research Limitation/implicationOne important implication is that the quality café has been found to be a usable method for quality development. This constitutes a methodological addition to the array of tools used for research as well as for practice of quality management. Furthermore, the dimensions defined provide further understanding into the meaning of quality in the SPA-industry. A limitation is that the study was only performed in one industry and in one country. Further research is consequently needed for assessing the generalizability of the findings.

    Originality/ValueAlthough the SPA-industry is expanding in most parts of the world little research has been carried out regarding quality in this sector. The quality café is an original and novel method which has proved its usefulness in the current study.

  • 26.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    The relationship between quality management and health : exploring the underlying dimensions 2010In: International Journal of Productivity and Quality Management, ISSN 1746-6482, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 109-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first purpose of this study was to verify the relationship betweenworkplace health and quality management, particularly the values 'leadership commitment' and 'participation of everybody' whose importance previous research has pointed to. The second purpose of the study was to examine the constituents and mechanics of the relationships between health and those values. A case study was carried out in a Swedish manufacturing company using data triangulation in the form of in-depth interviews and focus-group interviews on three levels.

    The findings show that the perceptions of the quality management values were significantly correlated with the employees' perception of their health. This finding substantiates earlier studies indicating a relationship between quality and health. Important dimensions of 'leadership commitment' and 'participation of everybody', regarding health, were identified and described in models. The paper provides additional understanding of the connection between quality management and health, particularly regarding the role of leadership. 

  • 27.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Approach for measuring health-related quality management2012In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 59-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop an approach to measuring health-related quality management based on earlier research on the connection between quality management and employee health. Design/methodology/approach - A questionnaire was developed and a research study was carried out at a manufacturing company. The constructs were tested for internal reliability using Cronbach's alpha tests. The dimensions' correlations with employee health were checked using Pearson correlation. Findings - Three of the dimensions were correlated with the perception of employee health: "presence/ communication" and "integrity" derived from leadership commitment, and "influence" derived from everybody's participation. These findings substantiate earlier studies indicating a relationship between visible, clear leadership and employee health. They are also in line with earlier findings of how the possibilities to influence their own work promote employee health and work ability. The paper provides a proposal as to how managers can proceed in the measurement and evaluation of quality management efforts related to employee health. Research limitations/implications - The research is conducted as a single research study in one industrial manufacturing company. Further research should be conducted in other organizations from different lines of business with the same conditions and in organizations with different conditions. Practical implications - This approach can be used by managers for gaining insight into underlying mechanisms in the organizational culture related to employee health from a quality management perspective. This could lead to improved employee well-being, satisfaction and motivation. It could be used as a first step for improvements when implementing health-related quality management "to break the ice" and it could be followed up by qualitative methods. Originality/value - Traditional ways of measuring health are rarely connected to quality management. Only requiring small resources, this approach to measuring health-related quality management can add to an understanding of underlying mechanisms.

  • 28.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Chebl, Rana
    Rios Tuesta, M
    Organisational Learning and Six Sigma Deployment Evaluation in an IT Setting.2009In: Proceedings of ECIME 2009, 2009, p. 274 - CD-ROM-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Chebl, Rana
    Rios-Tuesta, Max
    On your marks – but are you ready?: Like marriage, six sigma needs commitment2011In: Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, ISSN 1477-7282, E-ISSN 1758-6097, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 26-28Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

    Design/methodology/approach – This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

    Findings – Assessing suitability for big step in learning to improve. Any organization which decides to implement a six sigma system to improve business leadership and performance should not underestimate the enormity of the initial step and lasting commitment it is about to make. A little like going into marriage, perhaps – it is going to be wonderful if it succeeds but the people involved have to be sure they are ready to take the step. It is likely that attitudes and behaviors will have to change and, like marriage, six sigma can be costly so it is not advisable to take a half-hearted approach at the beginning.

    Practical implications – Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

    Originality/value – The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to digest format

  • 30.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Chebl, Rana
    Altran, Levallois-Perret, France.
    Rios-Tuesta, Max
    Altran Sud-Ouest at Airbus SAS, Levallois-Perret, France.
    Organisational learning and six sigma deployment readiness evaluation - a case study2011In: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, ISSN 2040-4166, E-ISSN 2040-4174, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 23-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide a greater understanding of organisational learning in connection with assessment of Six Sigma readiness. Different forms that a possible deployment can take in the organisation's context based on the degree of readiness are explored.

    Design/methodology/approach – The empirical data are derived from 12 in-depth semi-structured interviews of selected employees having different functions in the studied organisation, a global distribution system and information technology (IT) solutions provider to the travel and tourism industry. In addition, they include participant observation and documentation. The interview questions were built based on a modified version of Kettinger and Grover readiness assessment framework.

    Findings – The study shows that organisational learning can provide a useful framework for assessing Six Sigma readiness in an IT organisation. A synthesized model is proposed combining the frameworks of an adapted Kettinger and Grover model and the core disciplines of the learning organisation. Further, the results suggest that having Six Sigma as a company-wide strategy may not prove useful or suitable in the current context. However, the analysis shows that having Six Sigma as an improvement programme provides a structure for the improvement work and the define, measure, analyze, improve and control methodology is needed to address some current inefficiencies and problems.

    Research limitations/implications – This is a single case study and the possibility of generalising this finding to other contexts remains uncertain. Therefore, more research is needed. The procedure of using organisational learning as an assessment framework for Six Sigma readiness has been shown to be useful.

    Practical implications – Implementing Six Sigma means a large investment and therefore it is important to make the right deployment approach. Having one integrated readiness assessment model should be useful for companies when assessing their readiness.

    Originality/value – Knowledge of a Six Sigma readiness evaluation in an organisational learning context should be valuable for many organisations. In addition, research regarding Six Sigma in software companies is limited 

  • 31.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Grundén, Kerstin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lind, Linda
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Organisational learning and service quality for health and fitness entrepreneurs2011In: 4th Annual EuroMed Conference of theEuroMed Academy of Business: October 20th-21st, 2011, Elounda, Crete, Greece, 2011, p. 1037-1047Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study of learning, entrepreneurship and service quality in the health and fitness sector. The purpose is to outline the theoretical framework and to propose a methodological approach for the study. The theoretical basis for the project lies in the field of service dominant logic of marketing. One aim is to develop this field by integrating knowledge from organisational learning, entrepreneurship and quality management. Theories from those fields are presented and their relevance is discussed. On this basis, a methodology for an empirical study is proposed.

  • 32.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    Linnaeus University,Department of Marketing, School of Business and Economics, Kalmar, Sweden .
    Entrepreneurial Learning for Quality and Competitiveness: A Study in the Spa-Industry2015In: Proceedings of the European Conference on Innovation and Entrepreneurship, ECIE, 2015, p. 392-399Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The connection between well-functioning quality management and competitiveness has been established. Moreover, research has found that the success of quality management efforts is dependent on the values held by management and employees in the organisations. Consequently, there is a connection to organisational culture and organisational learning. Quality management is sometimes accused of only promoting incremental improvements while entrepreneurial learning is seen as a way of promoting truly innovative improvements in organisations. Combining entrepreneurial learning and quality management is, however, not obvious since they have aspects that may be contradictory. Nevertheless, organisational learning theories are often addressed in recent quality management literature and such attempts have often been found to be fruitful. Consequently, introducing entrepreneurial learning aspects in the quality management field might further its development. Exploring ways of combining these fields and perhaps finding a common ground should thus be valuable. The study reported in this paper has been carried out in the Swedish spa-industry. The purpose has been to explore if and how entrepreneurial learning can contribute to the management of quality in the companies. Case studies have been carried out at seven leading spa-hotels which have formed a learning network. Qualitative methods of data collection have been used including in-depth interviews, participant observation, seminars and a novel method called the quality café. The results are presented and a framework for entrepreneurial learning driven quality management is proposed.

  • 33.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Entrepreneurial learning for quality and innovation: A study in the wellness industry2012In: Proceedings of the 7th European Conference on Innovation and Entrepreneurship Escola Superior de Gestão e Tecnologia Instituto Politécnico de Santarém Portugal 20-21 September 2012 / [ed] Dr. Carla Vivas and Dr. Fernando Lucas, Reading: Academic Publishing International, 2012, p. 413-419Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study presented in this paper is to explore the relationship between entrepreneurial learning, innovation and quality management in the wellness industry. The theoretical framework is based on theories from quality management, organisational learning and entrepreneurship. An empirical study involving seven spa-hotels has been carried out. In-depth interviews were conducted with managers of the companies. The results indicate that innovation in the sector is closely connected to branding and that quality management largely consists of quality control of existing services. Thus, the connection between quality management and innovation is weak. Nevertheless, a network exists that might have a possibility of evolving into a learning network.

  • 34.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Examining service quality dimensions in fitness centres 2010In: 13th Toulon-Verona Conference, “Organizational Excellence in Service”: "Organizational Excellence in Service". 2nd-4th September 2010. Conference proceedings / [ed] Faculdade de Economia da Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra: University of Coimbra , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fitness industry is expanding in most parts of the world. Nevertheless, the amount of

    research regarding this industry has thus far been relatively limited. In previous research,

    quality dimensions for fitness companies have been explored and a tentative framework has

    been proposed. The purpose for the present study is to examine the framework and quantify

    its components. A survey has been conducted. A questionnaire based on previous research

    was developed and delivered by telephone to 86 fitness centres of which 67 agreed to

    participate, giving a response rate of 78%. The items of the quality dimensions in the studied

    framework were analysed with Cronbach's Alpha and were found to be statistically reliable.

    The underlying structure of the enablers in the framework was examined with explorative

    factor analysis resulting in five underlying enablers. Moreover, the impact of the enablers on

    the profitability of the centres was measured. The results should be interesting for managers in

    this sector as well as for the advancement of service quality theory. 

  • 35.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Organisational learning for school quality and health2012In: International Journal of Educational Management, ISSN 0951-354X, E-ISSN 1758-6518, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 664-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to shed light upon the connections between quality management, employee health and organisational learning in a school setting. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on a quantitative survey. Items measuring health status and values of quality management were included in a questionnaire addressed to teachers in a random sample of 20 schools. The items were checked for reliability with Cronbach's alpha tests and the correlation was measured with Pearson's correlation test. Findings: The Cronbach's alpha tests showed that the reliability of all the indices measured was sufficient. Moreover, correlations were found between all the indices of quality management values and the health index. This indicates that the health status of the school employees is related to the level of adoption of the quality management values. A framework depicting the findings from an organisational learning perspective is proposed. Research limitations/implications: The study strengthens the knowledge of the connections between quality management and health. The study was carried out in Sweden and the possibilities for generalising the findings to other countries are not certain. In addition, the relevance of the study for other organisations than schools remains unproven. A discussion regarding the possibilities of generalising the findings is included. Practical implications: The findings and the proposed framework are helpful for improving school quality and employee health in schools. Social implications: Improved school quality is important for society as a whole. Originality/value: Previous research has indicated links between quality management and health in industrial manufacturing. This is the first study to explore this link in the school sector. Furthermore, the connections to organisational learning represent a novel approach. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 36.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Work Integrated Learning for Schoool Quality and Health2011In: 10th International Research Conference on Quality, Innovation and Knowledge Management: 15 - 18 February 2011, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 2011, p. 580-585Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Travis, Frederick
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Entrepreneurship, organisational success and brain integration2011In: Uddevalla Symposium 2011 : Entrepreneurial knowledge, technology and transformation of regions: 16-18 June, Bergamo, Italy / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, 2011, p. 431-439Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Travis, Frederick T.
    Maharishi University of Management, Center for Brain, Consciousness and Cognition, Fairfield, IN, United States.
    Exploring the connection between quality management and brain functioning2015In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 565-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore possible connections between brain functioning and quality management. Design/methodology/approach: Five central principles regarding brain functioning according to neuroscience are conceptually described and related to principles and major concepts in quality management with a special emphasis on Deming’s system of profound knowledge. Findings: The principles are shown to be related in a profound way. The first principle of coherence is closely related to appreciation for a system. The principle of homeostatic feedback loops concerns events that disturb the equilibrium of a system and is related to knowledge about variation. Neural plasticity is related to a theory of knowledge. The last two principles involve emotional and cognitive contributions to decision-making. They are closely related to the element psychology and one of them could lead to a further development of Deming’s system of profound knowledge. Research limitations/implications: The paper adds to the understanding of the role brain integration has for success in quality management efforts. A limitation is that it is difficult to localise higher-order thinking in brain function. Nonetheless, the research is indicative and provocative as a window to stimulate research into the fundamental basis of quality management success. Practical implications: The findings provide a deeper understanding of profound knowledge in quality management through relating it to how the brain is functioning, which is of value for quality managers and leaders striving for excellence for their organisations. Originality/value: The connection of brain principles with Deming’s profound knowledge has not been elaborated in the literature before. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 39.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Winroth, Jan
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    Organisatoriskt lärande för kvalitet och hälsa2010In: Lärande i och för det nya arbetslivet / [ed] Lagrosen, Stefan, Lundh Snis, Ulrika & Nehls, Eddy, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2010, 1. uppl., p. 235-253Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Vuoristo, Petri
    Overview of thermal spray activity in the European Nordic countries2010In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference – Innovative technologies for joining advanced materials, ISSN 1844-4938, p. 109-115Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Nilsson, Galina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Land Surveying and Mathematics.
    Luchinskaya, Elena
    Kristiansson, Lilia
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Luchinskaya, Daria
    Competence Development and Employability Prospects: Using Non-traditional teaching Methods in a Changing Higher Education Environment 2010In: European Conference on educational research: ECER 2010, 23-27 August, Helsinki, 2010, p. 451-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The cultural changes in the modern society create new challenges for educators in Europe. The higher education curriculum has changed from factual knowledge acquisition to developing students' competences and skills in response to a changing professional environment. This paper analyses student experience and academic results in generic and subject-specific competence development in order to evaluate the potential of using problem-based learning (PBL) and project-based (PrBL) learning to increase the  students´ prospects of employment. The fast pace of technological advancements, interdisciplinary work, changing organisations and globalisation of the workplace characterize the modern knowledge-based society. Equipping students with competences required for their social and professional integration, successful career and personal development is a key mission of the higher education sector. Promoting effective teaching and learning methods facilitates the acquisition of professional skills and competence, and at the same time addresses the needs of a diverse student body in higher education. 

    This paper explores the opportunities for implementing PBL and PrBL in a range of programmes at the University West, Sweden and Lancaster University, UK focusing on the development of generic and subject specific competences. This is an on-going collaboration between two universities [1-3]. 

    PBL and PrBL are the examples of collaborative student-focused learning and are supported by constructivist theory [4-6]. These methods encourage deeper learning via meaning construction, connecting ideas as well as creating meaningful artifacts. They stimulate a collaborative process of building among participants, develop self-directed learning, improve student performance and develop a range of study skills through creating an informal environment for learning. 

    Our study was carried out at the University West, Sweden and Lancaster University, UK in 2009. The objectives of the study were: 

    • To assess the level of student-acquired competences, generic and subject-specific (mathematics, engineering)

    • To evaluate the quality of student experience by assessing the impact of PBL and PrBL on students' competence development;

    • To identify the best practice and opportunities for promoting effective teaching and learning methods to enhance student employability prospects. 

    Method

    In Sweden, the first-year students in the ' Surveyors' and the second-year students on 'Basic Principles of Turbomachinery and Hydraulics' undergraduate programmes participated in this study. The lectures were delivered in a traditional way; PBL was used throughout tutorials. The students solved applied mathematical problems aimed at acquiring a set of competences working in small groups. To evaluate the outcomes of this study, each group had to reflect on what they learned during each PBL session, how the session affected their learning process and their competence development. At Lancaster University the first-year mechanical engineering students reflected on their experience of project-based learning. The students had to design, build and test a lifting device working in groups of four. The lectures and tutorials in the programme were conducted in a traditional way. By the end of the project the students responded to a questionnaire consisted of open-ended questions.

    Expected Outcomes

    The results showed that the Swedish students evaluated PBL method highly, finding it useful, activating and valuable. The students indicated they developed problem-solving skills, advanced their analytical skills and ability to apply mathematical tools. These competences are important for their future employment. The students rated collaboration with peers highly. The students at Lancaster University pointed out the necessity of developing time management, communication with peers in the groups and organisational skills. The students stressed that problem-solving and decision-making were very important as they had to choose the right design concept to work with. Assigning tasks and requiring completion by a required date were the skills that the students had to learn while working as a team. The paper concludes with recommendations for promoting PBL and PrBL as they represent useful educational tools which encourage the development of generic and subject-specific competences. They also provide the opportunities to accommodate a diverse range of student learning-styles and academic backgrounds.

     

    References

    1. Nilsson G. and Luchinskaya E. "Problem-based Learning and competence development: a Case Study of Teaching Mathematics to Computer Science Students", Journal of Research in Teacher Education, 2007, No 3. p 13-21.

    2. Nilsson G. and Luchinskaya E. Using Problem-based and Peer-assisted Learning in Teaching Mathematics to University Students: Focus on Competence Development. Paper presented at the European Educational Research Conference, ECER 2009, Vienna, Austria, September 2009.

    3. Luchinskaya E., Nilsson G. and Williams C., "Developing students' competences in the light of Bologna process: the responses from Sweden and Russia". Paper presented at the European Educational Research Conference, ECER 2008, Gothenburg, Sweden, September 2008.

    4. Vygotsky, L. S. Mind in society. The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1978

    5. Phillips, D. Constructivism in education: Opinions and second opinions on controversial issues. Chicago, IL University of Chicago Press, 2000

    6. Light, G., Cox, R., & Calkins, S. (2009) Teaching and learning in higher education: The reflective professional. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2009. 

  • 42. Nilsson, Patric
    et al.
    Appelgren, Anders
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Henrikson, Per
    Volvo Aero.
    Runnemalm, Anna
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Automatic Ultrasonic testing for Metal Deposition2012In: Proceedings 18th World Conference on Non-Destructive Testing: 16 - 20 April 2012, Durban, South Africa, Durban, 2012, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal Deposition (MD) is a method to build three dimensional metal geometries by welding using filler wire or powdered metal. NDT of a MD feature is required when the feature is located in an area of high stress or could be a potential hazard to the part. Ultrasonic testing (UT) can be used to detect pores, linear indications and lack of fusion in welds. This method has limitations when it comes to large parts with complex geometries with various shapes and sizes. A flexible method for inspecting complex geometries is to mount an ultrasonic water flow probe (squirter) on a robot. The robot can then follow a pre-programmed path to achieve full inspection of the feature. This paper shows results and functionality from a system where a squirter probe was used together with a standard industrial robot. Results from a scanning of a three-dimensional MD-structure are also presented.

  • 43.
    Runnemalm, Anna
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Vibration Induced Disturbances in Automatic Non-destructive Testing2012In: Proceedings 18th World Conference on Non-Destructive Testing 16 - 20 April 2012, Durban, South Africa, Durban, 2012, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interest in automatic inspection of welds has increased during the last decade. An automatic inspection cell is self-acting both by scanning the inspected test piece and by evaluation of the resulting images. For automatic evaluation, high quality of the resulting images is essential. The non-smooth movement of the NDT-sensor when mounted on a robot-arm will have influence on the results. This paper focus on evaluation of the vibration induced disturbances due to the mounting of the sensor and the movement of the robot in an automatic cell. A thermography system detecting the geometry of welds is used in this study and both stationary and continuous movement of the IR camera are studied. The vibration due to the mounting on a robot arm are quantified and compared.

  • 44.
    Sikström, Fredrik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Lennartson, Bengt
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Model order reduction methods applied to a welding model2012In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part I, journal of systems and control engineering, ISSN 0959-6518, E-ISSN 2041-3041, Vol. 226, no 7, p. 972-984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A  finite element representation modelling transient heat conduction of gas tungsten arc welding of stainless steel is used to evaluate different methods for model order reduction. The focus is on establishing a linear low-order model of the dynamic  relation between the welding current and the temperature measured by a radiation pyrometer. The objective of this low-order model is to design a model-based feedback controller and to investigate the consequences of applying feedback control of the process. Three different approaches for model reduction have been evaluated, namely the Krylov subspace method for moment    matching, balanced truncation and parametric system identification. The study provides a knowledge base for the selection of model order reduction methods when dealing with large-scale systems like finite element models of transient heat conduction, and it recommends parametric system identification. It renders sufficient approximations for controller design, no linearization of the finite element model is required, and there is no limit on degrees of freedom of the finite element model.

  • 45.
    Sikström, Fredrik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Ericsson, Mikael
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Niklasson, Kjell
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Tools for simulation based fixture design to reduce deformation in advanced fusion welding2008In: Intelligent Robotics and ApplicationsLecture Notes in Computer Science Volume 5315,  2008: First International Conference, ICIRA 2008 Wuhan, China, October 15-17, 2008 Proceedings, Part II / [ed] Youlun Xioun, Springer, 2008, Vol. 5315 LNAI, no PART 2, p. 398-407Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional fusion welding and fixture simulations are performed using advanced finite element simulation tools, commonly used are e.g. MSC.Marc, ANSYS, ABACUS and COMSOL Multiphysics. These simulations are made one at a time and separately due to heavy calculation load for each case. Such an approach does not give a full description of the integrated work piece and fixture behaviour. We propose a strategy to decrease the computational time and solve the problem accurately enough for industrial needs. Focus of the simulation result is on residual deformation. The work piece is a simplified component composed by metal sheets, and rigid and loose clamping was investigated. Simulation results give the size of forces and deformations in the clamped edge. Deformation measurements are performed using 3D-scanning of the work piece after cooling and released from fixture, same situation as in the FE-simulations. The proposed strategy has shown to be useful and is industrially competitive due to reduced engineering manpower, computation time, and need for practical experiments. The strategy is to use full off-line programming where computer aided robotics for weld sequencies is integrated with finite element modelling in order to obtain weld parameters and fixture design.

  • 46.
    Soron, Mikael
    et al.
    ESAB Welding AB .
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Ilar, Torbjörn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    A local model for online path corrections in friction stir welding2010In: INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ADVANCES ON FRICTION STIR WELDING AND PROCESSING. Program.http://www.polytech-lille.fr/IMG/pdf/program.pdf, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has always been associated with high forces and rigid machines Today’s trends towards joining of more complex structures in e.g. the automotive and aerospace industry, the applications require machinery with increased dexterity and flexibility, which cannot be achieved with the traditional FSW systems. But the introduction of more flexible machines, with more complex workspace capacity, will lead to undesired tool path deviations and in worst case a weld seam with inferior quality. In this study an industrial robot system is used to emphasise the need to compensate for the deviations caused by the high lateral forces resulting from the FSW process. A local model to compensate for such deviations is implemented, evaluated and compared to uncompensate welds in terms of quality and reliability.

  • 47.
    Travis, Fred
    et al.
    Maharishi University of Management, USA.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Creativity and Brain-Functioning in Product Development Engineers: A Canonical Correlation Analysis2014In: Creativity Research Journal, ISSN 1040-0419, E-ISSN 1532-6934, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 239-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study used canonical correlation analysis to explore the relation among scores on the Torrance test of figural and verbal creativity and demographic, psychological and physiological measures in Swedish product-development engineers. The first canonical variate included figural and verbal flexibility and originality as dependent measures and (a) higher scores on the brain integration scale, (b) faster speed of processing in an event-related potential task, (c) faster conflict-resolution during the Stroop task, (d) higher moral reasoning, and (e) higher manageability and lower comprehensibility as independent measures. Flexibility and originality reflect the ability to see old situations in new ways leading to unique responses. Greater mental adaptability was associated with greater brain integration and speed of processing along with higher moral reasoning and feeling of being in control. Future research could investigate effects of interventions that optimize brain integration on creative output across professions.

  • 48. Travis, Frederick
    et al.
    Harung, Harald
    Oslo University College.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Moral development, Executive Functioning, Peak Experiences and Brain Pattern in Professional and Amateur Classical Musicians. Interpretation in light of a Unified Field Theory of Performance2011In: Consciousness and Cognition, ISSN 1053-8100, E-ISSN 1090-2376, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1256-1264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared professional and amateur classical musicians matched for age, gender, and education on reaction times during the Stroop color-word test, brainwaves during an auditory ERP task and during paired reaction-time tasks, responses on the Gibbs Sociomoral Reflection questionnaire, and self-reported frequencies of peak experiences. Professional musicians were characterized by: (1) lower color-word interference effects (Stroop task), (2) faster categorization of rare expected stimuli (P3b), and a trend for faster processing of rare unexpected stimuli (P3a), (3) higher scores on the Sociomoral Reflection questionnaire, and (4) more frequent peak experiences during rest, tasks, and sleep. Both groups had high values on the Brain Integration Scale. These findings are interpreted in light of a Unified Theory of Performance, which posits that effectiveness in any area is influenced by one’s level of mind-brain development—emotional, cognitive, moral, ego and cortical development—with higher mind-brain development supporting greater effectiveness in any domain.

  • 49.
    Wiklund, Daniel
    et al.
    Swerea IVF.
    Larsson, Mats
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    A friction model for the boundary and mixed lubricated regimes in sheet metal forming2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction is an important parameter to control in sheet metal forming since it influences the flow of material in the process. Consequently, it is also an important parameter in the design process of new stamping dies when numerical simulations are utilized. Today, the most commonly used friction model in forming simulations is Coulomb´s friction which is a strong simplification of the tribological system. In this work an advanced friction model is developed, which considers properties of tool and sheet surface topography (spatial and height), lubricant, sheet material, and process parameters such as sliding speed and contact pressure. The results show that the model can predict the frictional behavior over a wide range of influencing parameters. A regression analysis of model and experimental results, Bending-Under-Tension friction test, shows acorrelation of R2=0.89.

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