Change search
Refine search result
1234567 51 - 100 of 677
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Björklund, Stefan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Förbättrad lönsamhet för biogasanläggningar genom beläggning av knivar2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Björklund, Stefan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Goel, Sneha
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Function-dependent coating architectures by hybrid powder-suspension plasma spraying: Injector design, processing and concept validation2018In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 142, p. 56-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The attractive properties achieved by Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS), combined with the availability of high throughput capable plasma spray systems that permit axial feeding, provide encouragement to explore use of suspensions for next generation functional applications. This paper deals with realization of coatings with various pre-determined function-dependent architectures by employing a hybrid powder-suspension feedstock. Some illustrative application-relevant coating architecture designs are discussed, along with the specific benefits that can accrue by deploying a multi-scale powder-suspension feedstock combination. An elegant feedstock delivery arrangement to enable either simultaneous or sequential feeding of powders and suspensions to enable convenient processing of coatings with desired architectures is presented. As proof-of-concept, deposition of layered, composite and functionally graded coatings using the above system is also demonstrated using appropriate case studies

  • 53.
    Bolelli, G.
    et al.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria 'Enzo Ferrari', Via P. Vivarelli 10/1, Modena, MO, Italy .
    Berger, L.-M.
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, Dresden, Germany.
    Börner, T.
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, Dresden, Germany.
    Koivuluoto, H.
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, Tampere, Finland .
    Matikainen, V.
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, Tampere, Finland .
    Lusvarghi, L.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria 'Enzo Ferrari', Via P. Vivarelli 10/1, Modena, MO, Italy .
    Lyphout, Christophe
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Sassatelli, P.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria 'Enzo Ferrari', Via P. Vivarelli 10/1, Modena, MO, Italy .
    Trache, R.
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, Dresden, Germany .
    Vuoristo, P.c
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, Tampere, Finlan.
    Sliding and abrasive wear behaviour of HVOF- and HVAF-sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr hardmetal coatings2016In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 358-359, p. 32-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a comprehensive characterisation of HVOF- and HVAF-sprayed Cr3C2–25 wt.% NiCr hardmetal coatings. One commercial powder composition with two different particle size distributions was processed using five HVOF and HVAF thermal spray systems.All coatings contain less Cr3C2 than the feedstock powder, possibly due to the rebound of some Cr3C2-rich particles during high-velocity impact onto the substrate.Dry sand-rubber wheel abrasive wear testing causes both grooving and pull-out of splat fragments. Mass losses depend on inter- and intra-lamellar cohesion, being higher (≥70 mg after a wear distance of 5904 m) for the coatings deposited with the coarser feedstock powder or with one type of HVAF torch.Sliding wear at room temperature against alumina involves shallower abrasive grooving, small-scale delamination and carbide pull-outs, and it is controlled by intra-lamellar cohesion. The coatings obtained from the fine feedstock powder exhibit the lowest wear rates (≈5x10−6 mm3/(Nm)). At 400 °C, abrasive grooving dominates the sliding wear behaviour; wear rates increase by one order of magnitude but friction coefficients decrease from ≈0.7 to ≈0.5. The thermal expansion coefficient of the coatings (11.08x10−6 °C−1 in the 30–400 °C range) is sufficiently close to that of the steel substrate (14.23x10−6 °C−1) to avoid macro-cracking

  • 54.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Ferreira Magalhães, Ana Catarina
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Cederqvist, L.
    SKB AB, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Robotic Friction Stir Welding of complex geometry and mixed materials2018In: 50th International Symposium on Robotics, ISR 2018, VDE Verlag GmbH , 2018, p. 35-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state process for joining materials which has demonstrated advantages compares with other methods which include joining of mixed materials, hard to weld alloys and consistent and high quality. This paper presents a study of robotic FSW initiated by Volvo Skövde plant to join an insert workpiece of extruded aluminium with a cylinder block of aluminium casting. A three-stage procedure was decided to determine the feasibility to apply robotic FSW. The stages included study of welding the mixed materials, weld along the complex joint line with holes and channels close to the joint, and finally welding the cylinder block. The results based on preliminary analysis indicate that the final tests were successful and the process is feasible for the challenging case study. However, further studies are recommended in order to identify the operating parameters window, tool design, and control of the process in order to optimize productivity and quality. © VDE VERLAG GMBH

  • 55.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    On cutting tool resource management2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The search for increased productivity and cost reduction in machining can be interpreted as desire to increase the Material Removal Rate, , and maximize the cutting tool utilization. The CNC process is complex and involves numerous constraints and parameters; ranging from tolerances to machinability. A well-managed preparation process creates the foundation for achieving a reduction in manufacturing errors and machining time. Along the preparation process of the NC-program, two different studies have been performed and are presented in this thesis. One study examined the CAM programming process from the Lean perspective. The other study includes an evaluation of how the cutting tools are used in terms of and tool utilization. Two distinct combinations of cutting data might provide the same . However, the tool life and machining cost can be different. Therefore, selection of appropriate cutting parameters that best meet all these objectives is challenging. An algorithm for analysis and efficient selection of cutting data for maximal , maximal tool utilization and minimal machining cost has been developed and is presented in this work. The presented algorithm shortens the time dedicated to the optimized cutting data selection and the needed iterations along the program development. Furthermore, the objectives that need to be considered during the estimation of the manufacturing processes sustainability have been identified. In addition, this thesis also includes a theoretical study to estimate energy use, CO2-footprint and water consumption during the manufacture of a workpiece, which can be invaluable for companies in their search for sustainability of their manufacturing processes.

  • 56.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Flygmotorvagen 1, Trollhattan, 46138, Sweden.
    On how the selection of materials affects sustainability2019In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 33, p. 625-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The selection of the materials for the production of aerospace engine products is directly related to their performance in tough working conditions. However, the extraction of the materials requires high amounts of energy, use water and emit CO2, which can be directly related with environmental sustainability. The abundance of the materials and their sourcing and geographical location can be further related to economic and social sustainability. Manufacturing companies look for different materials and cutting data that will optimize material removal rate, cutting tool utilization, required cutting time, costs, energy used, CO2 footprint, coolants, etc. Here is presented a simple methodology to calculate the sustainability impact of the selection of materials. The study compares a simplified theoretical work piece that is geometrically complex and made of difficult to machine material, e.g. Ti-6Al-4V and MP159. The study shows how to select the optimal material, not only in terms of costs, but also in terms of environmental, societal and economical sustainability. © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 57.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Fredriksson, Claes
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Electrical- and Mechanical Engineering.
    Energy and Cost Estimation of a Feature-based Machining Operation on HRSA2017In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 61, no Supplement C, p. 511-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forward-looking manufacturing companies aim for sustainable production with low environmental footprint. This is true also for aerospace engine-makers, although their environmental impact mostly occurs during the use-phase of their products. Materials, such as Nickel alloys, are used for special applications where other materials will not withstand tough working conditions in terms of pressure and temperature. Heat Resistant Super Alloys are, however, considered difficult to machine and cutting tools will wear off rapidly. In this paper, a simple way to estimate the energy required, the cost and environmental footprint to produce a work piece using standard engineering software is presented. The results show that for a hypothetical 3 tonne work piece, Inconel 718 will be considerably cheaper and require less water but will require more energy, and has considerably larger CO2 footprint than Waspaloy.

  • 58.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Repo, Jari
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Analysis of Tool Utilization from Material Removal Rate Perspective2015In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 29, p. 109-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An end of life strategy algorithm has been used to study a CNC program to evaluate how the cutting inserts are used in terms of their full utilization. Utilized tool life (UTL) and remaining tool life (RTL) were used to evaluate if the insert has been used to its limits of expected tool life, or contributing to an accumulated tool waste. It is demonstrated that possible means to improvement exists to increase the material removal rate (MRR), thereby using the insert until its remaining tool life is as close to zero as possible. It was frequently found that inserts were used well below their maximum performance with respect to cutting velocity.

  • 59.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Repo, Jari
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Integrated optimization model for cutting data selection based on maximal MRR and tool utilization in continuous machining operations2016In: CIRP - Journal of Manufacturing Science and Technology, ISSN 1755-5817, E-ISSN 1878-0016, Vol. 13, p. 46-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The search for increased productivity can be interpreted as the increase of material removal rate (MRR). Namely, increase of feed, depth of cut and/or cutting speed. The increase of any of these three variables, will increase the tool wear rate; therefore decreasing its tool life according to the same tool life criteria. This paper proposes an integrated model for efficient selection of cutting data for maximal MRR and maximal tool utilization. The results show that, it is possible to obtain a limited range of cutting parameters from where the CAM Programmer can select the cutting data assuring both objectives.

  • 60.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Repo, Jari
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Streamlining the CAM programming process by Lean Principles within the aerospace industryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Broberg, Patrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Analytic model for pulsed thermography of subsurface defects2014In: Archives QIRT 2014: Documents and sessions presented during the 12nd conference QIRT (Bordeaux, France), QIRT , 2014, p. 1-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An analytic solution to the heat equation is used to model the response of subsurface defects in pulsed thermography. The model is compared to measurement data and shows good agreement, both in spatial and temporaldomain. The capability of the model is then demonstrated by calculating the response of arbitrary defects at different depth. This model, even though simplified, can prove useful due to good accuracy and low computational time forcomparing analysis methods and for evaluating a thermography method on a new material or new type of defect.

  • 62.
    Broberg, Patrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Imaging and analysis methods for automated weld inspection2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    All welding processes can give rise to defects, which weakens the joint and can eventually lead to the failure of the welded structure. In order to inspect welds for detects, without affecting the usability of the product, non-destructive testing (NDT) is needed. NDT includes a wide range of different techniques, based on different physical principles, each with its advantages and disadvantages. The testing is often performed manually by a skilled operator and in many cases only as spot-checks. Today the trend in industry is to move towards thinner material, in order to save weight for cost and for environmental reasons. The need for inspection of a larger portion of welds therefore increases and there is an increasing demand for fully automated inspection, including both the mechanised testing and the automatic analysis of the result. Compared to manual inspection, an automated solution has advantages when it comes to speed, cost and reliability. A comparison of several NDT methods was therefore first performed in order to determine which methods have most potential for automated weld inspection. Automated analysis of NDT data poses several difficulties compared to manual data evaluation. It is often possible for an operator to detect defects even in noisy data, through experience and knowledge about the part being tested. Automatic analysis algorithms on the other hand suffer greatly from both random noise as well as indications that originate from geometrical variations. The solution to this problem is not always obvious. Some NDT techniques might not be suitable for automated inspection and will have to be replaced by other, better adapted methods. One such method that has been developed during this work is thermography for the detection of surface cracks. This technique offers several advantages, in terms of automation, compared to existing methods. Some techniques on the other hand cannot be easily replaced. Here the focus is instead to prepare the data for automated analysis, using various pre-processing algorithms, in order to reduce noise and remove indications from sources other than defects. One such method is ultrasonic testing, which has a good ability for detecting internal defects but suffers from noisy signals with low spatial resolution. Work was here done in order to separate indications from corners from other indications. This can also help to improve positioning of the data and thereby classification of defects. The problem of low resolution was handled by using a deconvolution algorithm in order to reduce the effect of the spread of the beam.The next step in an automated analysis system is to go beyond just detection and start characterising defects. Using knowledge of the physical principles behind the NDT method in question and how the properties of a defect affect the measurement, it is sometimes possible to develop methods for determining properties such as the size and shape of a defect. This kind of characterisation of a defect is often difficult to do in the raw data, and is therefore an area where automated analysis can go beyond what is possible for an operator during manual inspection. This was shown for flash thermography, where an analysis method was developed that could determine the size, shape and depth of a defect. Similarly for laser ultrasound, a method was developed for determining the size of a defect.

  • 63.
    Broberg, Patrik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Runnemalm, Anna
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Analysis algorithm for surface crack detection by thermography with UV light excitation2016In: Quantitative InfraRed Thermography 2016: Abstracts / [ed] Kaczmarek, M. & Bujnowski, A., Gdańsk, Poland: Publishing Gdańsk University of Technology , 2016, p. 144-149Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface crack defects can be detected by IR thermograpgy due to the high absorption of energy within the crack cavity. It is often difficult to detect the defect in the raw data, since the signal easily drowns in the background. It is therefore important to have good analysis algorithms that can reduce the background and enhance the defect. Here an analysis algorithm is presented which significantly increases the signal to noise ratio of the defects and reduces the image sequence from the camera to one image.

  • 64.
    Broberg, Patrik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Runnemalm, Anna
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Detection of Surface Cracks in Welds using Active Thermography2012In: Proceedings18th World Conference on Non-Destructive Testing: 16 - 20 April 2012, Durban, South Africa, South African Institute for Non-Destructive Testing (SAINT) , 2012, p. 1-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface cracks in welds can be detected using several non-destructive testing methods; among the more popular ones are eddy current, penetrant and magnetic particle testing. For an automatic inspection cell, the traditional techniques have limitations. Here we have investigated the possibility of using active thermography for detecting surface cracks in welds. This technique features advantages such as non-contact and high speed. The weld is illuminated using an infrared light source. Due to higher energy absorption in a surface crack, the defect will be identified as a hot spot when imaged by an infrared camera. Artificial weld defects (notches) are investigated by use of active thermography. Results from an inspection of real longitudinal cold cracks in a weld are also presented. The results show that active thermography looks promising for detection of even small cracks and notches, as long as they are open to the surface.

  • 65.
    Cederberg, Emil
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Influence of welding and additive manufacturing thermal cycles on microstructure and properties of super duplex stainless steel base and weld metal studied by a physical simulation technique2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) is known for its excellent combination of high corrosion resistance and strength. However, the main limitations in SDSS applications are the risk of getting an imbalanced ferrite and austenite fraction and the sensitivity to form intermetallic phases at temperatures between approximately 600-1000 °C. During welding of SDSS, the welding parameters must be selected carefully in order to avoid formation of intermetallic phases such as sigma phase due to slow cooling or multiple reheating. In addition, special care is needed to have a balanced ferrite and austenite fraction. In this work, the influence of multiple thermal cycles and cooling rate on the microstructure of SDSS base and weld metal was investigated. A novel heat treatment method, using a stationary TIG arc, was performed to produce the samples. The test discs were composed of base and weld metal. Five samples were produced including 1, 5, and 15 passes of rapid cooling, one sample with medium cooling and one with slow cooling. The cooling time between 1000-700 °C was aimed at being similar for the pair of 5 passes and medium cooling and the other pair of 15 passes and slow cooling. The material was characterized by light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy while hardness mapping and sensitization testing were employed to evaluate the properties. It was revealed that sigma phase was more prone to precipitate in the weld compared to the base metal when exposed to high ageing temperature and repeated thermal cycles. Slow cooling was found to promote sigma phase precipitation more than multiple reheating in the weld metal. In the base metal, a minor difference was found between the slowly cooled and multiple reheated samples. Rapid cooling in multiple reheating generated nitrides in the fusion boundary zone. As more reheating passes were applied, the amount of nitrides decreased. Multipass reheating cycles also resulted in increased hardness and nitrogen depletion adjacent to the fusion boundary zone causing the ferrite content to increase. Based on this study, less sigma phase precipitation in the weld metal was achieved when using multiple reheating passes with low heat input instead of a few passes with high heat input, providing equal accumulative heating time between 1000-700 °C. However, the influence of multiple reheating on the hardness was larger compared to slow cooling.

  • 66.
    Cernuschi, F.
    et al.
    RSE – Ricerca per il Sistema Energetico, Via Rubattino, 54, 20134 Milano.
    Lorenzoni, L.
    RSE – Ricerca per il Sistema Energetico, Via Rubattino, 54, 20134 Milano.
    Capelli, S.
    RSE – Ricerca per il Sistema Energetico, Via Rubattino, 54, 20134 Milano.
    Guardamagna, C.
    RSE – Ricerca per il Sistema Energetico, Via Rubattino, 54, 20134 Milano.
    Karger, M.
    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energieforschung IEF-1, 52425 Jülich.
    Vaßen, R.
    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energieforschung IEF-1, 52425 Jülich.
    von Niessen, K.
    Sulzer Metco AG, Rigackerstr. 16, CH-5610, Wohlen.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Menuey, J.
    Snecma, 1 Rue Maryse Bastié, 86100 Châtellerault.
    Giolli, C.
    Turbocoating SpA, Via Mistrali 7, Rubbiano di Solignano,.
    Solid particle erosion of thermal spray and physical vapour deposition thermal barrier coatings2011In: Wear, Vol. 271, no 11-12, p. 2909-2918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are used to protect hot path components of gas turbines from hot combustion gases. For a number of decades, in the case of aero engines TBCs are usually deposited by electron beam physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD). EB-PVD coatings have a columnar microstructure that guarantees high strain compliance and better solid particle erosion than PS TBCs. The main drawback of EB-PVD coating is the deposition cost that is higher than that of air plasma sprayed (APS) TBC. The major scientific and technical objective of the UE project TOPPCOAT was the development of improved TBC systems using advanced bonding concepts in combination with additional protective functional coatings. The first specific objective was to use these developments to provide a significant improvement to state-of-the-art APS coatings and hence provide a cost-effective alternative to EB-PVD. In this perspective one standard porous APS, two segmented APS, one EB-PVD and one PS-PVD™ were tested at 700°C in a solid particle erosion jet tester, with EB-PVD and standard porous APS being the two reference systems.Tests were performed at impingement angles of 30° and 90°, representative for particle impingement on trailing and leading edges of gas turbine blades and vanes, respectively. Microquartz was chosen as the erodent being one of the main constituents of sand and fly volcanic ashes. After the end of the tests, the TBC microstructure was investigated using electron microscopy to characterise the failure mechanisms taking place in the TBC.It was found that PS-PVD™ and highly segmented TBCs showed erosion rates comparable or better than EB-PVD samples. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  • 67.
    Charles, Corinne
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Modelling Microstructure Evolution in Weld Deposited Titanium2007In: NAFEMS Contact Nordic Countries, 2007, NAFEMS Nordic seminar; 4 (Oslo): 2007.03.20-21, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Charles, Corinne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Järvstråt, Niklas
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Development of a Microstructure Model for Metal Deposition of Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-4V2007In: Ti-2007 : science and technology : proceedings of the 11th World Conference on Titanium (JIMIC 5): held at Kyoto International Conference Center, Kyoto, Japan, 3 - 7 June 2007, 2007, p. 1201-1205Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Charles, Corinne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Järvstråt, Niklas
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Finite Element Modelling of Microstructure on GTAW Metal Deposition of Ti-6Al-4V alloy2006In: Computer Technology in Welding and Manufacturing : 16th International Conference & Mathematical Modelling and Information Technologies in Welding and Related Processes: Kiev, Ukraine, June 6-8, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Charles Murgau, Corinne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Microstructure model for Ti-6Al-4V used in simulation of additive manufacturing2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is devoted to microstructure modelling of Ti-6Al-4V. The microstructure and the mechanical properties of titanium alloys are highly dependent on the temperature history experienced by the material. The developed microstructure model accounts for thermaldriving forces and is applicable for general temperature histories. It has been applied to study wire feed additive manufacturing processes that induce repetitive heating and cooling cycles.The microstructure model adopts internal state variables to represent the microstructure through microstructure constituents' fractions in finite element simulation. This makes it possible to apply the model efficiently for large computational models of general thermomechanical processes. The model is calibrated and validated versus literature data. It is applied to Gas Tungsten Arc Welding -also known as Tungsten Inert Gas welding-wire feed additive manufacturing process.Four quantities are calculated in the model: the volume fraction of phase, consisting of Widmanstätten, grain boundary, and martensite. The phase transformations during cooling are modelled based on diffusional theory described by a Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov formulation, except for diffusionless martensite formation where the Koistinen-Marburger equation is used. A parabolic growth rate equation is used for the to transformation upon heating. An added variable, structure size indicator of Widmanstätten, has also been implemented and calibrated. It is written in a simple Arrhenius format.The microstructure model is applied to in finite element simulation of wire feed additive manufacturing. Finally, coupling with a physically based constitutive model enables a comprehensive and predictive model of the properties that evolve during processing.

  • 71.
    Charles Murgau, Corinne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Lundbäck, Andreas
    Division of Mechanics of Solid Materials, Luleå University of Technology, 971 81 Luleå, Sweden .
    Åkerfeldt, Pia
    Division of Materials Science, Luleå University of Technology, 971 81 Luleå, Sweden .
    Pederson, Robert
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems, 461 81 Trollhättan, Sweden .
    Temperature and microstructure evolution in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding wire feed additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V2019In: Materials, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 12, no 21, article id E3534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) is used to solve temperature field and microstructure evolution during GTAW wire feed additive manufacturing process.The microstructure of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V is computed based on the temperature evolution in a point-wise logic. The methodology concerning the microstructural modeling is presented. A model to predict the thickness of the Į lath morphology is also implemented. The results from simulations are presented togethe rwith qualitative and quantitative microstructure analysis.

  • 72.
    Chazelas, Christophe
    et al.
    European Ceramic Center, SPCTS CNRS UMR 7315, University of Limoges, Limoges, France.
    Trelles, Juan Pablo
    Mechanical Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, USA.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Vardelle, Armelle
    European Ceramic Center, SPCTS CNRS UMR 7315, University of Limoges, Limoges, France.
    Main issues for a fully predictive plasma spray torch model and numerical considerations2017In: Plasma chemistry and plasma processing, ISSN 0272-4324, E-ISSN 1572-8986, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 627-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasma spray is one of the most versatile and established techniques for the deposition of thick coatings that provide functional surfaces to protect or improve the performance of the substrate material. However, a greater understanding of plasma spray torch operation will result in improved control of process and coating properties and in the development of novel plasma spray processes and applications. The operation of plasma torches is controlled by coupled dynamic, thermal, chemical, electromagnetic, and acoustic phenomena that take place at different time and space scales. Computational modeling makes it possible to gain important insight into torch characteristics that are not practically accessible to experimental observations, such as the dynamics of the arc inside the plasma torch. This article describes the current main issues in carrying out plasma spray torch numerical simulations at a high level of fidelity. These issues encompass the use of non-chemical and non-thermodynamic equilibrium models, incorporation of electrodes with sheath models in the computational domain, and resolution of rapid transient events, including the so-called arc reattachment process. Practical considerations regarding model implementation are also discussed, particularly the need for the model to naturally reproduce the observed torch operation modes in terms of voltage and pressure fluctuations.

  • 73.
    Chen, Y.
    et al.
    University of Manchester, School of Materials, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Zhao, X.
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced High-Temperature Materials and Precision Forming, Shanghai, China .
    Dang, Y.
    University of Manchester, School of Materials, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Xiao, Ping
    University of Manchester, School of Materials, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Characterization and understanding of residual stresses in a NiCoCrAlY bond coat for thermal barrier coating application2015In: Acta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6454, E-ISSN 1873-2453, Vol. 94, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The residual stresses in a NiCoCrAlY bond coat deposited on a Ni-base superalloy substrate after oxidation at 1150 °C were studied by X-ray diffraction using the sin2Ψ technique. The stresses were found to be tensile; they first increased and then decreased with oxidation time. High temperature stress measurement indicated that the stress developed and built up upon cooling, predominantly within the temperature range from 1150 °C to 600 °C. Microstructural examination suggested that, due to the limited penetration depth into the bond coat, the X-ray only probed the stress in a thin surface layer consisting of the single γ-phase formed through Al depletion during oxidation. Quantitative high temperature X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that, above 600 °C, the volume fraction of the β-phase in the bond coat increased with decreasing temperature. The mechanisms of stress generation in the bond coat were examined and are discussed based on the experiments designed to isolate the contribution of possible stress generation factors. It was found that the measured bond coat stresses were mainly induced by the volume change of the bond coat associated with the precipitation of the β-phase upon cooling.

  • 74.
    Chen, Ying
    et al.
    University of Manchester,School of Materials, M13 9PL, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Zhang, Xun
    University of Manchester,School of Materials, M13 9PL, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Zhao, Xiaofeng
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced High-Temperature Materials and Precision Forming, Shanghai, 200240, China.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Xiao, Ping
    University of Manchester,School of Materials, M13 9PL, Manchester, United Kingdom; Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced High-Temperature Materials and Precision Forming, Shanghai, 200240, China.
    Measurements of elastic modulus and fracture toughness of an air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating using micro-cantilever bending2019In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 374, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The elastic modulus and fracture toughness of an air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating (APS TBC) were measured using the micro-cantilever bending technique. The micro-cantilevers were machined by a focused ion beam with their central arms either parallel or normal to the bond coat/topcoat interface. Such orientations allowed direct measurements of both the in-plane and out-of-plane elastic moduli as well as mode I fracture toughness by bending. The calculated elastic modulus along the in-plane and out-of-plane direction is 144 GPa and 110 GPa, respectively, suggesting that the APS TBC is elastically anisotropic at microscale. The derived mode I fracture toughness along the plane parallel to the interface is 0.40 MPam. This relatively low toughness reflects the weak fracture resistance of the highly-flawed APS for short cracks at microscale. The measurements in this study can be incorporated into micromechanical life time prediction models of the APS TBCs. © 2019 Elsevier B.V.

  • 75.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Gas tungsten arc models including the physics of the cathode layer: remaining issues2018In: Welding in the World, ISSN 0043-2288, E-ISSN 1878-6669, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 177-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent review pointed out that the existing models for gas tungsten arc coupling the electrode (a cathode) and the plasma are not yet complete enough. Their strength is to predict with good accuracy either the electric potential or the temperature field in the region delimited by the electrode and the workpiece. Their weakness is their poor ability to predict with good accuracy these two fields at once. However, both of these fields are important since they govern the heat flux to the workpiece through current density and temperature gradient. New developments have been made since then. They mainly concern the approaches addressing the electrode sheath (or space charge layer) that suffered from an underestimation of the arc temperature. These new developments are summarized and discussed, the modelling assumptions are examined, and important modelling issues that remain unexplored are underlined.

  • 76.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Björklund, Stefan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Johansson, J.
    Wigren, J.
    New powder port holder geometry to avoid lump formation in APS2005In: 17th international symposium on plasma chemistry (ISPC 17) :: Toronto, Canada, August 7th – 12th, 2005, 2005, p. OP7. 1-6Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new geometry of the powder port ring holder used in atmospheric plasma spraying has recently been designed to avoid lump formation, and successfully tested for a set of process parameters associated with Ni-5Al powder used in production to form bond coat [1]. But with ZrO 2 powder used to made top coat, improvements were not enough satisfactory. Here, we investigate numerically the cause of the remaining defects, and further improve the ring geometry to prevent lump from forming in any part of the coating.

  • 77.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Javidi Shirvan, Alireza
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Mechanics, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A predictive model for gas tungsten arc heat source2016In: The 7th International Swedish Production Symposium, SPS16, Conference Proceedings: 25th – 27th of October 2016, Lund: Swedish Production Academy , 2016, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gas tungsten arcs are used as heat sources in production processes such as welding and metal deposition.However, the most advanced of the existing gas tungsten arc models still lack predicting the arc temperature observed experimentally, unless imposing a priori the extent of the cathode arc attachment.Possible causes of this problem were investigated. It was concluded that the physical state of the arcing gas tungsten cathode was too simplified by the existing models. This oversimplification results in an overestimation of the cathode arc attachment area and an underestimation of the arc temperature field.An improved model was developed based only on physical criteria. It was tested by comparison with experimental measurements available in the literature. Good agreement with the temperature measured on the cathode surface and within the arc were obtained.

  • 78.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Javidi Shirvan, Alireza
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Electric welding arc modeling with the three-dimensional solver OpenFOAM: A comparison of different electromagnetic models2011In: 64 th Annual Assembly and International Conference of International Institute of Welding, 64th IWW: Chennai, 17-22 july, 2011. Working group 212, 2011, p. 212-1189-11-1-212-1189-11-16Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the modeling of a plasma arc heat source in the context ofelectric arc welding. The model was implemented in the open source CFD softwareOpenFOAM-1.6.x, coupling thermal fluid mechanics in three dimensions with electromagnetics.Different approaches were considered for modeling the electromagneticfields: i) the three-dimensional approach, ii) the two-dimensional axi-symmetric approach,iii) the electric potential formulation, and iv) the magnetic field formulation asdescribed by Ramírez et al. [1]. The underlying assumptions and the differencesbetween these models are detailed. The models i) to iii) reduce to the same quasione-dimensional limit for an axi-symmetric configuration with negligible radial currentdensity, contrary to the formulation iv). The models ii) to iv) cannot represent the samephysics when the radial current density is significant, such as for a short arc or anelectrode with a conical tip. The models i) to iii) were retained for doing numerical simulations.The corresponding solvers were tested against analytic solution for an infiniteelectric rod. Perfect agreement was obtained for all the models tested. The completesolver (thermal fluid coupled with electromagnetics) was tested against experimentalmeasurements for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW). The shielding gas was argon,the arc was short (2mm), the electrode tip conical, and the configuration axi-symmetric.Anode and cathode were treated as boundary conditions. The models i) and ii) lead tothe same results, but not the formulation iii). It indeed neglects the radial current densitycomponent, resulting in a poor estimation of the magnetic field, and in turn of thearc velocity. Limitations of the complete solver were investigated changing also the gascomposition, and testing boundary conditions. These conditions, difficult to measureand to estimate a priori, significantly affect the simulation results.

  • 79.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Javidi Shirvan, Alireza
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Mechanics,412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    On the choice of electromagnetic model for shorthigh-intensity arcs, applied to welding2012In: Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, ISSN 0022-3727, E-ISSN 1361-6463, Vol. 45, no 20, p. 205203-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four different approaches were considered for modelling the electromagneticfields of high-intensity electric arcs: i) the three-dimensional model, ii) the twodimensionalaxi-symmetric model, iii) the electric potential formulation, and iv) themagnetic field formulation. The underlying assumptions and the differences betweenthese models are described in detail. Models i) to iii) reduce to the same limit for anaxi-symmetric configuration with negligible radial current density, contrary to modeliv). Models i) to iii) were retained and implemented in the open source CFD softwareOpenFOAM. The simulation results were first validated against the analytic solutionof an infinite electric rod. Perfect agreement was obtained for all the models tested.The electromagnetic models i) to iii) were then coupled with thermal fluid mechanicsin OpenFOAM, and applied to the calculation of an axi-symmetric Gas Tungsten ArcWelding (GTAW) test case with short arc (2mm) and truncated conical electrode tip.Models i) and ii) lead to the same simulation results, but not model iii). Model iii)is suited in the specific limit of long axi-symmetric arc, with negligible electrode tipeffect. For short axi-symmetric arc, the more general axi-symmetric formulation ofmodel ii) should instead be used.

  • 80.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science.
    Lucquin-Desreuw, B
    Hydrodynamic limit for an arc discharge at atmospheric pressure2005In: Journal of statistical physics, ISSN 0022-4715, E-ISSN 1572-9613, Vol. 119, no 1-2, p. 197-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we study a partially ionized plasma that corresponds to an arc discharge at atmospheric pressure. We derive an inviscid hydrodynamic/diffusion limit, characterized by two temperatures, from a system of Boltzmann type transport equations modelling that plasma problem. The original property of this system is that impact ionization is a leading order collisional process. As a consequence, the density of electrons is given in terms of the density of the other species (and its temperature) via a Saha law.

  • 81.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Mechanics, Gothenburg.
    Analysis of the Influence of the Composition of the Shielding Gas on Pressure Force and Heat Fluxes in Arc Welding2014In: Proceedings of The 6th International Swedish Production Symposium 2014 / [ed] Johan Stahre, Björn Johansson,Mats Björkman, 2014, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A main problem raised by arc welding manufacturing is the determination ofthe optimal process parameters to ensure weld quality as well as resource efficient andsustainable production. To address this problem a better process understanding is required.In this study thermal magneto hydrodynamic modeling of a welding arc is used to reacha deeper insight into the influence of the composition of the shielding gas on the pressureforce and the heat fluxes to a workpiece. The model was implemented in the open sourcesimulation software OpenFOAM. Four different shielding gas mixtures combining argonand carbon dioxide were studied. When increasing the fraction of carbon dioxide the resultsshow a significant increase of the arc velocity and temperature with constriction of thetemperature field, a decrease of the pressure force and a significant increase of the heatfluxes on the base metal.

  • 82.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Javidi Shirvan, Alireza
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Stenbacka, Nils
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Numerical simulation of Ar-x%CO2 shielding gas and its effect on an electric welding arc2011In: IIW Commission XII Doc. XII-2017-11, 2011, p. 1-12Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the simulation of a plasma arc heat source in the context of electric arc welding. The simulation model was implemented in the open source CFD software OpenFOAM-1.6.x, in three space dimensions, coupling thermal fluid mechanics with electromagnetism. Two approaches were considered for calculating the magnetic field: i) the three-dimensional approach, and ii) the so-called axisymmetric approach. The electromagnetic part of the solver was tested against analytic solution for an infinite electric rod. Perfect agreement was obtained. The complete solver was tested against experimental measurements for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) with an axisymmetric configuration. The shielding gas was argon, and the anode and cathode were treated as boundary conditions. The numerical solutions then depend significantly on the approach used for calculating the magnetic field. The so-called axisymmetric approach indeed neglects the radial current density component, mainly resulting in a poor estimation of the arc velocity. Plasma arc simulations were done for various Ar-x%CO2 shielding gas compositions: pure argon (x=0), pure carbon dioxide (x=100), and mixturesof these two gases with x=1 and 10% in mole. The simulation results clearly show that the presence of carbon dioxide results in thermal arc constriction, and increased maximum arc temperature and velocity. Various boundary conditions were set on the anode and cathode (using argon as shielding gas) to evaluate their influence on the plasma arc. These conditions, difficult to measure and to estimate a priori, significantly affect the heat source simulation results. Solution of the temperature and electromagnetic fields in the anode and cathode will thus be included in the forthcoming developments.

  • 83.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Sass-Tisovskaya, Margarita
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Modeling and simulation of a heat source in electric arc welding2011In: SPS11 : The 4th International Swedish Production Symposiom: Lund, 3-5 maj, 2011, 2011, p. 201-211Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focused on the modeling and simulation of a plasma heat source applied toelectric arc welding. The heat source was modeled in three space dimensions couplingthermal fluid mechanics with electromagnetism. Two approaches were considered forcalculating the magnetic field: i) three-dimensional, and ii) axi-symmetric. The anodeand cathode were treated as boundary conditions. The model was implemented in theopen source CFD software OpenFOAM-1.6.x. The electromagnetic part of the solverwas tested against analytic solution for an infinite electric rod. Perfect agreement wasobtained. The complete solver was tested against experimental measurements for GasTungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) with an axi-symmetric configuration. The shielding gaswas argon with thermodynamic and transport properties covering a temperature rangefrom 200 to 30 000 K. The numerical solutions then depend greatly on the approachused for calculating the magnetic field. The axi-symmetric approach indeed neglectsthe radial current density component, mainly resulting in a poor estimation of the arcvelocity. Various boundary conditions were set on the anode and cathode. Theseconditions, difficult to measure and to estimate a priori, significantly affect the plasmaheat source simulation results. Solution of the temperature and electromagnetic fieldsin the electrodes will thus be included in the forthcoming developments.

  • 84.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Wigren, J
    Deposition Rate Increase in APS Processes by Means of Multiple Injection Ports2004In: Thermal Spray 2004: Advances in Technology and Application: Proceedings of the International Thermal Spray Conference 10–12 May 2004, Osaka, Japan, 2004, p. 691-695Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Danielsson, Fredrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Heralic, Almir
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Ottosson, Mattias
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Hurtig, Kjell
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Automation of a robotised metal deposition system using laser melting of wire2008In: 18th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing (FAIM 2008): Skövde, 30 June-2 July, 2008, p. 122-129Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a system for full automation of free-form-fabrication of fully dense metal structures using robotized laser melting of wire. The structure is built of beads of melted wire laid side by side and layer upon layer governed by synchronized robot motion. By full automation is here meant that the process starts with a product specification of a component, and ends in a geometrically validated dense metal component fulfilling industrial material requirements. Due to the complexity of this flexible manufacturing system, a number of different disciplines are involved. This paper discusses mainly the system design, which includes how off-line programming is used for automatic generation of code and how feedback control is used for on-line adjustment of parameters based on desired building properties. To meet industrial needs, the project is carried out in a close cooperation between research and development activities in academy and industry.

  • 86.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Electrical Engineering and Land Surveying.
    Ottosson, Mattias
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Electrical Engineering and Land Surveying.
    Sensor and control system for metal deposition using robotised laser welding.2006In: 16th International Conference on Computer Technology in Welding and Manufacturing: Kiev, Ukraine, 2006, p. 328-332Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Coll Ferrari, Maria Teresa
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    On the evolution of tempering carbides in a modified H!# and a modified H11 when hardening at 1000°2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hot- work tool steels require high austenitising temperature during hardening in order to yield the high tempering resistance that vanadium- rich carbides supply. Such grades, when offering high cleanness, are also used for plastic injection molding. The hardening temperature can then be lower, yielding a lower content of vanadium in the martensitic matrix and precipitating instead molybdenum-rich carbides, M2C- type, during tempering. M2C- type carbides are metastable and have high carbide/ matrix interface energy, which implies a greater driving force for coarsening than that in the MC- type. In this paper the carbide evolution in two hot- work grades hardened at 1000˚C, is studied after two and threetemperings. Type, size and distribution of tempering carbides were investigated with the help of TEM. Undissolved carbides were documented by SEM investigation and the microstructures classified by LOM. Hardness levels and Charpy V test results are also reported here.

  • 88.
    Coll Ferrari, Maria Teresa
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Andersson, J.
    Kvarnström, M.
    Influence of lowered austenitisation temperature during hardening on tempering resistance of modified H13 tool steel (Uddeholm Dievar)2013In: International Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering, ISSN 1749-5156, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 129-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The surface of large tools will be exposed to the hardening temperature for longer times than the core. This might in occasions, result in grain growth. In order to prevent this, it has become practice to lower the hardening temperature. This paper presents the effect of this practice on the precipitation of tempering carbides and the tempering resistance of Uddeholm Dievar. Composition of equilibrium austenite and the undissolved carbides at two different hardening temperatures were estimated by Thermo Calc simulations and the calculations predict that the balance between the amounts of molybdenum and vanadium in the austenite is shifted towards more molybdenum at the lower austenitising temperature. Since molybdenum stabilises M2C precipitates, it was predicted also that the tempering carbides would be almost only M2C in the sample with the lower austenitising temperature, whereas for the higher austenitising temperature, the subsequent tempering would yield a mixture of the much more stable MC together with M2C. Samples were hardened at the simulated temperatures and tempered. The existing carbides were investigated with help of SEM and TEM. The result shows that a lowered austenitisation temperature decreases the tempering resistance. However, the transmission electron microscopy reveals that both samples have the same mixture of tempering carbides, as the samples do not reach thermodynamical equilibrium during the holding time at the hardening temperature. The lower austenitising temperature gives less tempering carbides as less alloying elements are dissolved.

  • 89.
    Coll Ferrari, María Teresa
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Effect of austenitising temperature and cooling rate on microstructures of hot-work tool steels2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The average size of hot-work tools has gradually increased over the past years.This affects the effective temperature cycle tools experience during hardening,as large dimensions prevent uniform and rapid cooling, and thereby the resulting microstructures and properties. In order to avoid the formation of coarse structures or cracking during heat treatment it has become common practise to lower the austenitising temperature below that recommended by the steel manufacturer.In this work, therefore, the effects of austenitising at temperatures lower thancommonly recommended are investigated. Three 5% Cr hot-work tool steelsalloyed with Mo and V were heat treated, resulting microstructures andtempering carbides were studied and transformation characteristics determined for different austenitising temperatures and different cooling rates. The temperatures and cooling rates have been chosen to be representative for heat treatments of different sizes of tools. Bainite rather than martensite formed during slow cooling regardless of austenitising temperature. A lowered austenitising temperature produced largeramounts of both bainite and retained austenite while a higher caused graingrowth. Carbon partitioning during the bainitic transformation resulted in anincrease of the carbon content in the retained austenite of at least 0.3 wt.%. The austenitising temperature influences also the type and amount of tempering carbides that precipitate, which affects the properties of the steel. Higher austenitising temperatures favour the precipitation of MC carbides during tempering. The Mo rich M2C type carbides were proven to be more prone to coarsening during service at 560°C-600°C, while V rich MC carbides preserve their fine distribution. A best practice heat treatment needs to balance the increase of grain size with increasing austenitising temperatures, with the possibility to form more tempering carbides. Higher austenitising temperatures also give less retained austenite, which can affect dimensional stability and toughness negatively after tempering

  • 90.
    Cruz-crespo, Amado
    et al.
    Universidad Central "Marta Abreu" de Las Villas, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia.
    Gonzalez, Lorenzo Perdomo
    Anim Hlth & Vet Labs Agcy, VLA Lasswade Vet Labs Agcy Lasswade, King Abdulaziz University.
    Rafael, Quintana
    Universidad Central "Marta Abreu" de Las Villas.
    Scotti, Americo
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology. Universidade Federal de Uberlandia University West - Sweden Fed Univ Uberlandia UFU.
    Flux for Hardfacing by Submerged Arc Welding from Ferrochrome-manganese and Slag from the Simultaneous Reduction of Chromite and Pyrolusite2019In: Soldagem & Inspeção, ISSN 0104-9224, E-ISSN 1980-6973, Vol. 24, article id e2424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The obtaining of a flux for hardfacing by Submerged Arc Welding (SAW), using ferrochrome-manganese and slag obtained from the simultaneous carbothermal reduction of chromite and pyrolusite is addressed. The ferrochrome-manganese and the slag were obtained, conceiving that both products satisfy the requirements of the components (alloy system and matrix) of an agglomerated flux for hardfacing. The fusion-reduction process to obtain the alloy and the slag was carried out in a direct current electric arc furnace. The pouring was carried out into water to facilitate the separation and grinding of the cast products. An experimental flux was manufactured, using the obtained alloy and slag. Deposits were obtained by SAW, which were characterized in terms of: chemical composition, microstructure and hardness. It was concluded that the flux obtained from ferrochrome-manganese and slag from the simultaneous carbothermal reduction of chromite and pyrolusite, allows to deposit an appropriate metal for work under abrasion conditions, characterized by significant carbon and chromium contents and a martensitic microstructure predominantly, with hardness of 63 HRc.

  • 91.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Design of Thermal Barrier Coating Systems2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC’s) are used to provide both thermal insulation and oxidation protection to high temperature components within gas turbines. The development of turbines for power generation and aviation has led to designs where the operation conditions exceed the upper limits of most conventional engineering materials. As a result there has been a drive to improve thermal barrier coatings to allow the turbine to operate at higher temperatures for longer.

    The focus of this thesis has been to design thermal barrier coatings with lower conductivity and longer lifetime than those coatings used in industry today. The work has been divided between the development of new generation air plasma spray (APS) TBC coatings for industrial gas turbines and the development of suspension plasma spray (SPS) TBC systems.

    The route taken to achieve these goals with APS TBC’s has been twofold. Firstly an alternative stabiliser has been chosen for the zirconium oxide system in the form of dysprosia. Secondly, control of the powder morphology and spray parameters has been used to generate coating microstructures with favourable levels of porosity.

    In terms of development of SPS TBC systems, these coatings are relatively new with many of the critical coating parameters not yet known. The focus of the work has therefore been to characterise their lifetime and thermal properties when produced in a complete TBC system.

    Results demonstrate that dysprosia as an alternative stabiliser gives a reduction in thermal conductivity. While small at room temperature and in the as produced state; the influence becomes more pronounced at high temperatures and with longer thermal exposure time. The trade-off for this lowered thermal conductivity may be in the loss of high temperature stability. Overall, the greatest sustained influence on thermal conductivity has been from creating coatings with high levelsof porosity.

    In relation to lifetime, double the thermo-cyclic fatigue (TCF) life relative to the industrial standard was achieved using a coating with engineered porosity. Introducing a polymer to the spray powder helps to generate large globular pores within the coating together with a large number of delaminations. Such a structure was shown to be highly resistant to TCF testing.

    SPS TBC’s were shown to have much greater performance relative to their APS counterparts in thermal shock life, TCF life and thermal conductivity. Columnar SPS coatings are a prospective alternative for strain tolerant coatings in gas turbine engines.

  • 92.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Design of Thermal Barrier Coating Systems2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC’s) are used to provide both thermal insulation and oxidation protection to high temperature components within gas turbines. The development of turbines for power generation and aviation has led to designs where the operation conditions exceed the upper limits of most conventional engineering materials. As a result there has been a drive to improve thermal barrier coatings to allow the turbine to operate hotter for longer.

    The focus of this study has been the development of a new generation of TBC system for industrial implementation. The goal for these new coatings was to achieve lower conductivity and longer lifetime than those coatings used today. The route taken to achieve these goals has been twofold. Firstly an alternative stabiliser has been chosen for the zirconium oxide system in the form of dysprosia. Secondly, Control of the powder morphology and spray parameters has been used to generate coating microstructures with favourable levels of porosity.

    Samples have been heavily characterised using the laser flash technique for evaluation of thermal properties. Measurements were performed at room temperature and at intervals up to 1200°C. Samples have also been tested in their as produced state and after heat treatments of up to 200 hours.

    Lifetime evaluation has been performed using the thermo-cyclic fatigue test to expose coating systems to successive cycles of heating and cooling combined with oxidation of the underlying metallic coating.

    Microstructures have been prepared and analysed using SEM. An image analysis routine has been used to attempt to quantify changes in microstructure features between coating types or coating exposure times and to relate those changes to changes in thermal properties

    Results show that dysprosia as an alternative dopant gives a reduction in thermal conductivity. While small at room temperature and in the as produced state; the influence becomes more pronounced at high temperatures and with thermal exposure time. Overall, the greatest sustained influence on thermal conductivity has been from creating coatings with high levels of porosity.

    In relation to lifetime, the target of double the thermo-cyclic fatigue life was achieved using a coating with engineered porosity. Introducing a polymer to the spray powder helps to generate large globular pores within the coating together with a large number of delaminations. Such a structure has shown to be highly resistant to TCF testing.

  • 93.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Treibacher AG, Austria.
    Feedstock for SPS and SPPS: Properties and Processing2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Suspension plasma spray: how suspension properties and spray parameters influence coating possibilities2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Curry, Nicholas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Donoghue, Jack
    University of Manchester.
    Evolution of thermal conductivity of dysprosia stabilised thermal barrier coating systems during heat treatment2012In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, ISSN 0257-8972, Vol. 209, p. 38-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dysprosia stabilised zirconia coatings offer a potential reduction in thermal heat transfer for thermal barrier coating systems with the added benefit of being producible with existing equipment and spray knowledge. However, there is little information on the long term performance of such systems relative to the standard coatings. While a low thermal conductivity is important for a gas turbine; sintering resistance is important to maintain properties over the lifetime of a component.

    In this study, four dysprosia stabilised zirconia coatings are compared with a standard yttria stabilised coating in present industrial use.

    Samples were exposed to isothermal furnace conditions at 1150 °C from 5 to 200 hours to observe the sintering resistance of the coating systems. Tests carried out include microstructural analysis with SEM, thermal conductivity measurements using laser flash analysis and porosity changes monitored using image analysis.

  • 96.
    Curry, Nicholas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Janikowski, Wysomir
    University of Manchester.
    Pala, Zdenek
    Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Plasma Physics.
    Vilémová, Monica
    Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Plasma Physics.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Impact of Impurity Content on the Sintering Resistance and Phase Stability of Dysprosia- and Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings2014In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, Vol. 23, no 1-2, p. 160-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dysprosia-stabilized zirconia (DySZ) is a promising candidate to replace yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as a thermal barrier coating due to its lower inherent thermal conductivity. It is also suggested in studies that DySZ may show greater stability to high temperature phase changes compared to YSZ, possibly allowing for coatings with extended lifetimes. Separately, the impurity content of YSZ powders has been proven to influence high-temperature sintering behavior. By lowering the impurity oxides within the spray powder, a coating more resistant to sintering can be produced. This study presents both high purity and standard purity dysprosia and YSZ coatings and their performance after a long heat treatment. Coatings were produced using powder with the same morphology and grain size; only the dopant and impurity content were varied. Samples have been heat treated for exposure times up to 400 h at a temperature of 1150 °C. Samples were measured for thermal conductivity to plot the evolution of coating thermal properties with respect to exposure time. Thermal conductivity has been compared to microstructure analysis and porosity measurement to track structural changes. Phase analysis utilizing x-ray diffraction was used to determine differences in phase degradation of the coatings after heat treatment. © 2013 ASM International.

  • 97.
    Curry, Nicholas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Janikowski, Wyszomir
    University of Mancheste.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Impact of impurity content on the sintering resistance of dysprosia and yttria stabilised zirconia thermal barrier coatings2013In: Proceedings of the International Thermal Spray Conference / [ed] Editor: Rogerio S. Lima, Arvind Agarwal, Margaret M. Hyland, Yuk-Chiu Lau, Georg Mauer, André McDonald, and Filofteia-Laura, ASM International, 2013, p. 557-563Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dysprosia stabilised zirconia (DySZ) is a promising candidate to replace yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) as a thermal barrier coating due to its lower inherent thermal conductivity. It is also suggested in studies that DySZ may show greater stability to high temperature phase changes compared to YSZ, possibly allowing for coatings with extended lifetimes. Separately, the impurity content of YSZ powders has been proven to influence high temperature sintering behaviour. By lowering the impurity oxides within the spray powder, a coating more resistant to sintering can be produced. This study presents both high purity and standard purity dysprosia and yttria stabilised zirconia coatings and their performance after a long heat treatment. Coatings were produced using powder with the same morphology and grain size; only the dopant and impurity content were varied. Samples have been heat treated for exposure times up to 400 hours at a temperature of 1150°C. Samples were subsequently measured for thermal conductivity to plot the evolution of coating thermal properties with respect to exposure time. Thermal conductivity has been compared to microstructure analysis and porosity measurement to track structural changes due to sintering.

  • 98.
    Curry, Nicholas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Goddard, Caroline
    Manchester University.
    Influence of Sensor contact on the Thermal Conductivity Values of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Part 1 Experimental2010In: Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Surface Modification Technologies: 7-9 sept, Dresden, 2010, p. 317-327Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Curry, Nicholas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Li, Xin-Hai
    Siemens Turbomachinery.
    Tricoire, Aurelien
    Volvo Aero Corp.
    Dorfman, Mitch
    Sulzer Metco.
    Next Generation Thermal Barrier Coatings for the Gas Turbine Industry2010In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, ISSN 1059-9630, Vol. 20, no 1-2, p. 108-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to develop the next generation of production ready air plasma sprayed thermalbarrier coating with a low conductivity and long lifetime. A number of coating architectures wereproduced using commercially available plasma spray guns. Modifications were made to powder chemistry,including high purity powders, dysprosia stabilized zirconia powders, and powders containingporosity formers. Agglomerated & sintered and homogenized oven spheroidized powder morphologieswere used to attain beneficial microstructures. Dual layer coatings were produced using the two powders.Laser flash technique was used to evaluate the thermal conductivity of the coating systems from roomtemperature to 1200 C. Tests were performed on as-sprayed samples and samples were heat treated for100 h at 1150 C. Thermal conductivity results were correlated to the coating microstructure using imageanalysis of porosity and cracks. The results show the influence of beneficial porosity on reducing thethermal conductivity of the produced coatings.

  • 100.
    Curry, Nicholas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Li, Xin-Hai
    Tricoire, Aurelien
    Dorfman, Mitchell
    Next Generation Thermal Barrier Coatings for the Gas Turbine Industry2010In: Proceedings of the Thermal Spray: Global Solutions for Future Application (ITSC 2010) Conference: Singapore, May 3-5, 2010, 2010, p. 716-722Conference paper (Refereed)
1234567 51 - 100 of 677
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf