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  • 1.
    Adli, E.
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Gjersdal, H.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Røhne, O.M.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Dorholt, O.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Bang, D.M.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Thomas, D,
    ESS ERIC, Lund, Sweden.
    Shea, T.
    ESS ERIC, Lund, Sweden.
    Andersson, R.
    ESS ERIC, Lund, Sweden.
    Ibison, M.G.
    University of Liverpool and Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, UK.
    Welsch, C.P
    University of Liverpool and Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, UK.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    The Ess Target Proton Beam Imaging Systemas In-Kind Contribution2017In: Proceedings of IPAC2017, Copenhagen, Denmark, 2017, p. 3422-3425Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Oscar
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Production Engineering and XPRES, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fahlström, Karl
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Melander, Arne
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Production Engineering and XPRES, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Experiments and efficient simulations of distortions of laser beam–welded thin-sheet close beam steel structures2018In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part B, journal of engineering manufacture, ISSN 0954-4054, E-ISSN 2041-2975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, geometrical distortions of steel structures due to laser beam welding were analyzed. Two 700-mm-long U-beam structures were welded in overlap configurations: a double U-beam structure and a U-beam/flat structure. The structures were in different material combinations from mild steel to ultrahigh-strength steel welded with different process parameters. Different measures of distortions of the U-beam structures were evaluated after cooling. Significant factors of the welding process and the geometry of the structures were identified. Furthermore, welding distortions were modeled using two predictive finite element simulation models. The previously known shrinkage method and a newly developed time-efficient simulation method were evaluated. The new model describes the effects of expansion and shrinkage of the weld zone during welding and material plasticity at elevated temperatures. The new simulation method has reasonable computation times for industrial applications and improved agreement with experiments compared to the often used so-called shrinkage method. © 2018, IMechE 2018.

  • 3.
    Barick, Prasenjit
    et al.
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad, 500005 Telangana, India.
    Chakravarty, Dibyendu
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad, 500005 Telangana, India.
    Saha, Bhaskar Prasad
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad, 500005 Telangana, India.
    Nitra, Rahul
    Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal, India.
    Joshi, Shrikant
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad, 500005 Telangana, India.
    Effect of pressure and temperature on densification, microstructure and mechanical properties of spark plasma sintered silicon carbide processed with β-silicon carbide nanopowder and sintering additives2016In: Ceramics International, ISSN 0272-8842, E-ISSN 1873-3956, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 3836-3848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of applied pressure and temperature during spark plasma sintering (SPS) of additive-containing nanocrystalline silicon carbide on its densification, microstructure, and mechanical properties have been investigated. Both relative density and grain size are found to increase with temperature. Furthermore, with increase in pressure at constant temperature, the relative density improves significantly, whereas the grain size decreases. Reasonably high relative density (~96%) is achieved on carrying out SPS at 1300 °C under applied pressure of 75 MPa for 5 min, with a maximum of ~97.7% at 1500 °C under 50 MPa for 5 min. TEM studies have shown the presence of an amorphous phase at grain boundaries and triple points, which confirms the formation of liquid phase during sintering and its significant contribution to densification of SiC at relatively lower temperatures (≤1400 °C). The relative density decreases on raising the SPS temperature beyond 1500 °C, probably due to pores caused by vaporization of the liquid phase. Whereas β-SiC is observed in the microstructures for SPS carried out at temperatures ≤1500 °C, α-SiC evolves and its volume fraction increases with further increase in SPS temperatures. Both hardness and Young׳s modulus increase with increase in relative density, whereas indentation fracture toughness appears to be higher in case of two-phase microstructure containing α and β-SiC.

  • 4.
    Barick, Prasenjit
    et al.
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad-500005, Telangana, India.
    Saha, Bhaskar Prasad
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad-500005, Telangana, India.
    Joshi, Shrikant
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad-500005, Telangana, India.
    Mitra, Rahul
    Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal, 721302, India.
    Spray-freeze-dried nanosized silicon carbide containing granules: Properties, compaction behaviour and sintering2016In: Journal of the European Ceramic Society, ISSN 0955-2219, E-ISSN 1873-619X, Vol. 36, no 16, p. 3863-3877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spherical granules comprising silicon carbide nanoparticles have been produced with the help of sprayfreeze-drying (SFD) technique. The effect of solid loading of slurries on rheological properties, flowability and morphology of the resulting SFD granules has been studied. Further, a systematic study has been performed to investigate the effect of applied pressures and granule density on the relative densities and microstructures of the green compacts. A marginal increase in viscosity is noted as the solid content of slurries increases from 5 to 15 vol% with significant increase in viscosity being observed in case of 18 vol% slurry. The granules prepared from SiC slurries are spherical in shape with their mean size, density, gravimetric flow rate, and yield strength increasing with the increase in solid content. The mechanical properties of sintered SiC produced from SFD granules are found relatively superior to that made from commercially available spray-dried (SD) granules.

  • 5.
    Bhoje, Sourabh
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Termisk cykling provuppställning konstruktion och provning av TBCs för dieselmotorapplikation2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) thermally insulate the substrate from high temperature exposure. This work attempted to simulate real engine thermal cyclic conditions by designing a test method to evaluate the thermal cyclic fatigue (TCF) performance of different coatings applied inside exhaust manifold of a diesel engine. The coatings investigated in this work comprised of two plasmas-sprayed TBCs (conventional 8YSZ and nanostructured 8YSZ) and one bond coat (NiCoCrAlY). Additionally, these coatings were exposed to isothermal testing and their oxidation behavior was evaluated.   All the coatings along with only substrate were exposed to temperature around 525°C for 150 cycles in thermal cyclic testing carried out on Scania’s heavy-duty diesel engine. For isothermal testing, all coatings along with only substrate material were exposed to 650°C and 750°C for 168 hours respectively. Microstructural analysis by SEM/EDS was carried out to compare the microstructural evolution of the tested coatings with the as sprayed TBCs. In the case of thermal cyclic test, all coatings showed no failure and no TGO growth up to 150 cycles. In the EDS analysis for isothermally tested coatings, oxidation of the substrate at bond coat- substrate interface instead of TGO growth was observed. Bond coat showed lowest oxide layer thickness at 650°C and 750°C followed by conventional YSZ and then nanostructured YSZ. But, conventional YSZ showed microcracks in top coat near top coat- bond coat interface after isothermal testing. Thermal cyclic and isothermal exposure test results showed that bond coated substrate and nanostructured YSZ have the potential to be implemented inside the real manifold.   

  • 6.
    Björklund, Stefan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Goel, Sneha
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Function-dependent coating architectures by hybrid powder-suspension plasma spraying: Injector design, processing and concept validation2018In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 142, p. 56-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The attractive properties achieved by Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS), combined with the availability of high throughput capable plasma spray systems that permit axial feeding, provide encouragement to explore use of suspensions for next generation functional applications. This paper deals with realization of coatings with various pre-determined function-dependent architectures by employing a hybrid powder-suspension feedstock. Some illustrative application-relevant coating architecture designs are discussed, along with the specific benefits that can accrue by deploying a multi-scale powder-suspension feedstock combination. An elegant feedstock delivery arrangement to enable either simultaneous or sequential feeding of powders and suspensions to enable convenient processing of coatings with desired architectures is presented. As proof-of-concept, deposition of layered, composite and functionally graded coatings using the above system is also demonstrated using appropriate case studies

  • 7.
    Bolelli, G.
    et al.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria 'Enzo Ferrari', Via P. Vivarelli 10/1, Modena, MO, Italy .
    Berger, L.-M.
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, Dresden, Germany.
    Börner, T.
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, Dresden, Germany.
    Koivuluoto, H.
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, Tampere, Finland .
    Matikainen, V.
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, Tampere, Finland .
    Lusvarghi, L.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria 'Enzo Ferrari', Via P. Vivarelli 10/1, Modena, MO, Italy .
    Lyphout, Christophe
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Sassatelli, P.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria 'Enzo Ferrari', Via P. Vivarelli 10/1, Modena, MO, Italy .
    Trache, R.
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, Dresden, Germany .
    Vuoristo, P.c
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, Tampere, Finlan.
    Sliding and abrasive wear behaviour of HVOF- and HVAF-sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr hardmetal coatings2016In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 358-359, p. 32-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a comprehensive characterisation of HVOF- and HVAF-sprayed Cr3C2–25 wt.% NiCr hardmetal coatings. One commercial powder composition with two different particle size distributions was processed using five HVOF and HVAF thermal spray systems.All coatings contain less Cr3C2 than the feedstock powder, possibly due to the rebound of some Cr3C2-rich particles during high-velocity impact onto the substrate.Dry sand-rubber wheel abrasive wear testing causes both grooving and pull-out of splat fragments. Mass losses depend on inter- and intra-lamellar cohesion, being higher (≥70 mg after a wear distance of 5904 m) for the coatings deposited with the coarser feedstock powder or with one type of HVAF torch.Sliding wear at room temperature against alumina involves shallower abrasive grooving, small-scale delamination and carbide pull-outs, and it is controlled by intra-lamellar cohesion. The coatings obtained from the fine feedstock powder exhibit the lowest wear rates (≈5x10−6 mm3/(Nm)). At 400 °C, abrasive grooving dominates the sliding wear behaviour; wear rates increase by one order of magnitude but friction coefficients decrease from ≈0.7 to ≈0.5. The thermal expansion coefficient of the coatings (11.08x10−6 °C−1 in the 30–400 °C range) is sufficiently close to that of the steel substrate (14.23x10−6 °C−1) to avoid macro-cracking

  • 8.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Analysis and direct optimization of cutting tool utilization in CAM2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The search for increased productivity and cost reduction in machining can be interpreted as the desire to increase the material removal rate, MRR, and maximize the cutting tool utilization. The CNC process is complex and involves numerous limitations and parameters, ranging from tolerances to machinability. A well-managed preparation process creates the foundations for achieving a reduction in manufacturing errors and machining time. Along the preparation process of the NC-program, two different studies have been conducted and are presented in this thesis. One study examined the CAM programming preparation process from the Lean perspective. The other study includes an evaluation of how the cutting tools are used in terms of MRR and tool utilization.

    The material removal rate is defined as the product of three variables, namely the cutting speed, the feed and the depth of cut, which all constitute the cutting data. Tool life is the amount of time that a cutting tool can be used and is mainly dependent on the same variables. Two different combinations of cutting data might provide the same MRR, however the tool life will be different. Thereby the difficulty is to select the cutting data to maximize both MRR and cutting tool utilization. A model for the analysis and efficient selection of cutting data for maximal MRR and maximal tool utilization has been developed and is presented. The presented model shortens the time dedicated to the optimized cutting data selection and the needed iterations along the program development.

  • 9.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    On cutting tool resource management2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The search for increased productivity and cost reduction in machining can be interpreted as desire to increase the Material Removal Rate, , and maximize the cutting tool utilization. The CNC process is complex and involves numerous constraints and parameters; ranging from tolerances to machinability. A well-managed preparation process creates the foundation for achieving a reduction in manufacturing errors and machining time. Along the preparation process of the NC-program, two different studies have been performed and are presented in this thesis. One study examined the CAM programming process from the Lean perspective. The other study includes an evaluation of how the cutting tools are used in terms of and tool utilization. Two distinct combinations of cutting data might provide the same . However, the tool life and machining cost can be different. Therefore, selection of appropriate cutting parameters that best meet all these objectives is challenging. An algorithm for analysis and efficient selection of cutting data for maximal , maximal tool utilization and minimal machining cost has been developed and is presented in this work. The presented algorithm shortens the time dedicated to the optimized cutting data selection and the needed iterations along the program development. Furthermore, the objectives that need to be considered during the estimation of the manufacturing processes sustainability have been identified. In addition, this thesis also includes a theoretical study to estimate energy use, CO2-footprint and water consumption during the manufacture of a workpiece, which can be invaluable for companies in their search for sustainability of their manufacturing processes.

  • 10.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Fredriksson, Claes
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Electrical- and Mechanical Engineering.
    Energy and Cost Estimation of a Feature-based Machining Operation on HRSA2017In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 61, no Supplement C, p. 511-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forward-looking manufacturing companies aim for sustainable production with low environmental footprint. This is true also for aerospace engine-makers, although their environmental impact mostly occurs during the use-phase of their products. Materials, such as Nickel alloys, are used for special applications where other materials will not withstand tough working conditions in terms of pressure and temperature. Heat Resistant Super Alloys are, however, considered difficult to machine and cutting tools will wear off rapidly. In this paper, a simple way to estimate the energy required, the cost and environmental footprint to produce a work piece using standard engineering software is presented. The results show that for a hypothetical 3 tonne work piece, Inconel 718 will be considerably cheaper and require less water but will require more energy, and has considerably larger CO2 footprint than Waspaloy.

  • 11.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Repo, Jari
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Analysis of Tool Utilization from Material Removal Rate Perspective2015In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 29, p. 109-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An end of life strategy algorithm has been used to study a CNC program to evaluate how the cutting inserts are used in terms of their full utilization. Utilized tool life (UTL) and remaining tool life (RTL) were used to evaluate if the insert has been used to its limits of expected tool life, or contributing to an accumulated tool waste. It is demonstrated that possible means to improvement exists to increase the material removal rate (MRR), thereby using the insert until its remaining tool life is as close to zero as possible. It was frequently found that inserts were used well below their maximum performance with respect to cutting velocity.

  • 12.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Repo, Jari
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Integrated optimization model for cutting data selection based on maximal MRR and tool utilization in continuous machining operations2016In: CIRP - Journal of Manufacturing Science and Technology, ISSN 1755-5817, E-ISSN 1878-0016, Vol. 13, p. 46-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The search for increased productivity can be interpreted as the increase of material removal rate (MRR). Namely, increase of feed, depth of cut and/or cutting speed. The increase of any of these three variables, will increase the tool wear rate; therefore decreasing its tool life according to the same tool life criteria. This paper proposes an integrated model for efficient selection of cutting data for maximal MRR and maximal tool utilization. The results show that, it is possible to obtain a limited range of cutting parameters from where the CAM Programmer can select the cutting data assuring both objectives.

  • 13.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Repo, Jari
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Streamlining the CAM programming process by Lean Principles within the aerospace industryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Design of Thermal Barrier Coating Systems2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC’s) are used to provide both thermal insulation and oxidation protection to high temperature components within gas turbines. The development of turbines for power generation and aviation has led to designs where the operation conditions exceed the upper limits of most conventional engineering materials. As a result there has been a drive to improve thermal barrier coatings to allow the turbine to operate at higher temperatures for longer.

    The focus of this thesis has been to design thermal barrier coatings with lower conductivity and longer lifetime than those coatings used in industry today. The work has been divided between the development of new generation air plasma spray (APS) TBC coatings for industrial gas turbines and the development of suspension plasma spray (SPS) TBC systems.

    The route taken to achieve these goals with APS TBC’s has been twofold. Firstly an alternative stabiliser has been chosen for the zirconium oxide system in the form of dysprosia. Secondly, control of the powder morphology and spray parameters has been used to generate coating microstructures with favourable levels of porosity.

    In terms of development of SPS TBC systems, these coatings are relatively new with many of the critical coating parameters not yet known. The focus of the work has therefore been to characterise their lifetime and thermal properties when produced in a complete TBC system.

    Results demonstrate that dysprosia as an alternative stabiliser gives a reduction in thermal conductivity. While small at room temperature and in the as produced state; the influence becomes more pronounced at high temperatures and with longer thermal exposure time. The trade-off for this lowered thermal conductivity may be in the loss of high temperature stability. Overall, the greatest sustained influence on thermal conductivity has been from creating coatings with high levelsof porosity.

    In relation to lifetime, double the thermo-cyclic fatigue (TCF) life relative to the industrial standard was achieved using a coating with engineered porosity. Introducing a polymer to the spray powder helps to generate large globular pores within the coating together with a large number of delaminations. Such a structure was shown to be highly resistant to TCF testing.

    SPS TBC’s were shown to have much greater performance relative to their APS counterparts in thermal shock life, TCF life and thermal conductivity. Columnar SPS coatings are a prospective alternative for strain tolerant coatings in gas turbine engines.

  • 15.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Design of Thermal Barrier Coating Systems2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC’s) are used to provide both thermal insulation and oxidation protection to high temperature components within gas turbines. The development of turbines for power generation and aviation has led to designs where the operation conditions exceed the upper limits of most conventional engineering materials. As a result there has been a drive to improve thermal barrier coatings to allow the turbine to operate hotter for longer.

    The focus of this study has been the development of a new generation of TBC system for industrial implementation. The goal for these new coatings was to achieve lower conductivity and longer lifetime than those coatings used today. The route taken to achieve these goals has been twofold. Firstly an alternative stabiliser has been chosen for the zirconium oxide system in the form of dysprosia. Secondly, Control of the powder morphology and spray parameters has been used to generate coating microstructures with favourable levels of porosity.

    Samples have been heavily characterised using the laser flash technique for evaluation of thermal properties. Measurements were performed at room temperature and at intervals up to 1200°C. Samples have also been tested in their as produced state and after heat treatments of up to 200 hours.

    Lifetime evaluation has been performed using the thermo-cyclic fatigue test to expose coating systems to successive cycles of heating and cooling combined with oxidation of the underlying metallic coating.

    Microstructures have been prepared and analysed using SEM. An image analysis routine has been used to attempt to quantify changes in microstructure features between coating types or coating exposure times and to relate those changes to changes in thermal properties

    Results show that dysprosia as an alternative dopant gives a reduction in thermal conductivity. While small at room temperature and in the as produced state; the influence becomes more pronounced at high temperatures and with thermal exposure time. Overall, the greatest sustained influence on thermal conductivity has been from creating coatings with high levels of porosity.

    In relation to lifetime, the target of double the thermo-cyclic fatigue life was achieved using a coating with engineered porosity. Introducing a polymer to the spray powder helps to generate large globular pores within the coating together with a large number of delaminations. Such a structure has shown to be highly resistant to TCF testing.

  • 16.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Treibacher AG, Austria.
    Feedstock for SPS and SPPS: Properties and Processing2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Suspension plasma spray: how suspension properties and spray parameters influence coating possibilities2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Devotta, Ashwin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Löf, Ronnie
    Sandvik Coromant AB, Sandviken, Sweden.
    FE Modelling and Characterization of Chip Curl in Nose Turning processIn: International Journal of Machining and Machinability of Materials, ISSN 1748-572XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Devotta, Ashwin Moris
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Characterization & modeling of chip flow angle & morphology in 2D & 3D turning process2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Within manufacturing of metallic components, machining plays an important role and is of vital significance to ensure process reliability. From a cutting tool design perspective,  tool macro geometry  design  based on physics based  numerical modelling  is highly needed  that can predict chip morphology.  The chip morphology describes the chip shape geometry and the chip curl geometry. The prediction of chip flow and chip shape is vital in predicting chip breakage, ensuring good chip evacuation and lower surface roughness.  To this end, a platform where such a  numerical model’s chip morphology prediction  can be compared with experimental investigation is needed and is the focus of this work. The studied cutting processes are orthogonal cutting process and nose turning process. Numerical models that simulate the chip formation process are employed to predict the chip morphology and are accompanied by machining experiments. Computed tomography is used  to scan the chips obtained from machining experiments and its ability to capture the variation in  chip morphology  is evaluated.  For nose turning process,  chip  curl parameters during the cutting process are to be calculated. Kharkevich model is utilized in this regard to calculate the  ‘chip in process’ chip curl parameters. High speed videography is used to measure the chip side flow angle during the cutting process experiments and are directly compared to physics based model predictions. The results show that the methodology developed provides  the framework where advances in numerical models can be evaluated reliably from a chip morphology prediction capability view point for nose turning process. The numerical modeling results show that the chip morphology variation for varying cutting conditions is predicted qualitatively. The results of quantitative evaluation of chip morphology prediction shows that the error in prediction is too large to be used for predictive modelling purposes.

  • 20.
    Devotta, Ashwin Moris
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Characterization of Chip Morphology in Oblique Nose Turning employing High Speed Videography and Computed Tomography Technique2016In: Proceedings International Conference on Competitive manufacturing: January 27, 2016 – January 29, 2016 Stellenbosch, South Africa, Conference on Assembly Technologies & Systems (CIRP), 2016, p. 249-254Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Devotta, Ashwin Moris
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. R&D Turning, Sandvik Coromant, Sandviken.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Löf, Ronnie
    R&D Turning, Sandvik Coromant, Sandviken.
    Finite element modelling and characterisation of chip curl in nose turning process2017In: International Journal of Machining and Machinability of Materials, E-ISSN 1748-572X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 277-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Finite element (FE) modelling of machining provide valuable insights into its deformation mechanics. Evaluating an FE model predicted chip morphology requires characterisation of chip shape, chip curl and chip flow angles. In this study, a chip morphology characterisation methodology is developed using computed tomography (CT), high-speed imaging and Kharkevich model equations enabling evaluation of FE model’s chip morphology prediction accuracy. Chip formation process in nose turning of AISI 1045 steel is simulated using a 3D FE model for varying feed rate and depth of cut and evaluated against experimental investigations using the employed methodology. The study shows that the methodology is able to characterise chip morphology in nose turning process accurately and enables evaluation of FE model’s chip morphology prediction accuracy. This can enable the finite element model to be deployed in cutting tool design for chip breaker geometry design.

  • 22.
    Devotta, Ashwin Moris
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Löf, Ronnie
    Sandvik Coromant AB, Sandviken, Sweden.
    Modeling of Chip curl in Orthogonal Turning using Spiral Galaxy describing Function2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Devotta, Ashwin Moris
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Sandvik Coromant AB, Sandviken, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Löf, Ronnie
    Sandvik Coromant AB, Sandviken, Sweden.
    Espes, Emil
    Sandvik Coromant AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quantitative Characterization of Chip Morphology Using Computed Tomography in Orthogonal Turning Process2015In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 33, p. 299-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The simulation of machining process has been an area of active research for over two decades. To fully incorporate finite element (FE) simulations as a state of art tool design aid, there is a need for higher accuracy methodology. An area of improvement is the prediction of chip shape in FE simulations. Characterization of chip shape is therefore a necessity to validate the FE simulations with experimental investigations. The aim of this paper is to present an investigation where computed tomography (CT) is used for the characterization of the chip shape obtained from 2D orthogonal turning experiments. In this work, the CT method has been used for obtaining the full 3D representation of a machined chip. The CT method is highly advantageous for the complex curled chip shapes besides its ability to capture microscopic features on the chip like lamellae structure and surface roughness. This new methodology aids in the validation of several key parameters representing chip shape. The chip morphology’s 3D representation is obtained with the necessary accuracy which provides the ability to use chip curl as a practical validation tool for FE simulation of chip formation in practical machining operations. The study clearly states the ability of the new CT methodology to be used as a tool for the characterization of chip morphology in chip formation studies and industrial applications.

  • 24.
    Devotta, Ashwin Moris
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Siriki, Ravendra
    Sandvik Materials Technology, Sandviken, Sweden.
    Löf, Ronnie
    Sandvik Coromant AB, Sandviken, Sweden.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Finite Element Modeling and Validation of Chip Segmentation in Machining of AISI 1045 Steel2017In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 58, p. 499-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The finite element (FE) method based modeling of chip formation in machining provides the ability to predict output parameters like cutting forces and chip geometry. One of the important characteristics of chip morphology is chip segmentation. Majority of the literature within chip segmentation show cutting speed (vc) and feed rate (f) as the most influencing input parameters. The role of tool rake angle (α) on chip segmentation is limited and hence, the present study is aimed at understanding it. In addition, stress triaxiality’s importance in damage model employed in FE method in capturing the influence of α on chip morphology transformation is also studied. Furthermore, microstructure characterization of chips was carried out using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the chip formation process for certain cutting conditions. The results show that the tool α influences chip segmentation phenomena and that the incorporation of a stress triaxiality factor in damage models is required to be able to predict the influence of the α. The variation of chip segmentation frequency with f is predicted qualitatively but the accuracy of prediction needs improvement. © 2017 The Authors.

  • 25.
    Ericson Öberg, Anna
    et al.
    Chalmers, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Åstrand, Erik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Volvo Construct Equipment, Braås, Sweden.
    Improved productivity by reduced variation in gas metal arc welding (GMAW)2017In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 92, no 1-4, p. 1027-1038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the research conducted is to describe the consequences of variation in the welding industry and the effect it has on manufacturing productivity. The potential has shown to be hidden in unnecessarily stringent requirements and over-processing. This has been studied in steps: customer requirements, design and analysis, preparation, welding, and assessment. The effect of variation in each step has been analyzed including estimations of its productivity improvement potential. Theoretically, in a perfect situation, with customized requirements and eliminated variation, more than half of all welding could be removed. Such a reduction is certainly neither practical nor possible. However, a sensible, controlled reduction could still have a very high impact. The financial implications are therefore substantial. The improved productivity of the manufacturing resources could be used for business development and increased production. To be able to realize the potential, interdisciplinary efforts are necessary. Management across different functions need to agree on the intended product life and make decisions thereafter.

  • 26.
    Ericsson, Mikael
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Three-dimensional simulation of robot path and heat transfer of a TIG-welded part with complex geometry2002In: 11th International Conferences on Computer Technology in Welding: Colombus, Ohio December 6-7, 2001, 2002, p. 309-316Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of commercial software (OLP) packages for robot simulation, and programming, use interactive computer graphics, provide powerful tools for creating welding paths off-line. By the use of such software, problems of robot reach, accessibility, collision and timing can be eliminated during the planning stage. This paper describes how such software can be integrated with a numerical model that predicts temperature-time histories in the solid material. The objective of this integration is to develop a tool for the engineer where robot trajectories and process parameters can be optimized on parts with complex geometry. Such a tool would decrease the number of weld trials, increase productivity and reduce costs. Assumptions and principles behind the modeling techniques are presented together with experimental evaluation of the correlation between modeled and measured temperatures.

  • 27.
    Fahlström, Karl
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Laser welding of boron steels for light-weight vehicle applications2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Laser beam welding has gained a significant interest during the last two decades. The suitability of the process for high volume production has the possibility to give a strong advantage compared to several other welding methods. However, it is important to have the process in full control since various quality issues may otherwise occur. During laser welding of boron steels quality issues such as imperfections, changes in local and global geometry as well as strength reduction can occur. The aspects that need to be considered are strongly depending on alloy content, process parameters etc. These problems that can occur could be fatal for the construction and the lowest level of occurrence is wanted, independent of industry.

    The focus of this study has been to investigate the properties of laser welded boron steel. The study includes laser welding of boron alloyed steels with strengths of 1500 MPa and a recently introduced 1900 MPa grade. Focus has been to investigate weldability and the occurrence of cracks, porosity and strength reducing microstructure that can occur during laser welding, as well as distortion studies for tolerances in geometry. The results show that both conventional and 1900 MPa boron alloyed steel are suitable for laser welding.

    Due to the martensitic structure of welds the material tends to behave brittle. Cracking and porosity do not seem to be an issue limiting the use of these steels. For tolerances in geometry for larger structures tests has been done simulating laser welding of A-pillars and B-pillars. Measurements have been done with Vernier caliper as well as a more advanced optical method capturing the movements during the welding sequence. Results from the tests done on Ushaped beams indicates that depending on the geometry of the structure and heat input distortions can be controlled to give distortions from 1 to 8 mm, at a welding length of 700 mm. This means that important geometry points can be distorted several millimeters if the laser welding process not is controlled.

  • 28.
    Fahlström, Karl
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Swerea KIMAB in Kista.
    Andersson, O.
    Volvo Cars in Torslanda & KTH in Stockholm, Sweden.
    Melander, A.
    Swerea KIMAB in Kista, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Leif
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Svensson, Lars-Erik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Correlation between laser welding sequence and distortions for thin sheet structures2017In: Science and technology of welding and joining, ISSN 1362-1718, E-ISSN 1743-2936, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 150-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin ultra-high strength steel shaped as 700 mm long U-beams have been laser welded in overlap configuration to study the influence of welding sequence on distortions. Three different welding directions, three different energy inputs as well as stitch welding have been evaluated, using resistance spot welding (RSW) as a reference. Transverse widening at the ends and narrowing at the centre of the beam were measured. A clear correlation was found between the weld metal volume and distortion. For continuous welds there was also a nearly linear relationship between the energy input and distortion. However, the amount of distortion was not affected by a change in welding direction. Stitching and RSW reduced distortion significantly compared to continuous laser welding.

  • 29.
    Fahlström, Karl
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Environment Production Technology West.
    Andersson, Oscar
    Volvo Cars, Torslanda, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Leif
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Svensson, Lars-Erik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Metallurgical effects and distortions in laser welding of thin sheet steels with variations in strength2017In: Science and technology of welding and joining, ISSN 1362-1718, E-ISSN 1743-2936, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 573-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geometrical distortions occur while welding, but the understanding of how and why they occur and how to control them is limited. The relation between the weld width, weld metal volume, total energy input, width of hard zone and distortions when laser welding three different thin sheet steels with varying strength has therefore been studied. Weld metal volume and total energy input show a good correlation with distortion for one steel at a time. The best correlation with the when including all three steel grades was the width of the hard zone composed of weld metal and the martensitic area in the heat affected zone. © 2017 Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining. Published by Taylor & Francis on behalf of the Institute.

  • 30.
    Fahlström, Karl
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Joining Technology, Swerea KIMAB, Kista 164 40, Sweden .
    Andersson, Oscar
    Volvo Cars, Torslanda 418 78, Sweden and XPRES, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm 100 44, Sweden.
    Todal, Urban
    Volvo Cars, Torslanda 418 78, Sweden.
    Melander, Arne
    Joining Technology, Swerea KIMAB, Kista 164 40, Sweden and XPRES, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm 100 44, Sweden.
    Minimization of distortions during laser welding of ultra high strength steel2015In: Journal of laser applications, ISSN 1042-346X, E-ISSN 1938-1387, Vol. 27, no 2, SI, article id S29011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultra high strength steels are frequently used within the automotive industry for several components. Welding of these components is traditionally done by resistance spot welding, but to get further productivity and increased strength, laser welding has been introduced in the past decades. Fusion welding is known to cause distortions due to built in stresses in the material. The distortions result in geometrical issues during assembly which become the origin of low joint quality due to gaps and misfits. U-beam structures of boron steel simulating B-pillars have been welded with laser along the flanges. Welding parameters and clamping have been varied to create different welding sequences and heat input generating a range of distortion levels. The distortions have been recorded dynamically with an optical measurement system during welding. In addition, final distortions have been measured by a digital Vernier caliper. The combined measurements give the possibility to evaluate development, occurrence, and magnitude of distortions with high accuracy. Furthermore, section cuts have been analyzed to assess joint geometry and metallurgy. The results show that final distortions appear in the range of 0-8 mm. Distortions occur mainly transversely and vertically along the profile. Variations in heat input show clear correlation with the magnitude of distortions and level of joint quality. A higher heat input in general generates a higher level of distortion with the same clamping conditions. Section cuts show that weld width and penetration are significantly affected by welding heat input. The present study identifies parameters which significantly influence the magnitude and distribution of distortions. Also, effective measures to minimize distortions and maintain or improve joint quality have been proposed. Finally, transient finite element (FE) simulations have been presented which show the behavior of the profiles during the welding and unclamping process. (C) 2015 Laser Institute of America.

  • 31.
    Fahlström, Karl
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Swerea KIMAB, Joining Technology, Kista, Sweden .
    Andersson, Oscar
    Volvo Cars, Torslanda; XPRES, KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Todal, Urban
    Volvo Cars, Torslanda.
    Melander, Arne
    Swerea KIMAB, Joining Technology, Kista; XPRES, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Minimization of distortions during laser welding of ultra-high strength steel2014In: ICALEO 2014 Congress proceedings, 2014, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultra high strength steels are frequently used within the automotive industry for several components. Welding of these components is traditionally done by resistance spot welding, but to get further productivity and increased strength, laser welding has been introduced in the past decades. Fusion welding is known to cause distortions due to built-in stresses in the material. The distortions result in geometrical issues during assembly which become the origin of low joint quality due to gaps and misfits.

    U-beam structures of boron steel simulating B-pillars have been welded with laser along the flanges. Welding parameters and clamping have been varied to create different welding sequences and heat input generating a range of distortion levels. The distortions have been recorded dynamically with an optical measurement system during welding. In addition, final distortions have been measured by a digital Vernier caliper. The combined measurements give the possibility to evaluate development, occurrence and magnitude of distortions with high accuracy. Furthermore, section cuts have been analyzed to assess joint geometry and metallurgy.

    The results shows that final distortions appear in the range of 0-8 mm. Distortions occur mainly transversely and vertically along the profile. Variations in heat input show clear correlation with the magnitude of distortions and level of joint quality. A higher heat input in general generates a higher level of distortion with the same clamping conditions. Section cuts show that weld width and penetration are significantly affected by welding heat input.

    The present study identifies parameters which significantly influence the magnitude and distribution of distortions. Also, effective measures to minimize distortions and maintain or improve joint quality have been proposed.

    Finally, transient FE simulations have been presented which show the behavior of the profiles during the welding and unclamping process.

  • 32.
    Fahlström, Karl
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Persson, Kjell-Arne
    Swerea KIMAB, Joining Technology, Kista 164 40, Sweden.
    Larsson, Johnny K.
    Volvo Cars, Torslanda 405 31, Sweden.
    Vila Ferrer, Elisenda
    Gestamp, Barcelona 08635, Spain.
    Evaluation of laser weldability of 1800 and 1900 MPa boron steels2016In: Journal of laser applications, ISSN 1042-346X, E-ISSN 1938-1387, Vol. 28, no 2, article id 022426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrahigh strength steels are frequently used within the automotive industry. The driving force for use of these materials is to exchange thicker gauges to thinner and lighter structures. To get excellent strength and beneficial crash performance, the steel is microalloyed with boron which contributes to the 1500 MPa tensile strength. Increasing the carbon content will give superior tensile strength up to 2000 MPa. Welding of these components is traditionally done by resistance spot welding, but to get further productivity and increased stiffness of the structure, laser welding can be introduced. Welding of boron alloyed high strength steel is in general a stable and controlled process, but if increasing the carbon content quality issues such as cracking could possibly be a problem. In the present study, weldability of two different hardened boron steels with tensile strengths of 1800 and 1900 MPa, respectively, has been evaluated. Laser welding has been done in a lap joint configuration with 3.8–4.7 kW and varying welding speed between 3.5 and 5.5 m/min. As reference, results from more conventional 1500 MPa boron steel have been compared to 1800 and 1900 MPa boron steels to show the influence of the carbon content. Metallographic investigation, hot crack test, cold crack test, shear tensile, and cross-tension strength tests have been done. The results show that a weld quality similar to that for conventional boron steel can be achieved. Cracking and other defects can be avoided. As expected when welding martensitic steels, the failure mode in tensile testing is brittle. No weld defects have been found that influence strength. The sheet interface weld width, which together with stack-up thickness correlates with strength of the joint, could be increased by increasing the heat input and defocusing the laser beam. The effect of increased carbon content on weldability will be discussed more in detail, as well as the risk of cracking

  • 33.
    Ganvir, Ashish
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Joshi, Shrikant
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Vilemova, Monika
    IPP.
    Pala, Zdenek
    IPP.
    Influence of Microstructure on Thermal Properties of Axial Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings2016In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, Vol. 25, no 1-2, p. 202-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suspension plasma spraying is a relatively new thermal spaying technique to produce advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and enables production of coatings with a variety of structures—highly dense, highly porous, segmented, or columnar. This work investigates suspension plasma-sprayed TBCs produced using axial injection with different process parameters. The influence of coating microstructure on thermal properties was of specific interest. Tests carried out included microstructural analysis, phase analysis, determination of porosity, and pore size distribution, as well as thermal diffusivity/conductivity measurements. Results showed that axial suspension plasma spraying process makes it possible to produce various columnar-type coatings under different processing conditions. Significant influence of microstructural features on thermal properties of the coatings was noted. In particular, the process parameter-dependent microstructural attributes, such as porosity, column density, and crystallite size, were shown to govern the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the coating.

  • 34.
    Ganvir, Ashish
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Vilemova, Monika
    IPP Prague, Czech Republic.
    Pala, Zdenek
    IPP Prague, Czech Republic.
    Influence of Microstructure on Thermal Properties of Columnar Axial Suspension Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings2015In: Proceedings of the International Thermal Spray Conference: International Thermal Spray Conference and Exposition, ITSC 2015; Long Beach; United States; 11 May 2015 through 14 May 2015 / [ed] A. McDonald, A. Agarwal, G. Bolelli, A. Concustell, Y.-C. Lau, F.-L. Toma, E. Turunen, C. Widener, ASM International, 2015, p. 498-505Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suspension Plasma Spraying is a relatively new thermal spraying technique to produce advanced thermal barrier coatings. This technique enables the production of a variety of structures from highly dense, highly porous, segmented or columnar coatings. In this work a comparative study is performed on six different suspension plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings which were produced using axial injection and different process parameters. The influence of coating morphology and porosity on thermal properties was of specific interest. Tests carried out include microstructural analysis with SEM, phase analysis using XRD, porosity calculation using Archimedes experimental setup, pore distribution analysis using mercury infiltration technique and thermal diffusivity/conductivity measurements using laser flash analysis. The results showed that columnar and cauliflower type coatings were produced by axial suspension plasma spraying process. Better performance coatings were produced with relatively higher overall energy input given during spraying. Coatings with higher energy input, lower thickness and wider range of submicron and nanometer sized pores distribution showed lower thermal diffusivity and hence lower thermal conductivity. Also, in-situ heat treatment did not show dramatic increase in thermal properties.

  • 35.
    Ganvir, Ashish
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Vassen, Robert
    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-1, Jülich, Germany.
    Tailoring columnar microstructure of axial suspension plasma sprayed TBCs for superior thermal shock performance2018In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 144, p. 192-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the thermal shock behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) produced by axial suspension plasma spraying (ASPS). TBCs with different columnar microstructures were subjected to cyclic thermal shock testing in a burner rig. Failure analysis of these TBCs revealed a clear relationship between lifetime and porosity. However, tailoring the microstructure of these TBCs for enhanced durability is challenging due to their inherently wide pore size distribution (ranging from few nanometers up to few tens of micrometers). This study reveals that pores with different length scales play varying roles in influencing TBC durability. Fracture toughness shows a strong correlation with the lifetime of various ASPS TBCs and is found to be the prominent life determining factor. Based on the results, an understanding-based design philosophy for tailoring of the columnar microstructure of ASPS TBCs for enhanced durability under cyclic thermal shock loading is proposed. © 2018 The Authors

  • 36.
    Goel, Sneha
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Ahlfors, Magnus
    Quintus Technologies AB, Västerås, Sweden.
    Bahbou, Fouzi
    ARCAM AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Effect of Different Post-treatments on the Microstructure of EBM-Built Alloy 7182018In: Journal of materials engineering and performance (Print), ISSN 1059-9495, E-ISSN 1544-1024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electron beam melting (EBM) of Alloy 718 is of rapidly growing interest as it allows cost-effective production of complex components. However, the inherent flaws in the component in as-built state are of concern in view of the severe working conditions in which Alloy 718 components typically operate. The present work entails an investigation of changes in microstructure that accompany some post-treatments that are being widely considered to address defects in EBM processed Alloy 718. The effect of two different post-treatments, namely hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and a combined HIP + heat treatment (HT) carried out inside the HIP vessel, have been studied and results from as-built and post-treated specimens were compared in terms of porosity/lack-of-fusion, microstructure, phase constitution (NbC content, ÎŽ-phase) and micro-hardness. Post-treatment resulted in reduction in defect content by more than an order of magnitude. HIPing led to complete dissolution of ÎŽ phase. In comparison to as-built material, HIPed specimens exhibited significant drop in hardness. However, a sharp ‘recovery’ of hardness to yield values higher than in as-built condition was observed after HIP + HT and can be attributed to precipitation of γ′′ phase. © 2018, The Author(s).

  • 37.
    Guerin, Elie
    et al.
    National School of Engineers, University of Limoges, Limoges, France.
    Sadeghimeresht, Esmaeil
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Role of Chemistry on Corrosion Behavior of Various Ni-based HVAF-Sprayed Coatings in Simulated Boiler Environments2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Vaßen, Robert
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Design of Next Generation Thermal Barrier Coatings- Experiments and Modelling2013In: Surface and Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, Vol. 220, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems have been used in the gas turbine industry since the 1980's. The future needs of both the air and land based turbine industry involve higher operating temperatures with longer lifetime on the component so as to increase power and efficiency of gas turbines. The aim of this study was to meet these future needs by further development of zirconia coatings. The intention was to design a coating system which could be implemented in industry within the next three years. Different morphologies of ceramic topcoat were evaluated; using dual layer systems and polymers to generate porosity. Dysprosia stabilised zirconia was also included in this study as a topcoat material along with the state-of-the-art yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ). High purity powders were selected in this work. Microstructure was assessed with scanning electron microscope and an in-house developed image analysis routine was used to characterise porosity content. Evaluations were carried out using the laser flash technique to measure thermal conductivity. Lifetime was assessed using thermo-cyclic fatigue testing. Finite element analysis was utilised to evaluate thermal-mechanical material behaviour and to design the morphology of the coating with the help of an artificial coating morphology generator through establishment of relationships between microstructure, thermal conductivity and stiffness. It was shown that the combined empirical and numerical approach is an effective tool for developing high performance coatings. The results show that large globular pores and connected cracks inherited within the coating microstructure result in a coating with best performance. A low thermal conductivity coating with twice the lifetime compared to the industrial standard today was fabricated in this work.

  • 39.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Dwivedi, Gopal
    Stony Brook University, USA.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Environment Production Technology West.
    Vackel, Andrew
    Stony Brook University, USA.
    Sampath, Sanjay
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    An Experimental Study of Microstructure: Property Relationships in Thermal Barrier Coatings2013In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 659-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermal-mechanical properties of thermal barrier coatings are highly influenced by the defects present in coating microstructure. The aim of this study was to meet the future needs of the gas turbine industry by further development of zirconia coatings through the assessment of microstructure-property relationships. A design of experiments was conducted for this purpose with current, spray distance, and powder feed rate as the varied parameters. Microstructure was assessed with SEM and image analysis was used to characterize porosity content. Evaluations were carried out using laser flash technique to measure thermal properties. A bi-layer beam curvature technique in conjunction with controlled thermal cycling was used to assess the mechanical properties, in particular their nonlinear elastic response. Coating lifetime was evaluated by thermo-cyclic fatigue testing. Relationships between microstructure and coating properties are discussed. Dense vertically cracked microstructure and highly porous microstructure with large globular pores were also fabricated. Correlations between parameters obtained from nonlinear measurements and lifetime based on a priori established microstructural analysis were attempted in an effort to develop and identify a simplified strategy to assess coating durability following sustained long-term exposure to high temperature thermal cycling.

  • 40.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Kumara, Chamara
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Bilayer Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Thermal Cyclic Lifetime: Experiments and Modeling2017In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 1038-1051Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) has been shown as a promising process to produce porous columnar strain tolerant coatings for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines. However, the highly porous structure is vulnerable to crack propagation, especially near the topcoat-bondcoat interface where high stresses are generated due to thermal cycling. A topcoat layer with high toughness near the topcoat-bondcoat interface could be beneficial to enhance thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs. In this work, a bilayer coating system consisting of first a dense layer near the topcoat-bondcoat interface followed by a porous columnar layer was fabricated by SPS using Yttria-stabilised zirconia suspension. The objective of this work was to investigate if the bilayer topcoat architecture could enhance the thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs through experiments and to understand the effect of the column gaps/vertical cracks and the dense layer on the generated stresses in the TBC during thermal cyclic loading through finite element modeling. The experimental results show that the bilayer TBC had significantly higher lifetime than the single-layer TBC. The modeling results show that the dense layer and vertical cracks are beneficial as they reduce the thermally induced stresses which thus increase the lifetime.

  • 41.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Design of Low Thermal Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings by Finite Element Modelling2011In: Surface Modification Technologies XXIV: SMT24, Dresden, September 7-9, 2010 / [ed] T. S. Sudarshan, Eckhard Beyer, and Lutz-Michael Berger, 2011, p. 353-365Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fundamental understanding of relationships between coating microstructure and thermal conductivity is important to be able to understand the influence of coating defects, such as delaminations and pores, on heat insulation in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Object Oriented Finite element analysis (OOF) has recently been shown as an effective tool for evaluating thermo-mechanical material behaviour as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent material microstructure as an input to the model. The objective of this work was to evaluate a procedure where this technique is combined with Tbctool, a plasma-sprayed TBC like morphology generator, thus enabling development of low thermal conductivity coatings by simulation. Input parameters for Tbctool were computed from SEM images of sprayed microstructures using the image analysis software, Aphelion. Microstructures for as-sprayed as well as heat treated samples were evaluated. The thermal conductivities of the artificially generated microstructures were determined using OOF. Verification of the modelling procedure was performed by comparing predicted values by OOF with corresponding measured values using the laser flash technique. The results, although tentative in nature, indicate that the proposed simulation approach can be a powerful tool in the development of new low conductivity coatings.

  • 42.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Structure-property Relationships in Thermal Barrier Coatings by Finite Element Modelling2012In: Surface Modification Technologies XXV : proceedings of the Twenty Fifth International Conference on Surface Modification Technologies: SMT25, Trollhättan, June 20-22, 2011 / [ed] T. S. Sudarshan, and P. Nylén, [Chennai]: Valardocs , 2012, p. 175-184Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermal and mechanical properties of Thermal Barrier Coating systems (TBCs) are strongly influenced by coating defects, such as delaminations and pores, thus making it essential to have a fundamental understanding of microstructure-property relationships in TBCs, to produce a desired coating. Object-Oriented Finite element analysis (OOF) has been shown previously as an effective tool for evaluating thermal and mechanical material behaviour, as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent material microstructure as an input to the model. In this work, OOF was used to predict the thermal conductivity and effective Young’s modulus of TBC topcoats. A Design of Experiments (DoE) was conducted by varying selected spray parameters for spraying Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (YPSZ) topcoat. Characterisation of the coatings included microstructure, porosity and crack content and thermal conductivity measurements. The relationships between microstructural features, thermal conductivity and Young’s modulus are discussed.

  • 43. Holmstrand, T
    et al.
    Mrdjanov, N.
    Barsoum, Z.
    Åstrand, Erik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Fatigue life assessment of improved joints welded with alternative welding techniques2014In: Engineering Failure Analysis, ISSN 1350-6307, E-ISSN 1873-1961, Vol. 42, no July, p. 10-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the fatigue life improvement by adopting the toe weaving technique on nonload carrying cruciform welded joints has been investigated. Fatigue testing was conducted on two batches of specimens welded using double-pass manual welding. One batch had a straight second pass and the other was weaved. The influence of different weaving shape parameters was analyzed by performing crack growth analyses. The fatigue testing shows a slightly improved fatigue life for the two different batches compared to as-welded joints; the improvement is similar for both batches. The crack growth analysis concludes that the batch with the straight second pass should provide slightly higher fatigue life compared to the toe weaved batch. Measurements show a presence of undercuts in the vicinity of the crack initiation site. Nonetheless, an increased fatigue life is obtained, due to the low flank angle created during welding of the second pass, which reduces the stress concentration in the weld toe, prolonging the fatigue life.

  • 44.
    Jafari, R.
    et al.
    Tarbiat Modares University, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tehran, 14115, Iran.
    Sadeghimeresht, Esmaeil
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Shahrabi Farahani, T.
    Tarbiat Modares University, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tehran, 14115, Iran.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    KCI-induced corrosion behavior of HVAF-sprayed Ni-based coatings in ambient air2017In: Proceedings of the International Thermal Spray Conference, ASM International, 2017, Vol. 2, p. 946-950Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that the presence of KCl deposited on superheater tubes in biomass- and waste-fired boilers leads to a severe corrosion and premature damage. In order to protect such critical components which are routinely exposed to aggressive environments, thermal spray coatings are frequently proposed as a potential solution. By virtue of the techno-commercial benefits that provides as a direct outcome of its ability to cost-effectively deposit coatings virtually free of porosity and in situ formed oxides, the high velocity air-fuel (HVAF) process offers a particularly attractive approach. In the present work, the influence of KCl on the oxidation behavior of four HVAF-sprayed Ni-based coatings (Ni21Cr, Ni5AI, Ni21Cr7AI1Y, and Ni21Cr9Mo) has been investigated. The coatings were deposited onto specimens of 16Mo3 steel, a widely used boiler tube material. High temeparture corrosion tests were carried out in ambient air at 600°C, with 0.1 mg/cm2 KCl being sprayed onto the samples prior to the exposure. Uncoated substrates and an identical test environment without KCl were used as reference. SEM/EDS and XRD techniques were utilized to characterize the as-sprayed and exposed samples. The results showed that the small addition of KCl significantly accelerated damage to the coatings. It was further revealed that the alumina-forming NiAl coating was capable of forming a more protective oxide scale compared to other chromia and mixed-oxide scale forming coatings. In general, the oxidation resistance of the coatings based on the kinetic studies had the following ranking (from the best to the worst): NiAl >NiCr> NiCrAlY> NiCrMo. © Copyright 2017 by DVS Media GmbH. All rights reserved.

  • 45.
    Jasim, Mohammed
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Failure analysis of suspension plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are proven to protect the hot section of components operated under elevated temperature. Suspension Plasma Spray (SPS) is an emerging manufacturing process that is used to produce TBCsI, It has the ability to deposit a thinner TBC that has finer microstructure than coatings deposited using traditional Atmospheric Plasma Spray (APS). The coating spray parameters have a significant role in developing the coating properties and thereby the coatings failure. In this thesis work, the parameters such as the spray distance, the feed rate, and the surface velocity were varied to deposit six sets of TBC samples. The as-sprayed samples were analysed and next tested at different temperatures (1000°C, 1050°C and 1100°C) making thermal cyclic fatigue test (TCF) and thermal shock test also known as Burner Rig Test (BRT). These investigations aimed at trying to find an explanation for the effect of each varied process parameter on the deposited TBC. However the cases at 1100°C were not reliable enough to conclude.

    It was found that most porous coating was produced in Run 1. The porosity decreased gradually from Run 1 to the last run (Run 6) by changing the spray parameters. The failure in all cases was mainly due to the Thermally Grown Oxide (TGO) which causes cracking near the topcoat-bond coat interface. According to many cross sectional and top surface morphology SEM images taken during this work, the sintering of TBCs during thermal cycling also played a significant role in the top coat failure.

  • 46.
    Johansson, Anders
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Global Industrial Development, Scania CV AB, Södertälje.
    Money talks while volume and value should run the show: An evaluation of financial parameters for decision making duringmanufacturing system acquisition2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Market economic values have for the last decades been given an increasing role with the establishment of financial institutes and global organisations with a capitalistic focus as a consequence. As a counter reaction, the concept of sustainable development has emerged complementing the economic focus with environmental and social aspects. However, there are still challenges on how to make balanced decisions based on all three view points and consequently the decision makers still primarily reside to the established tangible financial data. Within the industrial setting there is no difference. The manufacturing system design is based on multiple criteria and requirements, but commonly the final investment decision is primarily based on what can be financially justified. Longterm solutions probably lies in combining the tangible economy with the less tangible soft values that cannot be valued in monetary means. Therefore, to find this sweet spot, the purpose of this research is to in-depth investigate the world of economy, but from an engineers' point of view. A financial analysis is done to understand the economical components and how these are related to the manufacturing system. Furthermore, to connect cost with contributed value of the manufacturing system, a holistic business value chain analysis is done to ensure that less tangible aspects can be understood and utilised. The result of this research, highlights for example that sales volume has a larger impact on the manufacturing profitability, than that of the initial investment cost. Therefore, manufacturing systems should also be evaluated on the bases of how well it can meet the volatility in market demands. Another result presented is a portfolio of new graphical representation used as a support tool for investment decisions. Furthermore, to be able to invest in manufacturing systems that contribute to a more competitive company, the wider business value with manufacturing is discussed.

  • 47.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Global Industrial Development, Scania CV AB, Södertälje.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Pejryd, Lars
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University.
    Manufacturing System Design for Business Value, a Holistic Design Approach2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 50, p. 659-664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When designing and developing manufacturing systems, many aspects need to be considered. Typically, the manufacturing design objectives are specified to achieve certain operational requirements around quality, capacity, cost etc. They are also specified withthe intention to ensure efficient processes related to manufacturing, such as maintenance, logistics, not to mention the main process of manufacturing the actual part. This study proposes that a wider company perspective should be considered during manufacturing system design, to achieve a greater business value. The manufacturing system should be designed to create value to other core business processes, such as product development, marketing, sales and services. This paper also presents examples on value perspectives to consider and how this approach can be implemented.

  • 48.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Global Industrial Development, Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Nafisi, Mariam
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    The natural process mapping phenomenon: Resource oriented vs. value flow oriented2016In: The 7th International Swedish Production Symposium, SPS16, Conference Proceedings: 25th – 27th of October 2016, Lund: Swedish Production Academy , 2016, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean philosophy has created awareness and eagerness in companies to strive to continuously improve their performance and profitability. This is usually done by improving important and influential core processes since process focus gives the right quality results as well. Thus mapping processes have become more common in recent years. Creating a visual process map is the first step for understanding and improvements.Even though many companies map their processes and try to improve them, they are not always successful.This can be attributed to various reasons, an important one being the perspective from which the process is mapped. The starting point of this paper is that novice modelers naturally model processes from their own perspective, neglecting the goal or the value that the process is meant to achieve. This is demonstrated through simple workshops, at which the participants are tasked to map the “breakfast process”. It is shown in this study that different perspective in the process mapping leads to different process maps and consequently to different process improvement possibilities. Similar experiments are needed to be applied for industrial processes, such as Product Development process or Production System Development process, before the results of the paper can be generalized.

  • 49.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Global Industrial Development, Scania CV AB, Södertälje.
    Pejryd, Lars
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Consideration of market demand volatility risks, when making manufacturing system investments2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 40, p. 307-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When investing in new manufacturing systems, many aspects must be taken into consideration to ensure a sustainable business. In respect to the financial aspect, both the one-off investment cost and the continuous operational cost must be analysed to ensure that the life-cycle cost perspective is appreciated. However, one detail in the cost analyses that is often overlooked is the composition of fixed and variable cost elements. These details are important to be able to better manage the risk of market demand volatility, and accordingly make appropriateinvestment decisions. This case study demonstrates that when there is a low risk for reduced market demand, investing in a manufacturing system with low variable cost is favourable. However, if there is a high risk for reduced market demand, the importance will instead be to have a low fixed cost, as this will be the dominant cost factor.

  • 50.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Global Industrial Development, Scania CV AB, Södertälje.
    Pejryd, Lars
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Production support model to manage market demand volatility risks2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 57C, p. 664-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the investment selection process during the design of new manufacturing systems, both the technical attributes and the expected financial performance need to be evaluated. To manage the financial risks with market volatility, it is important to understand the composition of fixed and variable cost factors in relation to the expected volume interval. The support model developed in this paper will in a simple and intuitive way visualise the effect on production cost due to changes in market demands. It can also be used to evaluate the volume sensitivity of existing manufacturing systems, even compare systems making different products.

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