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  • 51.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Uddevalla Symposium 2016: Geography, Open Innovation,Diversity and Entrepreneurship. Revised papers presented at the 19th Uddevalla Symposium, 30 June- 2 July, 2016, London, UK2016Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Uddevalla Symposium 2017: Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Industrial Dynamics in Internationalized Regional Economies: Revised papers first presented at the 20th Uddevalla Symposium 15-17 June, 2017, Trollhättan, Sweden2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Uddevalla Symposium 2018: Diversity, Innovation, Entrepreneurship – Regional, Urban, National and International Perspectives: Revised papers presented at the 21st Uddevalla Symposium, 14–16 June, 2018, Luleå, Sweden2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Uddevalla Symposium 2019: Unlocking the Potential of Regions Through Entrepreneurship and Innovation. Revised papers presented at the 22nd Uddevalla Symposium,27–29 June, 2019, L’Aquila, Italy2019Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Gråsjö, Urban
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    23 years of the Uddevalla Symposium 1998-20202020Report (Other academic)
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  • 56.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Gråsjö, Urban
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Editorial2021In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 42, no 1-2, p. 1-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Gråsjö, Urban
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Introduction: diversity, innovation and clusters: spatial perspectives2020In: Diversity, innovation and clusters: spatial perspectives / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Urban Gråsjö and Charlie Karlsson, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2020, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Gråsjö, Urban
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Introduction to Unlocking Regional Innovation and Entrepreneurship: The Potential for Increasing Capacities2021In: Unlocking Regional Innovation and Entrepreneurship: The Potential for Increasing Capacities / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Urban Gråsjö and Charlie Karsson, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2021, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 59.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Gråsjö, UrbanUniversity West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.Karlsson, CharlieJönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Unlocking Regional Innovation and Entrepreneurship: The potential for increasing capacities2021Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Gustafsson, Mariana
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hedström, Karin
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sefyrin, Johanna
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    A digital society for all?: Meanings, practices and policies for digital diversity2019In: Proceedings of the 52nd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2019, 2019, p. 3067-3076Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of digital divides has been on the agenda in research and policy making for at least the last 20 years. But it is still, a challenge to grasp this concept that is so elusive and transforming. Inclusion, access and equality are still key values for democratic governance and must be addressed in particular when forming and contributing to a digital government. This paper seeks to intervene in current debates on digital divides and digital inclusion by analyzing two cases of responses among street-level public administration in relation to e-government services in Sweden. The case studies are strategically chosen and conducted in national agencies and in local public libraries. Three lines of contributions are discussed, firstly thei mportance to care for equality secondly the need to seethe non-users, and thirdly to discuss the potential of putting focus on digital diversity.

  • 61.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Collaboration Model for Work-Integrated Learning in Higher Education 3rd Cycle2018In: INTED 2018: Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, INTED , 2018, p. 5509-5515Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities need to constantly accommodate new forms of collaboration with society. Interaction with and impacts on society and practice are of crucial importance. University West (UW) in Sweden has a profile area in work-integrated learning (WIL), which generally aims to address issues on integrating theory and practice in a coherent and sustainable way. In this paper we base our arguments on a research education (3rd cycle) in informatics with specialization in work-integrated learning. The aim with the paper is to evaluate UW’s research education and research environment from a WIL perspective. We will adopt an informing science model in order to conduct a current state analysis, in which we identify and visualize collaboration activities within and between the research education/environment and the UWs key stakeholders; society/practices, research community and PhD students. Concrete implications show how collaboration and informing flows are connected and how they can be improved. General reflections are given on the model as a useful means for quality development and assurance beyond learning outcomes, including aspects of collaboration and interaction that can be regarded as paths of societal and practical impacts.

  • 62.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Samverkansmodell för Arbetsintegrerat Lärande i Forskarutbildning: En ökad samhällsrelevans genom interaktiva flöden2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities need to constantly accommodate new forms of collaboration with society. Interaction with and impacts on society and practice are of crucial importance. University West (UW) in Sweden has a profile area in work-integrated learning (WIL), which generally aims to address issues on integrating theory and practice in a coherent and sustainable way. In this paper we base our arguments on a research education (third-cycle) in informatics with specialization in work-integrated learning. The aim with the paper is to evaluate UW’s research education and research environment from a WIL perspective. We will adopt an informing science model in order to conduct a current state analysis, in which we identify and visualize collaboration activities within and between the research education/environment and the UWs key stakeholders; society/practices, research community and PhD students. Concrete implications show how collaboration and informing flows are connected and how they can be improved. General reflections are given on the model as a useful means for quality development and assurance beyond learning outcomes, including aspects of collaboration and interaction that can be regarded as paths of societal and practical impacts.

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  • 63.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    The Old Town District: Not Just a Scenic Backdrop - Stakeholders' Perspectives in Urban Re-generation2017In: Uddevalla Symposium 2017: Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Industrial Dynamics in Internationalized Regional Economies: Revised papers first presented at the 20th Uddevalla Symposium 15-17 June, 2017, Trollhättan, Sweden / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Trollhättan: University West , 2017, p. 111-127Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper takes its point of departure from an urban place innovation study with focus on local stakeholders with particular interest in the Old Town District in a Norwegian community. The aim of this paper is to identify place innovation challenges among local community stakeholders and to discuss approaches to integrate stakeholders in urban regeneration. We have conducted qualitative interviews with 21 different stakeholders representing local entrepreneurs, non-profit organizations, the municipality, elected officials, tourism organization and residents with particular interest in the Old Town District. Additional observations and document studies were conducted. The results reveal stakeholders' views on challenges and opportunities related to how such regeneration collaboration might be conducted. The complex nature is characterized by strong cultural heritage and a mix of opinions and visions. We argue that urban regeneration requires an integrated approach based on stakeholder collaboration and engagement in order to develop the potential of an old town district into something that is more than a scenic backdrop. We discuss several implications as prerequisites for integrated collaborative approaches in place innovation (urban regeneration).

  • 64.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Torsein, Ellinor
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Arvemo, Tobias
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Conceptualizing University-Society Collaboration: A Literature Review Focusing on Drivers of Collaboration2018In: ICERI2018 Proceedings, 2018, p. 9036-9042Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration and learning are vital for development in all sectors of society and there is a constant need for new ideas, innovation and development. Crucial for dealing with contemporary complex challenges on a local, regional, national and global scale is a need for the inclusion of many perspectives and competences. However, collaboration is never friction free but challenging. A reason for this might be that there are different expectations on goals and outcomes due to that collaborating organizations bring different contexts, Inter-organisational collaborations, cultures, traditions etc. These challenges are addressed by several approaches for university-society collaboration, e.g. Work-Integrated Learning (WIL), University-Industry-Government (Triple-helix), University Community Partnership (UCP), and Public Private Academic Partnership (PPAP). These are all aiming at planning, performing, compiling and leveraging knowledge exchange and co-creating sustainable results. What is less developed is what genuine impact such results do have on society, i.e. societal impacts. Thus, there is a need for gaining more knowledge in research about what key mechanisms that constitutes successful collaboration between academia and various public and private organizations in research projects.This conceptual paper explores the underlying concepts of principles that are used as guidelines for successful university-society collaboration. It draws on a literature review of key concepts selected from established frameworks and models that are current in the field of university-society collaboration, e.g. co-creation, trust, relationship building. The aim of the paper is to gain deeper insights in the complex dynamics of research collaboration by combining previous models with current research literature and suggest implications for both model development as well as principles of conduct when societal impact are to be ensured in university-society collaboration. Hence, the research questions to be addressed in this paper are: What are the key concepts that underlie the dynamics of university-society collaboration in the research literature? How can successful university-society collaboration be conceptualized in order to facilitate co-creation and societal impact?

  • 65.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Norström, Livia
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Gråsjö, Urban
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Degree of Digitalization and Citizen Satisfaction: A Study of the Role of Local e-Government in Sweden2018In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 16, p. 59-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate whether there is a relationship between degree of e-government in Swedish municipalities and perceived satisfaction among citizens generally. This is a large-scale quantitative study based on validand reliable Swedish national surveys. Based on these surveys, a new comprehensive index for measuring "degree of digitalization" was constructed. Citizen satisfaction was measured using established indices covering three dimensions:satisfaction with living in the municipality, satisfaction with performance of government activities (delivered services), and satisfaction with transparency and influence. The results show that there is a relationship between the degree of digitalization in a municipality and the perceived satisfaction among its citizens. The degree of digitalization is related to all three dimensions of citizen satisfaction. Additionally, this study indicates that the strength of this relationship is in parity with or even stronger than the relationship between citizen satisfaction and other crucial factors such as educational level and median income

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  • 66.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Olsson, Anna KarinUniversity West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    A Nordic Perspective on Co‐Operation for Sustainable Destination and Regional Development2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research report contributes to a Nordic perspective on co-operation for sustainable destination- and regional development based on studies conducted within a Swedish-Danish Interreg project 2012-2014 (MARIFUS). An introduction chapter with major themes initiates this report followed by five chapters1 written by researchers from Aalborg University, Denmark (Incevida) and University West, Sweden (School of Business, Economics and IT). The purpose of this report is to give deeper nsights in Nordic destination and regional development by empirical case studies. These studies have been presented and discussed at seminars during international scientific conferences within regional science (the 16th Uddevalla Symposium 2013 in Kansas City, USA and the 17th Uddevalla Symposium 2014 in Uddevalla, Sweden) organized by University West. The contributions are nterdisciplinary in that sense that they are written by scholars from different scientific disciplines such as business administration, informatics, planning and culture studies. However, all scholars have a destination and/or regional perspective as a point of departure in the case studies conducted. The three-year project offered great opportunities to cross-border learning and applied research in close co-operation (Work integrated learning) with project partners and students.The studies are partly supported by the project MARIFUS “Maritime Inlands – past, present and future strengths” financed by the European Union Regional Development Fund (Interreg IV A). The editors express sincere gratitude to all authors and all partners of the MARIFUS project. 

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  • 67.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Industrial PhD Education: Exploring Doctoral Students Acting in the Intersection of Academia and Work-Life2022In: Proceedings of the Informing Science and Information Technology Education Conference,  InSite 2022,: Informing Science and Information Technology Education Conference, Online July 6-7, 2022 / [ed] Jones, Michael, Informing Science Institute , 2022, p. 1-16Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim/Purpose:

    The aim is to explore the benefits and challenges of industrial PhD education through the perspectives of industrial PhD students who are acting in the intersection of academia and work-life by applying a work-integrated learning (WIL) approach to highlight issues that academy and industry need to consider.

    Background:

    Industrial PhD education is a vital part of collaboration between academia and society although still an under-researched field. This paper reveals the perspectives of the industrial PhD students who are at the same time involved in both academia and industry, with the same academic demands as traditionally enrolled academic PhD students combined with demands and expectations from their industrial employers.

    Methodology:

    Qualitative methods were applied and 19 semi-structured interviews with industrial PhD students were conducted. The empirical context is a Swedish university profiling work-integrated learning offering PhD programs for industrial PhD students from both the private and public sectors.

    Contribution:

    This explorative study contributes to advance the current knowledge of third cycle education to deepen the insights into benefits and challenges in industrial PhD education through the perspectives of industrial PhD students acting in the intersection of academia and work-life. By applying a WIL approach on third-cycle education, issues that academy and industry need to consider for successful collaboration within doctoral education are identified.

    Findings:

    Findings indicate that industrial PhD students acting in the intersection of academia and work-life are developing practical and transferable skills requested by employers outside academia, hence increasing societal impact. Findings show that industrial PhD education generates several WIL benefits. Novel challenges identified include unclear financial agreements, conflicts of interest, administrative bureaucracy, work promotion opportunities, and lack of be-longing and identity, hence not exploiting the full potential of WIL. This has been further intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic with restricted travel and dependence solely on virtual connections.

    Recommendations for Practitioners:

    It is vital to recognize that challenges do exist and need to be considered to strengthen industrial PhD education as well as collaboration between academia and society. Increased communication and continuous interactions between academia and industry during the entire industrial PhD education are needed.

    Recommendations for Researchers: Future studies of WIL in industrial PhD education are encouraged.

    Impact of society

    This study contributes insights into PhD education transforming along with societal needs based on successful university-society collaboration.

    Future Research:

    Further research is encouraged to deepen and broaden the industry perspective of industrial PhD education.

  • 68.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Network collaboration for local and regional development the case of Swedish women entrepreneurs2020In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 539-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore women entrepreneurs participation in networks with focus on local community collaboration. In recent years interest in the importance of women entrepreneurship worldwide has increased, especially from the viewpoint of local and regional development. Previous studies show that local competitors coordinated in networks can gain cross sector knowledge sharing and boost the attractiveness of a region. Using case study methodology with 14 qualitative semi-structured in-depth interviews in two phases with business counselors and women entrepreneurs, participatory observations and document studies, this study explores women entrepreneurs in smaller cities and their collaboration in networks with particular reference to a Swedish context. Results state that women entrepreneurs are active and participate in various local community networks and that networks are viewed as valuable assets for business development. Women entrepreneurs strategically choose to join strong networks that have an impact on local community development. Challenges faced by women entrepreneurs are mainly related to the role as entrepreneur and running a business in a smaller city. However, some specific gendered challenges are lack of trust or respect from other business and public actors, especially in contact with authorities. The women entrepreneurs have mixed experiences of local community support hence the main sources for renewal processes and knowledge sharing are co-owners, staff, digital tools, networks partners, families and friends.

  • 69.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Understanding Women Entrepreneurs' Encounters with an Increasingly Digitalized Workplace2019In: Uddevalla Symposium 2019: Unlocking the Potential of Regions Through Entrepreneurship and Innovation Revised papers presented at / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Trollhättan: University West , 2019, p. 73-89Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to explore how women entrepreneurs encounter and learn to use ICT at work in response to calls for further research regarding ICT and small businesses, especially women entrepreneurs' adaptation to an increasingly digitalized workplace. Qualitative methods were applied including a total of 13 interviews in two phases with 11 women entrepreneurs, and observations of the irdigital presence. Findings indicate the benefits of digitalization of small businesses, although the women entrepreneurs also emphasize digital disadvantages such as negative online comments and reviews and digital stress. Informal learning and self development were practiced. In order to remain competitive, the women entrepreneurs were aware that they constantly have to learn new things to capture the potential and keep up the pace in digitalizing their workplaces. The importance of recruiting young digitally skilled employees was strongly highlighted.

  • 70.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    University-Industry Collaboration in Higher Education: Exploring the Informing Flows Framework in Industrial PhD Education2020In: Informing Science: The International Journal of an Emerging Transdiscipline, ISSN 1547-9684, E-ISSN 1521-4672, Vol. 3, p. 147-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim/PurposeThe aim is to explore the informing flows framework as interactions within aPhD education practicing a work-integrated learning approach in order to revealboth the perspectives of industrial PhD students and of industry.

    Background An under-researched field of university-industry collaboration is explored revealing both the perspectives of industrial PhD students and of industry.

    Methodology Qualitative methods were applied including interviews and document studies. Intotal ten semi-structured interviews in two steps were conducted. The empiricalcontext is a Swedish PhD program in informatics with a specialization in workintegrated learning.

    Contribution By broadening the concept of work-integrated learning, this paper contributesempirical results on benefits and challenges in university-industry collaborationfocusing on industrial PhD students and industry by applying the informingflows framework.

    Findings Findings expose novel insights for industry as well as academia. The industrialPhD students are key stakeholders and embody the informing flows betweenpractice and university and between practice and research. They are spanningboundaries between university and industry generating continuous opportunities for validation and testing of empirical results and models in industry. Thismay enable increased research quality and short-lag dissemination of researchresults as well as strengthened organizational legitimacy.

  • 71.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Women Entrepreneurs in Local Community Networks: Participation, Challenges and Place Development2017In: Uddevalla Symposium 2017: Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Industrial Dynamics in Internationalized Regional Economies: Revised papers first presented at the 20th Uddevalla Symposium 15-17 June, 2017, Trollhättan, Sweden / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Trollhättan: University West , 2017, p. 129-147Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore women entrepreneurs' participation in local community networks with focus on place development. In recent years interest in the importance of female entrepreneurship worldwide has increased, especially from the viewpoint of local and regional development. Previous studies show that local competitors coordinated in networks can boost the attractiveness of a place and achieve network synergies. This study is a continuation of an earlier study of Swedish municipal business counsellors' support to female entrepreneurs in tourism where findings show that there was a lack of support for women as entrepreneurs. Using a qualitative method approach with semi-structured in-depth interviews and document studies, this study explores women entrepreneurs' participation and collaboration in local community networks, challenges and local support with particular reference to a Swedish context. The study is based on interviews with 11 women entrepreneurs who were selected from three municipalities in Sweden. All respondents are active in the tourism sector and participate in local community networks. Results indicate that cross-sector networks, preferably strong networks that may have an impact on local community development, are important, especially from the perspective of a small entrepreneur. Smaller informal groups of other local entrepreneurs are also vital for inspiration and renewal processes. Furthermore, findings indicate that participating in collaboration in networks (face-to-face and digital), smaller groups or co-ownership is seen as means to develop the business as well as contributing to boost the attractiveness of a place. Challenges faced by women entrepreneurs are mainly related to the role as entrepreneur and running a business in a smaller city. However, some specific gendered challenges are lack of trust or respect from other actors, especially in contact with authorities and the dual roles in combining entrepreneurship and family. Respondents have mixed experiences of local community support. However, several women entrepreneurs stress the importance of local support, stating the importance of family and friends.

  • 72.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Work-Integrated Learning and Collaboration in Higher Education 3rd Cycle: The Case of Industrial PhD Students2020In: INTED2020 Proceedings: 14th International Technology, Education and Development ConferenceValencia, Spain. 2-4 March, 2020. / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2020, p. 2344-2353Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today universities and higher education face challenges related to collaboration with the society. Societal impacts and innovation from academia are highly valued from governments and interaction with and impacts on society and practice are of crucial importance for universities today (Gellerstedt, et al. 2018; Galan, 2018). University West in Sweden has a profile area in work-integrated learning (WIL), which generally aims to address issues on integrating theory and practice in education in a sustainable and coherent way (Olsson et al. 2019; Gellerstedt et. al. 2015). In this paper the arguments are based on a study of a PhD-education (3rd cycle) in Informatics with the specialization of work-integrated learning. at University West.

    The focus is on the collaboration between the university and industry through industrial PhD-students who are active in the university-industry interface i.e. fully employed by the industry during their PhD-education.Research on collaboration between PhD- students and industry is, according to Thune scarce. Previous research mainly focuses on the students´ learning outcomes and educational experiences (Thune, 2009) although some benefits of this kind of collaboration are recognized (Assbring and Nuur, 2017). Thus, research on interaction and informing flows between university, students, research and practice needs to be further developed ( Bernhard et al, 2018).

    In a recent study aiming at evaluating a PhD education (third-cycle) and research environment from a WIL perspective several collaboration activities were identified at key stakeholders in university as well as in the industry (Bernhard et al 2018) by adopting an informing science model in order to conduct a current state analysis. The findings implicate e.g. that flows from PhD-student and research environment towards stakeholders were generally strong, while the opposite flows were weaker. This was especially crucial for the flows originating in practice.Thus, the overall aim of this paper is to explore university-industry collaboration and identify possible aspects of societal impact of industrial PhD-student education. The research is conducted as a case study and qualitative methods will be applied.

  • 73.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Inclusive place innovation as a means for local community regeneration2020In: Diversity, innovation and clusters: spatial perspectives / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Urban Gråsjö and Charlie Karlsson, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2020, p. 57-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter contributes knowledge on the challenges of collaboration within local community regeneration in order to identify innovative approaches at work in smaller cities through case studies in Sweden and Norway. Place innovation perspectives are applied to address issues of diversity and inclusiveness in the renewal of a small city centre or district based on cultural heritage. In-depth qualitative interviews in 2016–2018, participatory observations and document studies were conducted. The results reveal stakeholders' views on challenges related to collaborative approaches for place innovation. The complex nature of the two cases is characterized by diverse perspectives, conflicts and attitudes; limited inclusion of stakeholders; lack of digital communication and information as well as face-to-face information, and indistinct place identity. Findings indicate that place innovation requires an integrated approach based on including diverse stakeholder perspectives through common communication spaces, cultivating place identity and applying a step-by-step regeneration.

  • 74.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Stakeholder Collaboration for Place Innovation: Challenges and Visions in Local Regeneration2018In: Uddevalla Symposium 2018: Diversity, Innovation, Entrepreneurship – Regional, Urban, National and International Perspectives: Revised papers presented at the 21st Uddevalla Symposium, 14–16 June, 2018, Luleå, Sweden / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Trollhättan: University West , 2018, p. 127-145Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper takes its point of departure from urban place innovation studies with focus on stakeholders' interests and involvement in developing local communities in smaller cities. The aim of the present paper is to identify place innovation challenges among local community stakeholders and to discuss approaches to involve stakeholders in local regeneration through case studies in Norway and Sweden.

    In-depth qualitative interviews have been conducted during the years 2016-2018. In total 40 different stakeholders representing local entrepreneurs, non-profit organizations, municipalities, elected officials and residents with particular interests in regeneration of the local communities have been interviewed. Additional participatory observations and document studies were conducted. The results reveal stakeholders' views on challenges and opportunities related to collaborative approaches for place innovation. The complex nature of the two cases is characterized by cultural heritage, authenticity, indistinct place identity, insufficient communication and inclusion together with a mix of nostalgia and resignation. Findings indicate that place innovation requires an integrated approach based on stakeholder collaboration and engagement in order to develop the potential of city centers.

  • 75.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    von Friedrichs, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration. Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Women Entrepreneurs' Participation in Local Tourism Networks in Sweden: a Pilot Study2016In: Uddevalla Symposium 2016: Geography, Open Innovation,Diversity and Entrepreneurship. Revised papers presented at the 19th Uddevalla Symposium, 30 June- 2 July, 2016, London, UK / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Trollhättan: University West , 2016, p. 257-267Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In tourism contexts entrepreneurship contributes to the ongoing transformation and development of places and regions. In recent decades interest in the importance of women entrepreneurship in the perspective of local and regional development has increased worldwide. The tourism industry is characterized by a high degree of women entrepreneurs in small enterprises, innovation capacity and also a high growth of benefits from networking. The aim of this study is to explore women entrepreneurs' participation in local tourism networks in Sweden. Using a qualitative method approach, this pilot study on women entrepreneurs' participation in local tourism networks explores local support and collaboration in networks with particular reference to a Swedish context. Findings indicate that there is no special focus on or support for women entrepreneurs in any of the three cases. Furthermore there is limited knowledge ofthe local distribution of male and female entrepreneurs. There are contextual characteristics of the Swedish tourism sector that may affect women entrepreneursand their participation in tourism networks.

  • 76.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    Linköping Univeristy, Linköping.
    Automation of Digital Public Services: Challenges when Working with Automated Systems and Striving for Inclusion of End-Users2019In: Uddevalla Symposium 2019: Unlocking the Potential of Regions Through Entrepreneurship and Innovation. Revised papers presented at the 22nd Uddevalla Symposium, 27–29 June, 2019, L'Aquila, Italy / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Trollhättan: University West , 2019, p. 91-105Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing use of automated systems for decision making and decision supportin public administration is forming new practices and challenging public values. Automated decision-making systems are mainly used in administrative systems but require end-users of services to submit relevant data in correct ways to make the services functional. However, not all potential or intended users of these services have the competence and capacity to use them. There is a pressing need to uncover and analyze how professional staff at public agencies respond to users' problems caused by digitalization in general and automation in particular for those who have problems using the services since there is a legal requirement to provide impartial public services. The case study presented in this paper builds on a bottom-up qualitative study including in-depth interviews and observations at two Swedish authorities, the Swedish Public Employment Agency and the Swedish Social Insurance Agency, in two Swedish municipalities. The main contribution by the case study shows how challenges that the professional staff face when they have to support everyone when the main management method is to use automated systems. The first way of addressing risk of exclusion is improved personalized support by the professional "street-level" bureaucrats, and the second is the important support also provided by other citizens and users of the services that enhances inclusion. The study indicates the importance of forming new support structures when public services are digitalized with ambitions to be more efficient.

  • 77.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Urban Planing and Development. Division of Political Science, Department of Management, Linköping University, Linköping (SWE).
    Bringing all clients into the system: Professional digital discretion to enhance inclusion when services are automated2022In: Information Polity, ISSN 1570-1255, E-ISSN 1875-8754, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 373-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing use of automated systems for decision-making and decision support in public administration is forming new practices and challenging public values since public services must be impartially accessible and designed for everyone. New robotistic process automation (RPA) systems are generally designed based on back-office structures. This requires clients to submit relevant data correctly in order for these services to function. However, not all potential or intended users of these services have the competence and the capacity to submit accurate data in the correct way. Front-line case workers at public agencies play critical roles in supporting those who have problems using the services due to the a forementioned accessibility requirements and there by work in bridging digital divides. This article analyses strategies used by front-line case workers to complement RPA and improve the inclusion of all clients in the services. It builds on qualitative case studies at two Swedish authorities, including in-depth interviews and observations. The study shows that the discretion of the front-line case workers is limited by the RPA systems, and they also have limited discretion to support clients in their use of the digital services. Instead, they develop strategies in line with more service- and socially-oriented values; duty-oriented values are integrated into the RPA. The analysis shows the importance of forming new support structures for inclusion when public services are automated to maintain the core public values of inclusion and democratic legitimacy.

  • 78.
    Flensburg, Per
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics. University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Bernhard, Irene
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Law, Politics and Economics.
    Nåfors, Annika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    IT-Supported Work Processes for Contact Services in Swedish Municipalities: The Initial Design Steps2009In: Proceedings of ECIME 2009. The 3rd European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation held at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden on 17-18 September 2009 / [ed] Jan Ljungberg & Kerstin Grundén, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet , 2009, p. 497-503Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A contact service in a municipality is a place where the citizens can apply for processing of their claims concerning municipal jurisdiction. Examples could be application for a place at pre-school, planning permission or change of dustbin etc. The clerks at the contact centre should be able to provide immediate service in most of the matters. This requires the work-process for each matter to be known. Before starting of a contact service this knowledge existed in the administration for the actual claim. In many cases it was tacit and not described. This paper discusses the problem of making this knowledge explicit and described in order to be used at the contact service. Issues concerning work organisation, personnel and job satisfaction are recognised, but not in focus. Instead our focus lies on the work content, processing of the claims, which the clerks are dealing with. It is a qualitative study, based upon three existing contact services and one, which is in the design phase. We start with a brief discussion of different types of knowledge, related to classical epistemologies within the organisation area (Nonaka & Takeuchi, Brown & Duguid, Cook & Brown, Polyani, etc). Based upon empirical material from the cases we identify some typical knowledge categories. It might be general knowledge about rules, procedures and such things; it might be experience-based knowledge from previous claims, typical claims and work praxis developed over time. It might also be knowledge about the specific citizen and about the specific application. But it can also be totally new categories. Two categories we are pretty sure to identify are matter-oriented knowledge, concerning the actual matter and procedural knowledge, concerning the processing of the matter-oriented knowledge. In our previous research about work-flow four levels have been identified and we suspect the same basic reasoning might apply here.

  • 79.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Work-integrated Learning: Increasing societal impact by decreasing the gap between research and practice2018In: ICERI2018 Proceedings, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we outline models for conducting work-integrated learning research. Our experiences from two decades of doing research in close collaboration with practitioners are presented and discussed. Our main message is that by engaging practitioners in all steps of the research project there is a potential for research outcomes to have high societal impact, and theoretical contribution

  • 80.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Gellerstedt, Victoria
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Vallo Hult, Helena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Work-Integrated Learning: Impact of Individual and organizational Digitalization on Knowledge management and Expertise Sharing2019In: INTED2019 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, 2019, p. 3601-3609Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim with this study was to examine the impact of digitalization and the use of ICT for knowledge sharing in an organization. A secondary aim was to further develop knowledge management models to also include collaborative knowledge production and expertise sharing. Based on such a model, we developed a questionnaire answered by 265 respondents. We found that the relationship between using ICT for knowledge sharing was correlated to knowledge sharing also when adjusted for established factors like organisational climate and social norms. We conclude that digitalization, both individually and on an organisational level is an important asset for knowledge management, and that the use of ICT could support knowledge sharing beyond known and established important factors.

  • 81.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Norström, Livia
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Gråsjö, Urban
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Do Municipal Facebook Performance and Citizen Satisfaction go Hand in Hand?2020In: Electronic journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 30-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the relation between municipalities' social media performance and citizen satisfaction withthe municipality. An observational study was conducted, based on four different Swedish national public data sources. Thestudy shows that municipalities' Facebook performance is correlated to citizens' satisfaction with living in the municipalityand with satisfaction with municipal service provision. There was however no significant relationship between Facebookperformance and satisfaction with transparency and influence from a citizen perspective. In conclusion, one importantimplication of the study is that citizen perception regarding whether a municipality is a good place to live in or not is related to the use of social media for promoting the municipality. Furthermore, a relation between satisfaction and citizenperception of government service performance implies that social media could be valuable for interaction and co-creation.Finally, an implication is that usage of social media and the potential relationship to trust, influence and transparency mustbe further elaborated and studied. Overall, our recommendation is that municipalities and their citizens may benefit fromwell thought-out strategies of how to use social media for marketing, interaction and co-creating.

  • 82.
    Grundén, Kerstin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Bernhard, Irene
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Implementation of a Contact Centre: a Local eGovernment Initiative2012In: Proceedings of the 12th European Conference of e-Government: ESADE Ramo Llull University Barcelona, Spain 14-15 June 2012 / [ed] Dr. Mila Gascó, Reading, UK: Academic Publishing International, 2012, p. 329-335Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: A case study of the implementation of a contact centre (CC) in a Swedish municipality was described and discussed. The implementation was an example of a local e-Government initiative. Seventeen employees at the municipality were interviewed. The initial implementation of the CC was done quickly, with a top-down approach. There were initial problems with negative attitudes towards the CC from the employees at the municipal departments. The new technology systems contributed to increased efficiency and to a more process-oriented organization. The CC was largely well-functioning, and many handling officers were relieved of work tasks related to the implementation of CC. There was a need for further competence development among the service handling officers at the CC. The number of incoming matters increased, related to the increased availability to citizens of municipal services.

  • 83.
    Gråsjö, Urban
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Karlsson, CharlieUniversity West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics. Professor Emeritus of the Economics of Technological Change, Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University and Professor Emeritus, Blekinge Institute of Technology.Bernhard, IréneUniversity West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Geography, Open Innovation and Entrepreneurship: New Horizons in Regional Science series2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developed countries must be incredibly innovative to secure incomes and welfare so that they may successfully compete against international rivals. This book focuses on two specific but interrelated aspects of innovation by incumbent firms and entrepreneurs, the role of geography and of open innovation.

  • 84.
    Gråsjö, Urban
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Introduction: Geography, Open Innovation and Entrepreneurship2018In: Geography, Open Innovation and Entrepreneurship: New Horizons in Regional Science series / [ed] Gråsjö, U., Karlsson, C. och Bernhard, I., Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Johansson, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Uddevalla Symposium - Summary and a Historical Review2007In: Uddevalla Symposium tenth anniversary 2007: Institutions for Knowledge Generation and Knowledge Flows - Buildning Innovative Capabilities for Regions: Revised papers presented at the 10th Uddevalla Symposium, 14-16 June, 2007, University West, Uddevalla, Sweden / [ed] Iréne Johansson, Trollhättan: University West , 2007, p. 9-12Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Stakeholder Involvement in City Transformation: Towards a Smart Old Town2020In: Proceedings of Ongoing Research, Practitioners, Workshops, Posters, and Projects of the International Conference EGOV-CeDEM-ePart 2020 / [ed] Shefali Virkar, Marijn Janssen, Ida Lindgren, Ulf Melin, Francesco Mureddu, Peter Parycek, Efthimios Tambouris, Gerhard Schwabe, Hans Jochen Scholl, 2020, p. 347-350Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ongoing digitalization of society is of increasing importance for city transformation and a driving force for cities to become smart. The aim of this study is to explore stakeholder challenges in becoming a “smart old town” and to contribute with innovative implications based on stakeholder involvement and governance. An interpretative single case study with qualitative interviews was conducted in an old town district in a Norwegian city. The results reveal that in order to transform a city with cultural heritage into a smart city requires efforts that go beyond smart ICT implementations. We argue for collaborative governance based on an open and coordinated involvement of stakeholders. 

  • 87.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Becoming a smart old town: How to manage stakeholder collaboration and cultural heritage2021In: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, ISSN 2044-1266, E-ISSN 2044-1274, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 627-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Within the ongoing digitalization of society and dimensions of integration, equality, citizen needs, sustainability and quality of life are of increasing importance as driving forces for cities to become smart. The purpose of this paper is to examine participatory management challenges in becoming a smart old town in the context of cultural heritage. Design/methodology/approach: An explorative approach was applied on a qualitative single case study including in-depth interviews with 21 stakeholders representing local entrepreneurs, nonprofit organizations, the municipality, politicians, tourism organization and residents of an old town district in a Norwegian city. Additionally, participatory observations and document studies were performed. Findings were continuously validated with the respondents. Findings: The present study contributes with stakeholder views on challenges arising from the development of a smart old town and suggests possible innovative solutions for participatory management. The transformation of a city with cultural heritage into a smart city require efforts that go beyond smart ICT implementations into issues of social sustainability. Research limitations/implications: The study brings forward the opportunities that lie in the dynamics of interaction between the spirit of cultural heritage and the body of participatory management. It con-tributes by responding to calls for further research to deepen the insights into stakeholder inclusion in cultural heritage-based city transformation. This explorative study has its limitations as it is based on one qualitative single case. Practical implications: Participatory management insights and recommendations for smart city transformation are provided. Social implications: The study addresses socially sustainable outcomes to create democratic conditions that promote inclusion and community building by understanding what people need and expect from the place where they live and work. Originality/value: This study is positioned as unique in terms of its complex nature of transforming an old town to become a smart old town based on cultural heritage and an open and coordinated inclusion of stakeholders. Smartness in context of city transformation is revealed in many dimensions ranging from technology-driven to more participant-driven. 

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  • 88.
    Norström, Livia
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Boundaries of Logics in Municipality Communicators' Facebook Practice: Towards a New Public Service Competence2019In: Proceedings of the 52nd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 2019, 2019, p. 3097-3106Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With an increased use of external online platforms, digital government logics are gradually intertwined with external, algorithmic, crowd-influenced value logics of social media platforms. This new scene especially affects administration, which can no longer neutrally deliver public service, but becomes involved in processes of consideration and judging what rules and traditions seem most appropriate in the situation.Through deep interviews and workshops with municipal communicators, we examine this balancing act when communicators use social media for external communication. We use a practice perspective to characterize and conceptualize an emerging approach to public service.

  • 89.
    Norström, Livia
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Assmo, Per
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Transgressions and Transformations at Work: Towards a Social Media Practice among Swedish Municipality Communicators2017In: Transitions, Transformations and Transgressions in Work and Learning & Work and Learning Research: Book of Abstracts, Grahamstown: Rhodes University , 2017, p. 81-, article id ID071Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses how communicators at the municipality, in their work, negotiate the tension between a traditional role of an 'informative administrator' and a 'promoting, engaging social media profile'. The work is learned by carefully transgressing municipality social media and IT policy and by transforming social media practice from private and commercial use of Facebook, towards a new practice founded in democratic values.

    Social media has become an important strategy for municipalities to disclose a massive amount of information with relatively low cost and to create engagement with citizens. However, fostering participation and citizen engagement on social media platforms is still a great challenge for municipality administration as well as for research. Despite a widespread diffusion of platforms such as Facebook in municipalities, interaction level is relatively low compared to private organisations. We know from previous research that citizens' engagement with municipalities on Facebook is related to the municipalities' tradition of openness and transparency and their local administration style. Municipalities with a tradition of transparency are to a greater extent using features in Facebook that enable citizen engagement.Hence the organisational context where the engagement takes place is a crucial factor.However, what is often forgotten when trying to understand how engagement emerges on municipality social media platforms is the intentions of the platform providers and the emerging social logic of the platforms in use. A digital platform such as Facebook cannot be regarded as one overall technology choice, but as a platform provider that promotes services and tools along with a considerable amount of conditions and regulations. As social platforms are being adopted and matured, the huge amount of data concerning user behaviour and interaction patterns has changed from being side business to core business for the platform providers. This is applied,for instance, in the possibility to harvest and sell data. Overtime, the logic of such platforms has become more advanced and its ability to shape and transform the communication patterns has grown stronger and become critical. So, what implications do such a platform logic have on municipality administrations' use of Facebook? A content analysis of online interaction on four municipalities' Facebook pages during a period of two years was conducted. Approximately 6000 posts and comments were categorised by content, media type and tone. Engagement such as likes, shares and comments were then measured for the different categories.Empirical findings indicate that municipality communicators have problems both to reach out with information and to create engagement on Facebook. It is important for the communicators to be politically neutral, correct and speak with the voice of the whole municipality (i.e. not too personal). This way of being, however, does not work so well on Facebook.They report having gradually adjusted their work (content, tone, media type and timing) to what is spreadable, sharable and commentable according to a Facebook logic. The communicators say they feel forced to post pictures of blossomtrees and check-ins from the lunch restaurant in order to get likes and shares. They know that if they don't do this they will lose citizens' attention and they will not reach out with more important posts. They are aware that posts that are interesting to see and read are not sufficient; posts also need to trigger people to like, share and comment. The socialmedia work needs to be designed in accordance with a unique Facebook platform logic.

    This paper aims to contribute to the body of knowledge on IT and learning at work with a special focus on new competence in the public sector. It also extends an existing framework of e-government transparency and citizen engagement by taking into account the role of Facebook as a platform with highly structured strategies for how to foster a special kind of sociality and engagement. The practical contribution implies new knowledge for staff and management in the public sector to develop competence to manage transparency and engagement through social media.

  • 90.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Arvemo, Tobias
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Bachelor students in research projects: boosting WIL and University-Society Collaboration2019In: INTED2019 Proceedings / [ed] , L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, 2019, p. 3015-3021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing from the experiences of student projects organized and developed in accordance with work integrated learning, this paper contributes to the understanding of conditions necessary for successful implementation and sharing of knowledge in such projects as well as perceived benefits of university society collaboration. A case study was carried out focusing on student research projects on two parallelbusiness administration courses on Bachelor level. Students applied their skills in information literacy searching for and critically interpreting current research as well use of digital tools and social media platforms for data collection in their studies. The projects were initiated and presented by an external organization, which both supported the students in various ways during their work and received the completed results by the end of the courses. Students focused on themes such as the challenges of internal and external organizational communication, digital divides, inter-organizational collaboration,youth perspectives and sustainability. The empirical material of this study was collected from sourcess uch as course syllabi and instructions, observations, student reports and reflections, presentations,meetings, conversations and interviews members of the principal organization. The results show that the students perceived their tasks as stimulating and important due to the interaction and feedback received from the external principal, utilization of their course assignments as well as the opportunity to relate theory to practice. The external organization in turn received reports that may be used for decision-making purposes at a low cost, however what was perceived as most rewarding was the interaction and dialogue with students to get their perspectives on contemporary issues. Furthermore, collaboration with students was also viewed as means for future recruitment. In can thus be concluded that students, if allowed to interact and work with external organizations, play an important part in disseminating both results from and understanding for academic research in society. However, to realize successful student research projects this paper also discusses the need of legitimacy, access to external networks and organizations willing and able to deliver relevant topics for student research as well asstudent support along the way.

  • 91.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Challenges of collaboration in old townscapes2017In: 26th Nordic Symposium of Tourism and Hospitality Research, October 4-6 2017, Falun, Sweden. Book of Abstract: Tourism in a Hyper-Connected World: Challenges of Interactivity and Connectedness / [ed] Dalarna University, Falun, 2017, Vol. 1, p. 30-30Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Challenges of collaboration in old townscapes

    Contemporary cities are increasingly viewing cultural/heritage tourism as an area of tourism with great potential in city development, building city brands as well a local community. The relationship between heritage and tourism is complex since preservation and commercialization often are viewed as contrasts .Heritage tourism is among the most significant types of tourism and includes visits to sites of historical importance.  The concept of heritage is wide hence in this paper focus is on old town areas and the development of old townscapes. A townscape is here to be viewed as a holistic entity although there may be differences regarding the preservation, spatially and social objectives of the area. . An old townscape is sometimes a site for visitors (a destination), as well as a site for business (a workplace) and residents (a home). There are stakeholders from public, private and nonprofit sectors involved in the development of old townscapes. Hence there is a need for dialogue and cross-sector collaboration among stakeholders in order to develop heritage tourism that is beneficial to all. Existing research show that the inclusion of stakeholders in planning and implementation is crucial.  There are calls for further research to understand how collaboration work in different heritage sites. The purpose of this paper is to study the stakeholders’ challenges and views of collaboration and co-shaping of cultural heritage, here an old town in a fortress city. The data collection includes interviews with stakeholders and observations. Findings point out the importance of inclusion, communication, shared visions and strategies in order to balance the attractiveness of the old townscape for visitors, business and residents.

  • 92.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Collaboration for Learning - Industrial PhD-students in the Intersection of Academia and Work-life2021In: VILÄR: 9-10 december 2021, University West Trollhättan, 2021, p. 7-8Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary societal issues often call for the inclusion of many perspectives and competences hence there is a demand for increased academia-society collaboration in order to generate learning, new knowledge, and dissemination of research findings. Academia needs to apply collaboration for learning within a broad spectrum of contexts. Interaction with society and practice are of crucial importance for universities today. University West in Sweden has a profile area in work-integrated learning (WIL) to address issues on integrating theory and practice in all levels of higher education. An under-researched field of academia-society collaboration is here explored revealing the perspectives of industrial PhD- students. The aim of this study is hence to apply a WIL approach to explore the perspectives of Industrial PhD-students on collaborative learning acting in the intersection of academia and work-life. Industrial PhD-students are fully employed by industry during their PhD education. Accordingly, the industrial PhD students are at the same time involved in both academia and industry, with the same academic demands as traditionally enrolled academic PhD students combined with demands and expectations from their industrial employers. Qualitative methods were applied. All industrial PhD-students across disciplines at University West (in total 21) were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews. Findings expose insights that industrial PhD-students are acting as key stakeholders in academia and society embodying the collaboration for learning between practice and university. However, this kind of collaboration for learning covers both benefits and challenges to be aware of as prerequisites for work-integrated learning in academia as well as in industry. Some implications to point out are that the industrial PhD-students are spanning boundaries between academia and industry bringing forth access to networks, and empirical data. Furthermore, the results implicate that industrial PhD-students have continuous opportunities for validation and testing of empirical results and models in industry. To conclude this study also contributes to broaden the WIL concept to also include the category of industrial PhD education. Further studies will also include the perspectives on the industry of this kind of collaboration.

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    VILÄR2021
  • 93.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Industrial PhD students spanning the boundaries between academia and practice: a collaboration for organisational learning, Organisational Learning, Knowledge and Capabilities.2022In: Learning future workforce capabilities for global sustainability, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to further expand research on cross-boundary organisational collaboration for learning by focusing on industrial PhD education and the overlapping role of industrial PhD students. This paper reveals the perspectives of industrial PhD students, academia, and industry involved in collaboration for organisational learning. Work-integrated learning is applied as a theoretical lens to identify vital issues for collaboration. Qualitative methods are applied. The sample includes three categories of respondents (in total 38): 19 industrial PhD students from the three disciplines, 9 representatives from academia and 10 respondents from industry. This explorative study contributes to advance the current knowledge on PhD education by integrating multiple perspectives insights to reveal issues that are vital for a successful industrial PhD education collaboration to generate organisational learning. Findings state that industrial PhD education collaboration is generating organizational learning and understanding across sectors and industries.

  • 94.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Keeping up the pace of digitalization in small businesses: Women entrepreneurs' knowledge and use of social media2021In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 378-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to explore how women entrepreneurs in small businesses encounter digitalization and learn to use social media at work by combining theoretical perspectives from research on women entrepreneurs in small businesses, digitalization and use of social media and digital skills in response to calls from earlier research regarding women entrepreneurs' adaptation to an increasingly digitalized world.

    Design/methodology/approach – Qualitative methods were applied including a total of 13 in-depth interviews in two phases, in 2017 and 2019, with 11 women entrepreneurs in nine small businesses, along with observations of their digital presence.

    Findings – This study contributes with new insights regarding women entrepreneurs' behavior and ways to acquire digital skills to keep up the pace in digitalization. Learning by doing, informal learning and stepby-step self-development entrepreneurial behavior were practiced along with strategical recruiting of young digitally skilled employees, i.e. digital natives. Findings state that in order to remain competitive and generate business growth, women entrepreneurs constantly have to learn new skills to capture the potential of digitalization especially regarding the knowledge and use of social media. The women entrepreneurs emphasize challenges of digitalization as limited resources, constant need of new digital skills, digital stressor even burnout due to internal and external demands on online presence, scanning and maintenance of social media platforms. In contrast to earlier research, the women entrepreneurs did not express any significant gender stereotyping online, yet they strongly emphasized the continuous challenge of work–life balance.

    Originality/value – This study contributes to an under-researched field with novel research combining theories from women entrepreneurship and information and communication technologies (ICTs) related to digitalization with a special focus on social media. Following the era of digitalization, the women entrepreneurs have to act as digital entrepreneurs finding new innovative ways of doing business. The importance of recruiting young digitally skilled employees in small businesses is vital for women entrepreneurs, since the needed learning and business development takes place when digital natives and digital immigrants work together.

  • 95.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Transforming doctoral education: Exploring industrial PhD collaboration in Sweden2023In: International Journal of Work-Integrated Learning, ISSN 2538-1032, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 523-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Doctoral education is transforming, along with societal changes, as it is no longer solely aimed at academic careers. A new landscape with various models for doctoral education is emerging with an increased alignment with industry. This study aims to deepen research by critically exploring industrial PhD education collaboration in Sweden. The perspectives of industrial PhD students, academia, and industry are integrated with work-integrated learning as a theoretical lens to identify benefits, challenges, and prerequisites for how to structure and manage such a collaboration. Qualitative methods are applied including a total of 38 respondents. Industrial PhD students embody PhD education, research, and university-industry collaboration, generating learning and understanding across sectors and industries. The current knowledge of PhD education is advanced by integrating multiple perspectives, to reveal prerequisites that are vital for how to structure and manage industrial PhD education collaboration, to promote work-integrated learning towards a way to build knowledge.

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    fulltext
  • 96.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    University-Industry collaboration in higher education: Industry views on investing in industrial PhD students2020In: EDULEARN20 Proceedings, 2020, p. 6726-6733Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    University collaboration and networking with society and practice are of crucial importance in contemporary society. Contemporary societal challenges, on all levels from local to global, are complexand often call for the inclusion of many perspectives and competences. There is thus a demand for increased university-society collaboration generating learning, new knowledge, dissemination ofresearch findings, innovation and societal impact. One aspect of this is the collaboration between universities and industry through industrial PhD students who are active in the university-industryinterface, i.e., employed in industry during their PhD third-cycle education, while at the same time they are involved in both theory and practice. The aim of this paper is to explore university-industrycollaboration by focusing on industry perspectives in investing in industrial PhD students, third-cycle education. The research is conducted as an explorative case study, focusing on collaborations betweenindustry and the discipline of informatics with the specialization of work-integrated learning at University West in Sweden. Qualitative methods were applied including semi-structured interviews with fiverespondents from industry. Findings showed benefits to industry such as the mutual benefits of applying the WIL concept, knowledge creation and dissemination, short-term societal research impact,competence development, product development, innovation and increased organizational legitimacy.Some challenges were identified that need to be considered in order to strengthen the industrial PhD program as well as the university-industry collaboration. The industrial PhD students generatedknowledge and learning as both short-term and long-term dissemination of research results. The continuous opportunities for validation and testing of results in the organization was highly valued. Thisstudy contributes furthermore by broadening the work-integrated learning concept to include the category of industrial PhD education.

  • 97.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    What are the prerequisites for a successful industrial PhD education collaboration?2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 87-89Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    University-industry collaboration is a widespread phenomenon in response to complex societal challenges. All sectors of society struggle to meet contemporary challenges by including various perspectives and competences (Bernhard and Olsson, 2020; Olsson et al., 2021; Stegeager and Thomassen, 2021). There is a need to continuously learn at work and redevelop work practices by relating to new concepts, technologies, and organizational principles. University-industry interactions are of importance for mutual learning in higher education as well as in industry (Bölling & Eriksson, 2016; Olsson et al., 2021). Universities have an essential role supporting life -long learning and acting as knowledge hubs embedded in society (Lind et al., 2013) providing trained res earchers prepared to meet these challenges (Altbach et al., 2019; Hayes, 2021). There is an emerging interest for collaboration with university in third-cycle education as the importance of PhD education is recognized in contemporary society (Bernhard & Olsson, 2020; Bin et al., 2016; Borrell-Damian et al., 2010; Gill & Mullarkey, 2015; Gustavsson et al., 2016; Jones, 2018; Roolaht, 2015). European higher education policies call for PhD educations that are transformed along with societal needs and labor markets for PhDs. Especially since PhD education does not merely aim for academic careers (Malfroy, 2011; Santos & Patricio, 2020; Valencia -Forrester, 2019). Industrial PhD education is emerging as one way of increasing collaboration between university and wo rklife during the PhD education. Industrial PhD students here refer to students who originate from and are fully employed in industry (industry funded) during their PhD education, i.e., the company is investing in an employee to become a PhD. Accordingly, industrial PhD students are acting in the intersection of academia and work-life, but with the same academic demands as traditionally enrolled academic PhD students. One transdisciplinary approach to increase collaboration between university and society is work-integrated learning (WIL) to integrate theoretical knowledge with practice work bridging research, higher education, and practice for mutual learning outcomes (Bates, 2008; Billett, 2009; 2014; Gellerstedt et al., 2015; 2018; Rampersad, 2015). WIL is here applied as theory and a model for academia-society collaboration aiming at knowledge exchange and research together with industry.

    Aim

    The aim of this study is to expand research on university-industry collaboration by focusing on industrial PhD education exploring the prerequisites for a successful industrial PhD education collaboration. This paper reveals the perspectives of industrial PhD students, university, and industry.

    Methodology

    Qualitative methods are applied to capture several disciplines and perspectives during three years (2019-2022).The empirical research context is University West in Sweden. The sample includes three categories of respondents (in total 38): 19 industrial PhD students within the three disciplines of Work-integrated Learning, Informatics with a specialization in WIL, and Production Technology; nine representatives from academia and 10 respondents from industry. The academy perspective was represented by the main supervisors and head of PhD education. The industry perspective was represented by industrial supervisors/mentors covering both the private and public sectors. WIL is applied as a theoretical lens to identify the perspectives of industrial PhD students, academia, and industry. All collected data was analysed to identify patterns and themes following iterative phases, as the perspectives of industrial PhD students, academia and industry were explored along the progression of the theoretical framework and collected data.

    Findings and Conclusion

    Findings show that industrial PhD students are contributing to learning by acting in the intersection of university and industry across PhD education and research. The mutual benefits of industrial PhD education collaboration such as access to data and current research, contextual understanding, are strongly emphasized by respondents. The relationship embraces industrial PhD education, research and collaboration generating work -integrated learning and understanding across sectors and industries. However, this study implicates that the following prerequisites need to be considered by university and industry to reach a successful industrial PhD education collaboration: (i) To operationalize continuous activities and processes that increase and strengthen the understanding and expectations during the entire industrial PhD education. Continuous dialogues and close interactions are needed to build long-term relations and trust for knowledge creation by operationalizing the collaboration in actions, practices, and routines over time. (ii) To design detailed formal agreementsfor industrial PhD education collaboration to avoid conflicts of interest and negative impacts on the industrial PhD students’ work conditions. (iii) To continuously maintain activities for industrial PhD students’ inclusion and access to dual contexts to ensure belonging, visibility and legitimacy. (iv) To integrate research in practice and practice in research. The scope of the industrial PhD students’ thesis needs to be carefully anchored in industry and research to achieve an integration of theory and practice based on a mutual understanding of the work -integrated learning approach. 

    There are limitations as this study originates from one single university. The study was partly conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic which may have affected the results. Further research is of importance to deepen and broaden work-integrated learning in third-cycle collaborations to meet the demands and development of contemporary society.

  • 98.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Arvemo, Tobias
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    A conceptual model for university-society research collaboration facilitating societal impact for local innovation2021In: European Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1460-1060, E-ISSN 1758-7115, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 1335-1353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose is to develop a work-integrated learning (WIL) model for university-society research collaboration facilitating societal impact toward short lag yet sustainable societal impact for local innovation. Design/methodology/approach – The methodology applied was engaged scholarship based on a WIL approach involving a network of collaborating partners from different sectors of society and cross-disciplinary university researchers. Mixed data collection methods were applied. Findings – Conceptualization of university-society research collaboration for local innovation is presented asa WIL model including the elements of continuity and commitment, coordination, communication andrelationships, trust, courage and creativity and co-creation opportunities. Short lag societal impact as local innovation was identified as product and process innovations. Research limitations/implications – Further validation of the model is encouraged for the model to beviable in various contexts and to generate different kinds of societal impact. Practical implications – The model may act as a governing tool for project management to facilitate cocreative and short lag societal impact for local innovation to ensure that engaged and learning activities are membedded in the collaborative process. Social implications – The model has implications for inclusiveness and co-creation fostering transparency, respect and mutuality in university-society research collaboration and to equate both academic and practiceknowledge.Originality/value – The conclusions drawn support the understanding of a WIL approach practicing engaged scholarship in research collaborations. The main theoretical and practical contributions of the article are the conceptual model for university-society research collaboration generating short lag societal implications and local innovation.

  • 99.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Friedrichs, Yvonne von
    Mittuniversitetet, Östersund, Sverige.
    Approaches to inclusive networking in place development: an illustration from six smaller Scandinavian cities2018In: International Journal of Innovation and Regional Development, ISSN 1753-0660, E-ISSN 1753-0679, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 259-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to further explore and deepen research in place development with focus on inclusive networking related to renewal processes in smaller harbour cities in Scandinavia. The results are based on a multiple case study comprising in-depth interviews with driving network actors, document studies and observations from six different harbour cities in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The research questions focus on the characteristics of networks and inclusiveness, knowledge sharing and renewal processes related to networking. This study illustrates different inclusive network approaches for place development. Smaller harbour cities are dynamic places for cross-sector collaboration and networking, although driving network actors struggle with underlying mechanisms related to network characteristics, inclusiveness and governance. Furthermore, findings stress that communication, a sharing culture, transparency and democratic values are vital to enable trust, knowledge sharing and legitimacy for inclusive networking in place development.

  • 100.
    Sundström, Malin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Retailing and cultural heritage as means for the future city2022Conference paper (Other academic)
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