Change search
Refine search result
12 51 - 57 of 57
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Ajanović, Midhat
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    The Puppet-Actor in Virtual Environment: Theatrical puppetry, cinema puppetry, digital puppetry2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    My concern is animated puppetry in the digital era. Actually, this presentation is a brief depiction of a much larger "to-be-a book" project.

    Puppet comes from pupa, Latin for "small creature that portray human".

    The idea about a movable, humanlike object emerged in puppet theatre but blossomed in animated film. By using an inanimate objects as an actor puppet animators create worlds we recognize as a deeper, metaphorical truth of own world. Animators are tasked with creating expressions and emotions for their artificial figures, thus turning them into characters.

    That is why probably no other form of creating moving pictures is lavished with as much time, care and passion as stop-motion. In difference to live-action directors that direct living people, the animation director directs his or her own deepest feelings through the material, which allows practically unlimited space for individualism and creativity. By touching the models the animator leaves traces of his life on them so the feelings and spiritual state emanate from puppet-films as some sort of fantastic reportage about the dreams hidden deep in their creators.A great number of important puppet-animators such as Starewitz, Zeman, Ewald, O?Brien, Moss, Trnka, Pall, Kajer, Kawamoto, Borowczyck, Barta, Shorina, Svankmajer or Burton developed the type of iconoclastic aesthetic of the three-dimensional animation.

    But what happened with the illusion of "living" object in the modern 3D computer animation? Can we consider the three-dimensional figures created with the help of some software application as puppetry?

    I argue that digital puppetry could be seen as a new stage in the development of this form of expression whose basic characteristics largely coincide with cinema puppetry and theatrical puppetry.

    In this presentation I focus on a phenomenon sometimes called "uncanny valley",or rather a reduced emotional response, which I see as one of the main reasons for some doubts and confusion in recent discussions concerning digital animation. Absence of human touch and tactile sensation in digital pictures contributes to a form of dehumanization in 3D CGI animation because of the fact that mathematic accuracy in digitally created characters may not elicit the intended empathetic response in the viewer.

    I present three ways in which the problem is usually addressed by animators: (1) creating puppet characters that are in appearance markedly non-human or non-realistic, based on a tradition inherited from theatrical and cinema puppetry, (2) employing some documentary methods, (3) applying a kind of surreal quality to the performing puppet.

  • 52.
    Ajanović, Midhat
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Throbbing Desire: During the 70s and 80s, a feminist animation movement grew forth with the Czech creator Michaela Pavlátová as one of the central figures. This year’s animator in focus is an exuberant fountain of ideas who with humor and rich imagery portrays inequality, masturbation and unhappy marriage.2015In: Catalogue, 38th Göteborg International Film Festival, Göteborg, 2015, no 01, p. 23-28Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download (pdf)
    Throbbing Desire
  • 53.
    Ajanović, Midhat
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Titoism and the Idea of “The Third Road” as Ideological Foundation of Zagreb School for Animated Film2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geographically, and ideologically, Yugoslavia stood on the border between two confronted blocks during the Cold War, but belonged to neither. The idea of ‘the third road’ was extremely popular; people really saw their country as an alternative to imperialist West and bureaucratic East.

    Yugoslav regime was rarely criticized for lack of democracy; it was more fiercely attacked by the nationalist right wing, which sheds much light on the catastrophe that happened after Tito’s death.

    Yugoslav film makers rarely confronted the system; they were mostly its ardent propagators. The ‘third road’ idea was popular even among the creators of Yugoslav’s best films – members of the Zagreb School of Animated film. Still, satire was an important element of Zagreb films, but the satirical razor was directed towards actual global problems, racism, colonialism, pollution, hunger, poverty, fear of the A-bomb, war, etc. Criticism was present, but it did not include social criticism. Yugoslav system was not only spared of criticism, it was, indirectly but indisputably, celebrated. The idea of a small, spiteful country existing on the borderline between two gigantic and hostile worlds was interwoven in many films made in the Zagreb studio. A small freedom oasis, surrounded by pressures, terror and danger, was an all-present motif in animated anecdotes of the leading school’s masters. A small man abused by his surrounding, who, despite the troubles, kept fighting for his way of life, his independence and neutrality was a common denominator of the authors of the Zagreb school, regardless of their artistic profile and their filmic and visual expression.

    Soon after Tito’s death in 1980, the idea of the ‘third road’ turned out to be completely ‘unrealistic reality’, just like La Grande Illusion. After Gorbachov, perestroika, the fall of the Berlin wall, and the end of the cold war, the idea of the ‘third road’ and a country in between lost its initial meaning. Yugoslavia lost its international position, and moreover, dissolved in a bloody war.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 54.
    Ajanović, Midhat
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Tragajuci za kompleksnim kadrom: Roy Andersson, sadasnji i buduci klasik2010In: Sarajevske sveske/Sarajevo Notebok magazine, ISSN 1512-8539, no 29-30, p. 548-562Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Midhat Ajanovic's My Choice paints an idiosyncratic portrait of the most well-known Swedish director, Roy Andersson, and provides a translation of an inspirational program text by this controversial filmmaker.

  • 55.
    Ajanović, Midhat
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Tragajuci za vidljivim pojmom / Searching for visible concept: Pokusaj definiranja semiotike animiranog filma na primjeru opusa Nedjeljka Dragica / An attempt to define animated film semiotic on the example on Nedeljko Dragic's work.2012In: Hrvatski filmski ljetopis / Croatian Film Cronicle, ISSN 1330-7665, Vol. Sommar 2012, no 70, p. 91-118Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The text looks at semiotics in animation, a branch of semiotic which, as far as the author knows, has practically never appeared in its pure form. Such barely existing scientific discipline is here derived from the comparison with a relatively established film semiotics, considering the similarity between animated and film (photographic) moving images, the basic characteristics of which in most pert overlap. A case study was conducted on the animated films by  Croatian author Nedeljko Dragic, due to their complexity and richness of layers in terms of symbolic charge. Instead of treating the artificial movement in animation as a mimetic reflection of reality, as most of his colleagues do, Dragic takes interest in a moving concept, in a thought brought to life, in visual anthropology amd in animated documentarism, particular topical in our times. For Dragic, a viewer is an active consumer snd he perceives the act of screening as intersubjective communication, an idea that will become popular only in our postmodern times. Of course, this is not a coincidence, this is the intuition of the author who has always looked at the future with the full force of his creative energy.

    Key words: Animated film, semiotic, sign, Nedeljko Dragic, Passing Days, Diary, Tup-Tup        

  • 56.
    Ajanović, Midhat
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Usamljeni detektiv u svijetu pohlepe i lazi/Lonely detective in a world of greed and lies: Jedan pogled na  dugovječnu tradiciju tvrdo kuhanog trilera u literaturi i na filmu/One look at the long-lived tradition of hard-boiled thriller in literature and film.2016In: Hrvatski filmski ljetopis/Croatian Film Chronicle, ISSN 1330-7665, Vol. 22, no 85, p. 163-196Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is centred on the phenomenon of the specific socially critical so-called hard-boiled thriller that distinguished itself as a separate film genre in the USA already during 1920s. The reason for this should be looked for in the everyday life that provide versatile stimuli and inspiration, but first of all in hard-boiled literature that rose to stardom in this period. Another typical American genre, western, deals with the, not only geographically, but also strictly time-limited vision of American history in the years of expansion and settlement (the beginning of western coincides with the emergence of the Colt revolver and its end with the time when cars replaces horses) and in principle represents a glorification of American history and system. However, crime film has a tendency to adjust its framework to the changing historical circumstances, different and new media and is integrated in other cultures, most frequently as an eminent critique of capitalist society. Dashiell Hammett, author and screenwriter, played the most prominent role in the process of genre defining. He basically created the American-type thriller and made it an independent literary genre. Although he authored only a small number of literary works and although he has been more or less completely unrecognized by the academic and literary establishment, with is prose Hammett stimulated the development of the hard-boiled thriller and the aesthetic model on which it was based which transferred from literature to feature film and from there to other media as well, such as comic book and videogames. The model was successfully adapted to non-American environments as well in the form of original hybrids such as Scandinavian thriller for example. What Hammett inserted into crime literature, and indirectly into film and other media as well, is the perception of reality embodied through the modelling of protagonists and a complete relativisation of the line between good and evil. As a man who was all but apolitical, he contemplated society from the inside, from its darker and unembellished, but artwise much more stimulating side, formulating the hard-boiled thriller as a specific socially critical discourse.  On the one hand, this essay is constructed as an analytical overview of the development of genre, its characteristic and significance, and on the other hand as an attempt to provide arguments for the thesis on the stableness of the model, and its vitality, durability as well as pronounced presence in other media and non-American cultures. Regardless of time periods, different characteristics related to theme and style, and subgenres (crime film, gangster film, film noir, police drama, etc.), hard-boiled thriller is, just like Aristotle’s three-act structure, demonstrated as a magic formula on which a highly critical vision of the dominant modern civilisation system related to state, values and culture was based for almost an entire century.

  • 57.
    Ajanović, Midhat
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Vlado Kristls Don Quijote2011In: Maske und Kothurn, ISSN 0025-4606, E-ISSN 2305-0667, ISSN ISSN 0025-4606, no 3-4, p. 237-244Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The author studies the animated film Don Quixote (1962) by Vladimir Kristl and sees it as one of the first works of art which depicts a mechanical and dehumanized world marked by the loss of subjectivity and the violent erasure of cultural differences between people as an image of global civilization.

12 51 - 57 of 57
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf