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  • 201.
    Goel, Sneha
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Björklund, Stefan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Wiklund, U.
    Uppsala University, Materials Science Division, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Hybrid powder-suspension Al2O3-ZrO2 coatings by axial plasma spraying: Processing, characteristics & tribological behaviour2017In: Proceedings of the International Thermal Spray Conference & Exposition, New York: Curran Associates, Inc , 2017, Vol. 1, p. 374-379Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of suspension plasma spraying (SPS) to overcome difficulties associated with feeding of fine (submicron or nano-sized) powders and achieve more refined microstructures than possible in atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) is well established. In recent times, the use of axial injection plasma spray systems has yielded substantial enhancement in deposition rates/efficiencies due to improved thermal exchange between the plasma plume and injected feedstock. The present paper describes utilization of both the above advances in plasma spraying to create various function-dependent coating architectures through simultaneous and/or sequential spraying of hybrid powder-suspension feedstock. A specific variant of such hybrid axial plasma spraying that enables deposition of composite coatings by simultaneous injection of a powder and a suspension is discussed in particular detail. Results obtained using an Al2O3-ZrO2 material system as a case study reveal that composite coatings combining the micron-size features arising from the spray-grade Al2O3 powder and submicron or nano-sized features attributable to the ZrO2 suspension can be conveniently realized. The surface morphology, microstructure, and composition of these coatings, as well as their tribological behaviour determined using scratch and ball-on-disc tests, are presented herein. The utility of this method to develop a wide array of composite coatings is also discussed. 

  • 202.
    Goel, Sneha
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Bourreau, Kévin
    University of Limoges, Specialty Materials, Limoges 87000, France.
    Olsson, Jonas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Klement, Uta
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Gothenburg 41296, Sweden.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Can Appropriate Thermal Post-Treatment Make Defect Content in as-Built Electron Beam Additively Manufactured Alloy 718 Irrelevant?2020In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 13, no 3, article id 536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electron beam melting (EBM) is gaining rapid popularity for production of complex customized parts. For strategic applications involving materials like superalloys (e.g., Alloy 718), post-treatments including hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) to eliminate defects, and solutionizing and aging to achieve the desired phase constitution are often practiced. The present study specifically explores the ability of the combination of the above post-treatments to render the as-built defect content in EBM Alloy 718 irrelevant. Results show that HIPing can reduce defect content from as high as 17% in as-built samples (intentionally generated employing increased processing speeds in this illustrative proof-of-concept study) to <0.3%, with the small amount of remnant defects being mainly associated with oxide inclusions. The subsequent solution and aging treatments are also found to yield virtually identical phase distribution and hardness values in samples with vastly varying as-built defect contents. This can have considerable implications in contributing to minimizing elaborate process optimization efforts as well as slightly enhancing production speeds to promote industrialization of EBM for applications that demand the above post-treatments.

  • 203.
    Goel, Sneha
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Olsson, Jonas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Ahlfors, Magnus
    Quintus Technologies AB, Västerås, Sweden.
    Klement, Uta
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    The Effect of Location and Post-treatment on the Microstructure of EBM-Built Alloy 7182018In: Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 & Derivatives: Energy, Aerospace, and Industrial Applications / [ed] Ott, E., Liu, X., Andersson, J., Bi, Z., Bockenstedt, K., Dempster, I., Groh, J., Heck, K., Jablonski, P., Kaplan, M., Nagahama, D. and Sudbrack, C., Springer, 2018, p. 115-129Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of Ni-based superalloys such as Alloy 718 may obviate the need for difficult machining and welding operations associated with geometrically intricate parts, thus potentially expanding design possibilities and facilitating cost-effective manufacture of complex components. However, processing AM builds completely free from defects, which may impair mechanical properties such as fatigue and ductility, is challenging. Anisotropic properties, microstructural heterogeneities and local formation of undesired phases are additional concerns that have motivated post-treatment of AM builds. This work investigates the microstructural changes associated with post-treatment of Alloy 718 specimens produced by Electron Beam Melting (EBM) for as-built microstructures at 3 build heights: near base plate, in the middle of build and near the top of the build. Two different post-treatment conditions, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) alone and a combined HIP with solutionising and two-step aging were examined and compared to the results for the as-built condition. The influence of various post-treatments on minor phase distributions (δ, γ″, carbides), overall porosity, longitudinal grain widths and Vickers microhardness was considered. The HIP treatment led to significant reduction in overall porosity and dissolution of δ phase, which led to appreciable grain growth for both post-treatment conditions. The variation in hardness noted as a function of build height for the as-built specimens was eliminated after post-treatment. Overall, the hardness was found to decrease after HIP and increase after the full HIP, solutionising and aging treatment, which was attributed to dissolution of γ″ during HIP and its re-precipitation in subsequent heat treatment steps.

  • 204.
    Goel, Sneha
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Sittiho, Anumat
    University of Idaho, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Moscow, ID 83844, United States.
    Charit, Indrajit
    University of Idaho, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Moscow, ID 83844, United States.
    Klement, Uta
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Effect of post-treatments under hot isostatic pressure on microstructural characteristics of EBM-built Alloy 7182019In: Additive Manufacturing, ISSN 2214-8604, Vol. 28, p. 727-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electron beam melting (EBM) has emerged as an important additive manufacturing technique. In this study, Alloy 718 produced by EBM was investigated in as-built and post-treated conditions for microstructural characteristics and hardness. The post-treatments investigated were hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and combined HIP + heat treatment (HIP + HT) carried out as a single cycle inside the HIP vessel. Both the post-treatments resulted in significant decrease in defects inevitably present in the as-built material. The columnar grain structure of the as-built material was found to be maintained after post-treatment, with some sporadic localized grain coarsening noted. Although HIP led to complete dissolution of δ and γ′′ phase, stable NbC and TiN (occasionally present) particles were observed in the post-treated specimens. Significant precipitation of γ′′ phase was observed after HIP + HT, which was attributed to the two-step aging heat treatment carried out during HIP + HT. The presence of γ′′ phase or otherwise was correlated to the hardness of the material. While the HIP treatment resulted in drop in hardness, HIP + HT led to 'recovery' of the hardness to values exceeding those exhibited by the as-built material. © 2019 Elsevier B.V.

  • 205.
    Gopal, Vasanth
    et al.
    Department of Physics, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT, Vellore 632014, India Centre for Biomaterials, Cellular and Molecular Theranostics, VIT, Vellore 632014, India.
    Goel, Sneha
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Manivasagam, Geetha
    Centre for Biomaterials, Cellular and Molecular Theranostics, VIT, Vellore 632014, India.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Performance of Hybrid Powder-Suspension Axial Plasma Sprayed Al2O3-YSZ Coatings in Bovine Serum Solution2019In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 12, no 12, article id E1922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ceramic coatings on metallic implants are a promising alternative to conventional implants due to their ability to offer superior wear resistance. The present work investigates the sliding wear behavior under bovine serum solution and indentation crack growth resistance of four coatings, namely (1) conventional powder-derived alumina coating (Ap), (2) suspension-derived alumina coating (As), (3) composite Al2O3-20wt % Yittria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) coating (AsYs) deposited using a mixed suspension, and (4) powder Al2O3-suspension YSZ hybrid composite coating ApYs developed by axial feeding plasma spraying, respectively. The indentation crack growth resistance of the hybrid coating was superior due to the inclusion of distributed fine YSZ particles along with coarser alumina splats. Enhanced wear resistance was observed for the powder derived Ap and the hybrid ApYs coatings, whereas the suspension sprayed As and AsYs coatings significantly deteriorated due to extensive pitting.

  • 206.
    Gruber, H.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Division of Materials and Manufacture, Gothenburg, SE-412 96, Sweden.
    Karimi Neghlani, Paria
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Hryha, E.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Division of Materials and Manufacture, Gothenburg, SE-412 96, Sweden.
    Nyborg, L.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Division of Materials and Manufacture, Gothenburg, SE-412 96, Sweden.
    Effect of Powder Recycling on the Fracture Behavior of Electron Beam Melted Alloy 7182018In: Powder Metallurgy Progress, ISSN 1335-8987, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 40-48Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the effect of powder feedstock alterations during multicycle additive manufacturing on the quality of built components is crucial to meet the requirements on critical parts for aerospace engine applications. In this study, powder recycling of Alloy 718 during electron beam melting was studied to understand its influence on fracture behavior of Charpy impact test bars. High resolution scanning electron microscopy was employed for fracture surface analysis on test bars produced from virgin and recycled powder. For all investigated samples, an intergranular type of fracture, initiated by non-metallic phases and bonding defects, was typically observed in the regions close to or within the contour zone. The fracture mode in the bulk of the samples was mainly moderately ductile dimple fracture. The results show a clear correlation between powder degradation during multi-cycle powder reuse and the amount of damage relevant defects observed on the fracture surfaces. In particular, samples produced from recycled powder show a significant amount of aluminum-rich oxide defects, originating from aluminum-rich oxide particulates on the surface of the recycled powder. © 2018 H. Gruber et al., published by Sciendo.

  • 207.
    Guerin, Elie
    et al.
    National School of Engineers, University of Limoges, Limoges, France.
    Sadeghimeresht, Esmaeil
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Role of Chemistry on Corrosion Behavior of Various Ni-based HVAF-Sprayed Coatings in Simulated Boiler Environments2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Design of Microstructures in Thermal Barrier Coatings: A Modelling Approach2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasma sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating systems (TBCs) are commonly used for thermal protection of components in modern gas turbine application such as power generation, marine and aero engines. The material that is most commonly used in these applications is Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) because of this ceramic’s favourable properties, such as low thermal conductivity, phase stability to high temperature, and good erosion resistance. The coating microstructures in YSZ coatings are highly heterogeneous, consisting of defects such as pores and cracks of different sizes which determine the coating’s final thermal and mechanical properties, and the service lives of the coatings. Determination of quantitative microstructure–property correlations is of great interest as experimental procedures are time consuming and expensive.

    This objective of this thesis work was to investigate the relationships between coating microstructure and thermal-mechanical properties of TBCs, and to utilise these relationships to design an optimised microstructure to be used for next generation TBCs. Simulation technique was used to achieve this goal. Important microstructural parameters influencing the performance of TBCs were identified and coatings with the identified microstructural parameters were designed, modelled and experimentally verified. TBCs comprising of large globular pores with connected cracks inherited within the coating microstructure were shown to have significantly enhanced performance. Low thermal conductivity, low Young‘s modulus and high lifetime were exhibited by these coatings. The modelling approach described in this work can be used as a powerful tool to design new coatings as well as to achieve optimised microstructures.

  • 209.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Design of Thermal Barrier Coatings: A modelling approach2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are commonly used for thermal protection of components in modern gas turbine application such as power generation, marine and aero engines. TBC is a duplex material system consisting of an insulating ceramic topcoat layer and an intermetallic bondcoat layer. TBC microstructures are highly heterogeneous, consisting of defects such as pores and cracks of different sizes which determine the coating's final thermal and mechanical properties, and the service lives of the coatings. Failure in APS TBCs is mainly associated with the thermo-mechanical stresses developing due to the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer growth at the topcoat-bondcoat interface and thermal expansion mismatch during thermal cycling. The interface roughness has been shown to play a major role in the development of these induced stresses and lifetime of TBCs.The objective of this thesis work was two-fold for one purpose: to design an optimised TBC to be used for next generation gas turbines. The first objective was to investigate the relationships between coating microstructure and thermal-mechanical properties of topcoats, and to utilise these relationships to design an optimised morphology of the topcoat microstructure. The second objective was to investigate the relationships between topcoat-bondcoat interface roughness, TGO growth and lifetime of TBCs, and to utilise these relationships to design an optimal interface. Simulation technique was used to achieve these objectives. Important microstructural parameters influencing the performance of topcoats were identified and coatings with the feasible identified microstructural parameters were designed, modelled and experimentally verified. It was shown that large globular pores with connected cracks inherited within the topcoat microstructure significantly enhanced TBC performance. Real topcoat-bondcoat interface topographies were used to calculate the induced stresses and a diffusion based TGO growth model was developed to assess the lifetime. The modelling results were compared with existing theories published in previous works and experiments. It was shown that the modelling approach developed in this work could be used as a powerful tool to design new coatings and interfaces as well as to achieve high performance optimised morphologies.

  • 210.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Design of Thermal Barrier Coatings: A Modelling Approach2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book details the relationships between microstructure, interface roughness, and properties of thermal barrier coatings. The author proposes a method for the reduction of the thermal conductivity of the ceramic layer in order to increase the lifetime of thermal barrier coatings. He includes models for the optimization of ceramic layer microstructure and interface roughness.

  • 211.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Spraying of solid oxide fuel cells2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Vaßen, Robert
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Design of Next Generation Thermal Barrier Coatings- Experiments and Modelling2013In: Surface and Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, Vol. 220, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems have been used in the gas turbine industry since the 1980's. The future needs of both the air and land based turbine industry involve higher operating temperatures with longer lifetime on the component so as to increase power and efficiency of gas turbines. The aim of this study was to meet these future needs by further development of zirconia coatings. The intention was to design a coating system which could be implemented in industry within the next three years. Different morphologies of ceramic topcoat were evaluated; using dual layer systems and polymers to generate porosity. Dysprosia stabilised zirconia was also included in this study as a topcoat material along with the state-of-the-art yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ). High purity powders were selected in this work. Microstructure was assessed with scanning electron microscope and an in-house developed image analysis routine was used to characterise porosity content. Evaluations were carried out using the laser flash technique to measure thermal conductivity. Lifetime was assessed using thermo-cyclic fatigue testing. Finite element analysis was utilised to evaluate thermal-mechanical material behaviour and to design the morphology of the coating with the help of an artificial coating morphology generator through establishment of relationships between microstructure, thermal conductivity and stiffness. It was shown that the combined empirical and numerical approach is an effective tool for developing high performance coatings. The results show that large globular pores and connected cracks inherited within the coating microstructure result in a coating with best performance. A low thermal conductivity coating with twice the lifetime compared to the industrial standard today was fabricated in this work.

  • 213.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Dwivedi, Gopal
    Stony Brook University, USA.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Environment Production Technology West.
    Vackel, Andrew
    Stony Brook University, USA.
    Sampath, Sanjay
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    An Experimental Study of Microstructure: Property Relationships in Thermal Barrier Coatings2013In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 659-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermal-mechanical properties of thermal barrier coatings are highly influenced by the defects present in coating microstructure. The aim of this study was to meet the future needs of the gas turbine industry by further development of zirconia coatings through the assessment of microstructure-property relationships. A design of experiments was conducted for this purpose with current, spray distance, and powder feed rate as the varied parameters. Microstructure was assessed with SEM and image analysis was used to characterize porosity content. Evaluations were carried out using laser flash technique to measure thermal properties. A bi-layer beam curvature technique in conjunction with controlled thermal cycling was used to assess the mechanical properties, in particular their nonlinear elastic response. Coating lifetime was evaluated by thermo-cyclic fatigue testing. Relationships between microstructure and coating properties are discussed. Dense vertically cracked microstructure and highly porous microstructure with large globular pores were also fabricated. Correlations between parameters obtained from nonlinear measurements and lifetime based on a priori established microstructural analysis were attempted in an effort to develop and identify a simplified strategy to assess coating durability following sustained long-term exposure to high temperature thermal cycling.

  • 214.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Eriksson, Robert
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sand, Ulf
    EDR Medeso, Västerås, Sweden.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    A Diffusion-based Oxide Layer Growth Model using Real Interface Roughness in Thermal Barrier Coatings for Lifetime Assessment2015In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 271, no June, p. 181-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of thermo-mechanical stresses during thermal cycling can lead to the formation of detrimental cracks in Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed (APS) Thermal Barrier Coatings systems (TBCs). These stresses are significantly increased by the formation of a Thermally Grown Oxide (TGO) layer that forms through the oxidation of mainly aluminium in the bondcoat layer of the TBC. As shown in previous work done by the authors, the topcoat-bondcoat interface roughness plays a major role in the development of the stress profile in the topcoat and significantly affects the lifetime of TBCs. This roughness profile varies as the TGO layer grows and changes the stress profile in the topcoat leading to crack propagation and thus failure.

    In this work, a two-dimensional TGO growth model is presented, based on oxygen and aluminium diffusion-reaction equations, using real interface profiles extracted from cross-section micrographs. The model was first validated by comparing the TGO profiles artificially created by the model to thermally cycled specimens with varying interface roughness. Thereafter, stress profiles in the TBC system, before and after the TGO layer growth, were estimated using a finite element modelling model described in previous work done by the authors. Three experimental specimens consisting of the same chemistry but with different topcoat-bondcoat interface roughness were studied by the models and the stress state was compared to the lifetimes measured experimentally. The combination of the two models described in this work was shown to be an effective approach to assess the stress behaviour and lifetime of TBCs in a comparative way.

  • 215.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Kuhn, J.
    Kesler, O.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Influence of Process Parameters on Microstructure and Permeability of Axial Suspension Plasma Sprayed Electrolytes in SOFCs2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 216.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Kumara, Chamara
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Bilayer Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Thermal Cyclic Lifetime: Experiments and Modeling2017In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 1038-1051Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) has been shown as a promising process to produce porous columnar strain tolerant coatings for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines. However, the highly porous structure is vulnerable to crack propagation, especially near the topcoat-bondcoat interface where high stresses are generated due to thermal cycling. A topcoat layer with high toughness near the topcoat-bondcoat interface could be beneficial to enhance thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs. In this work, a bilayer coating system consisting of first a dense layer near the topcoat-bondcoat interface followed by a porous columnar layer was fabricated by SPS using Yttria-stabilised zirconia suspension. The objective of this work was to investigate if the bilayer topcoat architecture could enhance the thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs through experiments and to understand the effect of the column gaps/vertical cracks and the dense layer on the generated stresses in the TBC during thermal cyclic loading through finite element modeling. The experimental results show that the bilayer TBC had significantly higher lifetime than the single-layer TBC. The modeling results show that the dense layer and vertical cracks are beneficial as they reduce the thermally induced stresses which thus increase the lifetime.

  • 217.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Li, X-H
    Siemens Turbomachinery AB, Finspang, Sweden.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Kjellman, Björn
    GKN Aerosp, Trollhattan, Sweden.
    Design of high lifetime suspension plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings2020In: Journal of the European Ceramic Society, ISSN 0955-2219, E-ISSN 1873-619X, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 768-779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) fabricated by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) have shown improved performance due to their low thermal conductivity and high durability along with relatively low production cost. Improvements in SPS TBCs that could further enhance their lifetime would lead to their widespread industrialisation. The objective of this study was to design a SPS TBC system with optimised topcoat microstructure and topcoat bondcoat interface, combined with appropriate bondcoat microstructure and chemistry, which could exhibit high cyclic lifetime. Bondcoat deposition processes investigated in this study were high velocity air fuel (HVAF) spraying, high velocity oxy fuel spraying, vacuum plasma spraying, and diffusion process. Topcoat microstructure with high column density along with smooth topcoat bondcoat interface and oxidation resistant bondcoat was shown as a favourable design for significant improvements in the lifetime of SPS TBCs. HVAF sprayed bondcoat treated by shot peening and grit blasting was shown to create this favourable design.

  • 218.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Li, X. -H
    Siemens Turbomachinery, Finspång, Sweden.
    Kjellman, B.
    GKN Aerospace, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Influence of bondcoat surface characteristics on lifetime in suspension plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings2017In: Proceedings of the International Thermal Spray Conference & Exposition (ITSC 2017), New York: Curran Associates, Inc , 2017, Vol. 2, p. 883-887Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of TBCs allowing higher combustion temperatures in gas turbines is of high commercial interest since it results in higher fuel efficiency and lower emissions. It is well known that TBCs produced by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) have lower thermal conductivity as compared to conventional systems due to their very fine porous microstructure. Moreover, columnar structured SPS TBCs are significantly cheaper to produce as compared to the conventionally used electron beam - physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD). However, SPS TBCs have not yet been commercialised due to low reliability and life expectancy of the coatings. Lifetime of a TBC system is significantly dependent on topcoat-bondcoat interface topography. The objective of this work was to study the effect of topcoat-bondcoat interface in SPS TBCs by changing bondcoat spray parameters and bondcoat surface heat treatment High velocity air fuel (HVAF) spraying was used for bondcoat deposition while axial-SPS was used for topcoat deposition. Same topcoat spray parameters were used for all samples. Lifetime was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue and thermal shock testing. The influence of surface roughness on lifetime has been discussed. The results show that HVAF could be a suitable process for bondcoat deposition to achieve long lifetime SPS TBCs. 

  • 219.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Li, X. -H
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspång, Sweden.
    Östergren, Lars
    GKN Aerospace, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Influence of Bondcoat Spray Process on Lifetime of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings2018In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, Vol. 27, no 1-2, p. 84-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) manufactured by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is of high commercial interest as SPS has been shown capable of producing highly porous columnar microstructures similar to the conventionally used electron beam–physical vapor deposition. However, lifetime of SPS coatings needs to be improved further to be used in commercial applications. The bondcoat microstructure as well as topcoat–bondcoat interface topography affects the TBC lifetime significantly. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of different bondcoat deposition processes for SPS topcoats. In this work, a NiCoCrAlY bondcoat deposited by high velocity air fuel (HVAF) was compared to commercial vacuum plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY and PtAl diffusion bondcoats. All bondcoat variations were prepared with and without grit blasting the bondcoat surface. SPS was used to deposit the topcoats on all samples using the same spray parameters. Lifetime of these samples was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue testing. Isothermal heat treatment was performed to study bondcoat oxidation over time. The effect of bondcoat deposition process and interface topography on lifetime in each case has been discussed. The results show that HVAF could be a suitable process for bondcoat deposition in SPS TBCs.

  • 220.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Li, X.
    Kjellman, B.
    Effect of bondcoat and substrate chemistry on oxide growth and lifetime in suspension plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 221.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Li, X-H
    Influence of topcoat-bondcoat interface on lifetime in suspension sprayed therma barrier coatings2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Li, Xin-Hai
    Siemens Turbomachinery AB, Finspång, Sweden.
    Kjellman, Björn
    GKN Aerospace, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Development of bondcoats for high lifetime suspension plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings2019In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 371, no SI, p. 366-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fabrication of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) seems to be a promising alternative for the industry as SPS TBCs have the potential to provide lower thermal conductivity and longer lifetime than state-of-the-art allowing higher engine efficiency. Further improvements in lifetime of SPS TBCs and fundamental understanding of failure mechanisms in SPS TBCs are necessary for their widespread commercialisation. In this study, the influence of varying topcoat-bondcoat interface topography and bondcoat microstructure on lifetime was investigated. The objective of this work was to gain fundamental understanding of relationships between topcoat-bondcoat interface topography, bondcoat microstructure, and failure mechanisms in SPS TBCs. Seven sets of samples were produced in this study by keeping same bondcoat chemistry but varying feedstock particle size distributions and bondcoat spray processes. The topcoat chemistry and spray parameters were kept identical in all samples. Three-dimensional surface measurements along with scanning electron microscopy images were used to characterise bondcoat surface topography. The effect of varying interface topography and bondcoat microstructure on thermally grown oxide formation, stresses and lifetime was discussed. The results showed that varying bondcoat powder size distribution and spray process can have a significant effect on lifetime of SPS TBCs. Smoother bondcoats seemed to enhance the lifetime in case of SPS TBCs in case of same bondcoat chemistry and similar bondcoat microstructures. When considering the samples investigated in this study, samples with high velocity air-fuel (HVAF) bondcoats resulted in higher lifetime than other samples indicating that HVAF could be a suitable process for bondcoat deposition in SPS TBCs. © 2018 Elsevier B.V.

  • 223.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Li, Xin-Hai
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspong, Sweden.
    Peng, Ru Lin
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Improving the lifetime of suspension plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings2017In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 332, p. 550-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) for gas turbine applications allowing higher combustion temperatures is of high interest since it results in higher fuel efficiency and lower emissions. TBCs produced by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) have been shown to exhibit significantly lower thermal conductivity as compared to conventional systems due to their very fine porosity microstructure. However they have not been commercialised yet due to low reliability and life expectancy of the coatings. In addition to the initial topcoat microstructure and its sintering resistance, lifetime of a TBC system is highly dependent on bondcoat chemistry as it influences the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer. To enhance the lifetime of SPS TBCs, fundamental understanding of relationships between topcoat microstructure and its evolution with time, bondcoat chemistry, TGO growth rate, and lifetime is essential. The objective of this work was to study the effect of topcoat microstructure evolution and TGO growth rate on lifetime in SPS TBC systems. Experimental MCrAlY bondcoat powders with different aluminium activities were investigated and compared to a commercial bondcoat powder. High velocity air fuel spraying was used for bondcoat deposition while axial-SPS was used for yttria stabilized zirconia topcoat deposition. Lifetime was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue testing. Isothermal heat treatment was performed to study TGO evolution with time. The changes in microstructure of SPS coatings due to sintering under long term exposure at high temperatures were investigated. Different failure modes in SPS TBCs were also examined. The bondcoat with higher aluminium activity resulted in a significantly higher thermal cyclic lifetime of the corresponding TBC as it could have promoted protective alumina layer growth for a longer period of time. The results indicate that the significant changes in topcoat microstructure due to sintering as observed in this work could have a detrimental effect on TBC lifetime. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.

  • 224.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Li, Xin-Hai
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspång, Sweden.
    Östergren, Lars
    GKN Aerospace, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Development of bondcoat layer for long lifetime suspension plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings2017In: Proceedings of the International Thermal Spray Conference & Exposition (ITSC 2017), New York: Curran Associates, Inc , 2017, Vol. 2, p. 1158-1163Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) manufactured by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is of high commercial interest as SPS has been shown capable to produce columnar microstructures similar to the conventionally used electron beam – physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD) process. Moreover, SPS is a significantly cheaper process and can also produce more porous coatings than EB-PVD. However, lifetime of SPS coatings needs to be improved further for them to be applicable in commercial applications.The bondcoat microstructure as well as topcoat-bondcoat interface topography affect the TBC lifetime significantly. The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility of different bondcoat deposition process for SPS TBCs. In this work, a NiCoCrAlY bondcoat deposited by high velocity air fuel (HVAF) was compared to commercial NiCoCrAlY and PtAl bondcoats. All bondcoat variations were prepared with and without grit blasting the bondcoat surface. SPS was used to deposit the topcoats on all samples using the same spray parameters. Lifetime of these samples was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue and thermal shock testing. The effect of bondcoat deposition process and interface topography on lifetime in each case has been discussed. The results show that HVAF could be a suitable process for bondcoat deposition in SPS TBCs.

  • 225.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Rocchio-Heller, R.
    Oerlikon Metco, Westbury, USA.
    Liu, J.
    Oerlikon Metco, Westbury, USA.
    Li, X. -H
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspång, Sweden.
    Östergren, L.
    GKN Aerospace, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Failure Analysis of Multilayered Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Applications2018In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 402-411-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improvement in the performance of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is one of the key objectives for further development of gas turbine applications. The material most commonly used as TBC topcoat is yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). However, the usage of YSZ is limited by the operating temperature range which in turn restricts the engine efficiency. Materials such as pyrochlores, perovskites, rare earth garnets are suitable candidates which could replace YSZ as they exhibit lower thermal conductivity and higher phase stability at elevated temperatures. The objective of this work was to investigate different multilayered TBCs consisting of advanced topcoat materials fabricated by suspension plasma spraying (SPS). The investigated topcoat materials were YSZ, dysprosia-stabilized zirconia, gadolinium zirconate, and ceria–yttria-stabilized zirconia. All topcoats were deposited by TriplexPro-210TM plasma spray gun and radial injection of suspension. Lifetime of these samples was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue and thermal shock testing. Microstructure analysis of as-sprayed and failed specimens was performed with scanning electron microscope. The failure mechanisms in each case have been discussed in this article. The results show that SPS could be a promising route to produce multilayered TBCs for high-temperature applications.

  • 226.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Rocchio-Heller, Riston
    Oerlikon Metco, Westbury, USA.
    Liu, Jing
    Oerlikon Metco, Westbury, USA.
    Li, Xin-Hai
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Fingspång, Sweden.
    Östergren, Lars
    GKN Aerospace, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Multilayered suspension plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings for high temperature gas turbine applications2017In: Proceedings of the International Thermal Spray Conference & Exposition (ITSC 2017), New York: Curran Associates, Inc , 2017, p. 382-387Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improvement in the performance of thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) is one of the key objectives for further development of gas turbine applications. The material most commonly used as TBC topcoat is yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ). However, the usage of YSZ is limited by the operating temperature range which in turn restricts the engine efficiency. Materials such as pyrochlores, perovskites, rare earth garnets, etc. are suitable candidates which could replace YSZ as they exhibit lower thermal conductivity and higher phase stability at elevated temperatures.The objective of this work was to investigate different multi-layered TBCs consisting of advanced topcoat materials fabricated by Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS). The investigated topcoat materials were YSZ, dysprosia stabilised zirconia, gadolinium zirconiate, cerium doped YSZ and yttria fully stabilised zirconia. All topcoats were deposited with TriplexPro-210 plasma spray gun and radial injection of suspension. Lifetime of these samples was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue and thermal shock testing. Microstructure analysis of as-sprayed and failed specimens was performed with scanning electron microscope. The failure mechanisms in each case have been discussed in this article. The results show that SPS could be a promising route to produce multilayered TBCs for high temperature applications.

  • 227.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Musalek, Radek
    Department of Materials Engineering, Institute of Plasma Physics of Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Tesar, Tomas
    Department of Materials Engineering, Institute of Plasma Physics of Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Microstructure and failure analysis of suspension plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings2020In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 382, article id 125218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improvements in performance of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas turbine engines are highly desired as they can result in higher engine efficiency leading to reduction of harmful emissions. Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) has been shown to produce high performance porous columnar TBCs that can provide low thermal conductivity and high durability. Apart from the topcoat microstructure and chemistry, the lifetime of TBCs is also dependent on bondcoat microstructure and chemistry, and topcoat-bondcoat interface roughness. In case of SPS TBCs, the interface roughness can significantly affect the columnar topcoat microstructure, thus making the bondcoat selection even more crucial. In this work, six different sets of samples were produced by fabricating bondcoats with conventional atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high velocity air fuel (HVAF) spraying, or hybrid water/argon stabilised plasma (WSP-H) gun, and SPS topcoats using axial SPS (ASPS) or WSP-H spray guns. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of varying the topcoat microstructure, bondcoat microstructure and topcoat-bondcoat interface roughness on oxide growth behaviour and thermal cyclic fatigue (TCF) lifetime of SPS TBCs. Samples after failure were investigated to understand the failure mechanism in each case. The results showed that changing the bondcoat spray process and spray gun resulted in significant variation in bondcoat surface roughness. A porous columnar structure was created by the ASPS process, while a feathery columnar structure was created by the WSP-H spray gun in this study. Samples with WSP-H bondcoat resulted in highest cyclic lifetime in this study, despite showing severe oxidation of the bondcoat as compared to APS and HVAF bondcoats. This result could be attributed to the very high bondcoat surface roughness in these samples that could have resulted in improved mechanical anchoring of the topcoat. The HVAF bondcoats showed the best oxidation resistance in this study. © 2019 Elsevier B.V.

  • 228.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Structure-property Relationships in Thermal Barrier Coatings by Finite Element Modelling2012In: Surface Modification Technologies XXV : proceedings of the Twenty Fifth International Conference on Surface Modification Technologies: SMT25, Trollhättan, June 20-22, 2011 / [ed] T. S. Sudarshan, and P. Nylén, [Chennai]: Valardocs , 2012, p. 175-184Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermal and mechanical properties of Thermal Barrier Coating systems (TBCs) are strongly influenced by coating defects, such as delaminations and pores, thus making it essential to have a fundamental understanding of microstructure-property relationships in TBCs, to produce a desired coating. Object-Oriented Finite element analysis (OOF) has been shown previously as an effective tool for evaluating thermal and mechanical material behaviour, as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent material microstructure as an input to the model. In this work, OOF was used to predict the thermal conductivity and effective Young’s modulus of TBC topcoats. A Design of Experiments (DoE) was conducted by varying selected spray parameters for spraying Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (YPSZ) topcoat. Characterisation of the coatings included microstructure, porosity and crack content and thermal conductivity measurements. The relationships between microstructural features, thermal conductivity and Young’s modulus are discussed.

  • 229.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Skogsberg, Kristoffer
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Influence of topcoat-bondcoat interface roughness on stresses and lifetime in Thermal Barrier Coatings2013In: Proceedings of the International Thermal Spray Conference / [ed] Editor: Rogerio S. Lima, Arvind Agarwal, Margaret M. Hyland, Yuk-Chiu Lau, Georg Mauer, André McDonald, and Filofteia-Laura, ASM International, 2013, p. 596-601Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Failure in Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed (APS) Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) is associated with the thermomechanical stresses developing due to the Thermally Grown Oxide (TGO) layer growth and thermal expansion mismatch during thermal cycling. The interface roughness has been shown to play a major role in the development of these induced stresses and lifetime of TBCs. Modeling has been shown as an effective tool to understand the effect of interface roughness on induced stresses. In previous work done by the research group, it was observed that APS bondcoats performed better than the bondcoats sprayed with High Velocity OxyFuel (HVOF) process which is contrary to the present literature data. The objective of this work was to understand this observed difference in life-time with the help of finite element modeling by using real surface topographies. Different TGO layer thicknesses were evaluated. The modeling results were also compared with existing theories established on simplified sinusoidal profiles published in earlier works. It was shown that modeling can be used as an effective tool to understand the stress behavior in TBCs with different roughness profiles.

  • 230.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Skogsberg, Kristoffer
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Influence of Topcoat-Bondcoat Interface Roughness on Stresses and Lifetime inThermal Barrier Coatings2014In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, Vol. 23, no 1-2, p. 170-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Failure in Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed (APS) Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) is associated with the thermo-mechanical stresses developing due to the Thermally Grown Oxide (TGO) layer growth and thermal expansion mismatch during thermal cycling. The interface roughness has been shown to play a major role in the development of these induced stresses and lifetime of TBCs. Modeling has been shown as an effective tool to understand the effect of interface roughness on induced stresses. In previous work done by our research group, it was observed that APS bondcoats performed better than the bondcoats sprayed with High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) process which is contrary to the present literature data. The objective of this work was to understand this observed difference in lifetime with the help of finite element modeling by using real surface topographies. Different TGO layer thicknesses were evaluated. The modeling results were also compared with existing theories established on simplified sinusoidal profiles published in earlier works. It was shown that modeling can be used as an effective tool to understand the stress behavior in TBCs with different roughness profiles.

  • 231.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Weber, A.
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany .
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Gindrat, M.
    Oerlikon Metco, Wohlen, Switzerland.
    Electrochemical performance of plasma sprayed metal supported planar solid oxide fuel cells2015In: ECS Transactions, ISSN 1938-5862, E-ISSN 1938-6737, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 1791-1802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High production cost is one of the major barriers to widespread commercialization of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Thermal spray techniques are a low cost alternative for the production of SOFCs. The objective of this work was to evaluate the electrochemical performance of half-cells produced by plasma spraying. The anode was deposited on a porous metallic support by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) whereas the electrolyte was deposited by plasma spray-thin film (PS-TF) technique which can produce thin and dense coatings at high deposition rates. The cathode was deposited by screen-printing. The electrochemical tests were performed at 650-800°C. Current-voltage characteristics and impedance spectra were measured and analyzed. The impact of electrolyte composition and layer thickness on the gas tightness of the electrolyte and the area specific resistance of the cell is discussed. The results show that the applied thermal spraying techniques are a potential alternative for producing SOFCs. © The Electrochemical Society.

  • 232.
    Gutnichenko, O
    et al.
    Division of Production and Materials Engineering, Lund University, Lund, S-22100, Sweden.
    Agic, Adnan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. SECO Tools AB, Björnbacksvägen 2, Fagersta, 73782, Sweden.
    Ståhl, J-E
    Division of Production and Materials Engineering, Lund University, Lund, S-22100, Sweden.
    Modeling of Force Build-up Process and Optimization of Tool Geometry when Intermittent Turning2017In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 58, p. 393-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intermittent turning the slotted workpieces is always accompanied with a high impact load of the machine tool during the entry phase of the cutting edge. The process leads to a strong dynamic response of the system and results in vibrations arose and potential tool life and surface finish issues. The present study addresses the modeling of cutting force build-up process with further optimization of cutting edge geometry where tooltip overshoot during the tool entry is selected as an objective function. The model takes into consideration the interaction between three units of the machine tool such as a tool, toolpost, and workpiece as well as an influence of the process on the system's dynamics.

  • 233.
    Hagqvist, Petter
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems. Department of Signals and Systems Automatic control, Automation and Mechatronics, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Non-intrusive instrumentation and estimation: Applications for control of an additive manufacturing process2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For integration of additive manufacturing into industrial production, there is a need for capable yet robust automation solutions. Such solutions are to ensure consistent process outputs, both with regard to deposit geometry and material properties. In this thesis, instrumentation and control solutions have been investigated for the laser metal wire deposition additive manufacturing process. This particular process is promising with regard to e.g. high deposition rates and negligible material waste. However, due to its inherent dynamics, it requires automatic control in order to prove competitive. A large number of process parameters affect the resulting quality of the deposit. Successful control of these parameters is crucial for turning laser metal wire deposition into an industrially tractable process. This requires relevant and reliable process information such as the temperature of the deposit and the positioning of the tool relative to the workpiece. Due to the particular requirements of instrumenting the process, only non-intrusive measurement methods are viable. In this thesis, such measurement solutions are presented that advance automatic control of the laser metal wire deposition. In response to the need for accurate temperature measurements for the process, a new temperature measurement method has been developed. By adopting the novel concept of temporal, rather than spectral, constraints for solving the multispectral pyrometry problem, it opens up for temperature measurements which compensates for e.g. an oxidising deposit. For maintaining a good deposition process in laser metal wire deposition, control of tool position and wire feed rate is required. Based on measurements of resistance through the weld pool, a simple yet well performing control system is presented in this thesis. The control system obtains geometrical input information from resistance measurements made in-situ, and feeds this information to an iterative learning controller. This results in a robust, cheap and practical control solution for laser metal wire deposition, which is suitable for industrial use and that can easily be retrofitted to existing equipment.

  • 234.
    Hagqvist, Petter
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Heralic, Almir
    GKN Aerospace.
    Automation of a laser welding system for additive manufacturing2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 IEEE International Conference on Automation Science and Engineering / [ed] Kazuhiro Saitou, Univ. of Michigan, IEEE, 2015, p. 900-905Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the benefits and challenges ofusing a standard robotised laser welding cell for additive manufacturing(AM). Additive manufacturing, sometimes denoted3D-printing or rapid prototyping, has lately met strong interestin several areas of society, and a variety of technologies andmaterials have been in focus. The current paper summarisesautomation efforts for AM of advanced aero engine componentsusing high power laser with welding optics as power source formelting metal wire and using an industrial robot for obtaininga 3-dimensional feature shape. The challenges are related to theprocess itself encountering high and repeated temperatures withmelting and solidification of the metal as the main players. Themajor research solutions discussed in this paper are relatedto automation issues for obtaining a stable process and tohave control of the temperatures and temperature changes thatthe metals encounter during the process. The solutions aresuccessfully implemented in an industrial laser welding cell.

  • 235.
    Hagqvist, Petter
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Heralic, Almir
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Electrical Engineering and Land Surveying.
    Lennartson, Bengt
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System. Chalmers.
    Resistance based iterative learning control of additive manufacturing with wire2015In: Mechatronics (Oxford), ISSN 0957-4158, E-ISSN 1873-4006, Vol. 31, p. 116-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents successful feed forward control of additive manufacturing of fully dense metallic components. The study is a refinement of former control solutions of the process, providing more robust and industrially acceptable measurement techniques. The system uses a solid state laser that melts metal wire, which in turn is deposited and solidified to build the desired solid feature on a substrate. The process is inherently subjected to disturbances that might hinder consecutive layers to be deposited appropriately. The control action is a modified wire feed rate depending on the surface of the deposited former layer, in this case measured as a resistance. The resistance of the wire stick-out and the weld pool has shown to give an accurate measure of the process stability, and a solution is proposed on how to measure it. By controlling the wire feed rate based on the resistance measure, the next layer surface can be made more even. A second order iterative learning control algorithm is used for determining the wire feed rate, and the solution is implemented and validated in an industrial setting for building a single bead wall in titanium alloy. A comparison is made between a controlled and an uncontrolled situation when a relevant disturbance is introduced throughout all layers. The controller proves to successfully mitigate these disturbances and maintain stable deposition while the uncontrolled deposition fails.

  • 236.
    Hagqvist, Petter
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Kristoffersen, Hans
    Swerea IVF AB, Box 104, SE-431 22 Mölndal, Sweden.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Temperature Monitoring of Induction Hardening Using Spectral Pyrometry2014In: Proceedings of the 6th International Swedish Production Symposium 2014 / [ed] Stahre, Johan, Johansson, Björn & Björkman, Mats, 2014, p. 1-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a recently developed multispectral temperature measurement method is applied for temperature monitoring of induction hardening of steel. An industry-like induction heating process is used for evaluating the method and an automatic calibration procedure is presented. Thermocouples and a conventional pyrometer are used for comparison, showing that the multispectral method gives more accurate results than the conventional pyrometer. These results confirm that the multispectral method is well suited for accurate, non-contacting temperature measurements for induction hardening processes. Enabling measurements which have previously not been possible. This enables fast selection of process parameters which can improve productivity.

  • 237.
    Hameed, Pearlin
    et al.
    Centre for Biomaterials, Cellular & Molecular Theranostics (CBCMT), Vellore Institute of Technology, Vellore, 632014, India.
    Gopal, Vasanth
    Centre for Biomaterials, Cellular & Molecular Theranostics (CBCMT), Vellore Institute of Technology, Vellore, 632014, India; Department of Physics, School of Advanced Sciences, Vellore Institute of Technology, Vellore, 632014, India.
    Björklund, Stefan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Ganvir, Ashish
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Sen, Dwaipayan
    Centre for Biomaterials, Cellular & Molecular Theranostics (CBCMT), Vellore Institute of Technology, Vellore, 632014, India.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Manivasagam, Geetha
    Centre for Biomaterials, Cellular & Molecular Theranostics (CBCMT), Vellore Institute of Technology, Vellore, 632014, India.
    Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying: An ultimate technique to tailor Ti6Al4V surface with HAp for orthopaedic applications2019In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 173, p. 806-815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dissolution of atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings on Ti-6Al-4 V medical implants have always been a challenge to overcome in the field of biomedical industry. In the present work, an attempt has been made to develop a HAp coating using a novel thermal spray process called axial suspension plasma spraying (SPS), which leads to thin adherent coatings. Two HAp coatings fabricated by APS (P1 and P2) and four SPS HAp coatings (S1, S2, S3 and S4) produced with varying spraying parameters were characterized in terms of (1) microstructure, porosity, hardness, adhesion strength, contact angle and phase purity; (2) corrosion resistance in 10% Fetal bovine serum (FBS); (3) in-vitro cell adherence and cell viability using human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Amongst different APS and SPS coatings, P1 and S3 exhibited superior properties. S3 coating developed using SPS exhibited 1.3 times higher adhesion strength when compared to APS coating (P1) and 9.5 times higher corrosion resistance than P1. In addition, both S3 and P1 exhibited comparatively higher biocompatibility as evidenced by the presence of more than 92% viable hMSCs. © 2018 Elsevier B.V.

  • 238.
    Hanning, Fabian
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    A Review of Strain Age Cracking in Nickel Based Superalloys2016In: The 7th International Swedish Production Symposium, SPS16, Conference Proceedings: 25th – 27th of October 2016, Lund: Swedish Production Academy , 2016, p. 1-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews the literature with emphasis on strain age cracking, a cracking phenomenon that can occur during welding or heat treatment of precipitation hardening superalloys. The influence of chemical composition in terms of e.g. hardening elements and impurities, microstructure of base material and weld zone, precipitation-induced stress development, welding heat input, restraint and post weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions is discussed and related to the cracking susceptibility of different nickel based superalloys. Furthermore, an overview on available testing methods is presented and scrutinized. As of now, neither a standardized nor universally applicable procedure is available where the now existing tests generally can be divided into two groups; procedures representing actual welds usually providing qualitative comparisons under specified conditions, and simulative tests like those based on the Gleeble® system which can provide fundamental insight into the ongoing mechanisms.

  • 239.
    Hanning, Fabian
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    The Influence of Base Metal Microstructure on Weld Cracking in Manually GTA Repair Welded Cast ATI 718Plus®2018In: Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 & Derivatives: Energy, Aerospace, and Industrial Applications / [ed] Ott, E., Liu, X., Andersson, J., Bi, Z., Bockenstedt, K., Dempster, I., Groh, J., Heck, K., Jablonski, P., Kaplan, M., Nagahama, D. and Sudbrack, C., 2018, p. 917-928Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of base metal conditions on the weld cracking response of cast ATI 718Plus® was investigated in this study, comparing as cast microstructure with pseudo hot isostatic pressing (HIP) heat treatments at 1120, 1160 and 1190 °C for dwell times of 4 and 24 h. Linear grooves have been filled using multipass manual gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to simulate repair welding conditions. Metallographic investigation revealed cracks in both base metal heat affected zone and fusion zone layers. The heat treatment temperatures chosen below, at and above incipient laves melting temperature of ATI 718Plus® were found to have an effect on weld cracking behaviour, with an increased average total crack length in the base metal heat affected zone for both 1160 and 1190 °C as compared to the as cast condition and the 1120 °C homogenization treatment. The increase in cracking susceptibility shows a correlation with the amount of Nb-rich secondary phases, with lower amounts leading to crack concentration to solidification grain boundaries present from the casting process, increasing the average crack length.

  • 240.
    Hanning, Fabian
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Weldability of wrought Haynes 282 repair welded using manual gas tungsten arc welding2018In: Welding in the World, ISSN 0043-2288, E-ISSN 1878-6669, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of the precipitation hardening superalloy Haynes® 282® to be repaired by multi-pass gas tungsten arc welding is investigated in this study. The repair welding has been carried out on forged discs having four pre weld heat treatments, resulting in different grain sizes and precipitate structures of the base material. Another set of discs has additionally been put through a post weld heat treatment. The tendency to form cracks in the heat-affected zone and the fusion zone has been investigated metallographically. No cracks in the base metal heat-affected zone were found,whereas solidification cracks were present in the weld fusion zone of all tested conditions. While high heat input during welding increased cracking by a factor of 1.5, none of the heat treatments had a measurable influence on the cracking behaviour. Voids with solid state crack-like appearance turned out tobe aluminium-rich oxides being present from the deposition of previous weld deposit layers.

  • 241.
    Hanning, Fabian
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology,Department of Industrial and Materials Science, S-Gothenburg, 41296, Sweden.
    Hurtig, Kjell
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Measurement of the thermal cycle in the base metal heat affected zone of cast ATI ® 718Plus TM during manual multi-pass TIG welding2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, p. 443-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a method to acquire thermal data in the base metal heat affected zone (HAZ) during manual multi-pass TIG welding of ATI ® 718Plus TM , representing conditions close to an actual repair welding operation. Thermocouples were mounted in different locations along side walls of linear grooves to record temperature data. The thermal cycling was found to be largely independent of location within the HAZ. The recorded temperatures were below the incipient laves melting temperature, indicating that the current test setup requires optimisation to study HAZ liquation. Based on the results of this study, a modified thermocouple mounting technique is proposed. © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 242.
    Hanning, Fabian
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Khan, Abdul Khaliq
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada; Manitoba Institute for Materials, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada .
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Ojo, Olamrewaju
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Advanced microstructural characterisation of cast ATI 718 Plus-effect of homogenisation heat treatments on secondary phases and repair welding behaviour2020In: Welding in the World, ISSN 0043-2288, E-ISSN 1878-6669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of base metal conditions on the weld cracking behaviour of cast ATI 718Plus® is investigated by comparing 4 h and 24 h dwell time pseudo-hip homogenisation heat treatments at 1120, 1160 and 1190 °C with the as-cast microstructure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) on electrolytically extracted powder and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to identify Nb-rich secondary phases in interdendritic areas as the C14 Laves phase and Nb(Ti) MC-type carbides. All homogenisation heat treatments but the 1120 °C 4-h condition dissolve the Laves phase. A repair welding operation was simulated by linear groove multi-pass manual gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). The Laves phase containing microstructures resulted in lower total crack length for heat affected zone cracking. Constitutional liquation of Nb(Ti) MC-type carbides is observed as a liquation mechanism in Laves-free microstructure, while thick liquid film formation due to the Laves eutectic melting could reduce the formation of weld cracks in microstructures containing the Laves phase.

  • 243.
    Hanning, Fabian
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Ind & Mat Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Khan, Abdul Khaliq
    Univ Manitoba, Dept Mech Engn, Winnipeg, MB R3T 5V6, Canada.
    Steffenburg-Nordenstroem, Joachim
    GKN Aerosp Sweden AB, S-46138 Trollhattan, Sweden.
    Ojo, Olanrewaju
    Univ Manitoba, Dept Mech Engn, Winnipeg, MB R3T 5V6, Canada.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Investigation of the Effect of Short Exposure in the Temperature Range of 750-950 degrees C on the Ductility of Haynes (R) 282 (R) by Advanced Microstructural Characterization2019In: Metals, E-ISSN 2075-4701, Vol. 9, no 12, article id 1357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Gleeble-based test method has been developed to study the change in the ductility signature of Haynes (R) 282 (R) during isothermal exposure from 5 s to 1800 s. A temperature range of 750 to 950 degrees C has been used to investigate the effect of age-hardening reactions. Microstructural constituents have been analyzed and quantified using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Carbides present in the material are identified as primary MC-type TiC carbides, Mo-rich M6C secondary carbides, and Cr-rich M23C6 secondary carbides. Gamma prime (gamma’) precipitates are present in all the material conditions with particle sizes ranging from 2.5 nm to 58 nm. Isothermal exposure causes the growth of gamma’ and development of a grain boundary carbide network. A ductility minimum is observed at 800-850 degrees C. The fracture mode is found to be dependent on the stroke rate, where a transition toward intergranular fracture is observed for stroke rates below 0.055 mm/s. Intergranular fracture is characterized by microvoids present on grain facets, while ductility did not change during ongoing age-hardening reactions for intergranularly fractured Haynes (R) 282 (R).

  • 244.
    Harati, Ebrahim
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Fatigue strength of welds in 800 MPa yield strength steels: Effects of weld toe geometry and residual stress2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays there is a strong demand for lighter vehicles in order to increase the pay load. Through this the specific fuel consumption is decreased, the amount of greenhouse gases is lowered and the transport economy improved. One possibility to optimize the weight is to make the components from high strength steels and join them by welding. Welding is the main joining method for fabrication of a large proportion of all engineering structures. Many components experience fatigue loading during all or part of their life time and welded connections are often the prime location of fatigue failure.Fatigue fracture in welded structures often initiates at the weld toe as aconsequence of large residual stresses and changes in geometry acting as stress concentrators. The objective of this research is to increase the understanding of the factors that control fatigue life in welded components made from very high strength steels with a yield strength of more than 800 MPa. In particular the influences of the local weld toe geometry (weld toe radius and angle) and residual stress on fatigue life have been studied. Residual stresses have been varied by welding with conventional as well as Low Transformation Temperature (LTT) filler materials. The three non-destructive techniques Weld Impression Analysis (WIA), Laser Scanning Profiling (LSP) and Structured Light Projection (SLP) have been applied to evaluate the weld toe geometry.Results suggest that all three methods could be used successfully to measure the weld toe radius and angle, but the obtained data are dependent on the evaluation procedure. WIA seems to be a suitable and economical choice when the aim is just finding the radius. However, SLP is a good method to fast obtain a threedimensional image of the weld profile, which also makes it more suitable for quality control in production. It was also found that the use of LTTconsumables increased fatigue life and that residual stress has a relatively larger influence than the weld toe geometry on fatigue strength of welded parts.

  • 245.
    Harati, Ebrahim
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Improving fatigue properties of welded high strength steels2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years a strong interest has been expressed to produce lighter structures.One possible solution to reduce the weight is to utilize high strength steels and use welding as the joining method. Many components experience fatigue loadingduring all or part of their life time and welded connections are often the prime location of fatigue failure. This becomes more critical in welded high strength steels as fatigue strength of welds does not increase by increasing the steel strength. A possible solution to overcome this issue is to use fatigue improvement methods.The main objectives of this project are, therefore, to increase understanding of the factors that control fatigue life and to investigate how the fatigue strength improvement methods; high frequency mechanical impact (HFMI) treatment and use of Low Transformation Temperature (LTT) consumables will affect fatigue properties of welds in high strength steels. In this regard, Gas Metal Arc Welding(GMAW) was used to produce butt and fillet welds using LTT or conventional fillers in steels with yield strengths ranging from 650-1021 MPa and T-joint weldsin a steel with 1300 MPa yield strength. The effect of HFMI on fatigue strength of the welds in 1300 MPa yield strength steels was also investigated. Butt and fillet welds in 650-1021 MPa steels were fatigue tested under constant amplitude tensile loading with a stress ratio of 0.1 while T-joints were fatigue tested under constant amplitude fully reversed bending load with a stress ratio of -1. The nominal stress approach was used for fatigue strength evaluation of butt and fillet welds whereas the effective notch stress approach was used in case of T-joints. Relative effectsof the main parameters such as residual stress and weld toe geometry influencing fatigue strength of welds were evaluated. Residual stresses were measured using X-ray diffraction for as-welded and HFMI treated welds. Neutron diffraction was additionally used to investigate the near surface residual stress distribution in 1300 MPa LTT welds.Results showed that use of LTT consumables increased fatigue strength of welds in steels with yield strengths ranging from 650-1021 MPa. For butt welds, the vii characteristic fatigue strength (FAT) of LTT welds at 2 million cycles was up to46% higher when compared to corresponding welds made with conventional fillermaterials. In fillet welds, a maximum improvement of 132% was achieved when using LTT wires. The increase in fatigue strength was attributed to the lower tensile residual stresses or even compressive stresses produced close to the weldtoe in LTT welds. Weld metals with martensite transformation start temperatures around 200 °C produced the highest fatigue strength. In 1300 MPa yield strength steel, similar FAT of 287 MPa was observed for LTT welds and 306 MPa for conventional welds, both much higher than the IIW FATvalue of 225 MPa. The relative transformation temperatures of the base and weldmetals, specimen geometry and loading type are possible reasons why the fatigue strength was not improved by use of LTT wires. Neutron diffraction showed that the LTT consumable was capable of inducing near surface compressive residual stresses in all directions at the weld toe. It was additionally found that there arevery steep stress gradients both transverse to the weld toe line and in the depth direction, at the weld toe. Due to difficulties to accurately measure residual stresses locally at the weld toe most often in the literature and recommendations residual stresses a few millimetre away from the weld toe are related to fatigue properties. However, this research shows that caution must be used when relating these to fatigue strength, in particular for LTT welds, as stress in the base materiala few millimetre from the weld toe can be very different from the stress locally at the weld toe.HFMI increased the mean fatigue strength of conventional welds in 1300 MPa steels about 26% and of LTT welds by 13%. It increased the weld toe radius slightly but produced a more uniform geometry along the treated weld toes. Large compressive residual stresses, especially in the longitudinal direction, were introduced adjacent to the weld toe for both LTT and conventional treated welds. It was concluded that the increase in fatigue strength by HFMI treatment is due to the combined effect of weld toe geometry modification, increase in surface hardness and introduction of compressive residual stresses in the treated region.It was concluded that the residual stress has a relatively larger influence than the weld toe geometry on fatigue strength of welds. This is based on the observation that a moderate decrease in residual stress of about 15% at the 300 MPa stress level had the same effect on fatigue strength as increasing the weld toe radius by approximately 85% from 1.4 mm to 2.6 mm, in fillet welds. Also, a higher fatigue strength was observed for HFMI treated conventional welds compared to as welded samples having similar weld toe radii but with different residual stresses.

  • 246.
    Harati, Ebrahim
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Karlsson, Leif
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Svensson, Lars-Erik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Dalaei, Kamellia
    ESAB AB, Lindholmsallen 9, 40227 Gothenburg.
    Applicability of Low Transformation Temperature welding consumables to increase fatigue strength of welded high strength steels2017In: International Journal of Fatigue, ISSN 0142-1123, E-ISSN 1879-3452, Vol. 97, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Application of Low Transformation Temperature (LTT) consumables in welding is a recent approach to increase the fatigue strength of welds. In this paper high strength steels with yield strengths ranging from 650-1021 MPa were fillet and butt welded using different LTT and conventional consumables. The effects of weld metal chemical composition on phase transformation temperatures, residual stresses and fatigue strength were investigated. Lower transformation start temperatures and hence lower tensile or even compressive residual stresses were obtained close to the weld toe for LTT welds. Fatigue testing showed very good results for all combinations of LTT consumables and high strength steels with varying strength levels. For butt welds, the characteristic fatigue strength (FAT) of LTT welds at 2 million cycles was up to 46% higher when compared to corresponding welds made with conventional filler materials. In fillet welds, a minimum FAT improvement of 34% and a maximum improvement of 132% was achieved when using LTT wires. It is concluded that different LTT consumables can successfully be employed to increase fatigue strength of welds in high strength steels with yield strength up to 1021 MPa. Weld metals with martensite transformation start temperatures close to 200°C result in the highest fatigue strengths.

  • 247.
    Harati, Ebrahim
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Karlsson, Leif
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Svensson, Lars-Erik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Dalaei, Kamellia
    ESAB AB, Gothenburg.
    The relative effects of residual stresses and weld toe geometry on fatigue life of weldments2015In: International Journal of Fatigue, ISSN 0142-1123, E-ISSN 1879-3452, Vol. 77, p. 160-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The weld toe is one of the most probable fatigue crack initiation sites in welded components. In this paper, the relative influences of residual stresses and weld toe geometry on the fatigue life of cruciform welds was studied. Fatigue strength of cruciform welds produced using Low Transformation Temperature (LTT) filler material has been compared to that of welds produced with a conventional filler material. LTT welds had higher fatigue strength than conventional welds. A moderate decrease in residual stress of about 15% at the 300 MPa stress level had the same effect on fatigue strength as increasing the weld toe radius by approximately 85% from 1.4 mm to 2.6 mm. It was concluded that residual stress had a relatively larger influence than the weld toe geometry on fatigue strength.

  • 248.
    Harati, Ebrahim
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Karlsson, Leif
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Svensson, Lars-Erik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Pirling, Thilo
    Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP156, F-38042 Grenoble, France.
    Dalaei, Kamellia
    ESAB AB, Lindholmsallen 9, 40227 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Neutron Diffraction Evaluation of Near Surface Residual Stresses at Welds in 1300 MPa Yield Strength Steel2017In: Materials, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 1-14, article id E593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluation of residual stress in the weld toe region is of critical importance. In this paper, the residual stress distribution both near the surface and in depth around the weld toe was investigated using neutron diffraction, complemented with X-ray diffraction. Measurements were done on a 1300 MPa yield strength steel welded using a Low Transformation Temperature (LTT) consumable. Near surface residual stresses, as close as 39 µm below the surface, were measured using neutron diffraction and evaluated by applying a near surface data correction technique. Very steep surface stress gradients within 0.5 mm of the surface were found both at the weld toe and 2 mm into the heat affected zone (HAZ). Neutron results showed that the LTT consumable was capable of inducing near surface compressive residual stresses in all directions at the weld toe. It is concluded that there are very steep stress gradients both transverse to the weld toe line and in the depth direction, at the weld toe in LTT welds. Residual stress in the base material a few millimeters from the weld toe can be very different from the stress at the weld toe. Care must, therefore, be exercised when relating the residual stress to fatigue strength in LTT welds.

  • 249.
    Harati, Ebrahim
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Ottosson, Mattias
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Karlsson, Leif
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Svensson, Lars-Erik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Non-destructive measurement of weld toe radius using Weld Impression Analysis, Laser Scanning Profiling and Structured Light Projection methods2014In: Proceedings of First International Conference on Welding and Non Destructive Testing (ICWNDT2014), 2014, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 250.
    Harati, Ebrahim
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Svensson, Lars-Erik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Karlsson, Leif
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Improving fatigue strength of welded 1300 MPa yield strength steel using HFMI treatment or LTT fillers2017In: Engineering Failure Analysis, ISSN 1350-6307, E-ISSN 1873-1961, Vol. 79, no September, p. 64-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fatigue improvement techniques are widely used to increase fatigue strength of welded high strength steels. In this paper high frequency mechanical impact (HFMI) and a Low Transformation Temperature (LTT) filler material were employed to investigate the effect on fatigue strength of welded 1300 MPa yield strength steel. Fatigue testing was done under fully reversed, constant amplitude bending load on T-joint samples. Fatigue strength of LTT welds was the same as for welds produced using a conventional filler material. However, HFMI treatment increased the mean fatigue strength of conventional welds about 26% and of LTT welds about 13%. Similar distributions of residual stresses and almost the same weld toe radii were observed for welds produced using LTT and conventional consumables. HFMI increased the weld toe radius slightly and produced a more uniform geometry along the treated weld toes. Relatively large compressive residual stresses, adjacent to the weld toe were produced and the surface hardness was increased in the treated region for conventional welds after HFMI. For this specific combination of weld geometry, steel strength and loading conditions HFMI treatment gave higher fatigue strength than LTT consumables.

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