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  • 301.
    Ronthy, Marika
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ledarintelligens utifrån chefs och ledarrollen2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to validate an instrument called Leader Intelligence Questionnaire (LQ-test) based on the theory of leader intelligence out of being a manager and a leader. Leader intelligence is a concept created by Ronthy observing skills within the rational, emotional and spiritual intelligence with the main focus on skills within the latter two which also is a human leadership. The questionnaire of leader intelligence is created by Ronthy and has 71 item, and the majority are from Larsson et al. (2003). The instrument has three scales to study all three intelligences. The scale for the rational intelligence studies the role as a manager and the emotional and spiritual intelligence studies the role as a leader. A second aim was to examine the gender distribution among managers and leaders. The participants in the study were 307 leaders (68% women). Furthermore, the participants also responded how much time they spent per month on tasks related to the management role as well as the leadership role. According to the leader intelligence theory the manager should spend more of his/her time in the leader role leading him / herself as well as others and less time in the managerial role managing administrative tasks. The result shows that 20% perceive themselves as managers with the emphasis on administrative tasks and 80% perceive themselves as leaders with the emphasis on a human leadership. When analysing the time spent on various tasks divided within the three different scales the study showed that 72% of the time was spent on managerial tasks and 28% on leader tasks as coaching, personal development and reflection. The study showed no significant differences between men and women. The relational aspect of leadership is being empathized more and more in today´s organizations which will be clarified in this study.

  • 302. Roos, John Magnus
    et al.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Big Five Manga: a non-verbal pathway to personality?2016In: 31st International Congress of Psychology, Yokohama, Japan, 24-29 July: Diversity in Harmony : Insights from Psychology, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 303.
    Roos, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Centre for Consumer Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Business Administration and Textile Management, University of Borås, Sweden..
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Expert validity on non-verbal personality characters2017In: 14th Conference on Psychological Assessment, July 5-8, 2017, Lisbon, Portugal: Book of Abstracts / [ed] ,. / [ed] Paula Ferreira, Aristides Ferreira, Inês Afonso, & Ana Margarida Veiga Simão, Lisbon, 2017, p. 81 p-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 304.
    Rothenberg, W. Andrew
    et al.
    Duke University, Duke Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA..
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Department of Special Education, Zarqa, Jordan; Counseling, Special Education, and Neuroscience Division, Emirates College for Advanced Education, Abu Dhabi, UAE.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples, Department of Humanistic Studies, Napoli, Italy..
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA; Institute for Fiscal Studies, London, UK.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology , Rome, Italy .
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann
    Duke University, Duke Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA ; King Abdulaziz University.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, DepartmentofPsychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Department of Psychology, Bogota,Colombia.
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, ,Quezon City,Philippines.
    Peña Alampay, Liane
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, 1000 Metro Manila National Capital Region, Philippin.
    Examining effects of parent warmth and control on internalizing behavior clusters from age 8 to 12 in 12 cultural groups in nine countries2019In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies of U.S. and European samples demonstrate that parental warmth and behavioral control predict child internalizing behaviors and vice versa. However, these patterns have not been researched in other cultures. This study investigates associations between parent warmth and control and three child-reported internalizing behavior clusters to examine this question.

    METHODS: Data from 12 cultural groups in 9 countries were used to investigate prospective bidirectional associations between parental warmth and control, and three child-reported internalizing behavior types: withdrawn/depressed, anxious/depressed, and somatic problems. Multiple-group structural equation modeling was used to analyze associations in children followed from ages 8 to 12.

    RESULTS: Parent warmth and control effects were most pervasive on child-reported withdrawn/depressed problems, somewhat pervasive on anxious/depressed problems and least pervasive on somatic problems. Additionally, parental warmth, as opposed to control, was more consistently associated with child-reported internalizing problems across behavior clusters. Child internalizing behavior effects on parental warmth and control appeared ubiquitously across cultures, and behaviors, but were limited to ages 8-10. Most effects were pancultural, but culture-specific effects emerged at ages 9-10 involving the associations between parent warmth and withdrawn/depressed and somatic behaviors.

    CONCLUSIONS: Effects of parent warmth and control appear stronger on some types of child-reported internalizing behaviors. Associations are especially strong with regard to parental warmth across cultures, and culture-specific effects may be accounted for by cultural normativeness of parent warmth and child-reported somatic symptoms. Child internalizing behavior effects on subsequent parenting are common across cultures.

  • 305.
    Rothenberg, W. Andrew
    et al.
    Duke University, Duke Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA..
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology , Rome, Italy .
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA ; King Abdulaziz University.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Department of Psychology, Bogota,Colombia.
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Peña Alampay, Liane
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, 1000 Metro Manila National Capital Region, Philippin.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Department of Special Education, Zarqa, Jordan; Counseling, Special Education, and Neuroscience Division, Emirates College for Advanced Education, Abu Dhabi, UAE.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples Federico II, Department of Humanistic Studies, Napoli, Italy..
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA; Institute for Fiscal Studies, London, UK.
    Examining the internalizing pathway to substance use frequency in 10 cultural groups.2019In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 102, article id 106214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Use of alcohol, tobacco, and drugs (i.e., substance use) is a leading cause of global health burden for 10-to-24-year-olds, according to the World Health Organization's index of number of years of life lost, leading international health organizations to prioritize the prevention of substance use before it escalates in adolescence. Pathways defined by childhood externalizing symptoms and internalizing symptoms identify precursors to frequent substance use toward which interventions can be directed. However, these pathways are rarely examined beyond the United States and Europe. We investigated these pathways in our sample of 1083 children from 10 cultural groups followed from ages 8-14. We found that age-10 externalizing symptoms predicted more frequent mother-reported age-13 and self-reported age-14 substance use. We also found that a depressive pathway, marked by behavioral inhibition at age 8 and subsequent elevation in depressive symptoms across ages 8-12 predicted more frequent substance use at age 13 and 14. Additionally, we found a combined externalizing and internalizing pathway, wherein elevated age-9 depressive symptoms predicted elevated externalizing symptoms at age-10 which predicted greater peer support for use at age-12, which led to more frequent substance use at age-13 and -14. These pathways remained significant within the cultural groups we studied, even after controlling for differences in substance use frequency across groups. Additionally, cultures with greater opportunities for substance use at age-12 had more frequent adolescent substance use at age-13. These findings highlight the importance of disaggregating between- and within-culture effects in identifying the etiology of early adolescent substance use.

  • 306.
    Rothenberg, William Andrew
    et al.
    Duke University, Durham, United States.
    Lansford, Jennifer. E.
    Duke University, Durham, United States.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy .
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, United States .
    Chang, Lei
    Universidade de Macau, Taipa, Macao.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirb
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst MA, United States.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Durham, United States .
    Malone, Patrick. S.
    Duke University, Durham, United States .
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya .
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy .
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Durham, United States.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence D.
    King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad de san Buenaventura, Bogota, Bogotá, Colombia .
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Examining effects of mother and father warmth and control on child externalizing and internalizing problems from age 8 to 13 in nine countries2019In: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study used data from 12 cultural groups in 9 countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and United States; N = 1,315) to investigate bidirectional associations between parental warmth and control, and child externalizing and internalizing behaviors. In addition, the extent to which these associations held across mothers and fathers and across cultures with differing normative levels of parent warmth and control were examined. Mothers, fathers, and children completed measures when children were ages 8 to 13. Multiple-group autoregressive cross-lagged structural equation models revealed that evocative child-driven effects of externalizing and internalizing behavior on warmth and control are ubiquitous across development, cultures, mothers, and fathers. Results also reveal that parenting effects on child externalizing and internalizing behaviors, though rarer than child effects, extend into adolescence when examined separately in mothers and fathers. Father-based parent effects were more frequent than mother effects. Most parent- and child-driven effects appear to emerge consistently across cultures. The rare culture-specific parenting effects suggested that occasionally the effects of parenting behaviors that run counter to cultural norms may be delayed in rendering their protective effect against deleterious child outcomes. © 2019 Cambridge University Press.

  • 307.
    Ryding, Jennie
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Evidensbaserat familjearbete- exemplet FCU2019Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 308.
    Ryding, Jennie
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Family support social workers (work-integrated) learning: the use of research and reflection2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 309.
    Ryding, Jennie
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Promoting reflection in family support social work with an evidence-based model2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Ryding, Jennie
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Social Workers' Use of Reflection and the Influence of an Evidence-Based Model2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 311.
    Ryding, Jennie
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Changing attitudes to dating violence: a game based intervention2016In: Nordic Youth Research Symposium: Youth Moves – Voices – Spaces – Subjectivities, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2016, p. 123-123Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of dating violence is increasing, and effective prevention and intervention methods are needed to address this growing social problem. The use of online, game-based intervention programs opens up new possibilities for large-scale interventions through social work as well as individual outreach work. The aim of this EU project was to design a primary intervention using innovative Serious Games technologies aimed at raising awareness and knowledge about the nature and consequences of dating violence behaviours, as well as providing education regarding the appropriateness of responses to dating conflict scenarios, and avenues for help-seeking for those directly and indirectly affected by these issues. Swedish youths (N=12), aged 17-18, who took part in the intervention programme were interviewed in focus groups. The aim of the study was to examine young people s experience of the online game-based intervention programme.The interpretation of the results was based on theories of learning through digital media. The study indicates that young people s perception is that they are engaged by and learn about dating violence through online games. Using a serious game method in a school setting offers social workers an effective method of working with dating violence, both from the perspective of prevention and intervention. It is clear that young people today belong to the digital-gaming generation. New methods need to be used to attract their attention and to make social learning possible in an interesting and interactive way. Socialworkers can use games to increase the motivation of players so that, through motivation, knowledge can be acquired and attitudes be changed.

  • 312.
    Ryding, Jennie
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ny förståelse för forskningsbaserade modeller i familjebehandlande socialt arbete2020In: Barnbladet, ISSN 0349-1994, Vol. XLVI, no 1, p. 12-16Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Evidensbaserad praktik (EBP) har sedan 2000-talet fått en ökad användningsgrad inom människorelaterade yrken, t ex inom verksamheter såsom elevhälsan och socialtjänsten, vars professioner uppmuntras till att arbeta evidensbaserat för att höja graden av kunskapsanvändning och kunskapsutvecklinginom fältet.I den här artikeln kommer vi att beskriva hur förståelsen,inställningen och kunskapen kring EBP och dess relaterade arbetssätt är i stort behov av att problematiseras, då dessa inte sällan bygger på förutfattade meningar och okunskap, vilket i sin tur har resulterat i ett för EBP oförtjänt rykte.

  • 313.
    Ryding, Jennie
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Wernersson, Inga
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    The Understanding and Use of Reflection in Family Support Social Work2018In: Journal of social service research, ISSN 0148-8376, E-ISSN 1540-7314, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 494-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research emphasizes the need for reflection in complex, dynamic practices, like social work.However, increased governance of the public sector and welfare state has caused a reform, which inturn has affected the layout and conditions of work. Private sector control ideals and ideas from theauditing system have led to a new focus. It is argued that we should subordinate practiceapproaches–characterized by reflection, proven experience, and tacit knowledge–to manual-based treatment, evaluations, and assessments. This study aims at understanding the role ofreflection in social work by investigating its use and valuation by family support social workers.Opportunities and resources for reflection are another focus. Focus group interviews (nD40) wereused to produce data. The need for reflection to conduct highly qualitative social work becameevident. The question is notwhetherto reflect or not, ratherhowthis best can be done, givencurrent time constraints. Reflection was considered a coping mechanism, offering a sense ofprofessional legitimacy. Organizational changes seem to impact on time for reflection. However,when enabling process, learning, and development, it can be argued that reflection is beneficial forseveral parties. Therefore, reflection requires continued emphasis, highlighting its potential benefits.

  • 314.
    Ryding, Jennie
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Wernersson, Inga
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    The Role of Reflection in Family Support Social Work and Its Possible Promotion by a Research-Supported Model2019In: Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work, ISSN 1543-3714, E-ISSN 1543-3722, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 322-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: There is a prevailing controversy over the use of evidencebased practice (EBP) within human-service organizations. Since it is argued that it is a threat to reflection, proven experience, and tacit knowledge, we wanted to investigate the impact of the research supported, family-centered model Family Check-Up (FCU) on practitioners' use of, and opportunities for, reflection. Method: Focus group interviews with family support social workers trained in FCU (n = 19) were conducted. Results: The significance of reflection for social work practice is clearly indicated. It is crucial for providing quality care: for making progress, processing cases, and effecting change in client-related work. Described as a coping-mechanism, it is also crucial for practitioners. Since various elements of FCU require practitioners' reflective ability, it was argued that it promotes both reflection and professional learning. Discussion: Rather than constituting a threat to reflection, FCU was seen as promoting it, indicating an inaccuracy in prevailing assumptions about research-supported models. This implies the need for revising the definition of such models to promote their potential use and benefits. Working with FCU, however, demands sufficient resources. Conclusion: With an increased focus on "production" leading to changes in priorities, it is argued that resources and opportunities for reflection decrease. As FCU and similar models seem to allow for the incorporation of reflection into ordinary tasks, we propose that they be used to prevent reflection from becoming even more difficult. However, to gain from the benefits of both reflection and research-supported models, various external factors need to be considered.

  • 315.
    Sahlberg, Sofia
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Wolmar, Lisa
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Aldrig mer fredagskänsla?: En kvalitativ studie om hur reglerad/oreglerad arbetstid påverkar work-life balance2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today, changes are taking place where society is moving towards the digital society that demands individuals to be available 24 hours a day. The result of this will lead to work being considered more fluid and the boundary between work and privacy is drifting apart. The purpose of this study is to see how regulated/unregulated working time affects the balance between privacy and work. The following questions were formulated: (1) What benefits are the disadvantages of working regulated and unregulated working hours? (2) How does the employee experience being connected to work even outside working hours? (3) In what way does freedom affect the individual? In order to measure how the balance between privacy and work is affected, deep interviews were conducted using a semi structured interview guide. Six people were interviewed, four women and two men aged 27-47 years. The material was transcribed and a thematic analysis was performed. The results showed that: (1) Those who work unregulated experience an imbalance between work and privacy. (2) Those who work regulated experience a better balance between work and privacy, until the family affects, for example, if the children get sick, then a stress occurs. The results indicate that the subject needs further examination to get clearer and more profound experiences of how regulated/unregulated working time affects the balance between work and privacy.

  • 316.
    Sahlin, Eva
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Work Science, Business Economics and Environmental Psychology, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Lindegård, Agneta
    Region Västra Götaland, Institute of Stress Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hadzibajramovic, Emina
    Region Västra Götaland, Institute of Stress Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Grahn, Patrik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Work Science, Business Economics and Environmental Psychology, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Vega Matuszczyk, Josefa
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ahlborg, Gunnar
    Region Västra Götaland, Institute of Stress Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Influence of the Environment on Directed Attention, Blood Pressure and Heart Rate: An Experimental Study Using a Relaxation Intervention2016In: Landscape research, ISSN 0142-6397, E-ISSN 1469-9710, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 7-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attention is a basic cognitive function necessary in most daily activities. Beneficial effects on cognitive abilities after exposure to nature have been reported. To explore if relaxation indoors and in nature differently affect directed attention and physiological measures, 51 participants (39 women) were measured on directed attention with the Necker Cube Pattern Control Test before and after a guided progressive relaxation session indoors and outdoors in nature. Additionally, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and after the relaxation. Participants’ environmental preference was explored. The main result showed an environmental effect on directed attention in favour of the natural environment. No similar environmental effect on physiological measures was seen. The results indicate that relaxation in natural environments had a positive effect on directed attention and hence could be an important component for preventive and rehabilitative interventions for stress-related symptoms.

  • 317.
    Sandström, Kristina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Electrical- and Mechanical Engineering.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Johansson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Students Sense of belonging and social media2018In: VILÄR Abstraktbok / [ed] Kristina Johansson, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2018, p. 8-8Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Students who participate in a work-integrated learning (WIL) program - such as Cooperative Education during their university studies are often better prepared for the labour market compared to students who do not receive discipline specific practical experience. But does this better preparedness come with a price? Students who participate in WIL programs compared to non-WIL students often have less access to social support networks and the university community due to their alternating academic and work terms.There is reason to believe that the construct of belonging may have especially important implications among university students. There has been growing attention in recent years to mental illness amongst post-secondary students, particularly during their first few years of university study (Conley, Kirsch, Dickson, & Bryant,2014; Storrie, Ahern, & Tuckett, 2010). Research suggests that a sense of school belonging among university students may help buffer the stress associated with the transition to university (Brunwasser, 2012). Pittman and Richmond (2008), for example, found that students who experienced a positive change in their sense of university belonging throughout their first year tended to experience a drop in levels of anxiety and depression related internalizing behavioural problems. A study by Friedlander, Reid, Shupak, and Cribbie (2007), found that when compared to parental social support, higher levels of perceived social support from friends better predicted a healthy social, emotional, and overall adjustment to university among first-year university students. While evidence points to a relation between peer support and sense of belonging and university students' academic and psychological outcomes, such measures do not account for the impact of Social Media (SM) use. This study aims to understand and describe students perception on the role social media play in sense of belonging and peer support and what the relationship(s) arebetween sense of belonging, peer support, social media and well-being. Is really work integrated learning models a way of supporting the transition between H.E and W.L or are we creating other barriers that's needs to be overcome? This study comprise of a questionnaire and focus groups interviews. 164 individuals completed a 30-45 minutes long questionnaire in English, in the end of the questionnaire the students could choose to say yes to participate in a focus group, and it resulted in five focus groups including 15 students representing all four faculties. Preliminary results indicate that the students emphasize the importance of peer-support during both their academic studies and work periods. The Students seem to find solutions trying to achieve this through SM, it becomes a natural tool and creates a platform for students to connect and support each other virtually. In the presentation we will illustrate more results.

  • 318.
    Schenck-Fontaine, Anika
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Educational Trajectories, Leibniz, Germany.
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    Duke University.
    Skinner, Ann T
    Duke University.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma 'La Sapienza.
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University.
    Malone, Patrick S
    Duke University.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana M
    Universidad San Buenaventura.
    Alampay, Liane P
    Ateneo de Manila University.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Hashemite University.; Emirates College for Advanced Education.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples 'Federico II.
    Bornstein, Marc H
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.; Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau.
    Associations Between Perceived Material Deprivation, Parents' Discipline Practices, and Children's Behavior Problems: An International Perspective.2018In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the association between perceived material deprivation, children's behavior problems, and parents' disciplinary practices. The sample included 1,418 8- to 12-year-old children and their parents in China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. Multilevel mixed- and fixed-effects regression models found that, even when income remained stable, perceived material deprivation was associated with children's externalizing behavior problems and parents' psychological aggression. Parents' disciplinary practices mediated a small share of the association between perceived material deprivation and children's behavior problems. There were no differences in these associations between mothers and fathers or between high- and low- and middle-income countries. These results suggest that material deprivation likely influences children's outcomes at any income level.

  • 319.
    Schüler, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Johansson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Vega Matuszczyk, Josefa
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Propper Planning and Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance (7P) -Training for the fictive scenario or learning to deal with reality?2019In: VILÄR 5-6 december 2019, University West, Trollhättan: Abstracts / [ed] Kristina Johansson, Trollhättan: University West , 2019, p. 17-17Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate critical incidents in a large medical exercise (mass casualty incident) including the Swedish Armed Forces (SwAF) and a regional hospital using activity theory. A total of 96 individuals played injured patients with a variety of injuries from simple cuts and bruises to severe head injuries. Patients were evacuated by different means of transportation i.e. minivan, ambulance, military as well as civilian ambulance helicopter.We participated in the final planning of the exercise in order to obtain access for the research team. Data was collected through observations, shadowing technique and 20 semi structured interviews. Professionals from the regional hospital and SwAF as well as evaluating personnel were interviewed. The interviewees were asked to describe significant events experienced during the exercise.

    Two researchers observed the triage and registration process in the ambulance intake and the emergency room of the hospital. One researcher observed the command and control (C2) function within the mass casualty management (MCM).Two students from the Swedish Defense University and three from University West collected data by playing injured patients according to the determined injure play card provided by SwAF. The students were instructed to observe what they themselves would classify as critical incidents based on their own subject i.e. education, economics and command and control studies. Five questions guided the observations: What happened? Who were involved? What consequences did the incident have? How were these consequences handled by the organization? Did the incident affect other areas?Data was analyzed, thematized and coded using the third generation of activity theory and its areas: tools, rules, community, division of labor, subject and object as a guide for identifying contradictions within the regional hospital and the emergency medical plan developed for handling large casualty events.Preliminary results indicated that participating personnel were not faced with conditions mimicking real life but learned to deal with a corrected version of reality i.e. preparations before the start of the exercise created shortcuts affecting the veracity of the exercise. This was manifested through contradictions within and between the activity systems and the conflicting motives carried by the objects.The results might impact the future designs of large exercises, influencing the conditions that the participants will face in exercises and thereby increasing preparedness for authentic situations.

  • 320.
    Seitl, Camilla
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Pedagogers lärande i samtal med föräldrar: En studie genomförd vid sex förskolor2019In: VILÄR 5-6 december 2019, University West, Trollhättan: Abstracts / [ed] Kristina Johansson, Trollhättan: University West , 2019, p. 18-18Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I samarbete med Västerviks kommun har ett forskningsprojekt genomförts i syfte att studera pågående utvecklingsarbete vid sex förskolor. Utvecklingsarbetet har bl.a. bestått av att förskolorna har arbetat fram en ny form av samtal med föräldrar, nämligen gruppsamtal kring om barns lärande. Från att enbart erbjudit traditionella individuella utvecklingssamtal har de också infört gruppsamtal med föräldrar. De nya gruppsamtalen fokuserar barnens sociala samspel och utveckling och kompletterar de individuella utvecklingssamtalen. Eftersom arbetet med gruppsamtalen, till form och innehåll, skiljer sig från tidigare arbetssätt blir det intressant att studera fenomenet ur ett perspektiv på pedagogernas lärande. Forskningsfrågan handlar om hur gruppsamtal kan forma pedagogernas lärande i arbete vid de sex förskolorna.

    Den teoretiska ramen är uppbyggd kring identitetsformande och lärande, där identiteten ses som en integrerad del av ett socialt sammanhang. Identiteten formas av sammanhanget och påverkar individers beteende och därmed även lärande. Studiens datamaterial bygger på 78 texter bestående av individuella reflektioner rörande arbetet med gruppsamtalen. Texterna är skrivna av pedagogerna vid de sex studerande förskolorna och insamlade vid två olika tidpunkter (flera av pedagogerna har inkommit med text vid två tillfällen).

    Den genomförda studien belyser arbetsmetodens betydelse för lärande i arbete. Gruppsamtal med föräldrar ställer andra krav på arbetet och har, för pedagogerna, inneburit både utmaningar och farhågor. Exempelvis behöver pedagogerna vara pålästa på styrdokument, metoder i arbete osv, för att kunna förklara kollektiva lärprocesser eller lärandemål inför en grupp föräldrar. För att pedagogerna ska kunna leda gruppsamtalen på ett bra sätt behöver de även kunna hantera själva samtalsformen. Detta har inneburit att kunskapsluckor identifierats och att kunskap som saknas har fyllts på (exempelvis teorier om lärande, nya metoder, styrdokument, verksamhetsmål osv). Gruppsamtalen utmanar alltså pedagogernas tidigare kunskaper och erfarenheter. Kunskapssökande är en drivkraft bakom pedagogernas identitetsformande, i den ny rollen som ledare för gruppsamtal, och en förutsättning för att de ska lära sig det som krävs i genomförandet av samtalen.

  • 321.
    Shafik, Rebar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Elkhayek, Halima
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Att vara kvinna på en mansdominerad arbetsplats: En kvalitativ studie om kvinnors upplevelser av att arbeta på en arbetsplats som domineras av män2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to get a deeper insight of how women experience working at a male-dominated workplace and if they are treated different than men. The analysis is based on the concepts of "tokens", demands and control, social support and gender. The study also intends to examine if any difficulties occur for the women. Qualitative interviews were chosen as the data collection method to examine how women experience working in a male-dominated workplace. The results of our study show that our respondents as well as experience a high degree of pressure and stress, and low control over their own work.

  • 322.
    Sikström, Nadine
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sjöström, Åsa
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Glad eller skamfylld?: En experimentell studie om upplevd affekt och målreglering till följd av resultat2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research shows that goal-performance discrepancies affect individuals' achievement motivation, as in that individuals regulate their goals towards obtained results, and that subsequent affective reactions can generate consequences in work life. Some research suggest that perceived affect is influenced by personality traits, other research suggest that affect is a direct consequence of goal-performance discrepancies. More infrequent are studies that examine affect and goal-regulation as consequence of goal-performance discrepancies, as well as studying how personality traits can explain these variables.

    The purpose of the following study was to investigate: (a) differences in perceived positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA) and goal regulation; (b) if personality traits can explain the variance in PA, NA and goal regulation.

    An online survey was conducted where the results on a problem-solving task were manipulated to either 3 out of 10 points (N = 33, M = 36.9 years, 76% women) or 9 out of 10 points (N = 101, M = 41.6 years, 64% women). The participants were instructed to set individual goals before and after assigned results. IPIP-30 was used to measure personality. A self-constructed instrument was used to measure PA and NA.

    Results from t-test and multiple regression analyses shows that: (a) the groups differed regarding PA (d = 0.57), NA (d = 1.05) and goal regulation (d = 0.85); (b) Personality traits explained 9.3% of PA, but not NA or goal regulation. The results contribute to in-depth knowledge about which variables might influence perceived affect and goal regulation, and how goal-performance discrepancies affects individuals' future achievement motivation, which are variables that previous research regard as of importance for work life.

  • 323. Sjögren, Karin
    et al.
    Sandström, Kristina
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Electrical- and Mechanical Engineering.
    Johansson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    What gender barriers do students face in WIL placements?: A comparative study between WIL and Non- WIL Students in an international empirical study.2018In: VILÄR Abstraktbok / [ed] Kristina Johansson, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2018, p. 6-6Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In an earlier project (2014-2015) we found that young adults and specifically women was a exposed group when it came to reported psychological vulnerability. This triggered us to design for a new study to learn more about their sense of belonging in and out of study context. We plan to use a mixed methods approach with individual interviews, focus groups, and a broader online survey on students that are enrolled in WIL-programs, the student need to have completed at least a practicum or coop-period prior to participation in the research study. Our next steps will be to start the ethics protocols for both the University of Waterloo and the University of Toronto. Thereafter Scotland and Sweden apply for theirs. The research questions is: What gender challenges do WIL students face that impact their career identity, sense of belonging, work self-efficacy, overall wellbeing, sociability, and transition to full-time employment after graduation? What gender specific barriers impact WIL students' perceptions of being valued in the workplace (on the team, in meetings)? What gender specific barriers impact WIL students' perceptions of how employers perceive their technical competencies? What resources do WIL students perceive are available to them from their universities and employers to help overcome these barriers? In the interactive session we will discuss both the research questions/content and the methodological approaches.

  • 324.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    et al.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, USA.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts at Amherst, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, USA.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Thailand.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Colombia.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemiste University, Jordan & Emirates College for Advanced Education, UAE.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Cross-national collaboration in the study of parenting and child adjustment2017In: Child-rearing: Practices, attitudes and cultural differences / [ed] Goetz Egloff, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2017, p. 1-19Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 325.
    Somi, Gabriella
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Normmedveten undervisning: En kvalitativ studie om didaktiska utmaningar2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med föreliggande uppsats är att undersöka vilka didaktiska utmaningar gymnasielärare i ämnet Samhällskunskap upplever med att undervisa om normmedvetenhet till gymnasieelever, med fokus på elevernas olika bakgrunder såsom socioekonomisk bakgrund som i föreliggande studie associeras med skolsegregation, men även etnicitet och kön. Frågeställningarna som besvaras i studien är vilka utmaningar lärare upplever i den didaktiska planeringen och hur lärare arbetar med den normmedvetna undervisningen grundat på elevernas olika uppfattningar, kring normrelaterade begrepp.

    Metoden är kvalitativa samtalsintervjuer som utfördes med fem gymnasielärare i Samhällskunskap. Lärarna arbetar på tre olika gymnasieskolor i centrala Göteborg. Samtalsintervjuerna utfördes under en vecka, en intervju i början av veckan, tre stycken i mitten av veckan och en i slutet av veckan. Transkriberingen genomfördes dagen efter respektive intervju, för att upptäcka om teman förekom i samtalen. När sista intervjun utfördes fick studien en variation i svaren.

    Resultatet visar att lektionsplaneringen påverkas av elevers känslor och detta leder till olika arbetsmetoder för den normmedvetna undervisningen. Respondenterna strävar efter att ingen elev ska bli kränkt under lektionen och det andra perspektivet är att planera så att undervisningen blir bred. Lärarna vill att eleverna ska uppleva någon slags relation till undervisningen genom vilka normer som valts ut. Utmaningarna i att utföra sådana lektioner blir att somliga elever kan känna en tillhörighet till vissa normer och därför kan känna sig anklagade. Planeringen påverkas även av elevsammansättningen då somliga elever är stökigare än andra och detta leder till enskilda arbeten istället för klassrumsdiskussioner. Ytterligare en utmaning är att somliga elever befinner sig i normen och dessa elever är omedvetna. Sådana elever menar somliga respondenter att man måste fokusera på.

  • 326.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Arbetsintegrerat lärande med fokus på barn- och ungdomsvetenskap2018In: Nya vägar, nya perspektiv: Barn- och ungdoms nätverket i samarbete med Tema barn, Linkopings universitet, Linköping: Linköpings universitet, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2018, p. 14-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Högskolan Väst har en profilering mot arbetsintegrerat lärande (AIL) och en del av den barn- och ungdomsvetenskapliga forskningen vid lärosätet knyter an till forskningsfrågor inom AIL. AIL som begrepp i vid mening kan innefatta allt lärande som på något sätt sker i samband med eller knyter an till aktiviteter som betecknas som arbete, nödvändigtvis inte lönearbete. Området kan innebära studier av barns och ungas röster i relation till professionellas (vuxnas) lärande. Centralt i barn- och ungdomsvetenskapliga analyser med AIL-inriktning är att mot bakgrund av ungas agens belysa implikationer för spontant, informellt och/eller organiserat lärande i olika kontexter. Här kan exempelvis ungas socialisations-processer i relation till arbete (oavlönat eller avlönat) och arbetsliv fokuseras inom såväl institutionaliserade kontexter (t ex skola och socialtjänst) som mer civilsamhälleliga kontexter (t ex fritid och föreningsliv). Hur kan AIL perspektivet bidra till utvecklingen av det barn- och

  • 327.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    En systematisk samverkansmodell2019In: Samverkansforskning: att främja barns och ungas välfärd / [ed] Lena Nilsson & Emma Sorbring (red.), Stockholm: Liber, 2019, p. 111-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 328.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Internet as a social arena for young people with learning disabilities: Paper presented at Nordic Youth Research Symposium 142019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many people with learning disabilities (LD) live socially isolated lives and are often in need of more contactwith the surrounding community. Although the Internet can be an important arena for finding friends, partners and experiencing greater participation in the community, some scholars question whether these possibilities that the Internet offers are really there. In this study we have interviewed Swedish young people with ID, parents as well as professionals about Internet as an arena for identity formation, love, sex and companionship. The findings shows that young people mostly feel confident and in no need of support. Professionals and parents, on the other hand, consider the Internet an arena for positive opportunities, but also with risks. The professionals seemed to be more worried about the risks than the parents who state that the opportunities outweigh the disadvantages. For parents, the real risk is described as the risk of loneliness and social isolation. Considering young people's need for autonomy, it is of great importance that parents and professionals balance their level of support depending on the needs of the young person. Furthermore, the results will be discussed in light of 'positive risk-taking'. What strategies can be used by young people with LD and supported by parents and professionals, so that a certain portion of risk-taking can lead to positive experiences and positive development?

  • 329.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Risks and Opportunities on the Internet: The Voices of Intellectually Disabled Teens'Parents2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation will explore the following research questions: How do the parents of intellectually disabled teens perceive opportunities and barriers to their children's use of the Internet? In what ways do parents act to lower the barriers and support opportunities? The bond between parents and the teen with intellectual disabilities is often very close and strong. Opportunities to develop self-determination and independence can therefore be restricted in relationships that are characterized by dependency upon others. In line with this, research has shown that family members (as well as caring staff) are often the primary supports for new technology used among intellectually disabled teens. However, parents many times experience ambivalence in handling both technical and moral issues that come with an increased use of the Internet. Parents tend to exhibit strong feelings of responsibility and feelings that are often manifested through different forms of control and/or restrictions, especially about private spheres like love and sexuality. The aim of this presentation is to highlight parents' perceptions and actions in relation to opportunities and barriers to the teen when using the Internet. The empirical material consists of interviews with the parents of intellectually challenged teens in Sweden. The transcribed interviews were analysed using a qualitative approach. A thematic analysis was used, which is a method of identifying, analysing and reporting patterns within data sets. The results show that parents' views are double-edged; on the one hand, they see great possibilities for their disabled children thanks to the Internet, but on the other hand, they are afraid that due to their disability, their adolescents are more sensitive to different contents and interactions on the Internet. Parents talk about the Internet as an opportunityfor their teenage child to meet someone and start an intimate relationship. The Internet asa potentially dangerous place is acknowledged, but looked upon as a risk worth taking when it comes to social experience. Due to their children's specific challenges, these parents see the Internet as offering them great opportunities; at the same time they are afraid theirteens could be more susceptible to various kind of content and interactions. Parents both want to encourage more Internet use and simultaneously encourage more time for face-toface interactions. They perceive the risk that their teen will end up alone, without an intimate partner as more serious than the risks of the Internet. This presentation will discuss barriers and opportunities in relation to a 'barrier-pyramid' and a 'supporting-ecological surrounding´, which brings into focus the parent's responsibility and support for teens, helping them to surmount barriers – not avoiding or ignoring them – but acting to manage them.

  • 330.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Exempel 4: Ett utökat och fördjupat barn- och elevhälsoarbete2019In: Samverkansforskning: att främja barns och ungas välfärd / [ed] Lena Nilsson & Emma Sorbring (red.), Stockholm: Liber, 2019, p. 57-65Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 331.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skolans identifiering av barn i gråzonen2017In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 94, no 4, p. 477-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel genomlyses projektet Team Agera som ingår i Folkhälsomyndighetens nationella satsning på stöd till barn i riskmiljöer. Team Agera är en tvärprofessionell, utökad och fördjupad elevhälsa. Syftet med verksamheten är att erbjuda insatser som av tradition erbjudits av socialtjänsten, i ett försök att öka tillgängligheten av stöd till barn och familjer. Insatserna fokuseras på: 1) barn i familjer med missbruksproblem eller psykisk ohälsa, eller där våld förekommer samt 2) barn med psykisk ohälsa. Genom att arbeta förebyggande är målet att tidigare och i ökad utsträckning hitta de barn och familjer som av olika anledningar är i behov av hjälp och stöd. I artikeln ligger fokus på att besvara frågan: På vilket sätt kan en verksamhet som Team Agera möjliggöra en ökad potential att agera i den så kallade gråzon som utgörs av elever och föräldrar som annars "trillar utanför" systemet, alternativt inte får hjälp och stöd förrän långt efter det att behoven uppkommit?

  • 332.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Team Agera: Ett utökat och fördjupat barn- och elevhälsoarbete genom tvärprofessionell samverkan2016Report (Other academic)
  • 333.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Team Agera: Ett utökat och fördjupat barn- och elevhälsoarbete genom tvärprofessionell samverkan2016Report (Other academic)
  • 334.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bowen, Erica
    Kunskapsspel i interventions- och preventionsinsatser2016In: Socialt arbete och internet: att förstå och hantera sociala problem på nya arenor / [ed] Kristian Daneback & Emma Sorbring, Stockholm: Liber, 2016, 1, p. 197-214Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 335.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ryding, Jennie
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    A Game-based Intervention: a technical tool for social workers to combat Adolescent Dating-Violence2015In: Advances in Social Work, ISSN 1527-8565, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 125-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dating violence prevalence is increasing and effective prevention and intervention methods are needed in order to adress this growing social problem. The use of on-line game-based intervention programmes open ups new possibilities for social worker practice of interventions on a large scale. The purpose of this study was to examine young people´s experiences of a on line game-based intervention programme designed to adress dating-violence among youths. Swedish youths that took part in the intervention programme were interviewed in focus-groups. Results indicate that the use of a game as an intervention method for this socially sensitive topic was perceived as positive by the young people, seeing it as a new, engaging and interesting method. The findings from the study indicate that on-line game-based programme addressing dating violence between young people has the potential to be used as a technical tool in social work practice.

  • 336.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ymefors, Mattias
    Grästorps kommun, Grästorp, Sverige.
    "Att sänka tröskeln och ge den långa berättelsen plats": Om ett skolhälsoarbete där tillvaratagandet av barns och ungas eget aktörskap bidrar till att fler får stöd och hjälp2017In: Barnbladet, ISSN 0349-1994, no 5, p. 24-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 337.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Eskilstuna, Sverige.
    Överlien, Carolina
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete, Sverige.
    Våld och kränkningar i ungas parrelationer2018In: Barn- och ungdomsvetenskap: grundläggande perspektiv / [ed] Johansson, Thomas & Sorbring, Emma, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, p. 622-637Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 338.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Komplexa internationella forskningssamarbeten: Att bryta den akademiska kolonialismen och hitta nya vägar2018In: Samhälle, genus och pedagogik: utbildningsvetenskapliga perspektiv : vänbok till IngaWernersson / [ed] Kerstin von Brömssen, Signild Risenfors & Lena Sjöberg, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2018, p. 241-256Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att uppleva, att ta intryck av och att lära från andra kulturer är något de flesta uppskattar och strävar efter genom att läsa böcker, se på film och allra helst genom att resa. Från våra upplevelser bär vi med oss inte bara uppdaterade mat- och klädrepertoarer, utan också nya sätt att uttrycka oss och nya sätt att hantera situationer. Det här kapitlet kommer varken handla om spännande matupplevelser eller moderna begrepp och uttryck, utan om kulturella utbyten. Att gränsöverskridande internationella samarbeten resulterar i kunskap som vi annars inte hade kunnat utveckla är uppenbart och tydligt i forskningslitteraturen, men huruvida dessa samarbeten bidrar till utveckling av forskningen, forskaren själv och de lärosäten som är inblandade, är inte lika väl dokumenterat. Internationella gränsöverskridande samarbeten inom akademin kan vara krävande både för forskaren och lärosätet och det är därför värt att ställa sig frågan: Utvecklas ämnesområdet, forskaren och lärosätet i dessa komplexa internationella forskningssamarbeten eller kräver samarbetet kompromisser som går ut över forskningen, forskaren och lärosätet på olika sätt?

  • 339.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kuczynski, Leon
    University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada.
    Children´s agency in the family, in school and in society: implications for health and well-being2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no sup 1 Equal Health, article id 1634414Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 340.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    School Systems, Parent Behavior, and Academic Achievement: An International Perspective2019Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 341.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy.
    Education and Parenting: An Introduction2019In: School Systems, Parent Behavior, and Academic Achievement: An International Perspective / [ed] Sorbring, Emma; Lansford, Jennifer E., Springer International Publishing , 2019, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Theoretical models and empirical studies suggest that parental involvement and parenting practices are important for adolescents' academic achievement. However, the picture is complicated, and how parents choose to be involved at different ages of the child is critical for how parental involvement is related to students' academic achievement. Furthermore, populations from different cultural backgrounds need to be studied. This chapter lays out the agenda for the rest of the book, presenting an overview of research on parenting and students' academic achievement, as well as presenting the Parenting Across Cultures project, a longitudinal study of mothers, fathers, and children in China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. These nine countries are the focus of the school-system and country-specific studies in the chapters that follow.

  • 342.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Löfgren-Mårtenson, Lotta
    Malmö Universitet, Malmö, Sverige.
    Molin, Martin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Relationships and the Internet2018In: Sexuality and Learning Disabilities: A handbook / [ed] Claire Bates, Hove, UK: Pavilion Publishing and Media , 2018, 2, p. 133-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 343.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Molin, Martin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Löfgren-Mårtenson, Lotta
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    "I'm a mother, but I'm also a facilitator in her every-day life": Parents’ voices about barriers and support for internet participation among young people with intellectual disabilities2017In: Cyberpsychology : Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, ISSN 1802-7962, E-ISSN 1802-7962, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 3Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In general, the Internet is an arena where parents (as well as other adults) have limited insight and possibilities to support the young person. However, several studies indicate that parents are one of the most important facilitators in the every-day life of young persons with intellectual disabilities. Therefore, the aim of the current article is to highlight parents' perceptions and actions in relation to opportunities and barriers for these young people when using the Internet. The empirical material consists of interviews with 22 parents of intellectually challenged young people in Sweden. The transcribed interviews were analysed using a thematic analysis, which is a method of identifying, analysing and reporting patterns within data sets. The results show that parents' views are double-edged; on the one hand, they see great possibilities for their children, thanks to the Internet, but on the other hand, they are afraid that due to their disability, their children are more sensitive to different contents and interactions on the Internet. Furthermore, the results indicate that parents believe that the Internet can facilitate participation in social life, but that it precludes young people with intellectual disabilities from being part of society in general when it comes to community functions and services. This article will discuss barriers and support in relation to the individual and her or his support system, which brings into focus the parent's responsibility and support for young people, helping them to surmount barriers – instead of avoiding or ignoring them – and find ways to take action to do so.

  • 344.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Molin, Martin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Löfgren-Mårtensson, Lotta
    Malmö Universitet, Malmö, Sverige.
    Att våga utan att falla.: Internet som en arena för delaktighet och relationer för unga med intellektuella funktionsnedsättningar2018In: Barnbladet, E-ISSN 0349-1994, no 3, p. 14-17Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Trots att forskning kring ungdomars delaktighetoch relationer på internet är ett växande område är det få studier som belyser särskoleungdomars förutsättningar. Ungdomar med intellektuella funktionsnedsättningar har ofta olika grad av språkliga och kommunikativa begränsningar som å ena sidan gör att värdet av nya sociala arenor kan vara stort, å andra sidan kan göra internetanvändande problematiskt i olika sammanhang. I den här artikeln tittar vi närmare på möjligheter och risker i relation till internet som uppmärksammas av ungdomar, föräldrar och professionella, samt reflekterar över hur ett visst mått av risktagande kan leda till positiva erfarenheter och positiv utveckling, så kallat"positivt risktagande".

  • 345.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Nilsson, Lena A.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Rapportering, spridning och nyttinggörande2019In: Samverkansforskning: att främja barns och ungas välfärd / [ed] Lena Nilsson & Emma Sorbring (red.), Stockholm: Liber, 2019, p. 121-123Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 346.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Nilsson, Lena A.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tips och råd inför samverkansforskning2019In: Samverkansforskning: att främja barns och ungas välfärd / [ed] Lena Nilsson & Emma Sorbring (red.), Stockholm: Liber, 2019, p. 124-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 347.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Osman, Fatuma
    Dalarna University.
    Glatz, Terese
    Örebro universitet .
    Predictors and outcomes of parental burnout in a Swedish context: Paper presented at the 1st International Conference on Parental Burnout2019In: Abstracts: 1st International Conference on Parental Burnout, 2019, p. [7]-[7]Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, parental burnout has been examined among parents of children with serious diseases(e.g., cancer) and/or chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes). However, there is a lack of studies on nonclinical samples of parents and studies that compare parents of children with and without diseases.

    Sweden is a country with a well-developed social support system, where school and health care are covered by taxes and not by individuals themselves. Support to parents is available through social services, care centers, and through the child's school. This support can be universal (i.e., cover allparents), aimed (i.e., focus on certain at-risk groups), or at an individual level. In other words, Sweden offers much support to parents in general and not only to parents of children with a seriousillness/disease. Such support can have a positive influence on parents' health and competence, inboth of these parental samples. International research on non-clinical samples has been shown that certain parental and family characteristics are influential for parents' health and well-being. However, a potential gap between actual (and perceived) demands on parents and their individual and contextual resources seems to be an important factor for the development of parental burnout. Based on these premises, this study focuses on the association between parental burnout on the one hand and parents' health and sense of competence on the other, among mothers of children with and without a diagnosis. We will also perform analyses concerning potential predictors of parental burnout covering different parental and family characteristics. Material has been collected from 425 mothers in Sweden. About 20% of these mothers have at least one child with some diagnosis (e.g.,Autism, ADHD), 10% are born outside of Sweden, and 85% are working outside of the home. In general, mothers who are working outside of the home spend less time with their children than mothers without a job (six hours compared to 10 hours), but there were no differences in time spent with their children between mothers of children with and without a diagnosis. Using path analysis in Mplus, we will examine both predictors (e.g., ethnicity, child's diagnosis, parental work situation) and outcomes (parents' health and sense of competence) of parental burnout. This analysis will point outrisk as well as protection factors for parental burnout—on an individual and family level—and will show whether there is a difference in health problems and parental competence between parents of children with and without a diagnosis.

  • 348.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ryding, Jennie
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Exempel 6: Implementering av evidensbaserat föräldrastödsprogram2019In: Samverkansforskning: att främja barns och ungas välfärd / [ed] Lena Nilsson & Emma Sorbring (red.), Stockholm: Liber, 2019, p. 71-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 349.
    Sorokowska, Agnieszka
    et al.
    University of Wroclaw Institute of Psychology, Wroclaw, Poland..
    Groyecka, Agata
    University of Wroclaw Institute of Psychology, Wroclaw, Poland..
    Karwowski, Maciej
    University of Wroclaw Institute of Psychology, Wroclaw, Poland..
    Frackowiak, Tomasz
    University of Wroclaw Institute of Psychology, Wroclaw, Poland..
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh
    Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences Behavioral Sciences Research Center, Tehran, Iran..
    Alghraibeh, Ahmad M
    King Saud University Department of Psychology, College of Education, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Aryeetey, Richmond
    University of Ghana School of Public Health, Legon, Ghana..
    Bertoni, Anna
    Catholic University of Milan Department of Psychology, Milan, Italy..
    Bettache, Karim
    Monash University Department of Psychology, Bandar Sunway, Malaysia..
    Blumen, Sheyla
    Pontificia Department of Psychology, Lima, Peru..
    Blazejewska, Marta
    University of Wroclaw Institute of Psychology, Wroclaw, Poland..
    Bortolini, Tiago
    Federal University of Rio de Janeiro Graduate Program in Morphological Sciences, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil..
    Butovskaya, Marina
    National Research University Higher School of Economics Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology, Moscow, Russia..
    Cantarero, Katarzyna
    SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities Faculty in Sopot, Sopot, Poland..
    Castro, Felipe Nalon
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte Laboratory of Evolution of Human Behavior, Natal City, Brazil..
    Cetinkaya, Hakan
    Ankara University Department of Psychology, Ankara, Turkey..
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Chen, Bin-Bin
    Fudan University Department of Psychology, Shanghai, China..
    Cunha, Diana
    University of Faculty of Psychology and, Coimbra, Portugal..
    David, Daniel
    Babes-Bolyai University Cluj-Napoca International Institute for the Advanced Studies of Psychotherapy and Applied Mental Health, Cluj-Napoca, Romania..
    David, Oana A
    Babes-Bolyai University Cluj-Napoca Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania..
    Dileym, Fahd A
    King Saud University Department of Psychology, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Domínguez Espinosa, Alejandra Del Carmen
    Universidad Iberoamericana Departament of Psychology, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico..
    Donato, Silvia
    Catholic University of Milan Department of Psychology, Milan, Italy..
    Dronova, Daria
    Russian Academy of Sciences Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology, Moscow, Russia..
    Dural, Seda
    Izmir University of Economics Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Izmir, Turkey..
    Fialová, Jitka
    Charles University Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Fisher, Maryanne
    Saint Mary's University Department of Psychology, Halifax, Canada..
    Gulbetekin, Evrim
    Akdeniz University Department of Psychology, Antalya, Turkey..
    Hamamcioglu Akkaya, Aslihan
    Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Literature, Department of Anthropology, Sivas, Turkey..
    Hilpert, Peter
    University of School of Psychology, Surrey, United Kingdom..
    Hromatko, Ivana
    University of Zagreb Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Zagreb, Croatia..
    Iafrate, Raffaella
    Catholic University of Milan Department of Psychology, Milan, Italy..
    Iesyp, Mariana
    Ivan Franko National University of Lviv , Lviv, Ukraine..
    James, Bawo
    Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital Department of Clinical Services, Benin-City, Nigeria..
    Jaranovic, Jelena
    Belgrade University, Belgrade, Serbia..
    Jiang, Feng
    Central University of Finance and Economics Department of Organization and Human Resources Management, Beijing, China..
    Kimamo, Charles Obadiah
    University of Nairobi Department of Psychology, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Kjelvik, Grete
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Trondheim, Norway..
    Koç, Firat
    Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Literature, Department of Anthropology, Sivas, Turkey..
    Laar, Amos
    University of Ghana School of Public Health, Legon, Ghana..
    Lopes, Fívia de Araújo
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Laboratory of Evolution of Human Behavior, Natal City, Brazil..
    Macbeth, Guillermo
    National University of Entre Rios Facultad de Ciencias de la Educación, Concepción del Uruguay, Argentina..
    Marcano, Nicole M
    Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, USA.
    Martinez, Rocio
    University of Granada Department of Social Psychology, Granada, Spain..
    Mesko, Norbert
    University of Pécs Institute of Psychology, Pécs, Hungary..
    Molodovskaya, Natalya
    University of Wroclaw Institute of Psychology, Wroclaw, Poland..
    Moradi Qezeli, Khadijeh
    Razi University Department of Agricultural Extension & Education, Kermanshah, Iran..
    Motahari, Zahrasadat
    University of Science & Culture Institute of Psychology, Tehran, Iran..
    Mühlhauser, Alexandra
    University of Vienna Faculty of Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria..
    Natividade, Jean Carlos
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro Department, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Ntayi, Joseph
    Makerere University Business School Faculty of Computing and Management Science, Kampala, Uganda..
    Oberzaucher, Elisabeth
    University of Vienna Faculty of Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria..
    Ojedokun, Oluyinka
    Adekunle Ajasin University Department of Pure & Applied Psychology, Akungba-Akoko, Nigeria..
    Omar-Fauzee, Mohd
    Universiti School of Educational, Sintok, Malaysia.
    Onyishi, Ike E
    University of Nigeria Department of Psychology, Nsukka, Nigeria..
    Paluszak, Anna
    University of Wroclaw Institute of Psychology, Wroclaw, Poland..
    Pierce, John D
    Thomas Jefferson University College of Science, Health, and the Liberal Arts, Philadelphia, USA..
    Pillay, Urmila
    Independent scholar, Bangalore, India..
    Portugal, Alda
    University of Madeira Centre for Social Studies Coimbra, Portugal..
    Razumiejczyk, Eugenia
    National University of Entre Rios Facultad de Ciencias de la Educación, Buenos Aires, Argentina..
    Realo, Anu
    University of Tartu Institute of Psychology, Tartu, Estonia..
    Relvas, Ana Paula
    University of Coimbra Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences, Coimbra, Portugal..
    Rivas, Maria
    Universidad del Magdalena, Santa Marta, Colombia..
    Rizwan, Muhammad
    University of Karachi Institute of Clinical Psychology, Karachi, Pakistan..
    Salkicevic, Svjetlana
    University of Zagreb Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Sarmány-Schuller, Ivan
    Institute of Experimental Center of Social and Psychological Sciences SAS, Bratislava, Slovakia..
    Schmehl, Susanne
    University of Vienna Faculty of Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria..
    Senyk, Oksana
    University of Vienna Faculty of Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria..
    Sinding, Charlotte
    Centre des Sciences du Gout et de l'Alimentation INRA, Dijon, France..
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Stamkou, Eftychia
    University of Amsterdam Departament of Social Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands..
    Stoyanova, Stanislava
    South-West University Neofit Rilski, Department of Psychology, Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria.
    Šukolová, Denisa
    Matej Bel University in Banská Bystrica Educational Research Centre, Banská Bystrica, Slovakia..
    Sutresna, Nina
    Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia Jurusan Pendidikan Kepelatihan, Bandung, Indonesia..
    Tadinac, Meri
    University of Zagreb Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Zagreb, Croatia..
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Teras, Andero
    Mõttemaru OÜ, Tartu, Estonia..
    Tinoco Ponciano, Edna Lúcia
    University of the State of Rio de Janeiro Institute of Psychology, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil..
    Tripathi, Ritu
    Indian Institute of Management Bangalore Organizational Behaviour and Human Resource Management, Bangalore, India..
    Tripathi, Nachiketa
    Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Guwahati, India..
    Tripathi, Mamta
    School of Management SRM Institute of Science and Technology, Chennai, India..
    Uhryn, Olja
    Lviv State University of Internal Affairs Faculty of Psychology, Lviv, Ukraine..
    Yamamoto, Maria Emília
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte Laboratory of Evolution of Human Behavior, Natal City, Brazil..
    Yoo, Gyesook
    Kyung Hee University Department of Child & Family Studies, Seoul, South Korea..
    Sorokowski, Piotr
    University of Wroclaw Institute of Psychology, Wroclaw, Poland..
    Global study of social odor awareness2018In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 503-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Olfaction plays an important role in human social communication, including multiple domains in which people often rely on their sense of smell in the social context. The importance of the sense of smell and its role can however vary inter-individually and culturally. Despite the growing body of literature on differences in olfactory performance or hedonic preferences across the globe, the aspects of a given culture as well as culturally universal individual differences affecting odor awareness in human social life remain unknown. Here, we conducted a large-scale analysis of data collected from 10,794 participants from 52 study sites from 44 countries all over the world. The aim of our research was to explore the potential individual and country-level correlates of odor awareness in the social context. The results show that the individual characteristics were more strongly related than country-level factors to self-reported odor awareness in different social contexts. A model including individual-level predictors (gender, age, material situation, education and preferred social distance) provided a relatively good fit to the data, but adding country-level predictors (Human Development Index, population density and average temperature) did not improve model parameters. Although there were some cross-cultural differences in social odor awareness, the main differentiating role was played by the individual differences. This suggests that people living in different cultures and different climate conditions may still share some similar patterns of odor awareness if they share other individual-level characteristics.

  • 350.
    Spante, Maria
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Johansson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Jaldemark, Jimmy
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    MakerSpaces in schools: networked learning among teachers to support curriculum-driven pupil learning in programming2019In: Networked Professional Learning: Emerging and Equitable Discourses for Professional Development / [ed] Allison Littlejohn, Jimmy Jaldemark, Emmy Vrieling-Teunter, and Femke Nijland, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 223-237Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, many countries have introduced programming as contentin their national educational strategies. This study focussed on how teachers from various K-6 schools met regularly in learning groups to discuss their experiences integrating programming in MakerSpace settings, places equipped with various materials that can be used to construct things to enhance creativity and cross disciplinary collaboration. The project focussed on studying the activities in an established network in a Swedish municipality (i.e. how teachers experienced the value of network meetings and how they incorporated lessons learned from other participants in the teacher learning group [TLG]). The study addressed the following research question: What are the learning experiences of teachers in K-6 schools that participate in a top-down networked professional development project that focusses on integrating computer programming into the curriculum? A narrative written method was applied to collect data from seven teachers in the network. The results indicated that teachers found it useful to participate in a top-down networked professional development project. They experienced that participating in the TLG helped them develop their professional attitudes, knowledge and practices.

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