Change search
Refine search result
12 51 - 56 of 56
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Spante, Maria
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Johansson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Jaldemark, Jimmy
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    MakerSpaces in schools: networked learning among teachers to support curriculum-driven pupil learning in programming2019In: Networked Professional Learning: Emerging and Equitable Discourses for Professional Development / [ed] Allison Littlejohn, Jimmy Jaldemark, Emmy Vrieling-Teunter, and Femke Nijland, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 223-237Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, many countries have introduced programming as contentin their national educational strategies. This study focussed on how teachers from various K-6 schools met regularly in learning groups to discuss their experiences integrating programming in MakerSpace settings, places equipped with various materials that can be used to construct things to enhance creativity and cross disciplinary collaboration. The project focussed on studying the activities in an established network in a Swedish municipality (i.e. how teachers experienced the value of network meetings and how they incorporated lessons learned from other participants in the teacher learning group [TLG]). The study addressed the following research question: What are the learning experiences of teachers in K-6 schools that participate in a top-down networked professional development project that focusses on integrating computer programming into the curriculum? A narrative written method was applied to collect data from seven teachers in the network. The results indicated that teachers found it useful to participate in a top-down networked professional development project. They experienced that participating in the TLG helped them develop their professional attitudes, knowledge and practices.

  • 52.
    Svensson, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Johansson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Thång, Per-Olof
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Guest editorial: the inaugural Swedish conference on work-integrated learning2010In: Journal of cooperative education and internship, ISSN 1933-2130, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 8-8Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The inaugural Swedish Conference on Work-Integrated learning was held at University West in Trollhättan in December of 2009.  University West has adopted work-integrated learning as their main profile, and have since 2001 been assigned with a national mission to coordinate and lead the development of pedagogical models for work-integrated learning by the Swedish Ministry of Education.  The conference attracted 35 contributions of which three papers were selected for the special issue.  In addition the two keynote speakers, Kristen Betts and Lars-Owe Dahlgren, of the conference were invited to contribute

  • 53.
    Vega Matuszczyk, Josefa
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Johansson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Schüler, Martin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    The student learning context during a pandemic2020In: VILÄR: 3–4 December 2020 University West,Trollhättan. Abstracts / [ed] Kristina Johansson, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2020, p. 28-30Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the midst of a semester the COVID-19 pandemic forced many universities to abruptly reorganize courses from being taught on campus to completely being imparted online. Therefore, the present study seeks to explore how students perceived the impact of COVID-19 on psychological well-being, stress, and satisfaction with their studies in a Swedish university. Participants were 560 university students in West Sweden attending courses during the spring semester of 2020.

    The study is part of a larger study involving eight different countries, including Sweden, with the objective to examine the impact of COVID-19 on university student’s well-being. Although this abstract only cover a small part of the collected data, the Swedish participants. The same questionnaire was sent to all fellow countries. In June 2020, 14571 students at a Swedish university received an e-mail including information about the study, an invitation to participate, and a link to the questionnaire. In total, 560 students chose to take part in the study. They were women (318) and men (242), mean age 29. 24 years (18-78) attending courses at undergraduate - (87.60%) and graduate levels. Most participants studied fulltime (87.60%), resided at home(71.60%) and stated they were following Governments recommendations about protection from COVID-19 (79.33%). The questionnaire was written in English, was administered with Qualtrics XM software, and took approximately 20 minutes to complete. The questionnaire included measures of Concerns about COVID-19, Perceived Stress, Well-being, Satisfaction with university information, University Support for Online Learning, having Sufficient Technical Requirements, Social Identification, and Satisfaction with studies. Cronbach’s alfa for the different scales ranged from .70 to .93. Spearman correlation analysis showed that satisfaction with studies was significantly related to all other measures. High concerns about Corona (-.096), low University support for Online Learning (-.638), low Satisfaction with University Information (-.549), low Social Identification (-.469), low Well-Being (-.494), High Stress (-.349), and insufficient Technical Preconditions (-.275) affected satisfaction with studies negatively. Mean comparisons with t-test showed significant differences between males and females. Males reported higher satisfaction with studies but significantly lower well-being, less satisfaction with university support for online learning and university information. The differences between males and females, although statistically significant, mean differences were small to moderate (.023-.044).It is concluded that University contributions to the change from campus- to online studies are significant factors affecting student’s well-being and satisfaction with studies. Furthermore, the role of Social Identification in students Well-being and Satisfaction with studies should be further investigated. The planes for the future is to write a comparative study in the European project.

  • 54.
    Vervoort, Inge
    et al.
    Thomas More Geel, Belgium.
    Dekelver, Jan
    Thomas More Geel, Belgium.
    Johansson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Niemi, Mariella
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Shabalina, O.
    Volgograd State Technical University Volgograd, Russia.
    The development and implementation of an educational model for Community Service Engineering: Work Integrated Learning and international interaction2016In: Engineering 4 Society 2016 Raising awareness for the societal role of engineering. Leuven, Belgium 15 - 16 September 2016: Proceedings, Leuven, 2016, p. 79-85Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the educational model four partner countries have developed in the context of Community Service Engineering (CSE). CSE is a project co-funded by the European Commission within the Lifelong Learning Programme 2013-2016.All participating institutions start from real-life project work with technology students (EQF level 6 or 7). All partners underpin this project work with a taught programme and the mentoring of the students. All students create an online portfolio in which they illustrate both the process and the final result of their project. (International) interaction is stimulated in the project based course work in various stages and for various reasons. International interaction is also facilitated via the taught programme to touch hot topics and compare between country contexts.The paper sums up the four building blocks which form the educational model and are the stepping-stones to move forward the real-life project work and allow for (international) interaction with students and other stakeholders. In the next paragraphs the paper identifies the prerequisites,process and outcomes that made collaboration for Community Service Engineering possible on the level of institutions, teachers/professors and students. Here we also touch the importance of networking with partners in the field in the various countries. The CSE curriculum also offers new opportunities and perspectives for them. In the last two paragraphs the paper pays detailed attention to the role of the teacher/professor and the future plans partners have for the CSE curriculum. Here the concept of ally partners will be explained and a call to join the consortium will be launched.

  • 55.
    Wren, J.
    et al.
    Linkoping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Renner, J.
    Linkoping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Gardhagen, R.
    Linkoping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Johansson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Learning more with demonstration based education2009In: International Journal of Engineering Education, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 374-380Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Zegwaard, Karsten E.
    et al.
    University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand.
    Johansson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kay, Judie
    RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    McRae, Norah
    University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada.
    Ferns, Sonia
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Hoskyn, Katharine
    Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Professional Development Needs of the International Work-Integrated Learning Community2019In: International Journal of Work-Integrated Learning, ISSN 2538-1032, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 201-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many governments are expecting higher education institutions to make strong links between the educationalofferings and employability while many employers are demanding graduates with prior workplace or community engagement before entering the workplace. As higher education institutions respond to these challenges, workintegrated learning (WIL) is increasingly seen as a powerful educational approach in developing and empowering work-ready graduates, with many institutions expanding their WIL offerings. With the expansion of WIL, however, comes the need for more staffing to resource the activity. The type of staff vary from practitioners (placement coordinators, field practitioners), teaching staff, researchers, and curricular designers, all of whom require a relevant skills set and knowledge. However, to date, professional development opportunities directly related to WIL have been limited, with most opportunities offered by some national associations providing webinars and workshops. Furthermore, little work has been undertaken to determine the actual professional development needs of WIL staff. Presented here are the findings of an online, international survey of 668 WIL practitioners which explores their perceived professional development needs.

12 51 - 56 of 56
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf