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  • 51.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sharkey, Paul M.
    University of Reading, School of Systems Engineering, Reading, United Kingdom.
    Merrick, Joav G.
    Ministry of Social Affairs Israel, Division for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Using virtual reality technologies to support everyday rehabilitation2016In: Journal of Pain Management, ISSN 1939-5914, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 197-198Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sharkey, PaulSchool of Systems Engineering, University of Reading, United Kingdom.Merrick, JoavNational Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel.
    International Journal of Journal of Child Development: Special Issue: Using technology to enhance rehabilitation and empower people with special needs2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sharkey, Paul
    University of Reading, School of Systems Engineering, United Kingdom.
    Merrick, Joav
    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Introduction: Using technology to enhance rehabilitation and empower people with special needs2015In: Technology, Rehabilitation and Empowerment of People with Special Needs, Nova Science Publishers, Inc. , 2015, p. xi-xiiiChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sharkey, PaulSchool of Systems Engineering, University of Reading, United Kingdom.Merrick, JoavNational Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Journal of Pain Management: Special issue: Using virtual reality technologies to support everyday rehabilitation2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics, Divison of Informatics. University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Snis, Ulrika L.
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics, Divison of Informatics.
    An explorative, operational method supporting usability evaluation of technology changes in work contexts2006In: Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Software Engineering, as part of the 24th IASTED International Multi-Conference on APPLIED INFORMATICS, Innsbruck, 2006, p. 276-281Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we elaborate on the process of designing usability evaluations of technology that is to be integrated into specific real work settings, and where technology is the main target for change. Our research question relates to both what to evaluate and how to evaluate, and the ambition is to support evaluation designers on a practical level. We propose an explorative, operational method for usability evaluation design, which makes the design process explicit and design decisions more tractable. The evaluation design method is illustrated by an empirical example of how to design a comparative usability evaluation study, in a health care setting. The method supports the designer on a conceptual level by describing the different levels in the evaluation design. On an operational level it supports the designers by defining transitions between levels. And, on the analytical level it provides a template for a usability matrix, which allows for an explorative approach of constructing the conceptual content as well as a structured way to define and refine usability measures. However, the method needs to be further tested in other settings.

  • 56.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics.
    Snis, Ulrika L.
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics, Divison of Informatics.
    Design strategies for enhancing experience-based activities2006In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 4161 LNCS, p. 326-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enjoyment and experience-based activities are important in today's society. The purpose of this paper is to explore and better understand how experiences can be enhanced using IS in such experience-based enterprises. The research is based on a case study conducted in collaboration with a Swedish regional museum, where a location-aware auditory museum application for experience enhancement is being designed. The results include design approach recommendations, enhancement strategies and a model for estimating the potential benefits related to enhancements features of the system design. © IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2006.

  • 57.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics, Divison of Informatics.
    Snis, Ulrika L.
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics, Divison of Informatics.
    Understanding users with reading disabilities or reduced vision: Toward a universal design of an auditory, location-aware museum guide2006In: International Journal on Disability and Human Development, ISSN 1565-012X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 147-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present ongoing work on the design of an information system for users with reading disabilities and users with reduced vision. The design target is a portable, auditory, location-aware information system, to complement visually displayed information in exhibitions. Applying a user-centered, we identify non-typical user-groups' specific requirements, which are turned into a design. The first design-iteration, which includes a formative evaluation, using a mock-up prototype, with dyslectic and visually impaired participants, is completed. The evaluation indicates that the user-group's specific aspects we have identified are relevant, while designing for these groups. Copyright © Freund Publishing House Limited.

  • 58.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Spante, Maria
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Willermark, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Challenges of Implementing Interactivity in the Classroom2014In: IRIS  Proceedings: Proceedings of the 37th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia (IRIS 37) / [ed] Ahmad Ghazawneh, Jacob Nørbjerg and Jan Pries-Heje, Ringsted, Denmark,, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization of schools has been on the agenda for decades and has resulted in new demands on teachers' skills in order to implememt technology into teaching. Despite political reforms, investments in technology and continuing professional development (CPD) initiatives for teachers, research often shows slow changes and unequal implementation. This paper addresses the challenges teachers are facing when participating in a 2-year CPD project using a highly interactive technology in classroom settings. The study is based on 18 in-depth interviwes and 6 video recalled observation sessions. The results show how the actual classroom situation is being very intense for the teacher in their everyday work. We conclude that for teachers to transform their teaching practices using highly interactive ICT-based learning is associated with several challenges related to planning and execution, for the part of the teachers, at the same time as it can be beneficial for student learning.

  • 59.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Svensson, LarsUniversity West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.Lundin, JohanGothenburg University, Applied Information Technology.Lundh Snis, UlrikaUniversity West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Proceedings of IRIS39, Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, Ljungskile, August 7-10, 20162016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Vejbæk, Leif
    University College Sjælland , Denmark.
    Wølner, Tor Arne
    Høgskolen i Buskerud og Vestfold , Norge.
    GNU matematik: aktiviteter och resultat2015Report (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Willermark, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Can teachers’ fragmented work situation jeopardize professional development of future teaching practices?2014In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), 2014, p. 464-469Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitization of schools has been on the political agenda for decades, but despite all reforms, technology investments and professional development initiatives, the goals are not yet reached. We have examined how teachers? perceive their working situation in order to explore if the conditions are suitable for learning and novel teaching practices. 18 interviews with Swedish primary school teachers were conducted and transcribed, from which 330 excerpts were extracted and divided in two characterizing categories: fragmentation reflecting working rhythm and density reflecting working tempo. The working condition had char-acteristics known to cause stress and less wellbeing, which counteracts teachers? sensitiveness to adapt to novelties and a reflective practice. This may jeopardize future professional development and thus digitalization of schools.

  • 62.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Willermark, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Educational technology in teaching: What do teachers perceive they need in order to develop their professional competence?2013In: Proceedings IRIS 36: August 11-14 2013 at Gran, Norway University of Oslo, department of informatics / [ed] Tone Bratteteig, Margunn Aanestad & Espen Skorve, Oslo, 2013, p. 1-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This paper addresses the challenge of how to reach an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) competent teaching faculty in the Swedish compulsory school. Continuing professional development (CPD) can be a means to reach ICT-competence among teachers. In order to achieve successful CPD it is important to understand what teachers’ perceive they need in their professional development, which is examined in this paper. The study was performed in order to get a better understanding of the challenges associated with achieving ICT-competence. 17 teachers have been interviewed to investigate how they perceive needs regarding professional development and how they want these needs to be met. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed by learning theories suitable for professional practices. Teachers’ expressed needs were interpreted as well aligned with CPD methods advocated in research literature, but less aligned with previous CPD initiatives. Their expressed needs were highly divergent, depending on individual competence, motivation and learning preferences. Previous ICT initiatives may therefore have been too uniform to be effective.

  • 63.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Willermark, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Prata och göra matematik tillsammans med digital teknik2016In: Kollaborativ undervisning i digital skolmiljö / [ed] Sylvana Sofkova Hashemi & Maria Spante, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, p. 21-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Willermark, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    TPACK in situ: A Design-based Approach Supporting Professional Development in Practice2019In: Journal of educational computing research (Print), ISSN 0735-6331, E-ISSN 1541-4140, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 1186-1226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological pedagogical and content knowledge (TPACK) is a well-known conceptual framework for what knowledge teachers need in order to teach successfully using technology. Most recent TPACK studies address assessment of teacher TPACK by quantitative self-reporting surveys. Such an approach provides little guidance for teachers in how to develop their everyday teaching practice. We argue for a revival of the original TPACK design-based approach and propose a design-based, operationalization of the framework that is situated in action, context specific, and integrated in practical teaching. The approach has been developed, evaluated, and validated in a school development project in a Nordic Elementary School context using design-based research. The project engaged more than 100 professionals: in-service elementary teachers, school administrators and researchers, and more than 1,000 students during 3 years. The theoretical development evolved from rich descriptions of 38 didactic design as delimited units of teaching including planning, implementation, and evaluation of specified learning tasks acted out in practice. Contributions include framing teaching practice as design activity and a TPACK in situ model and methods targeting reflective practitioners. Our proposed approach addresses current limitations of TPACK and is aligned with advocated professional development methods.

  • 65.
    Rangraz, Masood
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Robotics and quality: A sociomaterial analysis of assembly line2019In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, ISSN 1613-0073, E-ISSN 1613-0073, Vol. 2398, p. 123-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automation of manufacturing industry has been on agenda for nearly five decades now. Today, the affordability and efficiency of automated solutions make them increasingly relevant to Small and Medium-size Enterprises (SMEs). Their continued survival depends on the quality of the end product and as much as any SME might intend to increase its business potential, it can’t afford to lose quality by the time it turns to automated solutions. Here, we focus on an assembly line soon to leave its manual processes to automation. It is a case from a manufacturing plant, and we ask what happens to quality once the automation solutions are in place? Exploiting the five notions of Sociomateriality, we explore the changes in the socio-technical configurations of the workplace each of which, we discuss, are consequential for quality. We show while quality is an ultimate business goal for any SME; it is first and foremost a practical problem at the shop-floor. We discuss how quality originates from socio material configurations and distinguish the process-quality from product-quality while attending to working-life quality. We address the challenge of translating the quality which once was in hands, tools, and the relationship among them, to the quality of exact calculations of automated solutions. ©Copyright held by the author(s).

  • 66.
    Silvervarg, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University Cognitive Sciences.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Haake, Magnus
    Lund University Design Sciences.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Gulz, Agneta
    Lund University Cognitive Sciences.
    An Educational Math Game with a Teachable Agent and a Social Chat2011In: Artificial Intelligence in Education, Springer, 2011, p. 626-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an educational math game, including a teachable agent and a social chat, that trains basic arithmetic skills with a focus on grounding base-ten concepts in spatial representations. It employs a board-game design with a variety of different sub-games, game modes and levels of difficulty. When a student has learnt to play one of the sub-games, she may teach it to her Teachable Agent (TA). In the observation mode the TA “watches” the student play and picks up on game rules and on the student’s responses to multiple-choice questions, such as “Why did you choose this card?” Proper (or improper) choices of cards and answers promote corresponding skills in the TA throughout the game. In the try-and-be-guided mode, the agent is allowed to propose cards. The student either accepts the agent’s suggestion or rejects it and exchanges the agent’s card for another one. Again the agent asks for the reasons for the student’s behaviour, using the multiple-choice format. In other words, the basic game with the TA contains a form of on-task conversation between agent and student. But the game architecture also has been extended with a chat where the student can engage in conversation with the TA, writing freely by means of the keyboard and bring up basically any topic in a chat-like manner. We refer to this as off-task conversation and distinguish within it between on-domain conversation and off-domain conversation, the former referring to chat conversation related to school, math, the math game, etc., and the latter to any other topic. One reason to include off-task conversation is to enrich the game and its motivational qualities for the age group in question (12-14 year olds). Another is to be able to explore whether such a conversational module can enable pedagogical interventions, such as supporting pupils math self efficacy and change negative attitudes toward math in general. Notably the on-task and off-task conversations have very different formats, but are still designed as two interrelated and complementary activities. A recent study [1] indicates that the added off-task conversation module can i) improve students’ game experience, ii) improve learning outcomes, and iii) engage learners in voluntary on-domain chat.

  • 67.
    Sjödén, Björn
    et al.
    Lund University Cognitive Sciences.
    Tärning, Betty
    Lund University Cognitive Sciences.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Gulz, Agneta
    Lund University Cognitive Sciences.
    Transferring Teaching to Testing: An Unexplored Aspect of Teachable Agents2011In: Artificial Intelligence in Education / [ed] Gautam Biswas, Susan Bull, Judy Kay and Antonija Mitrovic, Springer, 2011, p. 337-344Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined whether socio-motivational effects from working with a Teachable Agent (TA) might transfer from the formative learning phase to a summative test situation. Forty-nine students (9-10 years old) performed a digital pretest of math skills, then played a TA-based educational math game in school over a period of eight weeks. Thereafter, the students were divided into two groups, matched according to their pretest scores, and randomly assigned one of two posttest conditions: either with the TA present, or without the TA. Results showed that low-performers on the pretest improved significantly more on the posttest than did high-performers, but only when tested with the TA. We reason that low-performers might be more susceptible to a supportive social context – as provided by their TA – for performing well in a test situation.

  • 68.
    Svanberg, Pia
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Lundh-Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Incentives for Participation in Organised Business Networks2009In: Proceedings of the 32nd Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, IRIS 32: Inclusive Design / [ed] Molka-Danielsen, J., Molde University College , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much research shows several implications that business collaboration and knowledge exchange takes place across several inter-organisational network constellations. As organisational boundaries become inter-connected into networks of people and resources there is a need to consider the value and effects of such non-traditional networking businesses. This paper portrays how business managers perceive the role of an organised business network and what values cross-company business networking generate. 16 in-depth interviews form the foundations of this preliminary findings. The research question is: Which are the incentives for participation in business networks? The aim is to better understand incentives and values for participation in order to design and manage the business network organisation more effectively. Our argument is that the specifics of incentives and preconceptions of business networking have big impact on how valuable the actual effects of such network participation are. From this study we also discuss implications of how the network can facilitate and coordinate for increased business opportunities.

  • 69.
    Svensson, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Bernheim, Bo-Göran
    Volvo Aero.
    Lundin, Johan
    Gothenburg university.
    Lundh-Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Supporting Competent Acting in the new Workplace2008In: Proceedings of E-Learn2008: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education / [ed] Curtis J. Bonk, Mimi Miyoung Lee & Tom Reynolds, Las Vegas, 2008, p. 3934-3941Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Svensson, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Lundin, Johan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Lundh-Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Vad gör dom duktiga duktiga?: Att artikulera kompetens i informationssystem och samtal2009In: Samhälle, teknik och lärande / [ed] Thomas Karlsohn, Stockholm: Carlsson , 2009, p. 104-121Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Willermark, Sara
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Challenges of Achieving ICT Competent Teachers through Continuing Professional Development: Teachers' perspectives2013In: Proceedings IRIS36: August 11-14 2013 at Gran, Norway, University of Oslo, department of informatics / [ed] Tone Bratteteig, Margunn Aanestad & Espen Skorve, Oslo: Akademika forlag, 2013, no 4, p. 103-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the problem of how to reach an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) competent teaching faculty in Swedish compulsory school.  Continuing professional development (CPD) is often used as a mean to increase competence in general among teachers, and is used for ICT initiatives as well. However, numerous studies have shown that previous ICT initiatives have not achieved sustainable change in teaching practices to the extend desired by policymakers. This study addresses the problem by investigating how such change initiatives can affect teachers in their every-day work. Therefore, we explore challenges and experiences, as perceived by teachers, related to CPD as a mean to achieve ICT competence into their profession. 17 teachers have been interviewed. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed by learning theories suitable for professional practices. Teachers’ expressed needs were well aligned with CPD methods advocated in research literature, but less aligned with previous CPD initiatives. Their expressed needs were diverse, reflecting their individual competence, length of teaching experience, personal motivation and learning preferences. 

  • 72.
    Willermark, Sara
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Progression in Practice: Development of TPACK in didactical designs2015In: Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2015 / [ed] D. Slykhuis & G. Marks, Chesapeake, VA:, 2015, p. 79-86Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report results from a three-year School Development Project in which digital technology supports cross-border collaboration and innovative models for teaching in virtual classrooms are designed. The study involved 22 teachers and 600 students in elementary school. The development and implementation of didactical designs were examined by using the TPACK model as an analytic lens. An in-depth analysis of 14 didactical designs, i.e., pre-planned sequences of lessons with specified learning objectives, in mathematics were conducted. We show how the TPACK model can be used to identify progression in practice, when didactical designs are studied in detail. We have been able to track progression in the didactical designs, where the TPACK components are becoming more integrated and balanced over time. We have seen examples of organizational development, in which teacher teams together with researchers built a productive community of practice around developing TPACK-based competence.

  • 73.
    Willermark, Sara
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sofkova Hashemi, Sylvana
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Didactical designs in use: exploring technological, pedagogical and content knowledge2016In: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Designs for Learning / [ed] Nortvig, A-M., Sørensen, B. H., Misfeldt, M., Ørngreen, R., Allsopp, B. B., Henningsen, B., & Hautopp, H., Aalborg: Aalborg Universitetsforlag, 2016, p. 253-268Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we operationalize the Technological Pedagogical And Content Knowledge (TPACK) model as an analytic lens to trace progression in teaching practice. We explore teacher development by studying didactical designs. Didactical design refers to the design of teaching sequences within a particular subject, and includes a pre-planned sequence of lessons, with a detailed teaching plan of how to implement the task in the classrooms. We report from a three-year school development project which involved 48 teachers and over 1000 students in elementary school. An in-depth analysis of 14 didactical designs in the subject of mathematics respectively 13 didactical designs in mother tongue was conducted. The analysis was based on classroom observations, video recordings, chat logs, online forums, interviews and participation in teachers'daily work. Our position is that our approach can serve as an effective way to categorize, analyzeand evaluate didactical designs

  • 74.
    Willermark, Sara
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sørensen, Carsten
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics. The London School of Economics and Political Science.
    Expansive Learning in Transforming Teaching PracticesIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
12 51 - 74 of 74
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