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  • 51.
    Hassler, Sven
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Kullgren, Carina
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Winroth, Jan
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Herrman, Margaretha
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Wallin, Mona
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Health promotive perspectives on sustainability: A review of the theoretical and conceptual premises for processes of organizational development and change2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Haugan, Gørill
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and NursingNTNU Norwegian University of Science and TechnologyTrondheim (NOR).
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    An Introduction to the Health Promotion Perspective in the Health Care Services2021In: Health Promotion in Health Care: Vital Theories and Research / [ed] Haugan, Gørill; Eriksson, Monica, Springer International Publishing , 2021, p. 3-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, the world faces a shift to an older population. For the first time in the history, now most people can expect to live into their 60s and beyond. Within this trend of people living longer, many grow very old; 80, 90 and 100 years. Today, 125 million people are 80 years or older; the proportion of ≥80 years increases the most. Age is not an illness, still most chronically ill are older people. Consequently, all countries in the world face major challenges to ensure that their health and social systems are ready to make the most of this demographic shift. Globally, finding new and effective ways to improve people’s health is crucial. Thus, in the years to come, health promotive initiatives will become ever more important. Accordingly, learning how to reorient the health care sector in a health promotion direction is highly needed. The salutogenic approach seems useful for such a reorientation.

  • 53.
    Haugan, Gørill
    et al.
    NTNU Department of public health and nursing, Faculty of medicine and health, (NOR).
    Eriksson, MonicaUniversity West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Health Promotion in Health Care: Vital Theories and Research2021Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Herrman, Margaretha
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    Johansson Bunting, Leona
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Wallin, Emmie
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Mammor som kulturtolkar: En förstudie om invandrarkvinnors möten med skola i Västra Götaland2013Report (Other academic)
  • 55. Idan, Orly
    et al.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences.
    Al-Yagon, Michal
    The salutogenic model: The role of generalized resistance resources2016In: The Handbook of Salutogenesis / [ed] Maurice B. Mittelmark, Shifra Sagy, Monica Eriksson, Georg F. Bauer, Jürgen M. Pelikan, Bengt Lindström, Geir Arild Espnes, New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2016, p. 57-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Koelen, Maria
    et al.
    Wageningen University, Wageningen (NLD).
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Older People,: Sense of Coherence and Community2022In: The Handbook of Salutogenesis / [ed] Maurice B. Mittelmark, Georg F. Bauer, Lenneke Vaandrager, Jürgen M. Pelikan, Shifra Sagy, Monica Eriksson, Bengt Lindström &Claudia Meier Magistretti, Cham: Springer, 2022, 2., p. 185-199Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, the authors consider the meanings of the concepts of healthy ageing, ageing well, salutogenic ageing and reciprocity between the sense of coherence (SOC) and ageing processes. They discuss how the community can provide resources to strengthen older adults’ SOC, perceived well-being and quality of life. Quoting ‘It’s not how old we are; it’s how we are old’, the authors illuminate critical differences in understanding healthy ageing by professionals, researchers and older people themselves.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 57.
    Koelen, Maria
    et al.
    Wageningen University, Department of Social Sciences, Health and Society Group, Wageningen, Netherland.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences.
    Cattan, Mima
    Northumbria University, Department of Health and Life Sciences, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
    Older people, sense of coherence and community2016In: The Handbook of Salutogenesis / [ed] Mittelmark, M. B. et al., New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2016, p. 137-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Population ageing is a global trend and even though years added to life often are lived in good health; it will have an impact on healthcare, housing and facilities, and social security costs. Healthy ageing in place, especially in one's own home and community, increasingly receives attention from health professionals, researchers, and policymakers. In this chapter, we first discuss the meaning of the concept of healthy ageing, and how Sense of Coherence contributes to this process. Next, we discuss the characteristics of the community in which older people live their lives and how the community can provide resources (GRR and SRR) to strengthen Sense of Coherence and hence perceived well-being and quality of life. © The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2017.

  • 58. Lindström, Bengt
    et al.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Contextualising the Salutogenesis and Antonovsky in Public Health Development2006In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 238-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More than 20 years have passed since the American-Israeli medical sociologist Aaron Antonovsky introduced his salutogenic theory ‘sense of coherence’ as a global orientation to view the world, claiming that the way people view their life has a positive influence on their health. Sense of coherence explains why people in stressful situations stay well and even are able to improve their health. The origin of salutogenesis derives from the interviews of Israeli women with experiences from the concentration camps of the Second World War who in spite of this stayed healthy. Sixty years after the Holocaust this paper aim to shed light on the salutogenic theory in the context of public health and health promotion. In addition, other approaches with salutogenic elements for the explanation of health are considered. A potential direction for public health of the early 21st century is proposed. The historical paradox is to honour the victims of the Holocaust and see the birth of post-modern public health and the salutogenic framework through the experience of its survivors in the ashes of Modernity.

  • 59. Lindström, Bengt
    et al.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences.
    Grundlagen der Salutogenese: Von der Anatomie der Gesundheit zur Architektur des Lebens - Salutugene Wege der Gesundheitsförderung2019In: Salutogenese kennen und verstehen: Konzept, Stellenwert, Forschung und praktische Anwendung / [ed] Meier Magistretti, Claudia, Bern: Hogrefe , 2019, p. 25-107Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Salutogenese ist die Wissenschaft von den Bedingungen, die Gesundheit ermöglichen, aufrechterhalten und wiederherstellen. Im Unterschied zur Pathogenese, die sich mit Ursachen von Krankheit beschäftigt, fokussiert Salutogenese die Ursachen von Gesundheit. Als Teilgebiet der Gesundheitswissenschaften gründet Salutogenese auf einer empirisch validierten Theorie von Aaron Antonovsky und verfügt über eine mittlerweile 40-jährige weltweite Forschungstradition. Mit der globalen Arbeitsgruppe zur Salutogenese innerhalb der internationalen Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsförderung (IUHPE) hat sich das Wissensgebiet zu einem Schwerpunkt in Public Health entwickelt.In diesem Werk wird die Komplexität des vorhandenen Wissens zur Salutogenese in kurzen, gut illustrierten Kapiteln dargestellt, die für verschiedene Anspruchsgruppen anschlussfähig sind und einen kompakten Überblick zu den relevanten Themen Gesundheitspolitik, Lebensqualität, Gesundheitserziehung oder psychische Gesundheit geben. Eine kurze Einführung zu den Thesen des Begründers der Salutgenese, Aaron Antonovsky, sowie ein abschließendes Kapitel zum aktuellen deutsche Forschungsstand runden das Werk ab.

  • 60.
    Lindström, Bengt
    et al.
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    Guía del autoestopista salutogénico: camino salutogénico hacia la promoción de la salud2011Book (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Lindström, Bengt
    et al.
    NTNU, Trondheims universitet.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Haikerens guide til salutogenese: Helsefremmende arbeid i et salutogent perspektiv2015 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Lindström, Bengt
    et al.
    Trondheims universitet.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    La salutogenèse: petit guide pour promouvoir la santé2012Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [fr]

    Au milieu des années 1970, un chercheur dans le domaine du stress, Aaron Antonovsky, a eu une intuition révolutionnaire dans l’univers des sciences de la santé : et si l’on tentait de comprendre ce qui génère la santé, la « salutogenèse », plutôt que de se concentrer essentiellement sur ce qui produit la maladie, la « pathogenèse », comme on le faisait depuis des siècles ? Ce livre permet, pour la première fois en langue française, de comprendre les possibilités et les limites de la salutogenèse, non seulement en tant que théorie, mais aussi en tant qu'orientation générale pour aborder les enjeux de santé du xxie siècle. À ce titre, il intéressa au premier chef les chercheurs et les praticiens des diverses disciplines du domaine de la santé et des services sociaux.

  • 63.
    Lindström, Bengt
    et al.
    Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Professor Aaron Antonovsky (1923-1994) - the father of the Salutogenesis2005In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 511-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 64. Lindström, Bengt
    et al.
    Eriksson, Monica
    Folkhälsans forskningscentrum, Helsingfors, Finland.
    Salutogeneesin teoria nostaa hyvän elämän voimavarat esiin2008In: Suomen Lääkärilehti, ISSN 0039-5560, no 6, p. 517-519Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Lindström, Bengt
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Center for Health Promotion Research, Trondheim, Norway..
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Salutogenesi: Una guida per promuovere la salute2018 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Lindström, Bengt
    et al.
    Folkhälsan Research Center.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    The Hitchhiker's Guide to Salutogenesis: Salutogenic pathways to health promotion2010Book (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Lindström, Bengt
    et al.
    Folkhälsan Research Centre, Helsinki, Finland.
    Eriksson, Monica
    Folkhälsans forskningscentrum, Helsingfors, Finland.
    The salutogenic approach to the making of HiAP/Healthy Public Policy: illustrated by a case study2009In: Global Health Promotion, ISSN 1757-9759, E-ISSN 1757-9767, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 17-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty years have passed since the central document of health promotion, the Ottawa Charter, was constituted. Health was seen as the process enabling individuals and communities to increase control over their determinants of health, thereby improving their health and enabling an active and productive life, that is, a good quality of life. One main strategy was the making of a healthy public policy. At the same time Aaron Antonovsky developed the salutogenic theory and its core concepts the sense of coherence and the generalized resistance resources. This paper integrates Antonovsky's salutogenic theory and a salutogenicmodel of quality of life into the core principles of theOttawa Charter and exemplifies how to make healthy public policy the salutogenic way. A process-oriented coherent health promotion research model integrating an ecological, a salutogenic and a resilient approach is shown. The objective of this theoretical model is to bring together the whole spectrum of risk factors, protective factors and promotion factors in one model. Further, individual, group and society level are considered. Themodel suggested aims to contribute to the creation of sense of coherence. This is exemplified in practice in a case study of a Nation, that is, on a national level. The case study of the "Nation" is partly masked. The principles behind these processes are explained in detail while the case study of the "Nation" only includes parts of the process explaining some core issues. The overall aim of this paper is to stimulate health promotion activities along the lines presented and invite the readers to comment and continue the discussion.

  • 68. Lindström, Bengt
    et al.
    Mittelmark, M.
    University of Bergen.
    Sagy, S.
    Ben Gurion University of the Negev.
    Espnes, G.
    NTNU.
    Cattan, M.
    Northumbria University.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Vaandrager, L.
    Wageningen University.
    Bruun Jensen, B.
    STENO HP Center.
    Bauer, G.
    Zurich University.
    Ziglio, E.
    WHO Europe.
    Laverack, G.
    WHO-INT.
    The effectiveness of the salutogenic approach to health promotion according to the Ottawa Charter principles and action areas.2011In: International Conference on Assets for Health and Wellbeing across the Life Course, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since health promotion was launched in 1986 through the Ottawa Charter it has suffered from the lack of a good theoretical foundation. However, it has now been demonstrated that the original salutogenic theory (The Sense of Coherence Theory of Antonovsky) matches the principles of the Ottawa Charter (OC). The evidence of a global systematic review on SOC proves that people and systems that have developed a strong SOC have a positive health outcome regarding the OC action areas. In 2007 IUHPE established a Global Working Group on Salutogenesis (GWG-SAL). In December 2010 10 research centers formed a core group for the GWG-SAL. These centers represent different profiles related to salutogenesis such as pollicy development, reorientation of health services, settings approaches such as workplace health, community action, health behaviours and learning for health, NCD interventions, development of research methods and indicators, contemporary evidence base and systematic reviews, the life-course approach, mental health, quality of life, population health and specific target groups such as youth and elderly... The proposed subkeynote/workshop or symposium proposes to coherently address these aspects where representatives of the Core Group speak to the core aspects of the above issues and discuss further research and interventions regarding the salutogenic approach to health and health promotion.

  • 69.
    Magnusson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Barnkonventionen på samhällsagendan?: En studie om förekomst av konventionen i svensk tryckt press och på webb.2019In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 585-593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sverige ratificerade FN:s konvention om barns rättigheter, barnkonventionen, 1990. Juni 2018 beslutade riksdagen att göra barnkonventionen till svensk lag. Barnkonventionen har således varit en del av svenska samhället under trettio år. Huruvida människor känner till detta kan hänga samman med i vilken utsträckning svenska medier uppmärksammat barnkonventionen och dess eventuella status som svensk lag. En utgångspunkt är mediers roll i samhället. Det handlar om att ge information, granska makt, visa på olika uppfattningar och skapa underlag för debatt och beslut. I studien undersöks om barnkonventionen omnämns i svenska medier, ifall det nämns med koppling till lag och ifall det sker förändringar över tid.

  • 70.
    Maurice, B. Mittelmark
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Bergen (NOR).
    Bauer, F. GeorgUniversity of Zürich Zürich (CHE).Vaandrager, LennekeWageningen University and Research, Wageningen (NLD).Pelikan, Jürgen M.University of Vienna, Austrian National Public Health Institute, Vienna ( AUT).Sagy, ShifraBen-Gurion University of the NegevBe’er Sheva (ISR).Eriksson, MonicaUniversity West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.Lindström, BengtNorwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (NOR).Meier Magistretti, ClaudiaLucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Lucerne (CHE).
    The Handbook of Salutogenesis2022Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Revised and updated from the first edition are background and historical chapters that trace the development of the salutogenic model of health and flesh out the central concepts, most notably generalized resistance resources and the sense of coherence that differentiate salutogenesis from pathogenesis. From there, experts describe a range of real-world applications within and outside health contexts. Many new chapters emphasize intervention research findings. Readers will find numerous practical examples of how to implement salutogenesis to enhance the health and well-being of families, infants and young children, adolescents, unemployed young people, pre-retirement adults, and older people. A dedicated section addresses how salutogenesis helps tackle vulnerability, with chapters on at-risk children, migrants, prisoners, emergency workers, and disaster-stricken communities.  Wide-ranging coverage includes new topics beyond health, like intergroup conflict, politics and policy-making, and architecture.  The book also focuses on applying salutogenesis in birth and neonatal care clinics, hospitals and primary care, schools and universities, workplaces, and towns and cities. A special section focuses on developments in salutogenesis methods and theory.

  • 71.
    Mittelmark, Maurice
    et al.
    HEMIL Senter, NO.
    Aspnes, Geir A
    Health Promotion and Resouces, NTNU, NO.
    Bruun Jensen, Bjarne
    STENO HP Research Center, DK.
    Cattan, Mima
    Folkhalsan,FI.
    Eriksson, Monika
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Lindström, Bengt
    Folkhälsan, FI.
    Salutogenesis as a system approach to health promotion2011In: Health promotion at the system level: How does the nordic welfare model cope with today's challenges?, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An ongoing systematic analysis of the global evidence on the overall impact and effectiveness of a salutogenic approach to health promotion proves that people and systems that develop the ability to implement a salutogenic approch strenghening the Sense of Coherence, will create systems where people not only live longer but perceive they are in good health, enjoy a better quality of life and mental wellbeing. In addition, they can withstand stress better than the average and are inclined to more constructive health behaviours. Even if they become acutely ill or develop a chronic disease such as an NCD they will manage better than the average. Overall the approach responds positively as a system to the acation areas and policies of the Ottawa Charter.

    Reference: The Hitchhikers Guide to Salutogenesis, Folkhälsan Research Report 2, 2010 The IUHPE Global Working Group on Salutogenesis formed a core group of 10 research centers in December 2010. Here the Nordic Representatives covering 4 Nordic Countries will speak to the issue healthy public policy implications, mental health and quality of life, health behaviours, chronic disease (NCDs), healthy learning and empowerment, community action. Further describing how the contemporary evidence is collected, documented and analyzed.

    Authors: Prof. Maurice Mittelmark, HEMIL Senter, NO, Prof. Geir A. Espnes, NTNU, NO, Prof. Bjarne Bruune Jensen, STENO Center, DK, Prof. Mima Cattan, Folkhälsan, FI, Dr Monica Eriksson, University West, Sweden, Prof. Bengt Lindström, Folkhälsan, FI.

  • 72.
    Mittelmark, Maurice B.
    et al.
    Department of Health Promotion and Development, Faculty of PsychologyUniversity of Bergen, Bergen (NOR).
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Sagy, Shifra
    Martin Springer Center for Conflict StudiesBen-Gurion University of the NegevBe’er Sheva (ISR).
    Pelikan, Jürgen M.
    WHO-Collaborating Centre for Health Promotion in Hospitals and Healthcare at the Austrian National Public Health Institute (Gesundheit Österreich GmbH)Vienna (AUT).
    Vaandrager, Lenneke
    Department of Social Sciences, Health and SocietyWageningen University and Research,Wageningen (NLD).
    Meier Magistretti, Claudia
    Centre for Health Promotion and ParticipationLucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Lucerne (CHE).
    Lindström, Bengt
    NTNU Center for Health Promotion ResearchNorwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (NOR).
    Bauer, Georg F.
    Center of Salutogenesis, Division of Public and Organizational Health, Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention InstituteUniversity of Zürich, Zürich (CHE).
    Salutogenesis for Thriving Societies2022In: The Handbook of Salutogenesis / [ed] Mittelmark, Maurice B.; Bauer, Georg F.; Vaandrager, Lenneke; Pelikan, Jürgen M.; Sagy, Shifra; Eriksson, Monica; Lindström, Bengt; Meier Magistretti, Claudia, Springer, 2022, p. 635-638Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is this handbook’s ‘grand finale’, addressing the potential of salutogenesis to nurture thriving societies. The handbook’s editors reflect on the advancement of salutogenesis concerning theory development, applying the salutogenic model in community settings and helping society tackle crises such as COVID-19.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Springer
  • 73.
    Mittelmark, Maurice B.
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Department of Health Promotion and Development, Bergen, Norway.
    Sagy, ShifraBen-Gurion University of the Negev, Martin Springer Center for Conflict Studies, Department of Education, Beersheba, Israel.Eriksson, MonicaUniversity West, Department of Health Sciences.Bauer, Georg F.University of Zürich, Division of Public, Organizational Health, Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, Zürich, Switzerland.Pelikan, Jürgen M.WHO-CC Health Promotion in Hospitals and Health Care, Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Health Promotion Research, Vienna, Austria.Lindström, BengtNorwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU Center for Health Promotion and Resources, Trondheim, Norway.Espnes, Geir A.Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU Center for Health Promotion and Resources, Trondheim, Norway.
    The Handbook of Salutogenesis2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This in-depth survey of salutogenesis shows the breadth and strengths of this innovative perspective on health promotion, health care, and wellness. Background and historical chapters trace the development of the salutogenic model of health, and flesh out the central concepts, most notably generalized resistance resources and the sense of coherence, that differentiate it from pathogenesis. From there, experts describe a range of real-world applications within and outside health contexts, from positive psychology to geriatrics, from small towns to corrections facilities, and from school and workplace to professional training. Perspectives from scholars publishing in languages other than English show the global relevance of the field.

    Among the topics in the Handbook:·        

    • Emerging ideas relevant to the salutogenic model of health
    • Specific resistance resources in the salutogenic model of health
    •  The sense of coherence and its measurement
    • The application of salutogenesis in communities and neighborhoods
    • The application of salutogenesis to health development in youth with chronic conditions
    • The application of salutogenesis in mental health care settings

    The Handbook of Salutogenesis summarizes an increasingly salient field for graduate and professional students of public health, nursing, psychology, and medicine, and for their instructors. It will also appeal to health-related academicians and professionals who wish to have a thorough grounding in the topic.

  • 74.
    Mittelmark, Maurice B
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Department of Health Promotion and Development, Bergen, Norway.
    Sagy, Shifra
    Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Martin Springer Center for Conflict Studies, Department of Education, Beersheba, Israe.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Bauer, Georg F.
    University of Zürich, Division of Public, Organizational Health, Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute,Zürich, Switzerland.
    Pelikan, Jürgen M.
    WHO-CC Health Promotion in Hospitals and Health Care, Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Health Promotion Research, Vienna, Austria.
    Lindström, Bengt
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU Center for Health Promotion and Resources, Trondheim, Norway.
    Espnes, Geir Arild
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU Center for Health Promotion and Resources, Trondheim, Norway.
    Preface2016In: The Handbook of Salutogenesis / [ed] [ed] Mittelmark, M. B., Sagy, Shifra, Eriksson, Monica, Bauer, Georg F., Pelikan, Jürgen M., Lindström, Bengt, Espnes, Geir Arild, New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2016, p. vii-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Mjösund, Nina Helen
    et al.
    Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Department of Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Norheim, Irene
    Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Department of Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Keyes, Corey L.
    Emory University, Department of Sociology, 1555 Dickey Drive, Tarbutton Hall, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Espnes, Geir Arild
    orwegian University of Science and Technology, Center for Health Promotion Research, N Trondheim, Norway.
    Forbech Vinje, Hege
    Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Department of Health Promotion, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kongsberg, Norway.
    Mental Health as perceived by Persons with Mental Disorders: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis Study2015In: International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, ISSN 1462-3730, E-ISSN 2049-8543, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 215-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this interpretative phenomenological analysis study, we explored how persons with mental disorders perceive mental health. Adapting a salutogenic theoretical framework, 12 former inpatients were interviewed. The analysis revealed experiences of mental health as a movement, like walking up and down a staircase. Perceived mental health is expressed both verbally in an everyday language and through body language. Mental health is an aspect of being that is always present and which is nourished by four domains of life: the emotional; physical; social and spiritual domains. Mental health is experienced in everyday life as a sense of energy, and as more or less wellbeing. Exploring persons' meanings of mental health from a subjective perspective can extend the knowledge base that can be used in mental health promotion strategies.

  • 76.
    Mjøsund, Nina Helen
    et al.
    Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Department of Mental Health Research and Development Vestre Viken Hospital Trust. Drammen (NOR).
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Salutogenic-Oriented Mental Health Nursing: Strengthening Mental Health Among Adults with Mental Illness2021In: Health Promotion in Health Care: Vital Theories and Research / [ed] Haugan, Gørill; Eriksson, Monica (eds), Springer, 2021, p. 185-208Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on mental health promotion with a salutogenic understanding of mental health as an individual’s subjective well-being encompassing both feelings and functioning. Mental health is an ever-present aspect of life, relevant for everybody; thus, to promote mental health is a universal ambition. Our chapter is written with adults with mental illness in need of mental health nursing in mind. To understand the present and make suggestions for the future, knowledge of the past is needed. We elaborate on historical trends of nursing, nursing models, and the hospital setting to support our statement; persons with mental illness need a more complete mental health nursing care, including salutogenic mental health promotion. In the last part of the chapter, we introduce the salutogenic-oriented mental health nursing, and further showing how salutogenesis can be integrated in nursing care for persons with mental illness. As well as elaborating on the features of salutogenic-oriented mental health nursing, and briefly present the Act-Belong-Commit framework for mental health promotion as an example of salutogenesis in nursing practice.

  • 77.
    Mjøsund, Nina Helen
    et al.
    Department of Mental Health Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Espnes, Geir Arild
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU Center for Health Promotion Research, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Trondheim, Norway.
    Forbech Vinje, Hege
    University College of Southeast Norway, Department of Health, Social and Welfare Studies, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Kongsberg, Norway..
    Reorienting Norwegian mental healthcare services: Listen to patients' learning appetite2019In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 541-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reorientation of healthcare services towards more efficient health promotion interventions is an urgent matter. Despite policies and guidelines being in place, it is the least developed key action area of the Ottawa charter. User involvement, or the voice of the patient, is missing from the knowledge base of health promotion in the mental healthcare services. The aim of this study was to add experiential knowledge from former patients. We explored the lived experience of 12 former inpatients at a mental healthcare hospital. We describe what they perceive as mental health promoting efforts. A salutogenic theoretical framework and the methodology of interpretative phenomenological analysis were used. The analysis revealed an appetite for learning in order to develop an in depth understanding of their former experiences. This was motivated by a desire to master daily life despite living with an illness and to increase health and well-being. The participants perceived the learning processes within the healthcare setting as mental health promoting. This craving for a better life is compatible with health promotion. It may turn out to be an opportunity to complement the curative activity of healthcare services with health promotion educational activities.

  • 78.
    Mjøsund, Nina Helen
    et al.
    Vestre Viken Hospital Trust,Department of Mental Health Research and Development,, Drammen, Norway.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences.
    Espnes, Geir Arild
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Center for Health Promotion Research, Trondheim, Norway..
    Haaland-Øverby, Mette
    Vestre Viken Hospital Trust,Department of Mental Health Research and Development,, Drammen, Norway.
    Jensen, Sven Liang
    Vestre Viken Hospital Trust,Department of Mental Health Research and Development,, Drammen, Norway.
    Norheim, Irene
    Vestre Viken Hospital Trust,Department of Mental Health Research and Development,, Drammen, Norway.
    Kjus, Solveig
    Vestre Viken Hospital Trust,Department of Mental Health Research and Development,, Drammen, Norway.
    Portaasen, Inger-Lill
    Vestre Viken Hospital Trust,Department of Mental Health Research and Development,, Drammen, Norway.
    Forbech Vinje, Hege
    University College of Southeast Norway, Department of Health Promotion, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kongsberg, Norway..
    Service user involvement enhanced the research quality in a study using interpretative phenomenological analysis: the power of multiple perspectives2017In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 265-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:The aim of this study was to examine how service user involvement can contribute to the development of interpretative phenomenological analysis methodology and enhance research quality.BACKGROUND:Interpretative phenomenological analysis is a qualitative methodology used in nursing research internationally to understand human experiences that are essential to the participants. Service user involvement is requested in nursing research.

    DESIGN:We share experiences from 4 years of collaboration (2012-2015) on a mental health promotion project, which involved an advisory team.

    METHODS:Five research advisors either with a diagnosis or related to a person with severe mental illness constituted the team. They collaborated with the research fellow throughout the entire research process and have co-authored this article. We examined the joint process of analysing the empirical data from interviews. Our analytical discussions were audiotaped, transcribed and subsequently interpreted following the guidelines for good qualitative analysis in interpretative phenomenological analysis studies.

    RESULTS:The advisory team became 'the researcher's helping hand'. Multiple perspectives influenced the qualitative analysis, which gave more insightful interpretations of nuances, complexity, richness or ambiguity in the interviewed participants' accounts. The outcome of the service user involvement was increased breadth and depth in findings.

    CONCLUSION:Service user involvement improved the research quality in a nursing research project on mental health promotion. The interpretative element of interpretative phenomenological analysis was enhanced by the emergence of multiple perspectives in the qualitative analysis of the empirical data. We argue that service user involvement and interpretative phenomenological analysis methodology can mutually reinforce each other and strengthen qualitative methodology.

  • 79.
    Mjøsund, Nina Helen
    et al.
    Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norge.
    Espnes, Geir Arild
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Vinje, Hege Forbech
    Perceived mental health: a basis for assessing comprehensive health needs2015In: Person-oriented health promotion in a rapidly changing world: Co-production – continuity – new media & technologies : Abstractbook, Oslo, Norway: International Network of Health Promoting Hospitals and Health Services , 2015, p. 35-36Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Mjøsund, Nina Helen
    et al.
    Department of Mental Health Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Vinje Forbech, Hege
    University of South-Eastern Norway, Department of Health, Social and WelfareStudies, Faculty of Health and SocialSciences, Norway, Kongsberg, Norway.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Haaland-Øverby, Mete
    Department of Mental Health Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Jensen, Sven Liang
    Department of Mental Health Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Kjus, Solveig
    Department of Mental Health Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Norheim, Irene
    Department of Mental Health Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Portaasen, Inga-Lill
    Department of Mental Health Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Espnes, Geir Arild
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU Center for Health PromotionResearch, Trondheim, Norway.
    Salutogenic service user involvement in nursing research: A case study2018In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 74, p. 2145-2156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim was to explore the process of involving mental healthcare service users in a mental health promotion research project as research advisors and to articulate features of the collaboration which encouraged and empowered the advisors to make significant contributions to the research process and outcome.Background There is an increasing interest in evaluating aspects of service user involvement in nursing research. Few descriptions exist of features that enable meaningful service user involvement. We draw on experiences from conducting research which used the methodology interpretative phenomenological analysis to explore how persons with mental disorders perceived mental health. Apart from the participants in the project, five research advisors with service user experience were involved in the entire research process.Design We applied a case study design to explore the ongoing processes of service user involvement. Methods Documents and texts produced while conducting the project (2012-2016), as well as transcripts from multistage focus group discussions with the research advisors, were analysed.Results The level of involvement was dynamic and varied throughout the different stages of the research process. Six features: leadership, meeting structure, role clarification, being members of a team, a focus on possibilities and being seen and treated as holistic individuals, were guiding principles for a salutogenic service user involvement. These features strengthened the advisors' perception of themselves as valuable and competent contributors. Conclusion Significant contributions from research advisors were promoted by facilitating the process of involvement. A supporting structure and atmosphere were consistent with a salutogenic service user involvement.

  • 81.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Obeid, Ayman
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Hillström, Lisbeth
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Truong, Anh
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Salutary factors and hospital work environments: a qualitative descriptive study of nurses in Sweden2020In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    BMC Nursing
  • 82.
    Pérez-Wilson, Patricia
    et al.
    University of Concepcion, Health and Family Medicine Program, School of Medicine, Concepcion, Chile (CHL); University of Alicante, Public Health Research Group, Alicante, Spain (ESP).
    Marcos-Marcos, Jorge
    University of Alicante, Department of Health Psychology, Alicante, Spain (ESP).
    Morgan, Antony
    Glasgow Caledonian University in London, Yunus Centre for Social Business and Health, UK (GBR).
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Lindström, Bengt
    Nordic School of Public Health, NHV, Västra Frölunda, Sweden.
    Álvarez-Dardet, Carlos
    University of Alicante, Public Health Research Group, Alicante, Spain (ESP); Public Health and Epidemiology Biomedical Research Network (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain (ESP).
    'A synergy model of health': an integration of salutogenesis and the health assets model.2021In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 884-894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article proposes to advance the connections between salutogenic theory and assets models for health improvement. There is a need to integrate their use in public health and health promotion so that their respective potentials can be fully developed. This requires their synergies to be made more explicit so that a more coherent approach can be taken to their utilization. A mechanism is therefore needed that helps to raise awareness of them and their value as a resource together. Bronfenbrenner's bioecological theory provides one framework that can support better integration of salutogenesis with the applied nature of assets-based models. This paper proposes a new 'synergy model for health' that integrates key concepts associated with salutogenic theory-generalized and specific resistance resources (GRRs/SRRs) and generalized and specific resistance deficits and the sense of coherence (SOC). In doing so, it highlights those GRRs and SRRs which are assets that, either individually or collectively, help to develop a stronger SOC. Higher levels of SOC can then support the transformations of potential resources into available assets (that people can understand, manage and make sense of), capable of producing positive health development. The proposed 'Synergy model of health' aims to contribute to a deeper theoretical understanding of health and development through the integration of the key elements of both salutogenesis and assets models. This can facilitate a better contextualization of the ideas into public health policy and practice by making the salutogenic theory more action-oriented and the assets model more theoretical.

  • 83.
    Rajesh, Gururaghavendran
    et al.
    Manipal University, Department of Public Health Dentistry, Manipal College of Dental Science.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Pai, Keshava
    Manipal University, Department of Psychiatry, Kasturba Medical College.
    Seemanthini, S
    Manipal University, Manipal College of Dental Sciences.
    Naik, Dilip G
    Manipal University.
    Rao, Ashwini
    Manipal University, Department of Public Health Dentistry, Manipal College of Dental Science.
    The validity and reliability of the Sense of Coherence scale among Indian university students.2016In: Global Health Promotion, ISSN 1757-9759, E-ISSN 1757-9767, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 16-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The importance of Salutogenesis, with the focus of what creates health rather than what causes diseases, has been highlighted for a long time. This has been operationalized by Aaron Antonovsky as the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale. The aim of this study was to further examine the psychometric properties of the SOC-13 in India. Methods: The present study was carried out among second year degree students at three randomly chosen institutions at Mangalore University. Investigators assessed the appropriateness, relevance, comprehensiveness and understandability of the scale. Further, the scale was assessed by five subject experts. The SOC-13 was then pretested by administering them to peers, individuals and a few of the study subjects. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach’s alpha and split half reliability. Test retest reliability was assessed by administering the instrument to the same study subjects after two weeks. Confirmatory factor analysis employing varimax rotation was employed. Results: The SOC-13 revealed a Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.76. Split-half reliability and Guttman Split-half reliability were found to be 0.71 and 0.70 respectively. Test-retest reliability was found to be 0.71 (p<0.01). Factor analysis revealed a three factor solution explaining 40.53% of the variation in SOC. Conclusions: SOC-13 was found to be a reliable and valid instrument for measuring SOC in an Indian context. The present study contributes to health promotion in an Indian context, and could be useful even in other developing countries and for further research in India.

  • 84.
    Rancken Lutz, Ylva
    et al.
    Folkhälsan Research Centre, Helsinki, Finland.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    Lindström, Bengt
    Folkhälsan Research Centre, Helsinki, Finland.
    First-time parents' appropriation of online and urban health promoting social spaces.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Social support is considered to be a crucial health-enhancing facator for first-time parents. Becoming a parent is an interruption in lifestyle (life stressor) and in daily routines and practices when priority has to be given to a small child's needs. Furthermore, parents in western cities today are faced with new urbanized patterns of living, including fewer accessible social support networks, a "do-it-yourself" reality, a "reduced-place-dependency" and an inner-city life which is becoming increasingly commercialized. Parents, fathers as well as mothers, are in need of "settings" - as meeting places for both spontaneous and more planned get-togethers with friends. Aim: Explore which urban and digital social arenas first-time urban parents need and use and how they form, maintain, perceive and combine these arenas as a health-promoting settings. Focus will be on places/settings whre parents find social support and parental resources. Underlying theories: The theoretical frameworks developed by Aaron Antonovsky, Pierre Bourdieu, Alfred Schutz and Henri Lefebvre will be used. Method: A participatory and exploratory qualitative study design will be adopted and data gathered through group interviews, walk-abouts, key-informant interviews, on-line group interviews and observations. Context: Respondents recruited among Swedish-speaking parents in Finland and parents in Gothenburg, Sweden. Outcomes: This paper presents preliminary findings of the ongoing study. My plan is to publish the findings in internationel journals as a part of my doctoral thesis. The results will be useful in planning healthy living environments.

  • 85.
    Sagy, Shifra
    et al.
    Ben-Gurion University of Negev.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences.
    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna
    Ben-Gurion University of Negev.
    The Salutogenic Paradigm2015In: Positive Psychology in Practice: Promoting Human Flourishing in Work, Health Education, and Everdyday Life / [ed] Joseph, Stephen, Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Publishers , 2015, 2, p. 61-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the salutogenic theory stems from the sociology of health, it has been at the leading edge of a range of academic movements emphasizing human strengths and not just weaknesses, human capacities and not just limits, well-being and not just illness. This chapter describes and explains the essence of the salutogenic conceptual framework developed by Antonovsky and to suggest it as a possible philosophical basis for the contemporary positive psychology movement. It explores the consequences of the dominance of the pathogenic paradigm in thinking, research, and intervention. The chapter also discusses the consequences of adopting a salutogenic paradigm. It emphasizes the basic idea of salutogenesis that the human condition is mainly chaotic. The chapter talks about Antonovsky's sense of coherence (SOC) construct, and illustrates how to measure the SOC both on the individual and collective levels.

  • 86.
    Sarit, Swapna
    et al.
    Department of Public Health Dentistry, SCB Dental College and Hospital, Cuttack, Odisha, India (IND).
    Rajesh, Gururaghavendran
    Department of Public Health Dentistry, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, Karnataka, India (IND).
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Pai, Mithun
    Department of Public Health Dentistry, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, Karnataka, India (IND).
    Impact of Sense of Coherence on Oral Health Behaviour and Perceived Stress among a Rural Population in South-India: An Exploratory Study2020In: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, ISSN 0973-709X, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Sense of Coherence (SOC) measures a person's ability to use currently existing life scenarios to overcome the associated problems and cope with life stressors to lead a healthy lifestyle, free from any disease to stay well. It is the central construct of the salutogenic theory put forth by Aaron Antonovsky. Few studies have examined its impact on Oral Health Behaviour (OHB) in adults, especially in the rural Indian context.

    Aim: To determine the impact of SOC on OHB and perceived stress among adults in rural South India.Materials and Methods: Present study was carried out among 230 adults aged 18 years and above visiting a Primary Health Centre in Ullal, Karnataka. SOC was assessed by employing the SOC-13 scale and perceived stress was assessed by using Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10). OHB was assessed by a structured, pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire. Information about socio-demographics was also collected. Correlation analysis employed Pearson's correlation coefficient and multivariate regression analysis was performed with OHB as dependant variable.

    Results: Education was significantly associated with OHB (r=0.16, p=0.01) and socio-economic status had a significant association with SOC (r=-0.13, p=0.04). OHB was significantly associated with SOC (r=0.31, p<0.001). Stress was also associated with SOC (r=-0.21, p=0.001) and OHB (r=-0.19, p=0.003). Multi-variate regression analysis revealed SOC (OR=1.02, p=0.04, CI 1.01-1.04) and PSS (OR=0.83, p<0.001, CI 0.76-0.91) as significant predictors for OHB.

    Conclusion: More favourable OHB like twice daily tooth brushing, maintaining adequate oral hygiene and no associated tobacco habits were observed among those with a stronger SOC and less perceived stress. Salutogenic model might have critical implications for OHB in rural India.

  • 87.
    Seah, Betsy
    et al.
    Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (SGP).
    Tan, Guang Rong
    Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (SGP).
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Wang, Wenru
    Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (SGP).
    Ramazanu, Sheena
    Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (SGP).
    Re-orienting healthcare for healthy living communities: A qualitative exploration of nursing students utilising the salutogenic theory for community health practice2022In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 119, article id 105545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Salutogenesis is a resource-oriented approach that focuses on health creation. With the shift in focus from healthcare to health, there is a need to develop salutogenic inquiry and capacity of future nurses to promote good health and well-being in the community.

    Objective

    This study explored nursing students' perspectives on utilising the salutogenic theory in the community for health promotion, including the scope, perceived benefits, and challenges of theory application.

    Design

    A qualitative study using framework analysis.

    Setting

    A tertiary institution in Singapore.

    Participants

    Nursing students who were taught the salutogenic theory for ‘Healthy Community Living’ module.

    Methods

    Data were gathered from four focus group discussions (n = 18) and 32 students' written assignments. They were analysed based on five components of knowledge framework.

    Results

    Four themes were identified: re-orienting healthcare for healthy living communities; ambivalent learning experiences; attracting early adopters of salutogenic paradigm; and practices for positive health development in complex systems: future directions. Findings reflected the value, versatility, and usefulness of introducing the salutogenic paradigm into the curriculum of healthcare education. Practical know-hows of applying the theory in community practice and development of health intervention were elicited.

    Conclusion

    Much work is needed to future-proof the next generation of nurses in embracing and unifying the concept of salutogenic science into the existing pathogenic-driven care model. The real challenge would be the continual support of nursing education and health system to provide salutogenic care in the community.

  • 88.
    Wennerberg, Mia M.T.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg,Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Health and culture.
    Danielson, Ella
    University of Gothenburg,Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Solveig M.
    University of Gothenburg,Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Unravelling Swedish informal caregivers' Generalized Resistance Resources2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 602-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInterlinked aspects, as demographic changes, accentuation on home-based community care, increase the amount of informal caregivers to older adults. To preserve and enhance their health are subsequently essential and a reoccurring topic on political agendas. How this may be achieved is vividly debated and mainly focused on elimination of risks and stresses associated with caregiving. Within health promotion, the salutogenic approach focusing on resources to health is recognised and this approach was used to acquire necessary knowledge to enhance caregivers' health 'the salutogenic way'.AimTo present Generalised and Specific Resistance Resources (GRRs/SRRs) described by caregivers as stemming from themselves and their carerecipients.MethodologyTo unravel caregivers' GRRs/SRRs, a theory-driven, explorative design guided by definitions of GRRs/SRRs was utilised. Data were collected through salutogenically guided interviews with 32 Swedish caregivers in one municipality. Inductively, data were analysed using content analysis to identify each caregiver's SRRs and thereafter deduction to identify the population's GRRs.FindingsThe synthesis of findings, caregivinghood, encompasses several domains of GRRs seemingly involved in caregivers' movements towards health. In the caregiver domain, 'Being someone significant in my own eyes' unites the essence of having access to GRRs stemming from oneself and 'Being "blessed" with a co-operative co-worker' that of having access to GRRs stemming from the carerecipient. This may be the core in an orientation to life which creates positive life experiences, since it enables caregivers to find a 'fit' between the possible and desired when resolving challenges.Conclusion and implicationsHealth-promoting initiatives should be conducted as partnerships between formal and informal sources due to the versatility of GRRs. It also seems essential to empower both parties so that they may make sense of their situation and use their available GRRs/SRRs in this 'joint venture' of managing. Thereby, their motivation to continue the journey through Caregivinghood may be enhanced.

  • 89.
    Wennerberg, Mia M.T.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Lundgren, Solveig M.
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Danielson, Ella
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Unravelling Swedish informal caregivers' Generalized Resistance Deficits2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 186-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In salutogenic theory, individual/contextual, immaterial/material characteristics enabling movements towards health are labelled Specific and Generalised Resistance Resources, SRRs/GRRs, and characteristics counteracting such movements Specific and Generalised Resistance Deficits, SRDs/GRDs. The aim of this paper was to present SRDs and GRDs described by caregivers as stemming from themselves and their care recipient. Guided by salutogenic theory, an explorative design was used to collect data through interviews with 32 Swedish informal caregivers. During the theory-driven analysis, SRDs were unravelled using within-case approaches. To be able to unite them as GRDs across cases, a serviceable GRD definition was developed from the existing theoretical GRR definition. In findings, SRDs are visualised in citations and GRDs described in detail. Caregivers' experiences of SRDs/GRDs are presented as themes: 'Experiencing personal deficiencies', when stemming from themselves; and 'Struggling with an uncooperative co-worker', when stemming from their care recipients. Findings indicate that if these themes dominate a caregiver's view of life, she/he seems to have reached the 'breaking point' when caregiving ends due to lack of usable SRRs/GRRs. To prolong the time until this occurs, support, making otherwise unusable SRRs/GRRs usable, is needed. When designing this type of 'salutogenic' support, it seems essential to involve the target group (e.g. caregivers, care recipients), to ascertain what their SRRs/GRRs and SRDs/GRDs may consist of. Such knowledge regarding SRRs/SRDs could be used to design individualised support, and regarding GRRs/GRDs to design generalised support at group level. This study suggests how such new knowledge regarding resistance resources and deficits could be acquired.

  • 90.
    Wennerberg, Mia M.T.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Homecare Health and Nursing, Municipality of Orust , Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Lundgren, Solveig M.
    University of Gothenburg , Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Danielson, Ella
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Nursing , Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Me and You in Caregivinghood: Dyadic resistance resources and deficits out of the informal caregiver's perspective2019In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 1041-1048Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:To present Specific and Generalized Resistance Resources (SRRs/GRRs) and Deficits (SRDs/GRDs) described by 32 informal caregivers as originating from themselves and their older adult carerecipients as dyads.METHOD:Salutogenic interviewing was used to assemble data from caregivers. A theory-driven, memo-guided and comparative analysis using within- and across- case analysis was applied to unravel resources and deficits influencing the outcomes when they managed tension associated with caregiving.FINDINGS:Living in fellowship in a well-functioning dyad unites the essence of having access to dyadic SRRs/GRRs. Such access enables dyads to use their specific dyadic tension management to resolve challenges through cooperation, derives 'positive' life-experiences and preserves dyad functioning. Struggling alone in a malfunctioning dyad indicates the presence of dyadic SRDs/GRDs counteracting such a development. If these SRDs/GRDs accumulate, the dyad become less able to resolve challenges, 'negative' life-experiences accumulates, the carerecipient's capability to cooperate decreases, caregiver's workload increases, the dyad becomes increasingly malfunctioning and moves towards the point where caregiving ends due to lack of usable SRRs/GRRs.CONCLUSIONS:Findings reveals the complex duality of caregiving and the necessity to assess all available SRRs/GRRs and SRDs/GRDs for caregiving dyads, including out of the carerecipient's perspective. Appropriate 'salutogenic' support reduces SRDs/GRDs, makes available SRRs/GRRs usable or provides alternative SRRs/GRRs, thereby dyadic tension management and dyadic functionality is preserved during this phase of life labelled Caregivinghood. The study adds new knowledge to the salutogenic framework regarding central, theoretical concepts and suggests how data for health promoting initiatives conducted the 'salutogenic way' may be acquired.

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