Change search
Refine search result
2345678 201 - 250 of 659
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 201.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Katende, Jesse Oluwafemi
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Rossi, Matti
    Information Systems, Aalto University, Espoo (FIN).
    A Mid-Range Theory for Designing Sustainable Safe Spaces of Immersive Learning Environments: A Design-Science Based Gamification Approach2023In: Design Science Research for a New Society: Society 5.0: 18th International Conference on Design Science Research in Information Systems and Technology, DESRIST 2023, Pretoria, South Africa, May 31 – June 2, 2023, Proceedings / [ed] Aurona Gerber, Richard Baskerville, Springer, 2023, Vol. 13873, p. 449-469Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gamification provides a prominent technique that can be used to provide Immersive Learning Environments (ILEs) for domains, where it is dangerous or expensive to learn in real environments. Especially industrial organizations (e.g., manufacturing, mining, construction) are a promising domain for implementing ILEs that combine gamification concepts with a pedagogical design to facilitate safety training under secure circumstances. Although there are design research studies that exemplify the utility of gamification of learning activities, or how to improve organizational safety training through gamification, there is a need to address how sustainable safe spaces can be designed for enhanced safety training in ILEs. Safe spaces are key elements of a successful safety training experience in ILEs as they provide safe and secure training environments, which in the physical world are typically considered too dangerous with high risk of injuring the training participants. This study reports findings from an ongoing DSR project that stresses the design of ILEs for sustainable safety training. Within the project, an artifact for immersive fire safety training in virtual reality has been designed, developed, and evaluated together with employees of a train operator company. The research responds to the need of producing design knowledge that moves beyond the highly contextualized designs principles that are particular for IVR applications. We use gamification concepts as a kernel theory for developing a mid-range theory of designing immersive virtual safety training environments.

  • 202.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Master Östlund, Christian
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Rossi, Matti
    Aalto University, Helsinki (FIN).
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Action design research as a means for organizing workplace learning: case studies of e-learning platforms2021In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 405-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Although there is a large body of literature available on the foundations of workplace learning (WPL), little is known about designated research methods that systematically combine intervention, design and learning at work. The purpose of this study is to propose action design research as an alternative method for organizing WPL in general and facilitating pedagogically rich activities in particular.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This research used a case study approach to focus the action design research method and exemplify its utility through two case studies that emphasize WPL in general and how the method can be used to facilitate pedagogically rich activities in particular.

    Findings

    The results of the case studies indicate that the action design research method had a significantly positive effect on organizing WPL in organizations systematically, as well as creating a narrative that structures the research process and its outcomes.

    Originality/value

    The findings help scholars that are in need of organizing WPL research in a systematic way. The findings do also help practitioners in organizations to solve real-world problems and develop new knowledge jointly together with scholars. Consequently, the findings contribute to the existing literature by exemplifying how to facilitate pedagogically rich activities and disseminate the outcomes of doing so in a formalized way.

  • 203.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Purao, Sandeep
    Information and Process Management, Bentley University, USA.
    Rossi, Matti
    Information Systems, Aalto University, Finland.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Action Design Research as a Method-in-Use: Problems and Opportunities2017In: Designing the Digital Transformation: DESRIST 2017 Research in Progress Proceedings / [ed] Maedche, Alexander [Hrsg.]; Brocke, Jan vom [Hrsg.]; Hevner, Alan [Hrsg.], Karlsruhe: KIT Publishers, 2017, p. 110-118Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the results of a study to investigate how scholars engage with and use the action design research (ADR) approach. ADR has been acknowledged as an important variant of the Design Science Research approach, and has been adopted by a number of scholars, as the methodological basis for doctoral dissertations as well as multidisciplinary research projects. With thisuse, the research community is learning about how to apply ADR's central tenets in different contexts. In this paper, we draw on primary data from researchers who have recently engaged in or finished an ADR project to identify recurring problems and opportunities related to working in different ADR stages, balancing demands from practice and research, and addressing problem instance vs. class of problems. Our work contributes a greater understanding of how ADR projects are carried out in practice, how researchers use ADR, and pointers to possibilities for extending ADR.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 204.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Purao, Sandeep
    Bentley University, Bentley, USA.
    Rossi, Matti
    Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Action Design Research in Practice: Lessons and Concerns2018In: Proceedings ECIS 2018 / [ed] Frank U.,Kautz K.,Bednar P.M., 2018, article id 1755Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the results of a study of how scholars engage with and use the action designresearch (ADR) method. Since its publication, ADR has been acknowledged as an importantvariant of DSR, and has been adopted by a number of researchers. It has been adopted as theprimary research method for doctoral dissertations as well as research projects in severaldisciplines. With the increasing use of ADR, the research community is also learning about how toapply ADR in different contexts. In this paper, we focus on how researchers are using the method.Drawing on primary data from researchers who have recently engaged in or finished an ADRproject, we identify several recurring themes: managing expectations with actual outcomes ofADR-projects, coordinating work across different ADR-stages, and balancing the focus on probleminstance versus class of problems. Our work contributes a greater understanding about how ADRprojects are carried out in practice, how researchers can avoid some of the common pitfalls, andhow the method can be applied more effectively.

  • 205.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Designing for Heterogeneous Groups of End-Users Towards a Nascent Design Theory2014In: Proceedings of World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2014, Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2014, p. 765-776Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poverty, war, conflicts, and other forces of global turmoil are constantly challenging how developed nations design their processes for immigration in general, and civic orientation in particular. This paper focuses on an exploratory study of the challenges coupled with the digitalization of civic orientation in a region of West Sweden – and concludes with a set of five tentative design guidelines for how to design for heterogeneous groups of end-users.

  • 206.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Winman, Thomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Meta-requirements for Immersive Collaborative Spaces in Industrial Workplace Learning: Towards a Design Theory2020In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 12388 LNCS, p. 339-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the digital transformation of society accelerates, sophisticated Information Technologies (IT) emerge and are introduced into organizations and institutions of society. An example of such technologies is the Virtual Reality (VR) technology that has re-emerged and become a frequently used solution for supporting collaboration and workplace learning in immersive spaces. The deep sense of immersion in VR enables users to learn and develop working skills in an authentic virtual space, which facilitates an increased feeling of user presence and mapping with real world working scenarios. However, due to the emerging nature of using VR for collaboration and workplace learning, there are wide possibilities for Information Systems (IS) scholars to explore the prescriptive knowledge space of how to design and theorize VR technologies through Design Science Research (DSR). In this research in progress paper, we scrutinize the question of how to design immersive collaborative spaces for industrial workplace learning, and subsequently perform a preliminary round of literature review to address the question. Consequently, the findings of the review are reported as three meta-requirements, which we target as the contribution and input for further development of an information systems design theory. © 2020, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

  • 207.
    Hajigatmiri, Fatemeh Delbar
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT.
    The Potential Privacy and Security Challenges and Benefits of Digital Healthcare From the Patient’s Perspective In Sweden2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The growth, expansion, and acceleration of large networks in recent years have led to massive changes in various aspects of human life. These changes in science, technology, and business have resulted in emerging new fields such as e-government, e-learning, and e-health. Electronic Health or digital health collects and integrates health information by creating an electronic health record. Electronic health records are beneficial for all stakeholders if patient privacy and security are maintained. This research aimed to study the potential privacy and security challenges and benefits of digital healthcare in Sweden from the patients’ perspective. In this research, a qualitative analysis was performed to investigate the patients’ perspectives on the security and privacy challenges and benefits of digital healthcare. Findings show considerable benefits from patients’ views are accessibility, time efficiency, and trustworthy information. Also show patients in Sweden have not had any experiences with privacy and security threat in e-healthcare, but they are aware of the potential challenges. And regarding the importance of the personal information including the private information and all health information for them, they feel more worried about privacy and maintaining the anonymity of information.

  • 208.
    Hallgren, Anna
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Disney: Från cartoon-komik till uncanny valley2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A conducted quantitative survey regarding a comparison of spectators experience of two of Disney's object characters in Beauty and the Beast from 1991 and 2017 revealed that object characters could be perceived uncanny. The cartoon characters were perceived to be more vibrant, due to exaggeration, which need to be used to a lesser extent to produce credible "photorealistic" 3D CGI-animated characters.

    The study indicates that the animation in photorealistic film needs to be more adapted to a greater tactile perceptiveness regarding the material of the character, which makes anthropomorphic object characters less anthropomorphic, and vivid, hence uncanny.

  • 209.
    Hansen, Rotvit Perlt Hansen
    et al.
    Department of People and Technology, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark (DNK).
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Design Principles Exposition: A Framework for Problematizing Knowledge and Practice in DSR2020In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, p. 171-182, article id 12388 LNCSArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design principles (DPs) have been recognized as a central contribution in Design Science Research and the research community has begun acknowledging their importance. Much of this work implicitly assumes that design principles are natural components of contributions that can easily be derived by researchers without a need for criteria for their proposal, application or evaluation. In this paper we infer a framework for how to expose the conceptual structure of DPs as both components and sole contributions. We find a danger in assuming that design principles alone are contributions as they are very broadly used to propose utility yet the specific target audience or the explicit use of them as components of design theory occur less frequent. Furthermore, by applying our framework to a set of DPs, we offer four parts of their conceptual structure that can be used to convey the nature of design principle contributions and further identify potential areas for improvement or further research. We derive 8 questions that offer a guiding hand to researchers who attempt to embed DPs as components of their contribution either to research or to practice. © 2020, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

  • 210.
    Hassen, Yasin Ali
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Ann
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    The Role of ICT for the Growth of Small Enterprises in Ethiopia2014In: The Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries, E-ISSN 1681-4835, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small enterprises strive to survive and grow in the business they are involved. They make efforts to utilize different resources and technologies available to this end as long as it is affordable and productive. Information Communication Technology or e-commerce are among those technologies that take the front line. This paper aims to define an adoption level of e-commerce in small Ethiopian enterprises and show that their business requirements and perceived benefits of e-commerce are related to business growth. It takes five small enterprises involved in import and export business to perform case study research on the issue and examines their utilization level of the technology. The findings show that small enterprises in the country have low levels of e-commerce utilization due to: (1) the scarcity of infrastructure development and expertise in the area, and (2) barriers created by government policy and bank regulations. However, this study found good understanding of the business opportunities and benefits that could be exploited from e-commerce.

  • 211.
    Hattinger, Monika
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Co-constructing Expertise: Competence Development through Work-Integrated e-Learning in joint Industry-University Collaboration2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is inter-disciplinary and proceed from the ongoing challenges of the increased digitalization, automation and robotization that impact the manufacturing industry's emergent need of high-qualified practitioners. Digitalization also challenges universities to open up to external collaboration and to design blended e-learning targeting industry knowledge needs. The studies take up on such challenges and explore inter-organizational collaborations and forms of knowledge construction to strengthen engineering competences integrated inwork in a way that enables manufacturing companies to remain effective and to be prepared for future industrial transformations. The objective is to explore how mutual construction of knowledge emerge through learning activities between multiple actors in a joint industry-university collaborative e-learning practice. The empirical setting is a new type of collaborative course concept developed within the project ProdEx. The project comprise a network of industries and one university in a longitudinal design and implementation process of blended and work-integrated e-learning. This initiative was explored with a collaborative action research approach integrated with five studies, from four perspectives, the industry managers, the practitioners, the research teachers and the course unit. Negotiated knotworking, from cultural-historical activity theory, became a central theoretical concept and a working tool to examine how managers, practitioners and research teachers together negotiated production technology knowledge content and e-learning design towards future workplace transformations. This concept was used to further understand how co-construction of knowledge was developing over time into a richer concept. The results contributes to a wider understanding of how co-construction of knowledge in an e-learning design practice was developing into stronger relations between actors and into more stable courses. Real learning cases and digital labs support theory-practical intertwining of mutual learning of active participation between practitioners and ix research teachers. Initial e-learning technology failures and pedagogical mistakes in the courses were easier to overcome, than issues concerning continuous company support for course participation. Matching industry competence needs with university research fields is continuously challenging. Practitioners' aiming for personal continuous competence development on university level created critical and high-qualitative performances and valuable engagement throughout the process of co-construction of knowledge. The knowledge co-construction became a two-way development, pushing research teachers to active involve and consider practitioners' industry experiences concerning learning content, pedagogical strategies and e-learning forms. While earlier research has discussed the problems of crossing boundaries between industry and university, overall findings show that industry and university actors are crossing boundaries when they mutually co-construct knowledge in an elearningpractice. Co-construction of knowledge entail mutual trust, sideways and interactive learning in a collaborative context. The main contribution suggested in the thesis is that co-constructing expertise entail three levels of activities among actors; to have insight into the purposes and practices of others (relational expertise), the capacity to transform the problems of a practice and together build common knowledge (distributed expertise), and finally the capacity of mutually co-construct knowledge acted upon in practice towards work-integrated transformations (co-constructing expertise).

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download full text (pdf)
    Spikblad
  • 212.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Christiernin-Gustafsson, Linn
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Engineering.
    Eriksson, Kristina M.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Digitizing work: Organizational Work-Integrated Learning through Technology Mediated Courses in Manufacturing Industry2013In: 18th WACE World Conference on Cooperative & Work-Integrated Education: WIL-POWER: FUELING THE FUTURE WORKFORCE, WACE , 2013, p. 1-12Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing industry is continuously facing global competition and customer demands which impose the need to knowledge development to manage changes and long-term business goals. Continuous and lifelong learning is often seen as processes that support competence development and learning integrated within work. In this paper we focus on processes of learning within the manufacturing industry and how learning initiatives as technology mediated courses (TMC) can support learning from the workplace learning needs. Is learning initiatives integrated in work considered as means for strategic business goals? Can TMC be an important learning tool for support of knowledge creation? The study is performed through interviews with production managers and human resource managers with eight manufacturing industries in the western part of Sweden. Through the study we try to understand what knowledge the industry needs to evolve and achieve effective production. We also study the readiness for technology mediated learning. Early results show that the industries have interest in learning initiatives such as TMC and are willing to co-produce knowledge together with universities. We present a matrix model that interlinks business goals and the industries current use of technology mediated learning tools. However, the experience of using tools such as web conference systems and learning management systems for learning initiatives is diversified.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Digitizing work
  • 213.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Engeström, Y.
    Sannino, Annalisa
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    From contradictions to transformation: a study of joint Work-Integrated Elearning between Industry and UniversityIn: Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0096-0640Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 214.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Eriksson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Action Design Research: Design of e-WIL for the Manufacturing Industry2015In: The 2015 Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS 2015): Proceedings, 2015, p. 1-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a design process of e-learning courses for competence development of experienced employees in the manufacturing industry. Through a cross- organizational collaborative action design research project the aim was to design e-learning courses at university level to support work-integrated learning. Two design- and learning cycles were evaluated over two years. The first cycle identified challenges that were applied to a pilot course in Industrial automation. From evaluation of this course we derived design principles applied to two further courses in Machining and Negotiation skills. The results from our empirical data suggest general principles as competence mapping work, collaborative manufacturing e-WIL cases and interactive learning technologies for design of e-WIL courses as boundary crossing activities to reach transformative learning integrated in the manufacturing industry.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 215.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Eriksson, Kristina M.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Learning negotiations skills on-line by a case-based methodology through co-construction of knowledge between industry and academy2018In: 12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference (INTED), Valencia, Spain: IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT , 2018, p. 6651-6658Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    University e-learning education aims to support lifelong learning for practitioners in the manufacturing industry and strengthen their competence development integrated in work practice. However, traditional higher education courses are usually designed for individuals on campus and do not support work practitioners working full time. Hence, they are not usually designed for time independence, flexibility or collaborative learning. Traditionally, campus courses do not include practitioners’ knowledge from their work experiences as a valuable source to be negotiated in knowledge construction with other peers and teachers. However, to integrate practitioners’ workplace experiences, as a valuable knowledge source, is a demanding process when designing e-learning courses that includes pedagogical strategies, case-based methodologies and choices of learning technologies. The aim of this study was to explore how engineering practitioners and research teachers mutually co-construct knowledge in a case-based methodology, specifically within the subject Negotiation Skills. Studies took part within a longitudinal and joint industry-university competence development project between a network of manufacturing industries and one university in the Western part of Sweden. The courses comprise 2.5 European Credits (ECTS) and include cases as a Harvard Case designed with a predefined role-play negotiation game, video production and essay. The case methodology was developing during three design cycles (2014-2015), as a part of the whole course design inspired by an Action Design Research (ADR) approach. Analysis from three focus group session discussions from the three courses including 34 practitioners, and through observations of web-conferencing show that that practitioners’strengthened their knowledge of handling negotiations within work practice. There were problems of using web-conferencing, producing own videos and fulfil written essays stringently, however these problems decreased throughout the three design cycles of the course, due to explicated instructions and a higher practitioner involvement. Generally, results show that practitioners; 1) strengthened their knowledge on how cultural differences affected negotiations, 2) improved their decision making skills in problematic business situations, and 3) developed personal skills on how to visualize conflict situations through reflections on their own actions and communications within practical work situations. The e-learning technology failures also decreased.

  • 216.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Eriksson, Kristina M.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Mind the Gap: A Collaborative Competence E-learning Model Evolving Between University and Industry2020In: Journal of Strategic Innovation and Sustainability, ISSN 1718-2077, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 10-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article arises from consideration of the effects of inter-organizational collaboration on participating partners, specifically from design-related activities and co-production of e-learning courses. The research focus is on critical factors for inter-organizational collaborative e-learning and co-production between university and industry. We describe the process of a six-year longitudinal collaborative action research project comprising six cases and three phases-initialization, implementation, and dissemination. The analysis is conducted from a multi-stakeholder perspective: managers, teachers, and practitioners. The overall aim is development of a sustainable collaborative competence e-learning model that will increase industrial employees' competencies. This work's main contribution is the finding that co-production of knowledge entails three levels of activities among actors: insight into the purposes and practices of others, capacity to transform the problems of a practice and build common knowledge together, and finally, the capacity to mutually co-produce knowledge acted upon for transformation in the workplace.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 217.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Eriksson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Malmsköld, Lennart
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    E-learning Readiness and Absorptive Capacity in the Manufacturing Industry2014In: International Journal of Advanced Corporate Learning, E-ISSN 1867-5565, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing industry constantly strive to develop the competencies of their expert production engineers in order to achieve and maintain a competitive advantage. Research shows that the absorptive capacity of a firm is central in order to reach such a goal. The absorptive capacity is the firm´s ability to recognize the value of new external information, assimilate it, and apply it to commercial ends, and thereby exploit the conditions for innovation. In this paper the concept of absorptive capacity is used as a lens for analyzing managerial rationales for engaging in technology enhanced competence development projects. Through interviews with key informants in 15 manufacturing firms we study the capabilities and readiness that organizations need for participation in e-learning initiatives. We present a framework of readiness for technology enhanced competence development comprised of the following interrelated constructs; awareness, e-learning maturity, dynamic capability and co-creativity. Results show a broad variation of levels within the constructs among the firms. Notable is the low level of e-learning maturity and dynamic capability. We argue that e-learning maturity is dependent on all four constructs.

  • 218.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    The Role of Learning Centers for Communities of Distance Education2004In: Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Web-based Education, Innsbruck, Austria, February 16-18, 2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 219.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    The Role of the Learning Centers for Web-based Distance Education2004In: Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference(WBE-2004) Web-Based Education, 2004, p. 350-355Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distance Education (DE) is not a new phenomenon butinformation technology has increased the use and accessibility to education anywhere and anytime. In Sweden, it is possible to study online courses on university level, using locally placed learning centres (LC). Focus of the study was to get a better understanding of what role locally learning environment, has on students performance. 14 interviews were conducted on Arvika LC, with both students and LC staff. The result show that a LC promote socialisation, technical and administrative support. Communication on organisationaland pedagogical levels between LC, universities and students are though not satisfactory. Thus, we argue for the importance of learning centres as mediators to facilitate a locally constructed learning context.

  • 220.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    Reykjavik University, School of Computer Science (ISL).
    Real-time Analytics through Industrial Internet of Things: Lessons Learned from Data-driven Industry2021In: Digital Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Amcis 2021), Association for Information Systems, 2021, article id 172685Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and the increasing role of real-time analytics (RTA) data are currently transforming industry and shop floor work. Manufacturing industry needs to adapt accordingly and implement systems solutions for rich data analysis to achieve increased business value. However, a data-driven implementation of RTA applications, often launched as “Plug&Play” solutions, often lacks both insights into shop floor work and the alignment to user perspectives. This paper focuses both on the technical implementation and the deployment of RTA applications from a design-in-use perspective and therefore we argue for congruence between a data-driven and a user-driven approach. The main findings reveal how configuration and implementation of RTA applications interplay with users’ work operations that further extends current IIoT layered models by aligning architectural levels with user and business levels. The main contribution is presented as lessons learned to inform sustainable and innovative implementation for increased business value for data-driven industry.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 221.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Norström, Livia
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Unpacking Social Media to explore professionals work practice2016In: Proceedings of IRIS39, Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, Ljungskile, August 7-10, 2016 / [ed] Pareto, Lena, Svensson, Lars, Lundin, Johan, Lundh Snis, Ulrika Lundh Snis, 2016, p. 1-14Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations are inspired by the massive social media use in the private domain and try to filter interactions and knowledge sharing in socialmedia also for professional purposes. Even if the interest in social media isstrong in the private domain, the use is far less widespread in organizations. The trajectory of traditional information spread through web platforms into use of new and open social media platforms stresses organization's and professionals to enrich user-generated content and take part in and enhance social networking. This study explore how social media is used in organizations and how professionals´ practice is challenged by use of social media of reaching out, sharing knowledge and interaction with target groups. Through illustration of two research cases; municipality-citizens' interactions and university-industry collaborations, three affordances of social media practice are emerging; incentives, perceptions and openness, where social media is constituted as the boundary object

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 222.
    Hedeblom, Therese
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT.
    Frisk, Rut
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT.
    Tillgänglighet för dyslektiker på svenska myndigheters hemsidor2022Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Web accessibility is something that affects all public actors in society. In this research the focus is on dyslexic users and Swedish authorities and how they follow the guidelines according to WCAG (Web Content Accessibility Guidelines). Swedish authorities have an obligation to maintain good accessibility in conformity with the DOS law (Accessibility to Digital Public Service)(2018:1937). Having the diagnosis dyslexia means that the person has a disability linked to speech and writing, this is a common disability not only in the world but also in Sweden. In this study 20 Websites of Swedish Authorities have been checked against 8 of the guidelines in WCAG that are relevant for dyslexic individuals. It turned out that 50% of the authorities met all 8 guidelines and that 50% failed to meet one or more of these guidelines. There is a need for further work on maintaining good accessibility for the web, and further research to develop individual adaptations on the web for people with dyslexia. This can also provide conditions for increasing accessibility for all groups in society.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 223.
    Hedlund, Elin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Citizen's Perspectives on Municipalities' E-Services: A Study about how a Municipality works with their E-Services and how they involve the Citizens2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization and e-services are a hot topic within the Swedish municipalities today. There are a lot of discussions about how the municipalities can improve their services with the help of digital tools. However, the one thing that is often missed is what the citizens or end users' needs and want from a service. Through a mixed method approach, this research is looking into how one municipality in the western part of Sweden are working with their e-services and what the citizens think about them. In the study, the results show that the municipality needs a general strategic position in relation to digitalization. The research also show that it is more about the process and journey for both the employees and citizens rather than a question about which digital tool or service that they should use. The municipality is in the initial phase of digitalization and they need to have both the employees and the citizens on board to be able to succeed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 224.
    Hedman, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Twitter var fantastiskt: nu är det dags att lämna.2022In: JournalistenArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 225.
    Hedqvist, Ann-Therese
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Det digitala mötet: Personcentrerad samordnad vård- och omsorgsplanering via videokonferens2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We are becoming older and more people remain in their home with the need for care. When these persons for some reason have been hospitalized and are to return to their homes, care planning is performed in order for the person to be able to leave the ward in a safe manner. With an increasing number of elderly persons in need of care interventions in their home, the need for coordinated care planning in hospitals will also increase. Such planning is today being performed increasingly often via video conferencing. This form of digital encounters poses new challenges for the nurse in creating and maintaining a mutuality.

    Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the conditions for coordinated care planning via video conferencing and how this affects the ability of health care professionals to understand and interpret the patient’s situation from a holistic perspective, thus performing a person-centered meeting at a distance.

    Method: A qualitative research approach was used to gain an understanding of nurses' experience of coordinated care planning via video conferencing. The method consisted of an initial exploratory literature study and individual personal semistructured interviews. The sample consisted of a total of seven nurses in primary care, primary care and municipal home nursing. The analysis of the interview material was conducted with an inductive approach inspired by phenomenology.

    Result: The result shows that the communication is affected and that meetings via video technology lose proximity and thus a part of the human contact. This can disrupt the possibility of seeing each other as persons but can be compensated by a person-centered approach. The technology can act as a means of human interaction, but not as a compensation for it. The main themes found in the result are loss of proximity compensated by multiple gains with associated themes screen as a barrier and benefits for healthcare professionals, patients and relatives as well as technology as means of human interaction with associated themes decidedly dependent on the people in the meeting and high quality in equipment and performance.

    Conclusion: Coordinated care planning via video conferencing involves challenges in conveying presence and genuine interest that compensates for the loss of physical presence. This form of meeting can make it more difficult to see each other as persons, however this obstacle can be compensated by a person-centered approach. The nurse needs to be well acquainted with person-centered care in order to meet the patient despite the barrier that the screen may create. Technology is a means, not an end in itself. Proper use of information and communication technology can be used with great time gains to access each other regardless of geographical location and can contribute to human interaction but not replace it.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 226.
    Heldal, Ilona
    et al.
    Högskolan i Bergen, Norge.
    Hammar Wijkmark, Cecilia
    Myndighetens för Samhällsskydd och Beredskap.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Simulation and serious games for firefighter training: challenges for effective use2016In: NOKOBIT - Norsk konferanse for organisasjoners bruk av informasjonsteknologi, ISSN 1892-0748, E-ISSN 1894-7719, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main criteria of effectively managing emergency and crisis situations is good preparedness. Simulation and serious games (SSG) are often advocated as promising technologies supporting training and increasing the skills necessary to deal with new, complex and often unexpected situations. This paper is based on an investigation of why a seemingly appropriate SSG technology was not used long after procurement. We identified potential obstacles and challenges of SSG implementation in organizations responsible for societal safety. The focus is on fire fighter training and is based on 33 interviews with major stakeholders from seven countries, from organizations with successful as well as unsuccessful experiences of SSG use. By contrasting the different incentives and views regarding the technology use, this paper contributes to a better understanding of challenges related to SSG implementation and use. The results confirm the possible benefits of SSGs, but also highlight an urgent need for new approaches to integrate these new technologies into organizational practices. Only by formulating local, organizational strategies with the SSG use can the technology be implemented successfully

  • 227. Heldal, Ilona
    et al.
    Schroeder, Ralph
    Axelsson, Ann-Sofie
    Spante, Maria
    Chalmers tekniska högskola Centrum för kunskapsbildning och kommunikation (CKK).
    Wideström, Josef
    Immersiveness and Symmetry in Copresent Scenarios2005In: Proceeding of IEEE VR2005, 2005, p. 171-178Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration at a distance has long been a research goal of distributed virtual environments. A number of recent technologies, including immersive projection technology systems (IPTs) and head-mounted displays (HMDs), promise a new generation of technologies that are more intuitive to use than desktop-based systems. This paper presents an experiment that compares collaboration in five different settings. Pairs collaborated on the same puzzle-solving task using one of: an IPT connected to another IPT, an IPT connected to an HMD, an IPT connected to a desktop system, two connected desktop systems, or face-to-face collaboration with real objects. The findings demonstrate the benefits of using immersive technologies, and show the advantages of using symmetrical settings for better performance. Some usability problems of the different distributed settings are addressed, as well as factors such as “presence” and “copresence” and how these contribute to the participants’ overall experiences

  • 228.
    Heldal, Ilona
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Institutionen för teknikens ekonomi och organisation, Teknik och samhälle.
    Spante, Maria
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Institutionen för teknikens ekonomi och organisation, Teknik och samhälle,.
    Assessing collaboration in virtual environments2009In: Challanges in the Evaluation of Usability and User Experience in Reality Based Interaction, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 229.
    Heldal, Ilona
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Institutionen för teknikens ekonomi och organisation, Teknik och samhälle.
    Spante, Maria
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Institutionen för teknikens ekonomi och organisation, Teknik och samhälle.
    Conell, Mike
    WSP Sweden AB .
    Are Two Heads Better than One?: Object-focused Work in Physical and in Virtual Environments2006In: VRST '06 Proceedings of the ACM symposium on Virtual reality software and technology, New York: ACM Digital Library, 2006, p. 287-296Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Under which conditions has collaboration added value over individual work? How does performance change when using different technologies? These are important questions for industry and for research. This paper addresses them for pairs versus individuals using physical objects and virtual representations for object-focused task-solving. Based upon previous research on pair’s performance and experiences for collaboration in a real setting and four different distributed virtual environments (VEs), single-user experimental studies were carried out. The results show that in relation to performance, pairs working in networked CAVE™ technologies are superior compared to individuals, or pairs working in other distributed settings. In general, social interaction works as a facilitator for this type of task solving in networked VEs. Though, best performance was found in the real setting, with no major difference when comparing individuals versus pairs, working in VEs often were appreciated higher than working with physical objects.

  • 230.
    Heldal, Ilona
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Institutionen för teknikens ekonomi och organisation.
    Steed, Anthony
    Spante, Maria
    Chalmers tekniska högskola. Institutionen för teknikens ekonomi och organisation, Teknik och samhälle.
    Schroeder, Ralph
    Bengtsson, Sophia
    Partanaan, Marja
    Successes and Failures in Copresent Situations2005In: Presence - Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, ISSN 1054-7460, E-ISSN 1531-3263, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 563-579Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 231.
    Hellström, Martin
    University West, Administration .
    Rektors inledningsord2021In: Organisering, implementering och användning av välfärdsteknologi: Resultat från eTeam-projektet / [ed] Ann Svensson, Camilla Gjellebæk, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2021, p. 5-5Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 232.
    Hermansson, Johan
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT.
    Zettervall Fredriksson, Jonathan
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT.
    Responsiv webbdesign: En komparativ studie om CSS Grid och Flexbox2022Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Web accessibility is something that affects all public actors in society. In this research the focus is on dyslexic users and Swedish authorities and how they follow the guidelines according to WCAG (Web Content Accessibility Guidelines). Swedish authorities have an obligation to maintain good accessibility in conformity with the DOS law (Accessibility to Digital Public Service)(2018:1937). Having the diagnosis dyslexia means that the person has a disability linked to speech and writing, this is a common disability not only in the world but also in Sweden. In this study 20 Websites of Swedish Authorities have been checked against 8 of the guidelines in WCAG that are relevant for dyslexic individuals. It turned out that 50% of the authorities met all 8 guidelines and that 50% failed to meet one or more of these guidelines. There is a need for further work on maintaining good accessibility for the web, and further research to develop individual adaptations on the web for people with dyslexia. This can also provide conditions for increasing accessibility for all groups in society.

  • 233.
    Herwix, Alexander
    et al.
    Cologne Institute for Information Systems (CIIS), University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany (DEU).
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Having a Positive Impact with Design Science Research: Learning from Effective Altruism2020In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 12388 LNCS, p. 235-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How to increase the chances of overall positive, rather than negative, impacts from new technology developments is expected to be a key challenge for the future of design-oriented research. In this context, we argue that a thorough understanding of the ethical dimension of research and technology is needed so that researchers can make an informed assessment of the expected impact of their work and carry it out more effectively. Myers and Venable [1] took a first step towards investigating the role of ethics in design science research (DSR) and proposed a tentative set of principles that aim to help researchers achieve outcomes that are good from an ethical perspective. We extend this stream of research and present an ethics-aware DSR framework, which describes how values and ethics are fundamentally related to DSR and how we measure its impact. Most importantly, the framework can act as an actionable guideline for how to maximize the expected positive impact of DSR projects. Moreover, the framework can also be used to discuss the structure, direction and expected positive impact of DSR.  

  • 234.
    Herwix, Alexander
    et al.
    University of Cologne, Köln, (GER).
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Revisiting the Problem of The Problem: An Ontology and Framework for Problem Assessment in is Research2021In: European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS). Human value crisis in a digitized world: ECIS Proceedings, Association for Information Systems, 2021, article id 154Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comprehensive understanding of how to achieve relevance and practical impact with our work remains elusive within the information systems (IS) community. While we know that finding or constructing important research problems sets the bar for the potential impact that research can have, we know little about how to support research problem assessment and selection in practice. This paper address this gap by presenting the problem assessment framework (PAF) and outlining its application for the assessment, selection, and justification of important research problems. The PAF builds on the problem assessment ontology, which explicates the domain of problem assessment based on a synthesis of extant research. We have instantiated the PAF in the problem assessment canvas to make it more accessible. Altogether, we contribute three novel artifacts that support researchers looking to work on the most important research problems as the basis for more relevant and impactful IS research.

  • 235.
    Herwix, Alexander
    et al.
    Cologne Institute for Information Systems, University of Cologne (DEU).
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Rossi, Matti
    School of Economics, Aalto University (FIN).
    Tremblay, Monica Chiarini
    Raymond A. Mason School of Business, William & Mary (USA).
    Purao, Sandeep
    College of Business, Bentley University, (USA).
    Gregor, Shirley
    College of Business & Economics, Australian National University, (AUS).
    Ethics in Information Systems and Design Science Research: Five Perspectives2022In: Communications of the Association for Information Systems, E-ISSN 1529-3181, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 589-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While ethics are recognized as an integral part of information systems (IS) research, many questions about the role of ethics in research practice remain unanswered. Our report responds to this emerging set of concerns with a broad and integrative account of five perspectives on ethics in IS research and design science research (DSR) in particular. Our report is informed by a broad literature review, a panel discussion at DESRIST 2020, and substantial personal experience from wrestling with ethical considerations in the field. The report provides a comprehensive discussion of prevailing perspectives on ethics and the implications for IS research. Together, we hope the report will inspire more ethics-conscious and responsible IS research. © 2022 by the Association for Information Systems.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 236.
    Hipkiss, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Sofkova Hashemi, Sylvana
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS). University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, .
    Andersson Varga, Pernilla
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Spante, Maria
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Tallvid, Martin
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Widigson, Mats
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Teaching in Flexible Spatial and Digital Conditions2021In: EARLI 2021: Book of abstracts, 2021, p. 314-314Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the opportunities and challenges of teaching under flexible spatial and digital conditions of the learning environment of a newly build school, analyzing how teaching is organized and what curricular genres can be discerned, what resources and practices are offered to stimulate students meaningmaking and what framing, relations and accessibility can be distinguished by the flexibility of furniture and classroom space. The analyses of a teacher team’s planning and teaching of the thematic work project on Space in years 2-3 (ages 8 to 9) and another teacher team’s thematic work project onCommunication in years 4-7 (ages10 to12) reveal varied teaching strategies between teacher-led and student-centered forms offering students linguistic, visual and audiovisual resources to make meaning of shared content in different school subjects. The young students practice reading comprehension, both of written texts and films, that also serves their knowledge-building about space. The older students display skills relating to different subjects through different technological and digital resources. 

  • 237.
    Holmgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Paediatrics, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vallo Hult, Helena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics. Department of Planning and Development, NU-Hospital Group, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Wekell, Per
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden Department of Paediatrics, NU-Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Integrating a pedagogic course in a CPD programme for paediatricians at out-patient clinics2021In: Journal of European CME, ISSN 2161-4083, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1862981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Equipping paediatricians for the challenges of the explosive development of knowledge and specialised health care calls for a well-planned continuing professional development (CPD) strategy which updates paediatric competencies and the pedagogic skills among paediatricians. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of a pedagogic course, integrated into a CPD programme for paediatricians at out-patient clinics. The pedagogic course comprised three learning components, participation in a CPD programme, during two and a half years, a pedagogic learning module and a pedagogic assignment. The objectives of all the learning activities, including the pedagogic course, were developed according to adult learning theories. Evaluations were made using questionnaires. Seventeen paediatricians participated in the CPD programme; 13 of them completed the pedagogic learning module and six the full pedagogic course, including the pedagogic assignment - teaching at one's own clinic. Evaluation of the pedagogic assignment at the participants' own clinics by 64 co-workers revealed that the co-workers appreciated the training activities and would recommend them to a colleague. We conclude that it is possible to combine medical and pedagogic education in a CPD programme for paediatricians and that the participants were able to digest and apply the pedagogic principles used in the course.

  • 238.
    Holén, Jonathan
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Hansson, Pontus
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Hur fear of missing out påverkar graden av cyberslacking: En kvalitativ studie inom serviceyrket2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    IT use for individuals is increasing both in the workplace and during free time. Previous research has shown that we spend several hours a day on social media and IT use during both working hours and during free time. This has positive effects such as it makes it easier to keep in touch with loved ones. There has also been negative links between high use of IT, depression and lower self-esteem. Based on the previous research, this report answers the following question: How does the fear of missing out affect the level of cyberslacking on employees within a service profession? To answer this question, we used two theoretical perspectives. The first one is Cyberslacking, which is the private use of IT during working hours. The second theoretical perspective is Fear of missing out (FoMO), which is the fear of missing rewarding experiences. The study was conducted at a Systembolag located in Västra Götaland county where we interviewed all store employees with a total of eight respondents.The analysis of the results shows that there is a link between FoMO and cyberslacking, and that it is the norm in the workplace that determines the level of cyberslacking. The study also shows results that access to private IT during working hours can influence the level of stress. Furthermore, the study shows results that there are clear links between location and cyberslacking. That is, respondents mainly cyberslacks at a specific location in the workplace. Further research on how new IT devices such as smart watches are increasing in use and influence individuals during working hours would be a favorable area to research more deeply.

  • 239.
    Hoti, Egzon
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Yeretzian, Andro
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Mobila betalningar: Vilka upplevda risker finns det bland svenska konsumenter2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we have examined what perceived risks Swedish users of mobile payments have. The study focuses on the risks consumers experience in mobile payments, including user habits, as well as social influences regarding how users first started using mobile payments. Previous studies have shown that there are concerns among Swedish users of mobile payments, including the perceived risks associated with the security aspect of using mobile payments, aswell as psychological risks. The purpose of this study is thus to identify what risks Swedish users experience when using mobile payments. To carry put the study and the empirical data collection, a qualitative study effort has been applied, through personal interviews with a total of six respondents. The respondents consisted of six students at the University of West, which are divided into two different programs that they study. A literature study has also been made, through a theoretical review. We found through the interviews that there are several perceived risks among mobile payment users. The three most important risks were theft of sensitive information, malicious software, and fraud as a serious and realistic perceived risk of mobile payments. We also found that the perceived risks are judged to be greater if users have previously suffered from mobile payment risks or have acquaintances that hafe suffered from it. The tendency to use mobile payments also reduces if they previously suffered from risks, which is in line with earlier studies. The study also shows that social influences have a significant factor in how users first start using mobile payments, especially the influence of family and friends. The conclusion we can deduce from the study are that factors affecting personal integrity appear to be the most important perceived risks among the users interviewed, and other security risks are also perceived as serious. We also found a direct correlation betwen previous experiences of mobile payments and how risks are perceived. Although several respondents perceive that there are risks with mobile payments, they continue to be used because the mobile payments services are perceived as practical, easy and convenient. The risks are not perceived to be big enough to stop them from using mobile payments, although they do exist.

  • 240.
    Hou, Jiazhen
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT.
    Akyol, Lydia
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT.
    Skönhetsideal på Instagram: En kvalitativ studie om hur skönhetsideal influerar unga vuxnas kroppsuppfattning, självpresentation och identitet på Instagram2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today's media society makes it possible for us to daily consume pictures on social media such as Instagram. Since the production and consumption of images is a focus on Instagram, there is a risk that we are constantly exposed to materials that present different beauty ideals and edited images. This material can have different effects on people and a greater impact on us than we think when it comes to how we see ourselves, but also which side of us we choose to portray to other people online. Therefore, we wanted to investigate how Instagram's beauty-related material affects young adults' body perception, identity creation and self-presentation in the form of selfies on Instagram. We carried out this study with the help of a qualitative method that consisted of semi-structured interviews where six different respondents were interviewed individually, both males and females. Everyone who participated in the study was in the ages 18-25 years old which was a conscious choice on our part, the reason is people born between these years have never lived a world without the internet and are also diligent users of social media. In the study, User gratification theory, Identity theory, self-presentation theory and social comparison theory are used as theoretical starting points to create a better understanding of the study. The results of the study show that young adults describe today's beauty ideals as something unrealistic. which has shown can lead to social comparisons which can have an impact on young adults' self-presentations in the form of selfies on Instagram. Young adults adapt to these beauty ideals by manipulating their selfies, as well as presenting a side of themselves that does not always correspond to reality.

  • 241.
    Hultskär, Gustav
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT.
    Åvall, Simon
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT.
    Praktiserandet av knowledge sharing i konsultverksamheter: före och efter pandemin2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to create an understanding of how consulting employees practice knowledge sharing in relation to explicit and tacit knowledge. Through knowledge management, this paper intends to investigate how consulting companies work with knowledge sharing and in what way knowledge sharing may have been affected by teleworking. The study has a qualitative and an inductive approach as we intend to create an increased understanding through analysis of empirical data by conducting semi-structured interviews.

    Developing innovative ideas to gain a competitive advantage and make strategic decisions for a long-term sustainable advantage is central to organizations. In order to be innovative and create sustainable competitive advantages, knowledge is considered to be the most important resource that enables companies to develop new capabilities and innovative strategies. Knowledge sharing therefore plays an important and is seen as a key ability for building competitive advantages. During the ongoing pandemic, when a large part of the active workforce works remotely, effective knowledge sharing between different employees has become problematic.

    Today, consulting firm's value proposition consists of, the consulting companies' broad experience and, above all, access to the knowledge that comes from this experience. The study has shown that knowledge sharing is widely practiced throughout the consulting business, and that the organizations are practicing knowledge sharing. It has been shown differences between different types of knowledge comes with different type of problem. It has been shown in study that the success of knowledge sharing is linked to the organization's processes and the employees’ individual incentives. Finally, it is concluded that the consulting industry is equipped for teleworking. This has led to the consulting company and their practice of knowledge sharing has been affected by the covid-19 pandemic, but studies show that the telework that follows the pandemic has been handled well.

  • 242. Hussain, Dena
    The Development of ICT Tools for E-inclusion Qualities: An Early Case Study2018In: ONLINE ENGINEERING & INTERNET OF THINGS, Springer International Publishing , 2018, p. 645-651Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the diversity and increasing use of different information and communication technologies (ICT) in the educational sector, new pedagogic approaches are also being introduced and have had a major impact on the educational sector, focusing on different perspective including improved educational methods and in both schools and homes, information and communication technologies (ICT) are widely seen as enhancing learning, fulfilling their rapid diffusion and acceptance throughout developed societies. But the need to utilize ICT tools to support and guide educators in finding the right support for students with special individual needs is still a challenge, investigating different challenges that are presented to teachers in their working environment is an ongoing matter. One of these challenges that teacher face frequently is creating an inclusive environment. An “inclusive education” is a process of strengthening the capacity of the education system to reach out to all learners involved. It changes the education in content, approaches, structures and strategies, with a common vision that covers all children of the appropriate age range. Inclusion is thus seen as a process of addressing and responding to the diversity of needs of all children. Therefore an inclusive education system can only be created if schools become more inclusive, in other words, if they become better at educating all children in their communities with their individual needs. Therefore, creative forms of communication should be encouraged to promote personalized care, hence the focuses of this research is to investigate the use of data process flow map with the aim to guide the teacher towards an inclusive way of thinking.

  • 243.
    Hussain, Dena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Computer, Electrical and Surveying Engineering.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Inter-communication management in cases with disabled children2015In: International Conference on Information Society, Technical Co-Sponsored by IEEE UK/RI Computer Chapter, November 9-11, 2015, London, UK: Proceedings / [ed] Charles A. Shoniregun & Galyna A. Akmayeva, Infonomics Society, 2015, p. 30-31Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the use of Information and communication tools has offered new possibilities for improving different aspect of the healthcare sector, the objective of this research is to design an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) tool to assist the learning process of caretakers of special need children inSweden. The research is based on long-term observations and indepth interviews with key experts, with the aim of developing a tool which should assist the intercommunication between caretakers, creating optimized action plans in a work integrated environment. Enhancing the learning processes of the caretakers’methods and knowledge of each other’s work processes through knowledge bridging between all caretakers involved and hence have a direct influence on the child’s development.

  • 244.
    Högberg, Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    A Learning Process In Organizational Social Media Use: A Longitudinal Case Study2019In: INTED2019 Proceedings: 13th International Technology, Education and Development Conference, Valencia, Spain. 11-13 March, 2019., The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2019, p. 4970-4976Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media has rapidly created a need for organizations to gain new knowledge and ability to quickly adapt to a changing environment in order to keep up with competitors. This has also created a pressure on organizational members to gain new competence and knowledge and to be able to learn these new technologies in a workplace environment. Workplace learning has therefore become important for professional development and learning. The present study has conducted over five years (2013-2018) within an international hotel chain. The data collection is based on 40 interviews with hotel employees who are using and who are in charge of the social media use in 14 hotels within the international hotel chain. In addition, data from online observations, workplace observations and written documents have been collected. The analysis identified the employees learning strategies, barriers facilitators and outcomes of workplace learning related to social media use.

  • 245.
    Högberg, Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Challenges of social media marketing: an explorative international study of hotels2017In: International Journal of Technology Marketing, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 127-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the worldwide increased usage of social media, organisations are experiencing great pressure to implement social media into their existing marketing strategies. Due to this development, social media has rapidly become an important marketing tool. The study focuses on social media marketing implementation, with the aim to develop an increased understanding of the challenges concerning how hotels adapt social media into their marketing activities by investigating social media marketing usage in hotels. The result suggests that most hotels are reactive in their social media usage and do not actively seek interaction, and that individual knowledge needs to be spread throughout organisations to a greater extent in order to achieve interaction with customers in social media channels.

  • 246.
    Högberg, Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Exploring How Hotel Organizations Use Social Media: An International Qualitative Study2017In: MCIS 2017 Proceedings, Association for Information Systems, 2017, article id 26Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media has changed how both individuals and organizations communicate and interact online. It is argued that social media has had major effects on the hospitality and tourism industry, changing how organizations market themselves, provide service and create relationships with customers. Over- all, there is little empirical evidence on how and why organizations use social media. Existing re- search is rather fragmented, focusing on specific social media use such as marketing or internal communication. More research with a holistic view on social media usage is therefore needed. The present study investigates how 14 hotel organizations in seven European countries within an international hotel chain use social media and what effects the use has on the organizations. The result shows that the hotels use social media for both internal and external communication. However, there is a large focus on managing User-Generated Content

  • 247.
    Högberg, Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Linking Workplace Learning To Organizational Social Media: A Longitudinal Study Of An International Hotel Chain2018In: ICERI2018 Proceedings, The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2018, p. 9745-9752Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New technologies such as social media has rapidly expanded the organizational need for new knowledge and ability to quickly adapt to a changing environment in order to keep up with competitors. This also puts pressure on organizational members to gain new competence and knowledge and to be able to learn these new technologies in a workplace environment. Organizations often spend time and resources on formal training and education. However, the development of new technologies such as social media has enabled employees to learn anywhere and anytime. Web 2.0 technology and social media technologies in particular allows researchers to shed a new light on the importance and occurrence of both formal and informal learning in the workplace. Unlike the technologies employees may encounter in organizational settings, social media has proliferated outside organizational contexts prior to being introduced to the workplace. Formal learning is often described as planned and structured and often takes place outside of the workplace, while in contrast, informal learning often is described as unstructured and non-institutionalized. Informal learning is also often linked to tacit knowledge, learning by doing and a result of everyday workplace activities. A large amount of studies revealed that the majority of workplace learning occurs through informal means. While there is growing evidence that social media is increasingly supporting informal learning at home, there are few empirical studies that support the claim that organizational social media enables informal learning in the workplace. The present study investigates the relationship between both formal and informal workplace learning and organizational social media. Earlier research on social media use in organizational settings has mainly focused on the use of specific social media platforms and also made clear distinctions between internal and public use of social media. A key gap in the literature on social media is a lack of analysis that considers more overall use and impact of all these social media uses on the organization. Hence, this study take the approach of using the perspective of organizational social media in order to embrace a more general use of social media in an organizational context. For this purpose, a longitudinal case study has been conducted over five years (2013-2018) within an international hotel chain. The data collection is based on 43 interviews (including 17 follow-up interviews) with hotel employees who are using and who is in charge of the social media use in 14 hotels within the international hotel chain. In addition, data from online observations, workplace observations and written documents has been collected. The following research question has been asked: 1) When does formal and informal learning occur in the workplace? 2) How does the employees formal and informal learning effect the organizational social media use over time ? The results showed that the employees had little interest in the formal learning that was offered by the hotel chain management and that informal learning occurred related to job-related activities, often related to un-expected situations. Furthermore, the study showed that that the employees personal drivers for informal learning highly effected how they used social media in their workplace.

  • 248.
    Högberg, Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Managing knowledge on social media: an empirical study of social media adoption in hotel organizations2016In: Journal of Advances in Information Technology, E-ISSN 1798-2340, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 113-118Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 249.
    Högberg, Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Managing social media adoption - an exploratory international case study of hotel organizations2015In: Innovation, Entrepreneurship And Sustainable Value Chain In A Dynamic Environment: 8th Annual Conference of the EuroMed-Academy-of-Business. / [ed] Vrontis, D; Weber, Y; Tsoukatos, E, EUROMED PRESS , 2015, p. 1027-1040Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The usage of social media is increasing rapidly in organizations. Technology has long been considered to be one of the most influential elements affecting the rules of competition. Therefore both technology management and strategy has become an important task for many business organizations. Seen from an organizational perspective, social media can not only be used to create interaction between members of the organization, employees, and customers but also to create a shared organizational intelligence. Hotel organizations is the focus of this study. The objective of the study is to provide insights to the managerial and organizational perspective of the adoption of social media in hotel organizations, exploring how the strategy of adopting and managing social media is performed within the hotel organizations. The results show that the hotels of the case study are in the beginning of their path of forming a strategy for social media adoption that also works in practice, not just in theory.

  • 250.
    Högberg, Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Real Estate, Economics and Society.
    Multiple Social Media in Practice: Investigating Emergent Work Practices2023In: Journal of Computer Information Systems, ISSN 0887-4417, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 68-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media platforms have in the last decade been widely used in the workplace. Although many organizations use multiple social media platforms for different purposes, recent research has focussed on the use of single social media platforms and its implications for work practices. The present study focuses on multiple social media use in the workplace. This perspective embraces social media platforms used for both internal and external purposes, as well as social media content produced on third-party platforms. Moreover, few studies focus on how the use of multiple social media in the workplace affects existing work practices. Therefore, this study aims to examine how new work practices develop over time and how the workplace is transformed due to the ongoing use of multiple social media. The present study contributes to the Information Systems (IS) literature by emphasizing that the explicit features of “algorithmic phenomena” of social media platforms, like ever-changing algorithms and transparency, create the need for new work practices as well as new organizational structures.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
2345678 201 - 250 of 659
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf