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  • 801.
    Zietz, Susannah
    et al.
    Duke University (USA).
    Cheng, Emily
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, (USA).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002, (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome, (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza” (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University (USA) and King Abdulaziz University (SAU).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, L.M.
    Department of Psychology, Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín 050001, (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Department of Psychology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education (ARE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Neapel, (ITA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau (MAC); Department of Humanistic Studies, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, (USA).
    Positive parenting, adolescent adjustment, and quality of adolescent diet in nine countries2022In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 94, no 8, p. 1130-1141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction We sought to understand the relation between positive parenting and adolescent diet, whether adolescents’ internalizing and externalizing behaviors mediate relations between positive parenting and adolescent diet, and whether the same associations hold for both boys and girls and across cultural groups. Methods Adolescents (N = 1334) in 12 cultural groups in nine countries were followed longitudinally from age 12 to 15. We estimated two sets of multiple group structural equation models, one by gender and one by cultural group. Results Modeling by gender, our findings suggest a direct effect of positive parenting at age 12 on a higher quality diet at age 15 for males (beta = .140; 95% CI: 0.057, 0.229), but an indirect effect of positive parenting at age 12 on a higher quality diet at age 15 by decreasing externalizing behaviors at age 14 for females (beta = .011; 95% CI: 0.002, 0.029). Modeling by cultural group, we found no significant direct effect of positive parenting at age 12 on the quality of adolescent diet at age 15. There was a significant negative effect of positive parenting at age 12 on internalizing (beta = -.065; 95% CI: -0.119, -0.009) and externalizing at age 14 (beta = -.033; 95% CI: -0.086, -0.018). Conclusions We founder gender differences in the relations among positive parenting, adolescents’ externalizing and internalizing behaviors, and adolescent diet. Our findings indicate that quality of parenting is important not only in promoting adolescent mental health but potentially also in promoting the quality of adolescents’ diet.

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  • 802.
    Zietz, Susannah
    et al.
    Duke University (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, (ÜSA).
    Liu, Qin
    Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Global Health Research Center, Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan 215300, (CHN).
    Oburu, P. O.
    Maseno University, (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma "LA Sapienza" (ITA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skinner, A.T.
    Duke University, (USA).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, L.M.
    Department of Psychology, Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín 050001, (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, S.
    Department of Psychology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education (ARE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Neapel, (ITA).
    Bornstein, M.H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD 20810, (USA), UNICEF, New York, NY 10001, (USA), Institute for Fiscal Studies, London WC2R 2PP, (GBR).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau (MAC).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002, (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome, (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Household income loss, parental depression, and adolescent internalizing/externalizing behavior: A longitudinal study in seven countries.2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large body of previous research using the family stress model has examined relations among economic pressure, parental psychological distress, and child psychosocial development. However, the impact of income loss changes in the broader macro-economic cultural context in which families are situated. For example, in countries with more generous social safety nets or where helping extended family members is more normative, income loss may be less predictive of parent and child psychosocial outcomes. This study examined the longitudinal links among the adverse event of severe household income loss, parental depression, and adolescent internalizing and externalizing behavior. Longitudinal data from 1,082 families in 10 cultural groups in seven countries (Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Thailand, and United States) were included. The data on income were collected between 2011 and 2013, a period when Italy was in recession and many of the other countries had just started recovering from a period or multiple periods of recession. Across all countries, when the child was 12 years old (referencing a 12 month period somewhere between 2011 and 2013), 14% of families had experienced a decrease in their household annual income by more than 25% (ranging from 4% of families in Colombia to 25% of families in Naples, Italy). A multiple-group structural equation model was conducted with 5,000 bootstrap replications. We constrained all paths to be equal across cultures and then used an iterative process of referencing modification indices to indicate whether to release a path in a specific culture. We then used chi square difference tests to assess whether the restricted model with equal paths was significantly worse than the alternative model allowing a loading to differ in one culture. The final model released an average of 4.5 paths per culture (out of a possible 27) and fit the data well (RMSEA=.040 90% CI: .016, .056; CFI/TLI=.971/.962; SRMR=.073) revealed that controlling for child gender, parental education, household income, former severe income loss, and age 12 internalizing and externalizing behavior, maternal depression (age 13) fully mediated the relation between a family experiencing severe income loss (age 12) and child internalizing behavior (age 14) in all cultures except the Philippines. However, paternal depression did not mediate this relation. There was no significant relation with any of the variables and child externalizing in any of the cultural groups. Additionally, we found in Thailand, household income (standardized within cultural group) moderated the relation between severe income loss and both maternal and paternal depression. This study largely found effects of severe income loss on maternal depression and child internalizing, regardless of the level of income before the loss, indicating that although those living in poverty may be the most vulnerable to adverse effects on child development, in 9 out of 10 cultures in the study, the effects of severe income loss on family stress did not vary as a function of household income. This finding supports policies such as Universal Basic Income and cash transfers, to potentially mitigate the effects severe income loss.

  • 803.
    Zietz, Susannah
    et al.
    Duke University (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, (USA).
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza” (ITA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University (USA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University (USA) and King Abdulaziz University (SAU).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, L.M.
    Department of Psychology, Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín 050001, (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Department of Psychology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education (ARE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Neapel, (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau (MAC).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002, (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome, (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    A longitudinal examination of the family stress model of economic hardship in seven countries2022In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 143, article id 106661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Family Stress Model of Economic Hardship (FSM) posits that economic situations create differences in psychosocial outcomes for parents and developmental outcomes for their adolescent children. However, prior studies guided by the FSM have been mostly in high-income countries and have included only mother report or have not disaggregated mother and father report. Our focal research questions were whether the indirect effect of economic hardship on adolescent mental health was mediated by economic pressure, parental depression, dysfunctional dyadic coping, and parenting, and whether these relations differed by culture and mother versus father report. We conducted multiple group serial mediation path models using longitudinal data from adolescents ages 12–15 in 2008–2012 from 1,082 families in 10 cultural groups in seven countries (Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Thailand, and the United States). Taken together, the indirect effect findings suggest partial support for the FSM in most cultural groups across study countries. We found associations among economic hardship, parental depression, parenting, and adolescent internalizing and externalizing. Findings support polices and interventions aimed at disrupting each path in the model to mitigate the effects of economic hardship on parental depression, harsh parenting, and adolescents’ externalizing and internalizing problems. © 2022 Elsevier Ltd

  • 804.
    Zöger, Sigyn
    et al.
    Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Section of Psychiatry.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Svedlund, Jan
    Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Section of Psychiatry.
    Holgers, Kajsa-Mia
    Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Section of Audiology.
    Benefits from group psychotherapy in the treatment of severe refractory tinnitus2008In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 62-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 805.
    Ängteg, Sara
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Livsnöjsamhet och förlåtelse hos den svenska befolkningen2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Life satisfaction and trait forgiveness have shown importance to the individual mental health in the field of positive psychology. Research concerning the correlation between life satisfaction and trait forgiveness have never been researched in a nationwide study on a Swedish population. 

    Material and method. The national representative SOM-enquiry from 2019 was used to study the relationship between life satisfaction and trait forgiveness. In total 3,500 individuals between the ages of 16 and 85 was selected (simple random sampling). A total of 1,514 respondents reported on every question (including the control variables). Multiple regression analysis with 5000 bootstrap iterations was used to study the correlation and control for the background variables. 

    Results. A weak positive correlation was detected between life satisfaction and trait forgiveness even after the result was controlled for gender, age, ethnic upbringing, education, and income.

    Conclusion. Trait forgiveness is potentially a health promotion that together with life satisfaction should be considered to promote the individual mental health. 

  • 806.
    Ärleskog, Caroline
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Strukturella villkor: En åldersfråga: En kritisk åldersstudie om barns strukturella villkor utifrån kommunala hemsidors information om behandling vid spelproblem2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aims to, through a critical age perspective, describe and illustrate the structural conditions of the age category of children based on the information about treatment for gambling problems provided by municipal websites. The study has a quantitative character and in order to answer the study's questions, a content analysis of municipal websites (N = 119) was conducted. 52,1% of those websites contained information on treatment for gambling problems (n = 62). The result showed a statistically significant difference in the distribution regarding information by municipal websites on treatment for gambling problems ( χ² = 9,478a , df = 2, p = ,009) and treatment methods ( χ² = 13,400a , df =2, p = ,001) between the structural age categories. Throughout, age as an organizing principle was updated, and the age category of children was directed to information about treatment for gambling problems through municipal websites to a considerably lower extent than other age categories. This brought to light an age hierarchy and from a children perspective it is possible to state that children's structural conditions were unequal. When this was consistent, it is reasonable to assume that there is systematic inequality, which raises social stratification.

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  • 807.
    Åsberg, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Klamas, Maria
    Fyrbodals kommunalförbund.
    Perspektiv på BIM, Barnahusets insatsmodell: Professionellas erfarenheter av och upplevelser i arbete med våldutsatta barn2020Report (Other academic)
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14151617 801 - 807 of 807
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