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  • 51.
    Boniati, Sofia
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Zaytoun, Ornina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Från passage till flexibel mötesplats: En kvalitativ studie om professionellas upplevelse av en renovering2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to investigate how the staff experience the change in the physical work environment with the newly renovated lounge and what affects the staff's experience with the change in the physical work environment. Twelve employees with different professions were selected. The strategic requirements where that they have different professions and have seen how it looked before the change and after. Semi-structured interviews were performed at the respondent's workplace and the collected material was then analyzed with a thematic analysis.

    The result showed that the information has been well thought out and that the managers has been straightforward. The staff felt that they needed all the information to be open to change and it was considered positive that the managers was straight forward in the decision making process. It was also shown that inspiration from the outside world affects the staff's openness to change. This may be because the modernization of the surface has made the company seen as modern and kept up with the development, but also that a sense of pride has been created by having customers reacted positively. It has been perceived that the new lounge has created new flexible workspaces and new meeting places that can be used for both formal and informal occasions.

  • 52.
    Borg, Anna-Lena
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Delaktighet och inflytande: ungas definition, erfarenheter och upplevelser2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this essay was to try to understand young people's experiences of participation and influence. The purpose has been to define participation and influence with young people's own words, and with the definition as a basis explore young people's experiences of participation and influence. The purpose has also been to seek understanding for young people's experiences of participation and influence by discuss young people's descriptions at different levels. There have been three research questions: How do young people define participation and influence?; Which experiences in life about participation and influence do young people narrate?; How do young people experience participation and influence and how do that come to expression? The first research question was answered by asking (n=13) secondary youth with methodological support of vignettes. The second and the third research question has been answered by collecting young people's narratives on the Internet. The (n=37) narratives were analyzed by support of content analysis and narrative analysis. The result was a definition of participation and influence put together from young people's own defining words. The result also shows that young people's experiences of participated and influence is about both having and not having participation and influence. Young people narrate more often about experiences of not participated and influence. Finally, the result show us that young people's experiences of participation and influence come to expression in three different ways were the young actor's agency has a central role.

  • 53.
    Bornstein, Marc H
    et al.
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, USA..
    Putnick, Diane L
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, USA..
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan..
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Macau, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA..
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA..
    Malone, Patrick S
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA..
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya..
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA..
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand..
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Rome University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy..
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Mixed blessings: parental religiousness, parenting, and child adjustment in global perspective.2017In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 58, no 8, p. 880-892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Most studies of the effects of parental religiousness on parenting and child development focus on a particular religion or cultural group, which limits generalizations that can be made about the effects of parental religiousness on family life.

    METHODS: We assessed the associations among parental religiousness, parenting, and children's adjustment in a 3-year longitudinal investigation of 1,198 families from nine countries. We included four religions (Catholicism, Protestantism, Buddhism, and Islam) plus unaffiliated parents, two positive (efficacy and warmth) and two negative (control and rejection) parenting practices, and two positive (social competence and school performance) and two negative (internalizing and externalizing) child outcomes. Parents and children were informants.

    RESULTS: Greater parent religiousness had both positive and negative associations with parenting and child adjustment. Greater parent religiousness when children were age 8 was associated with higher parental efficacy at age 9 and, in turn, children's better social competence and school performance and fewer child internalizing and externalizing problems at age 10. However, greater parent religiousness at age 8 was also associated with more parental control at age 9, which in turn was associated with more child internalizing and externalizing problems at age 10. Parental warmth and rejection had inconsistent relations with parental religiousness and child outcomes depending on the informant. With a few exceptions, similar patterns of results held for all four religions and the unaffiliated, nine sites, mothers and fathers, girls and boys, and controlling for demographic covariates.

    CONCLUSIONS: Parents and children agree that parental religiousness is associated with more controlling parenting and, in turn, increased child problem behaviors. However, children see religiousness as related to parental rejection, whereas parents see religiousness as related to parental efficacy and warmth, which have different associations with child functioning. Studying both parent and child views of religiousness and parenting are important to understand the effects of parental religiousness on parents and children.

  • 54.
    Bowen, Erica
    et al.
    University of Worcester, Institute of Health and Society, United Kingdom.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Meeting adolescents 'where they're at': the use of technology to prevent violence and abuse in adolescent romantic relationships2017In: Eliminating gender-based violence / [ed] A. Taket & B.R. Crisp (red), Abingdon: Routledge, 2017, p. 54-67Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Bozsodi, Judit
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kan sex timmars arbetstid skapa ett hållbart arbetsliv?: En kvalitativ studie baserad på några medarbetares erfarenhet av sex timmars arbetsdag.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Working time reduction can be a means of reducing stress in society. Having a reasonable working time for wage workers is important in order to get the job done today. Today's problem is to create a sustainable working life for people in the future. According to the Ministry of Labor, several factors show that working life is not adapted to people's ability and needs. Work-related ill health is growing, which has been shown in increasing sick leave and stress in working life. Even the recovery time has decreased which leads to wear damage (Ds 2000: 22, p.14). The study aims at examining employee's experience of working time shortening thirteen years after organizational reform and see what this type of working-time reduction has meant for internal values such as: motivation, participation, requirements and learning that are indicators of a sustainable working life. Data gathering has helped with semi structured interview questions combined with open questions to get a more detailed answer. The study is based on a qualitative method with a phenomenological approach. The interview includes eight workshop staff in a car company that has worked with both eight hours and six hours of work since 2002. The results showed that six hours of work with retained pay create motivation for employees who increase their productivity unemployment and efficiency even after thirteen years. This may be because they are experiencing their psychosocial work environment positively, which are the main motivational factors, indicating sustainable working life. Furthermore, the requirement has increased after the shortening of working hours, as the pressures to perform in a short period of time are experienced stressful. However, despite this picture, there is no risk of ill health when the employee's absence due to illness is not increased. Six-hour working day with retained salary contributes to reduced sick leave for long-term sickness who work full time instead of being partially ill-treated. The role of organizations is to create greater conditions for recovery for individuals to work longer and to have a sustainable working life. The result is consistent with previous research that has been done in a shorter period of time, where self-perceived health is increasing. Furthermore, the result shows that the activities and focuses on people's learning and skills development can thus maintain a sustainable working life. The theoretical frame of reference for the study contains the requirements -control-support model, experience theory, organization's change, Kasam.

  • 56.
    Bravo Vera, Evelyn
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Behrami, Vjollca
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    "Vi springer in och ut": En kvalitativ studie om NPM införandet i hemtjänsten2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and increase our understanding of what the New Public Management reform has resulted for the employees of the municipal home care service and if they feel that the work has changed. The study is based on a qualitative research methodology and empirical material was collected through semi-structured interviews. In the study six respondents participated. All worked as assistant nurses in municipal home care services in Västra Götaland County. In order to analyze the collected material, Foucault's theories about discipline, power and monitoring were used. These theories can be interpreted as a power-using tool. Who are exercised to create committed bodies with the purpose of socializing the individual to adapt to norms and rules that will lead to efficiency in the work. The results of the study shows that the respondents feel controlled and supervised. It has also had a negative impact on the quality of care and social relations with the care providers.

  • 57.
    Broberg, Sandra
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Martinsson, Maria
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Personlighet och innovation: vad karaktäriserar den kreativa medarbetaren?2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Innovative ability is a sought-after competence in today's labor market, marked by expansive technological progression, globalization and increased flexibility. International studies in work psychology indicate that innovative ability is correlated with specific personality traits.

    In this study the correlation between personality through Five Factor Model (FFM; Costa & McCrae, 1992) and innovative ability through Ideational Behavior (IB; Runco, Plucker, & Lim, 2001) was explored. There is a lack of exploration of IB and its two distinct factors in relation to personality in previous Swedish research, which has led to this study aiming to remedy the situation.

    Data was collected through a web survey based on the self-assessment instrument IPIP-NEO-120 (Johnson, 2014) to examine personality, and Runco Ideational Behavior Scale (RIBS) to examine IB. The survey gathered 256 respondents with various educational background and main occupation.

    The result indicates that IB was positively and significantly associated with the personality traits Openness to Experience and Extraversion, while Conscientiousness and Agreeableness presented negative correlations with IB. A noteworthy result implied that there were differences in the correlations between FFM and the two distinct factors of IB, which measures two separate constructs of creativity: Divergent thinking and Scatterbrained. The difference was especially prominent for the trait Neuroticism, for which the correlation indicated a negative association with the factor Divergent thinking and a positive association with the factor Scatterbrained. It was established through forced entry regression method that selected personality facets of FFM and gender accounted for a little over half of the variance in IB. The results are in line with international research, indicating that IB is a possible instrument for measuring innovative behavior at an individual level.

  • 58.
    Brorsson, Karolina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Vestin, Eric
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    En utforskande sambandsstudie om moralisk vitalism och värderingar2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Some people imagine, and believe, that good and evil exist as active forces that can influence people and events and also determine actions as morally right or wrong. This conception is called moral vitalism. The study examined connections between belief in moral vitalism and values. Values refer to the individual's personal estimation of the value of something, in the results of an action. The study had a wide angle and 188 respondents answered the webb questionnaire. The questionnaire had a normal distribution and of the respondents 74.2 % was women, 24.7% men and 1.1% answered being another sex. The largest part of the respondents were 26–35 (36%) and 79% had some kind of college or university education. The instrument from Schwartz values model (2012) and Bastian, Bain, Buhrmester, Gómez, Vásquez, Knight and Swann´s (2015) instrument to measure the degree of belief in moral vitalism were used in collecting data. Pearson’s correlation analysis was used to explore the connections. The study show two weak correlations between having conservation values or universal values and belief in moral vitalism, i.e. the belief that evil and good power have influence over people and events.

  • 59.
    Brunedal, Cecilia
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Väringer, Kajsa
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Global självkänsla & prestationsbaserad självkänsla: En kvantitativ undersökning om generell tilltro till den egna förmågans modererande effekt2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The study was examined to get an insight in the underlying factors of global selfesteem. More specifically, the purpose was to examine if the relation between global self-esteem and performance-based self-esteem was moderated by general selfefficacy. Our hypothesis was that individuals who have a greater tendency to link their self-worth to their performance will have higher global self-esteem, but only if they have high general self-efficacy. The study was based on an online survey which used Rosenberg Global Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), Performance-based Self-EsteemScale (PBSE) and General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE). Through a conveniencesample 242 participants were recruited and 81.8% were women, 17.4% men and .8% stated another gender identity. The ages varied between 19 to 74 years (M = 31.83,SD = 13.8). Data was analysed via the Process macro for SPSS and the moderatoranalysis "model 1" was used. The study showed that global self-esteem and performance-based self-esteem was negatively correlated and global self-esteem and general self-efficacy was positively correlated. These results are in line with previous studies. Further, the study showed that the level of general self-efficacy did not affect the relation between global self-esteem and performance-based self-esteem. In otherwords there was no moderating effect of general self-efficacy.

  • 60.
    Bubach, Simon
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kesete, Sara  
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Mindfulness, Big Five, ålder och kön: en sambandsstudie2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Mindfulness means being deliberately focused on the present with a nonjudgmental attitude towards the feelings and thoughts that may emerge. Since a person can be more or less mindful by default this study will look at the relations between mindfulness (dependent variable), and personality traits, sex and age (independent variables).

    This essay used a quantitative method with an internet-based inquiry poll with a total of 20 questions. Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) was used to measure mindfulness and Ten Item Personality Inventory (TIPI) to measure personality traits. The participants (N = 114) consisted of 76 women and 38 men (average age = 25.8, standard deviation = 6.7). The data material was analyzed by using correlation analysis, regression analysis, t-test and Cohen's d.

    The results were similar to previously conducted studies on the same topic although there were a few small differences. The results showed that age and extraversion lacked any connection to mindfulness. Agreeableness showed a weak and negative connection to mindfulness. Conscientiousness have a medium strong and positive connection towards mindfulness. Neuroticism showed a strong and negative connection to mindfulness. Openness showed a weak and positive connection to mindfulness. A moderate difference was found between the sexes in relationship to mindfulness with a statistical significance. Conscientiousness and neuroticism was the two personality traits that had a statistical significance to mindfulness. The results from the regression analysis showed that traits, age and gender explain a quite large portion (42%) of mindfulness while age and sex and age have a smaller explanatory effect (4%) on mindfulness.

  • 61.
    Bäckman, Beata
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Samordnarens upplevelse av den psykosociala arbetsmiljön på en bemanningsenhet i kommunal regi: En kvalitativ studie2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This research project aims to examine the psychosocial working environment within a communal staffing unit, the experience of the coordinators working there, as well as the contributing factors affecting the psychosocial working environment. The information used in the research was extracted from semi-structured interviews with five individual coordinators. Each coordinator was working with allocating employees in the leave of absence due to various sickness, annual leave and/or flexible working hours; as well as child care, home care services, group homes, retirement homes and personal assistance. The material was analyzed using a thematic analysis approach and these four overarching patterns emerged: feedback, clear objectives in the workplace, working in an open plan office and collaboration. The results clearly show which factors the informants perceive to be the most meaningful for a favorable and less propitious psychosocial work environment. By demonstrating a greater understanding for what improvement that are needed, the results contribute to future enhancements which could provide an improved psychosocial working environment for the coordinators.

  • 62.
    Bång, Thomas
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Närmande som försvar: En kvantitativ studie om närmandemotivation och personlighet2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Employers would benefit from increased knowledge in approcah motivation, to aid employees in directing their drive toward constructive goals.

    The purpose of this paper was to examine if there where differences in how people use approach motivation as a defensive mechanism when experiencing goal conflict (when the pursuit of one goal hinders the pursuit of other goals) in the goal domains of work life and personal life.

    Goal conflict was operationalized by randomly assigning participants into two groups, asking one group to describe a personal dilemma concerning their personal life, and the other group to describe a dilemma concerning their professional life. Personality according to the five factor model was then measured, as well as approach motivation towards the two goal domains.

    The conducted study could not show any significant differences between groups in approach motivation towards the two goal domains. A regression analysis showed that the personality factors explaining most of the variance in approach motivation were conscientiousness (β = .43), extroversion (β = .32) and openness to experience3(β = .18).

    Following these results, connections between personality and approach motivation are discussed based on the assumption that human beings are cybernetic (goal directed and self regulating) systems (DeYoung, 2014).

  • 63.
    Carlsson, Linda
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Hafstrand, Elin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    En utvärdering av ungdomars akademiska målsättningar: Betydelsen av prestationsbaserad självkänsla, personlighet och kön i samverkan med akademiska målsättningar2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    What goals young people have after their high school studies and how easily they are achieved are influenced by what kind of personality one has (Zhou, 2015).

    This study examined how young people's performance-based self-esteem and personality interacted with their academic goals. To understand how these variables, interact and differentiate, the study has been conducted in two secondary schools where fifty-nine students participated in a survey. The youth were between 15-19 years old and were distributed fairly evenly between girls and boys. Research shows (Spinath, Eckert & Steinmayr, (2014) that girls are more likely to achieve their academic goals than boys. This study has chosen to investigate whether personality and performance-based self-esteem are factors that capture. The questionnaires used in the study was the Big Five Personality Test and Performance-Based Self-esteem Scale (Dåderman, Personal communication, 2018; Hallmer, Josephson & Torgén, 2005).

    The study results showed that girls more than boys intend to study further after high school. There was a positive relationship between performance-based self-esteem and personality trait neuroticism. Individuals with a high degree of conscientiousness show a statistical significance in pursuit of further education after secondary school. These results are in line with previous research results (Furnham, Monsen & Ahmetoglu, 2009).

  • 64.
    Carttenridge, Alexandra
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Att inte räcka till: En kvalitativ studie om (o)hälsan bland nyexaminerade förskollärare inom förskolans verksamhet2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to examine the newly graduated preschool teachers (ill)health within the preschool. In the study, the well-being of preschool teachers is examined in relation to the preschool's working environment.

    The informants consisted of four preschool teachers aged 26-33 who have been working for one and a half to three years. The informants work at four different districts within the City of Gothenburg. The study is based on preschool teachers' reports on their own work. The material was collected through interviews and analyzed on the basis of Lazarus and Folkman's (1984) transactional theory of stress and coping, Karasek and Theorell's (1990) job demands-control model and Antonovsky's (1979) sense of coherence model.

    In the study, four themes emerged which are to find their role, to create context, to handle challenges and to gain insight. The study shows that the result is in line with the theory, models and previous research. The result shows that the participants in the study experience a high degree of mental and physical (un)health during their first working years.

    The study's results suggest that work-related (un)health is based on external and internal factors. The external factors concern the organizational design such as lack of resources, high workload and high child numbers, while the internal factors are the preschool teachers lack of job satisfaction and motivation.

  • 65.
    Chang, Lei
    et al.
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Lu, Hui Jing
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA; Institute for Fiscal Studies, London, UK.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA ; King Abdulaziz University.
    Chen, Bin-Bin
    Fudan University Department of Psychology, Shanghai, China..
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples Federico II, Department of Humanistic Studies, Napoli, Italy..
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Department of Special Education, Zarqa, Jordan; Counseling, Special Education, and Neuroscience Division, Emirates College for Advanced Education, Abu Dhabi, UAE.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology , Rome, Italy .
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Department of Psychology, Bogota,Colombia.
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    External environment and internal state in relation to life-history behavioural profiles of adolescents in nine countries2019In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 286, no 1917, article id 20192097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The external environment has traditionally been considered as the primary driver of animal life history (LH). Recent research suggests that animals' internal state is also involved, especially in forming LH behavioural phenotypes. The present study investigated how these two factors interact in formulating LH in humans. Based on a longitudinal sample of 1223 adolescents in nine countries, the results show that harsh and unpredictable environments and adverse internal states in childhood are each uniquely associated with fast LH behavioural profiles consisting of aggression, impulsivity, and risk-taking in adolescence. The external environment and internal state each strengthened the LH association of the other, but overall the external environment was more predictive of LH than was the internal state. These findings suggest that individuals rely on a multitude and consistency of sensory information in more decisively calibrating LH and behavioural strategies.

  • 66.
    Chang, Lei
    et al.
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Lu, Hui Jing
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Department of Applied Social Sciences, China.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Chen, Bin Bin
    Fudan University, Department of Psychology, Shanghai, China.
    Tian, Qian
    Fudan University, Department of Psychology, Shanghai, China.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Department of Psychology, Italy.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan .
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psycholog , Rome, Italy .
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Medellín, Colombia.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Environmental harshness and unpredictability, life history, and social and academic behavior of adolescents in nine countries.2019In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 890-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Safety is essential for life. To survive, humans and other animals have developed sets of psychological and physiological adaptations known as life history (LH) tradeoff strategies in response to various safety constraints. Evolutionarily selected LH strategies in turn regulate development and behavior to optimize survival under prevailing safety conditions. The present study tested LH hypotheses concerning safety based on a 6-year longitudinal sample of 1,245 adolescents and their parents from 9 countries. The results revealed that, invariant across countries, environmental harshness, and unpredictability (lack of safety) was negatively associated with slow LH behavioral profile, measured 2 years later, and slow LH behavioral profile was negatively and positively associated with externalizing behavior and academic performance, respectively, as measured an additional 2 years later. These results support the evolutionary conception that human development responds to environmental safety cues through LH regulation of social and learning behaviors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

  • 67.
    Coster, Matilda
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Johnsson, Rebecca
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tillfredsställelse med livet bland svenskar: En kvantitativ studie om vad som predicerar tillfredsställelse med livet.2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There are many psychological factors that affect how satisfied a person is with his life, and many studies have investigated whether it is possible to predict life satisfaction. To achieve a high level of life satisfaction is a relevant goal that concerns everyone. In this study, life satisfaction was examined and the aim of this study was to study how much of the variance in life satisfaction that could be explained by the variables: income, age, gender and to what extent the participants had creative- and independent work.

    An analysis was performed on already collected data from the World Value Survey. Data consisted of 1204 participants, of which 50 percent were women and 50 percent were men, aged 18-85 years.

    The results revealed that all the variables together accounted for 9 percent of the variance in life satisfaction. Consistent with the other studies in the literature, findings indicate that income could predict the most variance in life satisfaction. Results also revealed that having independent work was important. Furthermore findings also suggest that self-reported creative work was not a vital variable when predicting life satisfaction.

    This study concluded, similar to previous research, that there is a strong relationship between income and self-reported life satisfaction.

  • 68.
    Dafgård, Pia
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Edvardsen, Catrin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Du är huvudpersonen i ditt liv, eller?: En kvalitativ studie om kvinnors upplevelser av empowerment dimensioner på kvinnodominerade arbetsplatser2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The background of this study is to promote women in working life and to find methods for preventing ill health and sick leave, as well as highlighting women's experiences of empowerment processes in their area regarding their work situations. The purpose of this qualitative study is to investigate what strengthens women in their professional role. Do women have the opportunity to participate in empowerment processes and influence their skills development? Do women experience powerlessness in the women-dominated workplaces? The vision of the ideal work in which organization and employees are prioritized equally is the human relation theory where organization and employees need each other. Seven workplaces are represented by fifteen informants interviewed with a hermeneutic approach and interpreted through the IPA model. The result showed differences in the different workplaces that gave empowerment the dimensions of empowerment, powerlessness and strengthening through skills development. Where more knowledge gives more power.

  • 69.
    Dahl, Therése
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Hevosaho, Therése
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tillsammans är vi trygga: En kvantitativ studie om den feministiska identitetens inverkan på unga kvinnors upplevda trygghet i ett samhälle präglat av sexuella trakasserier2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual harassment is not a new phenomenon, but with the #metoo movement, this world-wide health problem showed a whole new side. Studies have shown that future perceptions of safety are significantly affected after being sexually harassed. Also, women who identify themselves as feminists, have better coping strategies after being sexually harassed, than women who do not identify themselves as feminists.

    This study aimed to explore if a feminist identity would serve young women as a protector for keeping the perception of safety in a world where sexual harassment is perceived as a big problem. Girls (n =27) at a Swedish gymnasium were heard through a web-based survey, which is the fundament of the study´s data.

    The results showed that there was no relation between feminist identity and perceived safety or the perception of sexual harassment as a societal problem. However, a significant relation between sexual harassment and perceived safety was to be found.

  • 70.
    Dahlström, Ellen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Swedén, Emelie
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    "Alltså den här gillningen eller kommentaren liksom, det ger en viss bekräftelse...": En kvalitativ studie om ungdomars meningsskapande på Instagram2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to increase the understanding for the meaning-making that comes to expression when adolescents uses the social network Instagram. Specific focus is directed on what defines meaning-making in relation to adolescents experiences of the images on body ideal and health that is portrayed on Instagram. To answer the purpose we have used a qualitative research method, inspired by a phenomenological approach. We have completed three group interviews with a total of 16 adolescents in the last year of high school and then analyzed the data with inspiration from a qualitative content analysis. The result shows that Instagram are used as a tool to maintain the social interaction, on and beside of the media. By being interesting and show your best side the users also seek confirmation, which they get from likes and comments. The results also shows that adolescents are aware that the image of body ideal and health that exists on Instagram only shows a part of the whole picture. To be healthy the adolescents express that it's important to love yourself and have a balance in life.

  • 71. Daneback, Kristian
    et al.
    Sorbring, EmmaUniversity West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Socialt arbete och internet: att förstå och hantera sociala problem på nya arenor2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    et al.
    Département de psychologie, Université de Poiters, France.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Learning from tinnitus patients' narratives: A case study in the psychodynamic approach2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, no 19540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tinnitus is assumed to be the perception of sound that results exclusively from activity within the nervous system without any external stimulation. Approximately 1-2% of the population regard their tinnitus as a serious threat towards their quality of life. The way the patients describe their suffering varies, sometimes also depending on the interest and insight of the clinician to whom they turn to for help. The lack of insightful narratives of someone who is severely annoyed by the presence of a constant tinnitus sound may lead to limited and biased models of tinnitus suffering. In the present case study the participating patient, a woman aged 70, shared her experience of being victimized by tinnitus with the clinician/ researcher during a number of psychotherapeutic sessions. The psychodynamic, narrative approach, made it possible for the client to articulate the unique and specific meaning that she experienced as being part of her suffering. In her words, tinnitus became a tolerable symptom that she managed to work through within psychotherapeutic alliance

  • 73.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    et al.
    University of Poitiers, France.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    The construction of meaning through psychotherapy: a tinnitus case story2014In: / [ed] Professor Dr. Birgit Mazurek, Charité University Hospital, Berlin, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Besides considering tinnitus as a complication following a hearing impairment or a sudden noise trauma, it is essential to consider the emotional suffering of the patient as it may be linked to personal experiences in life. Repressed traumatic incidents can manifest itself in the wake of tinnitus onset.  

     

    Objective

    In the case of tinnitus suffering psychotherapy resting on psychodynamic foundations has a very remote place in the literature. Naturally, the narrative of the client is of special quality in the psychodynamic psychotherapy approach. The objective of this study was therefore to illustrate how the narrative of a suffering client can be an inherent part of psychotherapy as well as a source of qualitative data in research on tinnitus (Dauman & Erlandsson, 2012). 

     

    Method

    The patient was a 70 years old woman with tinnitus (Lucie) who experienced her suffering as life threatening, which at times required psychiatric hospitalization. She participated in 16 psychotherapy sessions taken place over a period of eight months. The interview method building on free associations was judged to be the best way to understand the meaning behind evoked narratives of the patient.

     

    Results

    With the purpose to describe the analytical procedure we applied a narrative structure based on the following four labels: Listening to Lucie - Learning from Lucie’s speech - Narrative breakdown and psychotherapy  - Psychodynamic insights on Lucie’s emotional drives. The social dimension of the patient’s suffering was a central theme in her narrative, expressed by others’ reluctance to listen to her despair as well as her own deep sorrow for a broken social bond prior to her psychological brake-down.

     

    Conclusion

    The construction of meaning is a human act of self-preservation. In this case, it helped the patient to overcome alienation and made her tinnitus bearable.

  • 74.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    et al.
    University of Poitiers, CAPS-EA4050, Department of Psychology, Poitiers, France.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Albarracin, Dolores
    University of Poitiers, CAPS-EA4050, Department of Psychology, Poitiers, France.
    Dauman, Rene
    University of Bordeaux, INCIA, UMR Centre Nationnal de la Recherche Scientifique, Bordeaux, France.
    Exploring Tinnitus-Induced Disablement by Persistent Frustration in Aging Individuals: A Grounded Theory Study2017In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 9, p. 1-18, article id 272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Qualitative research can help to improve the management of patients, meet their expectations and assist physicians in alleviating their suffering. The perception of moment-to-moment variability in tinnitus annoyance is an emerging field of exploration. This study sought to enlighten variability in tinnitus-induced disablement using a qualitative approach. Methods: Twelve participants (six females, six males, aged 51-79) were recruited via the French Tinnitus Association Journal for participation in recorded semi-structured interviews. Each participant had three interviews lasting 1 h, the sessions being separated one from the other by 2 weeks. Following recommendations of Charmaz (2014), the second and third interviews were aimed at gathering rich data, by enhancing the participants’ reflexivity in the circumstances of distress caused by tinnitus. After transcription, the data (n = 36 interviews) were analyzed using the approach to Grounded Theory proposed by Strauss and Corbin (1998). Results: Tinnitus as persistent frustration emerged as being the core category uniting all the other categories of the study. Hence, the core category accounted for the broader scope in participants’ experience of chronic tinnitus. It is suggested that tinnitus-induced disablement varied according to the degree of frustration felt by the participants in not being able to achieve their goals. The implications of this were analyzed using the following categories: “Losing body ownership,” “ Lacking perspectives,” and “Persevering through difficulties.” Based on these findings, we draw a substantive theory of tinnitus tolerance that promotes an active, disciplined and individualized approach to tinnitus-induced disablement. The model distinguishes pathways from sustained suffering to reduced annoyance (i.e., emerging tolerance). It accounts for difficulties that the participants experienced with a perceived unchanged annoyance over time. Furthermore, this model identifies a set of new attitudes toward oneself and others that tinnitus tolerance would entail. Conclusion: The subjective experience of frustration enlightens tinnitus-induced disablement, offering new perspectives for long-term self-management. Modulation of frustration, rather than moderation of tinnitus interference, is suggested as a new approach to the clinical management of tinnitus-related distress.

  • 75.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Poitiers, France.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Carlsson, Sven
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Habituation models: can tinnitus be compared to anexternal sound?2014In: / [ed] Professor Dr. Birgit Mazurek, Charité University Hospital, Berlin, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    The process of habituation often remains obscure to those patients most disturbed by tinnitus.

    Since three decades, the Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) has promoted a habituation model (Hallam et al. 1984) founded on experimental data regarding the orienting response (OR) (Horvath 1980). Habituation of the OR is the natural extinction of attention to repeated identical stimuli which lose their ability to trigger orientation. Considering epidemiological data, the habituation model (Hallam & McKenna, 2006) hypothesizes that:

    1. tolerance is “a natural and inevitable process” illustrated by three quarter of people with tinnitus;

    2. annoyance is “a consequence of a failure to cease attending” to tinnitus, because of psycho-physiological factors that delay a natural process to occur (i.e., extinction of the OR)

  • 76.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    et al.
    University of Poitiers, France.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Carlsson, Sven G.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Habituation theories in current models of chronic tinnitus: evidence and criticism2013In: Habituation: theories, characteristics and biological mechanisms / [ed] Buskirk, Arie, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc. , 2013, 1, p. 55-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    et al.
    University of Poitiers,  CAPS-EA4050, Department of Psychology, Poitiers.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Lundin, Linda
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Dauman, Rene
    University of Bordeaux and CHU of Bordeaux, Tinnitus Clinic, Department of ORL-HNS, CNRS-UMR 5287, Bordeaux.
    Intra-individual variability in tinnitus patients: Current thoughts and perspectives.2015In: HNO (Berlin. Print), ISSN 0017-6192, E-ISSN 1433-0458, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 302-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most tinnitus studies have attempted to compare groups of individuals, thus revealing inter-individuals differences, i.e., variations between compared subjects. For methodological reasons, inter-individual studies cannot take into account the variability of tinnitus experience, which has been known for decades to be relevant in daily practice with tinnitus patients. The concept of intra-individual variability has been promoted in the research literature, in order to shed light on this aspect of individual perception. In previous studies, unrelated to hearing, the concept of intra-individual variability implied inclusion of the environment (i.e., physical and social interactions) as a factor of individual performance. In tinnitus research, we believe that the concept of variability (within a person) could find a place beside the concept of variation (between groups of subjects). In this paper, four perspectives of tinnitus experiences from the clinical and research fields are described: (1) ENT consultation; (2) short-term group psychotherapy; (3) psychodynamic psychotherapy; and (4) clinical psychological research. Intra-individual variability stresses the importance of defining tinnitus in a dynamic way, contrary to the current definition of tinnitus as the perception of sound(s). In clinical practice, it is useful to embrace the perspective of the perceiverof tinnitus, and to include social and cultural circumstances as well as audiological/physical changes.

  • 78.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    et al.
    University of Poitiers, Department of Psychology, Poitiers , France.
    Haza, Marion
    University of Poitiers, Department of Psychology, Poitiers , France.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Liberating parents from guilt: a grounded theory study of parents' internet communities for the recognition of ADHD2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 1564520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study presents a qualitative analysis of information posted on the Internet by two communities of French parents promoting the recognition of ADHD in the context of current health and school practices.

    METHOD: Grounded Theory (Strauss & Corbin's approach) was applied to the posted messages, with the aim to discover the main concern and common theme through a constant comparison analysis.

    RESULTS: Liberating parents from feeling responsible for their child's misconduct was found to be the core category. From this perspective, we account for the commitment of the digital communities to formalize the child's conduct as a consequence of a neurodevelopmental disorder. This approach helps to account for the promotion of behavioural expertise and conditioning strategies (e.g., positive reinforcement) for handling the child's so-called disorder as appropriate parental responses. Giving evidence for parenting struggles was the third main concern of the communities, in the face of perceived skepticism from professionals towards ADHD as a medical condition.

    CONCLUSIONS: By using examples from countries that are found to have a more pro-medical approach to ADHD, the communities aim at improving such medical practices in France. Issues surrounding the claim that ADHD would require a specific style of parenting are also discussed.

  • 79.
    Davis, Linnea
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Att skapa en gemensam organisationskultur: En kvalitativ fallstudie på Folktandvården Västra Götaland2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2017 Folktandvarden Vastra Gotaland has worked with its organizational culture to develop its basic values and to be able to work towards a desired culture. By a distinctly organizational culture, it becomes more clearer what the organization stands for. Managers and leaders are seen as key people in living and developing the culture. The purpose of my case study is to describe how clinic managers address the change process with culture and values as well as how their experience is. The study was carried out with a qualitative approach, where I conducted semi-structured interviews to enable a deeper understanding of the clinic heads' perception. The result shows that most of the managers find that cultural work is difficult to deal with. There is a lack of time and the work is perceived as unclear, which makes it difficult for the managers to keep the commitment up. Much of the work is carried out locally at the clinics and therefore contributes to strengthening subcultures instead of promoting an overall organizational culture. One of the conclusions from the study is that leadership is of great importance to how well the cultural work falls out. The heads of the clinic need support and knowledge to be able to drive the cultural work forward. The management needs to clarify the structure and process and have a closer dialogue with the clinic managers about what is expected of them in the next phase.

  • 80.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    et al.
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, China.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Medellín, Colombia.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Within- and between-person and group variance in behavior and beliefs in cross-cultural longitudinal data2018In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 62, p. 207-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This study grapples with what it means to be part of a cultural group, from a statistical modeling perspective. The method we present compares within- and between-cultural group variability, in behaviors in families. We demonstrate the method using a cross-cultural study of adolescent development and parenting, involving three biennial waves of longitudinal data from 1296 eight-year-olds and their parents (multiple cultures in nine countries). Family members completed surveys about parental negativity and positivity, child academic and social-emotional adjustment, and attitudes about parenting and adolescent behavior. Variance estimates were computed at the cultural group, person, and within-person level using multilevel models. Of the longitudinally consistent variance, most was within and not between cultural groups—although there was a wide range of between-group differences. This approach to quantifying cultural group variability may prove valuable when applied to quantitative studies of acculturation.

  • 81.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    et al.
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad San Buenaventura,Consultorio Psicologico Popular, Medellín, Colombia.
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan; Emirates College for Advanced Education.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples Federico II, Department of Psychology, Italy.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psycholog , Rome, Italy .
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA ; King Abdulaziz University.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Chaos, Danger, and Maternal Parenting in Families: Links with Adolescent Adjustment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries2019In: Developmental Science, ISSN 1363-755X, E-ISSN 1467-7687, Vol. 22, no 5, article id e12855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current longitudinal study is the first comparative investigation across Low- and Middle- Income Countries (LMICs) to test the hypothesis that harsher and less affectionate maternal parenting (child age 14 years, on average) statistically mediates the prediction from prior household chaos and neighborhood danger (at 13 years) to subsequent adolescent maladjustment (externalizing, internalizing, and school performance problems at 15 years). The sample included 511 urban families in six LMICs: China, Colombia, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, and Thailand. Multigroup structural equation modeling showed consistent associations between chaos, danger, affectionate and harsh parenting, and adolescent adjustment problems. There was some support for the hypothesis, with nearly all countries showing a modest indirect effect of maternal hostility (but not affection) for adolescent externalizing, internalizing, and scholastic problems. Results provide further evidence that chaotic home and dangerous neighborhood environments increase risk for adolescent maladjustment in LMIC contexts, via harsher maternal parenting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 82.
    Dragin, Apilou
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Harlos Lundin, Camilla
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Är resiliens en framgångsfaktor på arbetsmarknaden?: - Personlighet som prediktor för resiliens2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the Swedish labor market jobseekers are largely judged based on their CV, despite the fact that employers increasingly require personal qualities like resistance to stress and ability to handle complex situations. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether personality factors or common recruitment factors have the highest predictive validity for resilience in work life. A digital questionnaire was compiled to quickly and easily reach respondents online. Measuring instruments IPIP30, COPSOQ II and The Resilience Scale were used to measure personality, perceived stress, quantitative requirements at work, risk of burnout and resilience. Data regarding age, sex, education level, grades, time in current employment and occupational area as well as total work experience were collected in order to collect classical recruitment factors. Data was analyzed from 252 professionals in the ages 17-62 (M = 34, SD = 10), 62% women and 38% men. At the time of the study the majority of the respondents worked full-time and their education level was primarily a secondary education or a bachelor's degree. To calculate the predictability for the current factors, a two-step hierarchical linear regression analysis was implemented. Results showed that personality factors can predict an individual's ability to handle work-related stress more reliably than common recruitment factors. Our analysis also indicated that classical recruitment methods such as CV review could not contribute with a reliable resilience assessment. Hopefully, our results could help enhancing

  • 83.
    Duell, Natasha
    et al.
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Icenogle, Grace
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Silva, Karol
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Chein, Jason
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Banich, Marie T.
    University of Colorado at Boulder, Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, United States.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Fanti, Kostas A.
    University of Cyprus, Department of Psychology, Cyprus.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia .
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Takash, Hanan M. S.
    Hashemite University, Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, Jordan.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Department of Psychology, Italy.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Chaudhary, Nandita
    University of Delhi, Department of Human Development and Childhood Studies, Lady Irwin College, India.
    A cross-sectional examination of response inhibition and working memory on the Stroop task2018In: Cognitive development, ISSN 0885-2014, E-ISSN 1879-226X, Vol. 47, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors examined the association between working memory and response inhibition on the Stroop task using a cross-sectional, international sample of 5099 individuals (49.3% male) ages 10–30 (M = 17.04 years; SD = 5.9). Response inhibition was measured using a Stroop task that included "equal" and "unequal" blocks, during which the relative frequency of neutral and incongruent trials was manipulated. Competing stimuli in incongruent trials evinced inhibitory functioning, and having a lower proportion of incongruent trials (as in unequal blocks) placed higher demands on working memory. Results for accuracy indicated that age and working memory were independently associated with response inhibition. Age differences in response inhibition followed a curvilinear trajectory, with performance improving into early adulthood. Response inhibition was greatest among individuals with high working memory. For response time, age uniquely predicted response inhibition in unequal blocks. In equal blocks, age differences in response inhibition varied as a function of working memory, with age differences being least pronounced among individuals with high working memory. The implications of considering the association between response inhibition and working memory in the context of development are discussed.

  • 84.
    Duell, Natasha
    et al.
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA ; King Abdulaziz University.
    Icenogle, Grace
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Chein, Jason
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Chaudhary, Nandita
    ady Irwin College, Department of Human Development and Childhood Studies, LUniversity of Delhi, India.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology , Rome, Italy .
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Fanti, Kostas A.
    University of Cyprus, Department of Psychology, Cyprus.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Department of Psychology, Bogota,Colombia.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Department of Special Education, Zarqa, Jordan; Counseling, Special Education, and Neuroscience Division, Emirates College for Advanced Education, Abu Dhabi, UAE.
    Takash, Hanan M. S.
    Hashemite Univ, Queen Rania Fac Childhood, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples Federico II, Department of Humanistic Studies, Napoli, Italy..
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Correction: Age Patterns in Risk Taking Across the World (vol 47, pg 1052, 2018)2019In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 835-836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the original publication, the legends for Figs 4 and 5 were incorrect, such that each regression line was mislabeled with the incorrect country. Below are the correctly labeled countries. The authors apologize for any confusion or misinformation this error may have caused.

  • 85.
    Duell, Natasha
    et al.
    Temple University, Department of Psychology,Philadelphia, USA.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University,Department of Psychology, Philadelphia, PA, USA and King Abdulaziz University.
    Icenogle, Grace
    Temple University, Department of Psychology,Philadelphia, USA.
    Chein, Jason
    Temple University, Department of Psychology,Philadelphia, USA.
    Chaudhary, Nandita
    University of Delhi, Department of Human Development and Childhood Studies, Lady Irwin College, New Delhi, India..
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA..
    Fanti, Kostas A.
    University of Cyprus, Department of Psychology, Kallipoleos, Cyprus..
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA..
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma, La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Roma, RM, Italy.
    Skinner, Anne T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand..
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia .
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, Metro Manila, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education, Al Zafranah, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Takash, Hanan M. S.
    Hashemite University, Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, Zarqa, Jordan..
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Department of Psychology, Caserta, CE, Italy .
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology,Zhuhai Shi, China..
    Age patterns in risk taking across the world2018In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 1052-1072Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiological data indicate that risk behaviors are among the leading causes of adolescent morbidity and mortality worldwide. Consistent with this, laboratory-based studies of age differences in risk behavior allude to a peak in adolescence, suggesting that adolescents demonstrate a heightened propensity, or inherent inclination, to take risks. Unlike epidemiological reports, studies of risk taking propensity have been limited to Western samples, leaving questions about the extent to which heightened risk taking propensity is an inherent or culturally constructed aspect of adolescence. In the present study, age patterns in risk-taking propensity (using two laboratory tasks: the Stoplight and the BART) and real-world risk taking (using self-reports of health and antisocial risk taking) were examined in a sample of 5,227 individuals (50.7% female) ages 10-30 (M = 17.05 years, SD = 5.91) from 11 Western and non-Western countries (China, Colombia, Cyprus, India, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the US). Two hypotheses were tested: (1) risk taking follows an inverted-U pattern across age groups, peaking earlier on measures of risk taking propensity than on measures of real-world risk taking, and (2) age patterns in risk taking propensity are more consistent across countries than age patterns in real-world risk taking. Overall, risk taking followed the hypothesized inverted-U pattern across age groups, with health risk taking evincing the latest peak. Age patterns in risk taking propensity were more consistent across countries than age patterns in real-world risk taking. Results suggest that although the association between age and risk taking is sensitive to measurement and culture, around the world, risk taking is generally highest among late adolescents

  • 86.
    Dunkel, Caroline
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Eriksen, Liv
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Generationsskillnader och work-life balance2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Work-life balance has been found to be of importance to the physical and mental well-being, and statistics show that sick leave due to stress and mental illness has increased in Sweden in recent years.

    Generational differences are a debated topic, let alone in an occupational context. Therefore, this study aims at investigating if there are differences between how generation X and generation Y in Sweden, experience the ability to balance work and private life.

    To investigate this, a quantitative survey was conducted in the form of a questionnaire based on an already validated instrument for measuring work-life balance and some background questions. A total of 324 individuals in the ages 20-53, evenly distributed between generation X and Y, participated.

    The result shows that there is no difference between the generations concerning experienced work-life balance. However, the result shows that work and private life affect each other in both generations, and that it is to a greater extent the work that inhibits the balance between work and private life. Other factors that prove to correlate with work-life balance are weekly working hours, level of education and gender. More worked hours/week and higher completed education meant higher levels of perceived imbalance between work and private life of both generations. The women of generation X were found to experience a greater degree of imbalance than men. The study shows that there is no need to take into account generation in the prevention of imbalance, but also the importance of employers' awareness of the impact of work for the individual's ability to maintain balance between work and private life.

  • 87.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    et al.
    Stockholm universitet.
    Haas, Linda
    Indiana University.
    Hwang, Philip
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sweden country note2017In: International Review of Leave Policies and Research 2017 / [ed] Koslowski A., Blum S. and Moss P. (eds.), Wien: Austrian Institute for Family Studies University of Vienna , 2017, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Basinska, Beata A.
    Gdansk University of Technology, Faculty of Management and Economics, Poland.
    Job Demands, Engagement, and Turnover Intentions in Polish Nurses: The Role of Work-Family Interface2018In: Psychosocial job dimensions and distress/well-being: issues and challenges in occupational health psychology / [ed] Renato Pisanti, James Campbell Quick, Montgomery Anthony, Frontiers Media S.A., 2018, 1, p. 91-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Poland has lower ratios of employed registered nurses per 1,000 inhabitants than the EU average. Polish nurses work under miserable conditions without assisting personnel, and they reconcile their professional demands with responsibilities for their families; 96% of them are women.

    Rationale/Aims:

    This study uses Hobfoll's conservation of resources (CORs) theory to explain the role of various resources in the improvement of work conditions in the nursing profession. Work-family conflict (WFC) and family work conflict (FWC) threaten to deplete nurses' resources. This paper set out to (1) examine the extent to which perceived job demands (workload and interpersonal conflicts at work) and engagement (vigor, dedication, and absorption) are associated with turnover intentions (the intention to leave the present workplace and the intention to leave the nursing profession); (2) attempt to determine whether levels of WFC and FWC moderate these associations.

    Design/Method:

    This study comprised 188 female registered nurses. The inclusion criterion was to live with a partner and/or have children.

    Results:

    WFC was moderately related to FWC. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that only high job demands and low vigor were significantly associated with turnover intentions. WFC was experienced more intensively than FWC. Job demands, vigor, dedication, and turnover intentions had a strong effect on WFC, while absorption had a strong effect on FWC. However, levels of WFC and FWC did not significantly moderate these associations.

    Originality/Conclusion:

    The study produces new knowledge by examining a constellation of job demands, work engagement and WFC, which reflect the management of personal resources. Results from such a constellation in nurses from countries with a post-transformational economic system have not previously been discussed in the light of COR theory. Most importantly, we conclude that WFC does not intensify turnover intentions.

  • 89.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Forensic Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet.
    Hallberg, Angela
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skog, Sandra
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    A Leadership Meta-Resource Factor Explicates Task Performance, Work Engagement, and Perceived Stress2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research links emotional leadership resources (e.g., emotional intelligence) positively with important working life outcomes, such as health, job satisfaction, job performance, organizational commitment, and leadership effectiveness. However, no study has yet described emotional leadership resources based on traits linked with work motivation and stress resilience. The aim was to describe emotional leadership resources based on traits in a novel fashion (meta-traits, based on structural trait analysis). Our hypothesis was that an emotional leadership meta-resource factor would converge with motivation and stress resilience. Participants (N = 344) were leaders aged between 23 and 65 years (M = 49, SD = 8.6; 58% women) who completed an online questionnaire including measures of common traits (e.g., trait emotional intelligence, Big Six), and coping resources. We estimated work motivation by self-rated work engagement, and stress resilience by the level of perceived stress. We used an exploratory factor analysis approach to describe and structure our data, and structural equation modelling (SEM) to test whether an emotional leadership meta-resource factor would converge with work motivation and stress resilience. Our findings revealed that the investigated traits and resources could be described along four broad emotional leadership resource factors, namely (1) Externalizing, (2) Moral goodness, (3) “Destrudo”, and (4) Rational mastery. As expected, the emotional leadership meta-resource factor showed a strong convergence (~.80) with both work motivation and stress resilience. “Externalizing” and “Rational mastery” were the most important emotional resource factors. The findings are discussed using Hobfoll’s motivational Conservation of Resources (COR) theory. It is concluded that common traits, including personality traits, and coping resources comprise an emotional leadership meta-resource factor, which to a high degree converges with work motivation and stress resilience. The results imply that organizations may strengthen work motivation and reduce stress by recruiting leaders possessing valuable emotional leadership resources.

  • 90.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Hallberg, Angela
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skog, Sandra
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Emotional Leadership in Relation to Task Performance, Work Engagement, and Perceived Stress2019In: Working for the greater good: Inspiring people, designing jobs and leading organizations for a more inclusive society / [ed] Prof. Franco Fraccaroli, Turin, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe and explore emotional leadership meta-resources based on traits (self-esteem, emotional intelligence, leadership intelligence, empathy, Big Six, narcissism) and coping resources (e.g. cognitive), using Hobfoll’s motivational Conservation of Resources (COR). Our hypothesis was that leadership resources would be positively related to work engagement and negatively to perceived stress.

    Methodology: Participants (N = 344) were leaders aged between 23 and 65 years (M = 49, SD = 8.6; 58% women) who completed an online questionnaire including measures of common traits and coping resources. Work engagement was measured by Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9; Schaufeli & Bakker, 2004), and stress by Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10; Cohen & Williamson, 1988). We used an exploratory factor analysis approach to describe and structure our data, and structural equation modelling (SEM) to test whether an emotional leadership meta-resource factor would be positively related to work engagement and negatively to perceived stress.

    Results: The investigated traits and resources could be described along four broad emotional leadership resource factors: (1) Externalizing; (2) Moral goodness; (3) Destrudo; (4) Rational mastery. As expected, the emotional leadership meta-resource factor showed a strong convergence (~.80) with both work engagement (positively) and perceived stress (negatively). 

    Research/Practical Implications: The results imply that organizations may strengthen work engagement and reduce stress by recruiting leaders possessing valuable emotional leadership resources.

    Originality/Value: Our study is the first to describe emotional leadership resources based on traits linked with work engagement and perceived stress in a novel fashion (meta-traits, based on structural trait analysis).

  • 91.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Hellström, Åke
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Interrater Reliability of Psychopathy Checklist-Revised: Results on Multiple Analysis Levels for a Sample of Patients Undergoing Forensic Psychiatric Evaluation2018In: Criminal justice and behavior, ISSN 0093-8548, E-ISSN 1552-3594, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 234-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scores from the Psychopathy Checklist–Revised (PCL-R) are used to support decisions regarding personal liberty. In our study, performed in an applied forensic psychiatric setting, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for absolute agreement, single rater (ICCA1) were .89 for the total score, .82 for Factor 1, .88 for Factor 2, and .78 to .86 for the four facets. These results stand in contrast to lower reliabilities found in a majority of field studies. Disagreement among raters made a low contribution (0%-5%) to variability of scores on the total score, factor, and facet level. For individual items, ICCA1 varied from .38 to .94, with >.80 for seven of the 20 items. Items 17 (“Many short-term marital relationships”) and 19 (“Revocation of conditional release”) showed very low reliabilities (.38 and .43, respectively). The importance of knowledge about factors that can affect scoring of forensic instruments (e.g., education, training, experience, motivation, raters’ personality, and quality of file data) is emphasized.

  • 92.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Hjalmarsson, Annica
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Relationship between emotional intelligence, personality and work performance: A cross-sectional study2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The background of this study is the observation that people with high emotional intelligence (EI) perform well at work. The aim of this study was to further validate the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short Form (TEIQue-SF) by (1) investigating its relationships with the Mini International Personality Item Pool-6 Inventory (Mini-IPIP6), the Short Dark Triad Assessment (SD3), and the Individual Work Performance Questionnaire (IWPQ), (2) identifying which personality traits best explain variations in trait EI, and (3) investigating whether trait EI can predict variations in each dimension (Task Performance, Contextual Performance, and Counterproductive Work Behavior, CWB) of self-perceived work performance. A cross-sectional study was done with 228 Swedish participants (M = 34 years, SD = 12.6, range 16-71 years, 66% women) with an average work experience of 14 years (SD = 11.5). One expected result was that all dimensions of trait EI correlated negatively with Neuroticism and Machiavellianism, and positively with Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Openness to Experience, and Narcissism. Self-control and Sociability had, however, almost zero correlation with Machiavellianism. A positive correlation was found between all dimensions of EI and Task Performance and Contextual Performance. Standard regression analyses showed that 26% to 46% of the variation in the different dimensions of EI was explained by the “Big Six” personality traits. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that trait EI accounted for a significant proportion of the variation in Contextual Performance that was not explained by any of the “Big Six” personality traits, and that trait EI did not explain any variation in CWB above Neuroticism and Honesty-Humility. In addition, trait EI explained an additional 6% of the variation in Task Performance when controlling for gender, age, Neuroticism and Conscientiousness. It is concluded that the Swedish version of the TEIQue-SF has shown reasonable theoretically and empirically grounded relationships with relevant variables for the workplace.

  • 93.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ingelgård, Anders
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Mölnlycke Health Care .
    Koopmans, Linda
    Sustainable Productivity & Employability, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Cross-cultural adaptation, from Dutch to Swedish language, of the Individual Work Performance Questionnaire2020In: WORK: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment, and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 97-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for a short, self-rated, validated and reliable instrument for individual work performance suitable for generic use in the Swedish work and organizational context. The Individual Work Performance Questionnaire (IWPQ), comprising originally 47 items, was initially developed in the Netherlands, based on a four-dimensional conceptual framework, in which individual work performance consisted of task performance, contextual performance, adaptive performance, and counterproductive work behavior. During the development process, IWPQ was shortened to 18 items with three scales formally labeled as Task performance, Contextual performance, and Counterproductive work behavior (CWB), capturing three work performance types. The current version of the IWPQ, consisting of 18 items and three scales, was then translated as well as cross-culturally adapted to American-English and Indonesian contexts.

    OBJECTIVES: To translate and adapt the current IWPQ version, consisting of 18 items, from the Dutch to the Swedish context, to assess its content validity through cognitive interviews, to apply it to a pilot group to present descriptive statistics, to calculate the questionnaire’s internal consistency, as well as to clarify whether the translated items capture three or four performance types.

    METHODS: The Dutch version of the IWPQ, consisting of 18 items, was translated into Swedish. A six-stage translation and adaptation process was used: forward translation, synthesis, back translation, harmonization, cognitive interviews, revision, and sampling and analyses of pilot data for 206 managers (149 women) from five Swedish municipalities.

    RESULTS: IWPQ instructions, wording of a few items and one response form were slightly modified. The pilot testing showed Cronbach’s alphas similar to the Dutch version of the IWPQ, ranging between 0.73 and 0.82, good mean-inter-item correlations (all above 0.36). In deciding how many factors to retain, we employed both parallel analysis (PA), and Velicer’s minimum average partial (MAP) test. The number of factors to retain was, as indicated by PA, four, and by MAP, three or four. Exploratory factor analysis (principal axis factoring) revealed clearly separate factors, corresponding to four, rather than three, performance types. A new factor, roughly representing adaptive performance, comprised in the original, longer version of the IWPQ, emerged.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish version of the IWPQ was successfully translated and adapted in a pilot group of managers. Before it is used, it should be validated in a larger group of managers and in more heterogeneous groups of both white- and blue-collar workers.

  • 94.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ragnestål Impola, Carina
    Basinska, Beata A.
    Gdansk University of Technology, Faculty of Management and Economics, Poland.
    Some Bright And Dark Sides Of Personality May Be Adaptive For Well-Being In Face Of Workplace Bullying2017In: Enabling Change Through Work and Organizational Psychology : Opportunities and Challenges for Research and Practice, Dublin, Irland, 2017, article id Th-OR-S36-2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Targets of workplace bullying tend to have poor health, and we set out to determine whether personality may predict their health quality. 

    Design/Methodology We collected data from 172 people (98 women); social workers, engineers and restaurant employees. To measure health, we used parts of EQ-5D (usual activities, pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression), and EQ VAS, a visual analogue scale. Bright (Big-Six) and dark (Machiavellianism, subclinical psychopathy, and narcissism) personality traits were measured by MiniIPIP6 and Short-D3. NAQ-R was used to determine who feel bullied. The relationships of the traits and bullying with health (outcome) were analyzed using 3-step hierarchical linear regressions, controlling for gender, age and social desirability.

    Results In face of workplace bullying low extraversion, humility-sincerity and low narcissism significantly predicted poor health related to both discomfort and usual activities. Separate regression models regarding both bright and dark sides of personality predicting depression/anxiety became non-significant when NAQ-R was entered.

    Limitations Cross-sectional design and Swedish population.

    Research/Practical Implications These results imply that high extraversion and narcissism may protect aspects of health important for working life in face of workplace bullying, while low levels of these traits make a target’s health more sensitive. 

    Originality/Value The study is the first to analyze different dimensions of health quality with predictors of both bright and dark personality in face of workplace bullying, discussing the results in the light of Hobfoll’s COR theory and evolution theory. 

  • 95.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ragnestål-Impola, Carina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Workplace bullies, not their victims, score high on the Dark Triad and Extraversion, and low on Agreeableness and Honesty-Humility2019In: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 5, no 10, article id e02609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most past research has focused mainly on the personality of the victims of bullying and not on the personality of workplace bullies. Some researchers have suggested that bullies and their victims may share bully-typifying personality traits. The aims of this study were to find out what characterizes the personalities of workplace bullies and their victims, and to investigate the relationship between the Dark Triad, HEXACO and workplace bullying. We tested three hypotheses. H1: Machiavellianism and Psychopathy, but not Narcissism, predict the use of bullying tactics (i.e., bullying perpetration). H2: (Low) Honesty-Humility, (low) Agreeableness and (high) Extraversion predict the use of bullying tactics. H3: Honesty-Humility moderates the association between Machiavellianism and the use of bullying tactics. Employees in southwestern Sweden (N = 172; 99 women) across various occupations and organizations were surveyed. Negative Acts Questionnaire-Perpetrators (NAQ-P) and Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) were used to assess the use of bullying tactics and victimization. NAQ-P was correlated with NAQ-R (r = .27), indicating some overlap between the use of bullying tactics and victimization. NAQ-P was correlated with Machiavellianism (.60), Psychopathy (.58), Narcissism (.54), Agreeableness (-.34), Honesty-Humility (-.29) and Extraversion (.28). The results of linear regressions confirmed H1, but only partially confirmed H2: Machiavellianism, Psychopathy, (low) Agreeableness and (high) Extraversion explained 32%, 25%, 27% and 19%, respectively, of the variation in the NAQ-P. Replicating past research, NAQ-R was correlated with Neuroticism (.27), Extraversion (-.22), Openness (-.19) and Conscientiousness (-.16). Neuroticism explained 25% and (low) Extraversion 17% of the variation in the NAQ-R. Confirming H3, Honesty-Humility moderated the relationship between the NAQ-P and Machiavellianism. We conclude that bullies, but not their victims, are callous, manipulative, extravert and disagreeable, and that dishonest Machiavellians are the biggest bullies of all. In practice, the victims of workplace bullying need strong and supportive leadership to protect them from bullies with exploitative and manipulative personality profiles.

  • 96.
    Einarsson, Amelie
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Haugen, Matilda
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    På spaning efter tillitsbaserad styrning: En kvalitativ studie om chefers erfarenheter av tillitsbaserad styrning och ledning i praktiken2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In mid-2016, the Government appointed the Trust delegation, with the aim of establishing a more trust-based management of municipalities and county councils. For the public sector, this means among other things, increased trust at all levels in the operations and increased capacity of action. The present qualitative study aims to examine how managers experiences trust-based management in organizations. To investigate this, six managers from a small municipality in western Sweden where interviewed about their experiences of leading with trust.

    The questions that are asked in the study are: How do managers express trust-based management? What practical methods do managers use to work in line with credible governance and management? Collected data from the interviews were analyzed with thematic analysis and presented in the result in two themes with related sub-themes. The study presents two themes, called Trust in interpersonal relations and The steering chain must breathe trust. The first theme consists of four sub-themes, I strongly believe in people's own abilities, Dialogue and communication solves a lot, It is about including employees and We must have people who dare to do things. The other theme consists of three subthemes, My mission is part of a entirety, It is not the council’s part to do decide how we deliver something specific and We are here for the citizens.

    The study stated that it requires a major effort to succeed in implementing and maintaining trust-based management. Structures and working methods are required to enable the work, as well as the right conditions. The managers need tools and methods, such as dialogue, time and coherence at different levels in the organization.

  • 97.
    Eklund, Annika
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Can we be prepared for the next accident or catastrophe?: Potential contributions of emergency collaboration exercises2013In: Proceedings of  The 8th International Conference in Critical Management Studies; 10 Jul 2013-12 Jul 2013; The University of Manchester. Manchester, United Kingdom: The University of Manchester Library; 2013., Manchester: University of Manchester Library , 2013, p. 1-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catastrophes and accidents (natural,technological, or man-made) have been subjected to scientific research from different disciplines and perspectives for a long time. Examples of these perspectives include community risk and vulnerability, human behaviour during crisis, fire behaviour and eco-system management, decision-making, communication, and collaboration issues. This paper deals with different perspectives of preparation and prevention in terms of accidents and catastrophes. The overall aim is to present an overview of different aspects on the possibility for organisations and societies to be prepared for the next incident and to highlight emergency exercises as a part of crisis management. In the second part of the paper the project “Collaboration exercises—from parallelto synchronous”, is introduced. The project is carried out in Sweden, and aims to explore how collaboration between police, ambulance and rescue services is practiced and developed during exercises. Of particular interest is inter-organisational collaboration and learning during exercises. To develop an understanding of these processes, a range of different types of emergency collaboration exercises was observed and participants were interviewed about their experiences. Tentative findings from the studies so far are briefly introduced. Some challenges of using exercises to increase the preparedness for managing the uncertainty and the unexpected are further discussed.

  • 98.
    Eklund, Annika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Carlström, Eric
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level. Göteborgs universitet, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa .
    Berlin, Johan
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Organisering av en fingerad verklighet: Om övningar mellan blåljusorganisationer2013In: Nordiske organisasjonsstudier, ISSN 1501-8237, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 34-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to elucidate exercise participants’ understanding of critical aspects of organizing and implementation of collaboration exercises with police, fire department and ambulance services. The focus is critical aspects in exercises that have, or are expected to have, bearing on the participants’ ability to learn. Collaboration exercises are used as a tool to reinforce and develop the preparedness for future incidents. The need for such exercises was usually advocated after critique to actions during largescale real-life incidents. The study had a qualitative approach and is based on phenomenographic analysis of interviews with participants from four exercises with different scenarios. The identified critical aspects of exercises were related to realism, acceptance for mistakes, exercise extent and aims and opportunities for joint discussions. The management of an accident can be described to a large extent depend on the organizations’ joint ability to adapt to the prevailing situation and to collaborate. For exercises to contribute to these abilities, they could benefit from shifting the focus to how to organize exercises that allow participants to test different decisions and actions, with less emphasis on the choice of scenario.

  • 99.
    Eklund, Annika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skyvell Nilsson, Maria
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Kliniskt basår för nyutexaminerade sjuksköterskor inom Västra Götalandsregionen: en utvärderingsrapport2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Newly graduate nurses (NGN) transition between basic education and work in a complex health care practice, as well as their intention of leaving the profession during the first year of work and how this can be prevented, is a global concern. NGN experience difficulties integrating workplace environment, expectations, and educational experiences. This is an evaluation study of a one-year transition program, which was implemented as a project during 2016-17, at six hospitals in Sweden.

    An explorative research design was used and data consist of focus group and individual interviews with NGNs, interviews with first-line managers, observations of simulation training, and survey material from the hospitals. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Results show an overarching structure for all hospitals in the region, the NGNs are engaged in the following learning activities; introduction at the ward and a senior RN as preceptor, lectures and/or simulations, change of ward, process-oriented reflection seminars and mentorship.

    The different learning activities contribute to the overall learning in different ways. Continuous supervision and structured reflection are central to NGNs professional learning. Organizational conditions create prerequisites for learning during the transition program and a change of ward is a particular challenge to get organized. The results, also provides a deeper understanding of the foundational components in NGNs early development of expertise, security as professionals, and essential knowledge for bridging the practices of the first cycle program and healthcare practice at hospitals.

  • 100.
    Ekmekҫi, Karolin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Leandersson, Malin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Är alla svenskar kalla, tråkiga och osociala?: En kvalitativ studie om ensamkommande flyktingbarns upplevelser av det svenska samhället2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Our purpose with this study is to highlight the elements of civil society that can help newly arrived youths a sense of connection and belonging in the new society and what impact this may have on their future in the new country. The study is a qualitative method where four semi-structured interviews were conducted. The youths we interviewed are young men from Afghanistan who came to Sweden as an unaccompanied refugee children. The study is based on a phenomenological / hermeneutical approach and empirical data have been analyzed in the analytical unit with IPA. The study is abductive. We have analyzed the empirical basis and in cooperation with Antonovsky's theory of SOC. And the concepts of social inclusion and exclusion. Giddens' theory of ontological security and självreflexivitet have also been used and at last we choose to problematize change of culture using to describe two different society models. The results of our study show that civil society is significant because the youths felt a sense of community and social inclusion within organizations and associations in the community. The importance of having a job is seen as a key aspect of social inclusion. The biggest setback was the loss of their family and culture at home and try to find a new sense of community and belonging in Sweden. Young people tell us that they have encountered limitations in the Swedish society, which means that they sometimes feel excluded. While mention the other situations where they experience social inclusion. Youths feel that they are in Sweden have greater opportunities to influence their own life choices which gives them the motivation to find new challenges and goals to aim for in life. The youths we interviewed strive to feel involved in various ways in the social community.

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