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  • 51.
    Lundin, Linda
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Parental discussions online through the medical discourse-lens2017In: Journal of Childhood & Developmental Disorders, ISSN 2472-1786, Vol. 3, no 4, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study the research objective was to gain insights into parental communication on an open Internet forum where parents had the opportunity to discuss issues related to ADHD. In order for clinicians to help troubled children brought to the health clinic it may be important to learn more about the life situations of these troubled families as treatment options can require complex interventions for the whole family. Our aim was thus to go beyond the neurobiological medical model of ADHD, which does not take into account contextual factors. In today’s society specialized online discussion forums are available for parents who seek support for various difficulties that arise in the family. The online forums are sources of research data. As research tools we used the narrative psychological approach for the analysis of 72 online naratives. These narratives provided support for that the parents embraced medical explanations for the difficulties experienced when raising children, despite obvious challenging life circumstances, such as for example being a single parent without social support. Even very young children had been given serious psychiatric medical diagnoses such as ADHD, Bipolar disorder, Mood disorders and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Some of them had been diagnosed with more than one of these disorders. The complexity of the parental nnarratives in the present study indicates that the neurobiological model is not sufficient enough to form the basis of a personalized and comprehensive care for vulnerable families.

  • 52.
    Mac Giolla, Erik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ly, Alexander
    Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    What to do with all these Bayes factors: How to make Bayesian reports in deception research more informative2019In: Legal and Criminological Psychology, ISSN 1355-3259, E-ISSN 2044-8333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bayes factors quantify the evidence in support of the null (absence of an effect) or the alternative hypothesis (presence of an effect). Based on commonly used cut-offs, Bayes factors between 1/3 and 3 are interpreted as evidentially weak, and one typically concludes there is an absence of evidence. In this commentary on Warmelink, Subramanian, Tkacheva, and McLatchie (Legal Criminol Psychol 24, 2019, 258), we discuss how a Bayesian report can be made more informative. Firstly, this implies a departure from the labels provided by commonly used cut-offs when reporting Bayes factors. Instead, we encourage researchers to report the value of the Bayes factors, or to convert these values into nominal support for the hypotheses. Secondly, researchers can provide recommendations to design follow-up studies by examining the posterior distribution of the magnitude of the effect size. Lastly, we show how individual Bayes factors can be evaluated in the context of large-scale meta-analyses. © 2019 British Psychological Society

  • 53.
    Mac Giolla, Erik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology, Sweden.
    Ly, Alexander
    University of Amsterdam, Psychological Methods, The Netherlands; Machine Learning Group, Centrum Wiskunde &Informatica, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    What to do with all these Bayes factors: How to make Bayesian reports in deception research more informative2020In: Legal and Criminological Psychology, ISSN 1355-3259, E-ISSN 2044-8333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bayes factors quantify the evidence in support of the null (absence of an effect) or the alternative hypothesis (presence of an effect). Based on commonly used cut-offs, Bayes factors between 1/3 and 3 are interpreted as evidentially weak, and one typically concludes there is an absence of evidence. In this commentary on Warmelink, Subramanian, Tkacheva, and McLatchie (Legal Criminol Psychol 24, 2019, 258), we discuss how a Bayesian report can be made more informative. Firstly, this implies a departure from the labels provided by commonly used cut-offs when reporting Bayes factors. Instead, we encourage researchers to report the value of the Bayes factors, or to convert these values into nominal support for the hypotheses. Secondly, researchers can provide recommendations to design follow-up studies by examining the posterior distribution of the magnitude of the effect size. Lastly, we show how individual Bayes factors can be evaluated in the context of large-scale meta-analyses.

  • 54.
    Molin, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Löfgren-Mårtenson, Lotta
    Malmö Universitet, Malmö, Sverige.
    Del@ktighetens digitalisering: Om identitetsskapande aktiviteter på internet bland unga med intellektuell funktionsnedsättning2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although research on young people and the Internet is a growing field, there are few studies that illustrate conditions for young people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Previous studies have shown that young people with ID are worried about being marginalized, and that many in fact are lonelier than other young people. Social networking sites might be of vital importance as a space for exploring alternative and less stigmatized identities.

    This project aimed to describe and analyse how young people (age 16-20) with a mild ID interact and participate on the Internet. More precisely, drawing upon the perspectives of young people with ID, parents, and school staff, we have studied self-presentations, social relations, and participation within different kinds of Internet communities. Hence, the goal of the project was to generate knowledge concerning these complex processes, which could be useful for the involved adults, who support and help young people with ID in their Internet use. The project comprised qualitative interviews with young people with ID (n=27), parents of young people with ID (n=22), and professionals in special schools (n=17). The transcribed interviews were analysed, using a thematic content analysis. The project has been granted ethical approval by the Ethical Board of West Sweden (Dnr 048-15).

    A prominent finding in the study concerned the young informants being well aware of both the risks and opportunities in using Internet and Social Networking Sites. Consequently, the more they interacted with non-disabled peers, the more they experienced negative consequences of Internet use. One conclusion was that these circumstances lead to downsizing rather than upsizing Internet use, and as prolongation, less participation on Social Networking Sites.

    Although the Internet can be a 'free-zone' where the young person can develop social bonds and construct their identity away from adult oversight, parents and professionals are highly present. Young people mostly feel confident and also in no need of support. Professionals and parents do consider the Internet an arena for positive opportunities, but also with risks. The professionals seemed to be more worried about the risks than the parents who state that the opportunities outweigh the disadvantages. For parents, the real risk is described as the risk of loneliness and social isolation. That parents consider the Internet to be an arena for relationships is an interesting change compared to previous research where both parents and professionals were worried about the risks of abuse, etc. Overall,6the young people with ID are described as a more heterogeneous group by both parents and professionals, compared to previous research. The experiences of the informants are discussed in a conceptual framework of social identity, participation, positive risk-taking, sexuality, and emancipation.

    A comparative analysis of the results shows how social participation is negotiated and constructed dialectically between young people with and without ID, but also between the young people in the study and adults in their imme-diate surroundings. By applying an intersectional perspective to issues about identity formation and risk-taking on the Internet, a more relational under-standing of the problems and opportunities of digital participation can be made visible. A relational understanding of getting into difficulties implies that risk and vulnerability do not always have to depend on the disability but on contextual conditions and other co-varying factors.

    Considering young people's need for autonomy, it is of great importance that parents and professionals reflect upon the ways that support can be arranged in order to empower young people with ID to participate on the Internet. Providing support for positive risk-taking on the Internet means that adults, together with young people, reflect on how possible risks can be managed rather than how risk can be avoided.

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  • 55.
    Persson, Björn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Network for Empowerment and Well-Being, Sweden.
    Garcia, Danilo
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Blekinge County Council, Karlskrona, Sweden; Lund University, Lund, Sweden Network for Empowerment and Well-Being, Sweden.
    Revisiting the Structure of the Short Dark Triad2019In: Assessment (Odessa, Fla.), ISSN 1073-1911, E-ISSN 1552-3489, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past decade, extensive interest has been directed toward the Dark Triad (i.e., Machiavellianism, narcissism,and psychopathy), popularly assessed by the Short Dark Triad (SD3). Nevertheless, relatively little research has beenconducted on the SD3's factor structure. We investigated the SD3's psychometric properties in three studies with three independent samples, using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (N1 = 1,487; N2 = 17,740; N3 = 496). In all three studies, Machiavellianism and psychopathy items displayed large general factor loadings, and narcissism larger specific factor loadings. In subsequent studies, two- and three-factor models fitted the data similarly, with the best fitting model beinga bifactor model with items from Machiavellianism and psychopathy modelled as one specific factor, and narcissism as asecond specific factor. On this basis, we suggest that the SD3 does not seem to capture the different mental processestheorized to underlie the similar behaviors generated by Machiavellianism and psychopathy. Additionally, we recommend the use of a single SD3 composite score, and not subscale scores, as subscales contain small amounts of reliable variance beyond the general factor.

  • 56.
    Roos, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Centre for Consumer Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Business Administration and Textile Management, University of Borås, Sweden..
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Expert validity on non-verbal personality characters2017In: 14th Conference on Psychological Assessment, July 5-8, 2017, Lisbon, Portugal: Book of Abstracts / [ed] ,. / [ed] Paula Ferreira, Aristides Ferreira, Inês Afonso, & Ana Margarida Veiga Simão, Lisbon, 2017, p. 81 p-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Ryding, Jennie
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Evidensbaserat familjearbete- exemplet FCU2019Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 58.
    Schenck-Fontaine, Anika
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Educational Trajectories, Leibniz, Germany.
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    Duke University.
    Skinner, Ann T
    Duke University.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma 'La Sapienza.
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University.
    Malone, Patrick S
    Duke University.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana M
    Universidad San Buenaventura.
    Alampay, Liane P
    Ateneo de Manila University.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Hashemite University.; Emirates College for Advanced Education.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples 'Federico II.
    Bornstein, Marc H
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.; Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau.
    Associations Between Perceived Material Deprivation, Parents' Discipline Practices, and Children's Behavior Problems: An International Perspective.2020In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 91, no 1, p. 307-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the association between perceived material deprivation, children's behavior problems, and parents' disciplinary practices. The sample included 1,418 8- to 12-year-old children and their parents in China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. Multilevel mixed- and fixed-effects regression models found that, even when income remained stable, perceived material deprivation was associated with children's externalizing behavior problems and parents' psychological aggression. Parents' disciplinary practices mediated a small share of the association between perceived material deprivation and children's behavior problems. There were no differences in these associations between mothers and fathers or between high- and low- and middle-income countries. These results suggest that material deprivation likely influences children's outcomes at any income level.

  • 59.
    Schüler, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Ledningsvetenskap, Försvarshögskolan, Stockholm, Sverige..
    Vega Matuszczyk, Josefa
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Safety Climate in Military Organizations: A Pilot Study of an Adjusted Multi-Domain Instrument2019In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, ISSN 21695067, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 1373-1377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this pilot study is to adjust the NOSACQ-50 to the work environment of military organizations.NOSACQ-50 is a validated tool successfully used in several organizational domains to measure occupationalsafety climate (OSC). In general, few studies have been published investigating OSC in militaryorganizations. NOSACQ-50 consists of 50 items across 7 OSC dimensions, i.e. group members' sharedperceptions of: 1) management safety priority, commitment and competence; 2) management safetyempowerment; 3) management safety justice; 4) workers' safety commitment; 5) workers' safety priority andrisk non-acceptance; 6) safety communication, learning, and trust in co-workers' safety competence; 7)workers' trust in the efficacy of safety systems. To assess the relevance of the NOSACQ-50 items, a revisedversion of the instrument was sent to 11 military safety experts. In addition, 19 items pertaining to areas notcovered by NOSACQ-50 were validated by the same experts. After contents validation, data from 517participants from 4 garrisons were collected. The results showed that NOSACQ-50 had acceptable reliabilityscores (.70-.89.), and the factor structure was confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Principalcomponent analyses (PCA) of the supplementary 19 items showed that 12 items grouped into threedimensions (alpha .74-.91): Management enabling safety performance, personnel's knowledge of andcompetence in national laws regulating safety and Unit ethics. In conclusion, preliminary results showed theadjusted NOSACQ-50 instrument could be used to measure OSC in military organizations. However,additional studies must be performed to improve and develop military specific dimensions not covered byNOSACQ-50.

  • 60.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Arbetsintegrerat lärande med fokus på barn- och ungdomsvetenskap2018In: Nya vägar, nya perspektiv: Barn- och ungdoms nätverket i samarbete med Tema barn, Linkopings universitet, Linköping: Linköpings universitet, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2018, p. 14-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Högskolan Väst har en profilering mot arbetsintegrerat lärande (AIL) och en del av den barn- och ungdomsvetenskapliga forskningen vid lärosätet knyter an till forskningsfrågor inom AIL. AIL som begrepp i vid mening kan innefatta allt lärande som på något sätt sker i samband med eller knyter an till aktiviteter som betecknas som arbete, nödvändigtvis inte lönearbete. Området kan innebära studier av barns och ungas röster i relation till professionellas (vuxnas) lärande. Centralt i barn- och ungdomsvetenskapliga analyser med AIL-inriktning är att mot bakgrund av ungas agens belysa implikationer för spontant, informellt och/eller organiserat lärande i olika kontexter. Här kan exempelvis ungas socialisations-processer i relation till arbete (oavlönat eller avlönat) och arbetsliv fokuseras inom såväl institutionaliserade kontexter (t ex skola och socialtjänst) som mer civilsamhälleliga kontexter (t ex fritid och föreningsliv). Hur kan AIL perspektivet bidra till utvecklingen av det barn- och

  • 61.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Konsten att träffa rätt: om enkätundersökningar2013In: Barn- och ungdomsforskning: metoder och arbetssätt / [ed] Erlandsson, Soly I. & Sjöberg, Lena, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1. uppl., p. 135-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skolans identifiering av barn i gråzonen2017In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 94, no 4, p. 477-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel genomlyses projektet Team Agera som ingår i Folkhälsomyndighetens nationella satsning på stöd till barn i riskmiljöer. Team Agera är en tvärprofessionell, utökad och fördjupad elevhälsa. Syftet med verksamheten är att erbjuda insatser som av tradition erbjudits av socialtjänsten, i ett försök att öka tillgängligheten av stöd till barn och familjer. Insatserna fokuseras på: 1) barn i familjer med missbruksproblem eller psykisk ohälsa, eller där våld förekommer samt 2) barn med psykisk ohälsa. Genom att arbeta förebyggande är målet att tidigare och i ökad utsträckning hitta de barn och familjer som av olika anledningar är i behov av hjälp och stöd. I artikeln ligger fokus på att besvara frågan: På vilket sätt kan en verksamhet som Team Agera möjliggöra en ökad potential att agera i den så kallade gråzon som utgörs av elever och föräldrar som annars "trillar utanför" systemet, alternativt inte får hjälp och stöd förrän långt efter det att behoven uppkommit?

  • 63.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kuczynski, Leon
    University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada.
    Children´s agency in the family, in school and in society: implications for health and well-being2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no sup 1 Equal Health, article id 1634414Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Svensson, Ylva
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    A Master Narrative Approach to the Negotiation of an “Immigrant Identity” in Sweden.2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A Master Narrative Approach to the Negotiation of an "Immigrant Identity" in Sweden

    In Sweden, and many European countries, the concepts of race and ethnicity are not as relevant, and a division between immigrants and non-immigrants is more salient as the basis for in-group definitions. This would have consequences for identity work of young people with an immigrant background living in those societies. Master narratives are shared cultural stories of what types of behaviors are normative and valued (McLean & Syed, 2015) and defines the acceptable frameworks for defining the self ( McLean et al., 2017). Personal narratives are then form in alignment or misalignment with the master narratives (McLean & Syed, 2015).

    This study aims to understand the interplay between societal expectations and individual identity work in how immigrants negotiate their identities, in relation to the master narrative of being Swedish and the misaligning alternative narratives of being immigrant. Specifically, two research questions guided the work: 1) what narratives of being immigrant are told, and 2) how are identities negotiated their in relation to the master narrative of being Swedish, and the alternative, stereotypical narratives of being immigrant.

    Data was from a larger study addressing ethnic identity in Sweden, the Gothenburg Research on Ethnicity-related Experiences and identity Narratives (GREEN) project. The current sample comprised of 251 participants (74% female), age 16-25. Participants wrote stories about a time when they felt that their personal life story diverged from what is considered appropriate, normal or accepted (Alpert, Marsden Szymanowski, & Lilgendahl, 2013). Written narratives were analysed using thematic analyses (Braun & Clark, 2006). Results showed two main types of experiences of being immigrant:1) "Immigrant" as a self-chosen identity, and as an in-group. Feelings of sameness and belonging was based either on a shared immigrant experience or being in a minority (regardless of a shared ethnicity or language), or based on having the same view of life. 2) "Immigrant" as ascribed by others, and not an in-group. Participants described being viewed as immigrants regardless of being born in Sweden, and by being grouped together with other immigrants regardless of culture, language or ethnicity. Thus, the label "immigrant" was described as denying them a Swedish identity and their ethnicity of origin, resulting in a feeling of not belonging anywhere.

    Further, results of thematic analyses showed two main themes in how immigrant identities were negotiated in relation to the master narrative of being Swedish and the stereotypical immigrant narrative. The first, the "stereotypical immigrant" was in line with the stereotypical image of the immigrant as inferior to, and in direct contrast to the Swedish identity. The second type, the "successful immigrant" resisted the stereotype by proving it wrong, and being "more Swedish" than Swedes. This included stories of performing and behaving well, having good grades, by dressing neat, speaking impeccable Swedish, and not showing any religious symbols. Findings highlight how individual identity negotiation is affected by societal structures, where personal narratives are formed in adherence and adoption to an alternative narrative, or by resisting and proving the master narrative wrong. 100 words: Using a master narrative framework, the study explored the interplay between societal expectations and individual identity work in how immigrants negotiate their identities, in relation to the master narrative of being Swedish and the misaligning alternative narratives of being immigrant. 251 written narratives were thematically analyzed. Results indicate that "immigrant" can be both a self-chosen in-group, and an ascribed label. Identity negotiation included the "stereotypical immigrant" as inferior to, and in direct contrast to the Swedish narrative, and the "successful immigrant" as resisting and proving the immigrant narrative wrong by exceeding the Swedish narrative.

  • 65.
    Syed, Moin
    et al.
    University of Minnesota, USA.
    Juang, Linda P.
    University of Potsdam, Germany.
    Svensson, Ylva
    Gothenburg university, Sweden.
    Toward a new understanding of ethnic/racial settings for ethnic/racial identity development2018In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 262-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this conceptual article is to advance theory and research on one critical aspect of the context of ethnic–racial identity (ERI) development: ethnic–racial settings, or the objective and subjective nature of group representationwithin an individual's context. We present a new conceptual framework that consists of four dimensions: (1) perspective(that settings can be understood in both objective and subjective terms); (2) differentiation (how groups are defined in asetting); (3) heterogeneity (the range of groups in a setting); and (4) proximity (the distance between the individual andthe setting). Clarifying this complexity is crucial for advancing a more coherent understanding of how ethnic–racial set-tings are related to ERI development.

  • 66.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Svensson, Ylva
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Depressive symptoms and non-suicidal self-injury during adolescence: Latent patterns of short-term stability and change2019In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 75, p. 163-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    Depressive symptoms and non-suicidal self-injury not only increase in prevalenceduring adolescence, but they can also occur together. Both psychological problems seem to have similar precipitating conditions, suggesting they have transdiagnostic conditions—personal or contextual characteristics that contribute to co-occurrence. We sought to understand when these two problems co-occur and what is related to their co-occurrence.

    Methods:

    Using a pattern-centered approach and two waves of longitudinal data collected an-nually, we examined latent profiles of depressive symptoms and self-injury among a Swedish sample of adolescents aged 12 to 16 (MageT1= 13.65 years,SD= 0.64), 53.7% boys and 47.3% girls. Most of the adolescents were Swedish (89%), with parents who were married or cohabitating (68%). We also examined the transitions between profiles over time.

    Results:

    Our results suggest that during this time frame, depressive symptoms and self-injury tend to emerge and stabilize or abate together. We also examined a broad array of predictors, including individual characteristics, emotion dysregulation, experiences with friends, parents' negative reactions to behavior, and school stress. The significant unique predictors suggest that adolescents who reported being subjected to relational aggression, having negative experienceswhile drinking, and low self-esteem had a greater probability of moving from moderate to high levels or maintaining high levels of depressive symptoms and self-injury, compared to adolescents classified in the other statuses.

    Conclusions:

    Focusing on negative interpersonal experiences and selfesteem as transdiagnostic conditions may guide research and aid clinicians in supporting adolescents who feel depressed and engage in self-injury. Symptoms of depression increase during adolescence (Hankin et al., 1998;Lewinsohn, Rohde, Seeley, Klein, & Gotlib, 2000) as doself-injurious behaviors (Hilt, Nock, Lloyd-Richardson, & Prinstein, 2008; Lloyd-Richardson, Perrine, Dierker, & Kelley, 2007; Ross &Heath, 2002). Defined as direct and intentional destruction of one's own body tissue without suicidal intent, non-suicidal self-injury(NSSI) includes cutting, hitting, burning, and scratching (Nock, 2010). Although rates of NSSI are typically lower than those of depressive symptoms, they often covary (Auerbach et al., 2014; Lloyd-Richardson et al., 2007; Nock, Joiner, Gordon, Lloyd-Richardson, & Prinstein, 2006; Zetterqvist, Lundh, Dahlström, & Svedin, 2013). In this study, we focused on the co-occurrence of depressive symptoms and NSSI. We aimed to understand when these problems occurred together, in comparison to when adolescents exhibit only one problem or none and to explore how co-occurrence arises.https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2019.07.013

  • 67.
    Zannakis, Mathias
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Molander, Sverker
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Technology Management and Economics, Division of Environmental Systems Analysis, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Lars-Olof
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    On the Relationship between Pro-Environmental Behavior, Experienced Monetary Costs, and Psychological Gains2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 19, article id 5467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the emerging scarcity, abundance, and sufficiency (SAS) framework, this study explores how various consumer behaviors with potential environmental impacts relate to subjective evaluations of psychological resources such as economic resources, time, social networks, and emotional support. Assuming that individuals may "trade" the costs and efforts of green consumption, including the buying of eco-labeled goods, altered eating habits, and choice of transportation mode, against such psychological resources, we investigate the relationships between green consumer choices and resource evaluations using hierarchical regression analysis of data from an online panel survey. The results suggest that green consumer behaviors are positively related to subjectively evaluated resources such as feelings of economic sufficiency and other, more "relational" resources, including social networks and emotional support. Performing such behaviors may therefore lead to psychological gains. These findings do paint a rather positive picture of environmental behaviors, since they may thus be viewed as having a personal positive trade-off. Although directional effects cannot be firmly established, our study suggests that pro-environmental behavior may increase wellbeing and experienced prosperity. Future studies should further investigate these causalities and implications of these suggested relationships.

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  • 68. Øksnes, Maria
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Marcus
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Barns nej - ett steg mot ett hållbart samhälle2018In: Motstånd, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 55-76Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 69. Øksnes, Maria
    et al.
    Samuelsson, MarcusUniversity West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Motstånd2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 70. Øksnes, Maria
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Marcus
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    "Möte med motstånd är en existentiell fråga": Intervju med Gert Biesta2018In: Motstånd / [ed] Øksnes, M., & Samuelsson, M., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 143-160Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 71. Øksnes, Maria
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Marcus
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    "Nej, jag gör det på mitt sätt!" Motstånd i förskolan2018In: Motstånd / [ed] Øksnes, M., & Samuelsson, M., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 11-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
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