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  • 151.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    et al.
    University of Poitiers,  CAPS-EA4050, Department of Psychology, Poitiers.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Lundin, Linda
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Dauman, Rene
    University of Bordeaux and CHU of Bordeaux, Tinnitus Clinic, Department of ORL-HNS, CNRS-UMR 5287, Bordeaux.
    Intra-individual variability in tinnitus patients: Current thoughts and perspectives.2015In: HNO (Berlin. Print), ISSN 0017-6192, E-ISSN 1433-0458, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 302-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most tinnitus studies have attempted to compare groups of individuals, thus revealing inter-individuals differences, i.e., variations between compared subjects. For methodological reasons, inter-individual studies cannot take into account the variability of tinnitus experience, which has been known for decades to be relevant in daily practice with tinnitus patients. The concept of intra-individual variability has been promoted in the research literature, in order to shed light on this aspect of individual perception. In previous studies, unrelated to hearing, the concept of intra-individual variability implied inclusion of the environment (i.e., physical and social interactions) as a factor of individual performance. In tinnitus research, we believe that the concept of variability (within a person) could find a place beside the concept of variation (between groups of subjects). In this paper, four perspectives of tinnitus experiences from the clinical and research fields are described: (1) ENT consultation; (2) short-term group psychotherapy; (3) psychodynamic psychotherapy; and (4) clinical psychological research. Intra-individual variability stresses the importance of defining tinnitus in a dynamic way, contrary to the current definition of tinnitus as the perception of sound(s). In clinical practice, it is useful to embrace the perspective of the perceiverof tinnitus, and to include social and cultural circumstances as well as audiological/physical changes.

  • 152.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    et al.
    University of Poitiers, Department of Psychology, Poitiers , France.
    Haza, Marion
    University of Poitiers, Department of Psychology, Poitiers , France.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Liberating parents from guilt: a grounded theory study of parents' internet communities for the recognition of ADHD2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 1564520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study presents a qualitative analysis of information posted on the Internet by two communities of French parents promoting the recognition of ADHD in the context of current health and school practices.

    METHOD: Grounded Theory (Strauss & Corbin's approach) was applied to the posted messages, with the aim to discover the main concern and common theme through a constant comparison analysis.

    RESULTS: Liberating parents from feeling responsible for their child's misconduct was found to be the core category. From this perspective, we account for the commitment of the digital communities to formalize the child's conduct as a consequence of a neurodevelopmental disorder. This approach helps to account for the promotion of behavioural expertise and conditioning strategies (e.g., positive reinforcement) for handling the child's so-called disorder as appropriate parental responses. Giving evidence for parenting struggles was the third main concern of the communities, in the face of perceived skepticism from professionals towards ADHD as a medical condition.

    CONCLUSIONS: By using examples from countries that are found to have a more pro-medical approach to ADHD, the communities aim at improving such medical practices in France. Issues surrounding the claim that ADHD would require a specific style of parenting are also discussed.

  • 153.
    Davis, Linnea
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Att skapa en gemensam organisationskultur: En kvalitativ fallstudie på Folktandvården Västra Götaland2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2017 Folktandvarden Vastra Gotaland has worked with its organizational culture to develop its basic values and to be able to work towards a desired culture. By a distinctly organizational culture, it becomes more clearer what the organization stands for. Managers and leaders are seen as key people in living and developing the culture. The purpose of my case study is to describe how clinic managers address the change process with culture and values as well as how their experience is. The study was carried out with a qualitative approach, where I conducted semi-structured interviews to enable a deeper understanding of the clinic heads' perception. The result shows that most of the managers find that cultural work is difficult to deal with. There is a lack of time and the work is perceived as unclear, which makes it difficult for the managers to keep the commitment up. Much of the work is carried out locally at the clinics and therefore contributes to strengthening subcultures instead of promoting an overall organizational culture. One of the conclusions from the study is that leadership is of great importance to how well the cultural work falls out. The heads of the clinic need support and knowledge to be able to drive the cultural work forward. The management needs to clarify the structure and process and have a closer dialogue with the clinic managers about what is expected of them in the next phase.

  • 154.
    de Bruin, Mirja
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Wallander, Irma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Flexibilitet och inflytande – avgörande i upplevelsen av balans?: - En kvalitativ studie om egenföretagares upplevelse av balans mellan arbete och privatliv2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to get a deeper comprehension regarding self-employed people and their ability to reach flexibility and grant leverage over their work, it also seeks to investigate how they view the balance between leisure time and work. A qualitative approach was employed and the empirical data was collected through semi-structured interviews with seven respondents who are self-employed. The collected data was analyzed using thematic analysis method and through the themes of Clarks (2000) theories where different domains are put in relation to the conceptualization of integration and segregation. Working and private lives can be viewed as two contrasting domains, two very different domains yet interrelated. The individual draws the line between these domains through either integration, which refers to converging both work and private life or segregation, which instead refers to separating the two domains (Clark, 2000). The result of the study indicates that the respondents have difficulties to find the balance between work and private life in the sense that the domains integrate with each other. However, this was not considered negative but rather as a possibility to be able to manage the different domains. Furthermore, the possibility to reach flexibility and leverage over their work was a central aspect in the pursuit of a balance between working and private life.

  • 155.
    De Sousa Vieira, Paulina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Om sambandet mellan prestationsbaserad självkänsla och konfliktstilar: utifrån såväl kvantitativ som kvalitativ ansats2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For individuals with a high performance-based self-esteem there may be a vulnerability to threats. This vulnerability has been shown to cause conflicts. Is there a relationship between performance-based self-esteem and a certain style of conflict? How does people with a high performance-based self-esteem experience work-related conflicts? The study consisted of a total of 118 participants (M = 40 years, SD = 12 years; 77 women and 41 men): Six of those with high Performance-based self-esteem were interviewed. Performance-based self-esteem was measured by a standardized questionnaire and conflict style of the participants was measured by the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI). Data was analyzed by a correlation analysis and a thematic analysis method. The results of the study showed a weak positive significant correlation between performance-based self-esteem and the conflict style avoiding and a weak negative significant correlation between performance-based self-esteem and the conflict style collaborating. It emerged from the thematic analysis method that the interviewees experienced disagreements about the right and wrong approach to the performance of tasks, negative perceptions about the other party's attitude and feelings of being overridden, of frustration as well as of irritation during the conflict situation. One difficulty for people with high performance-based self-esteem was interpreted to be dealing with task conflicts. Another interesting result also showed that the interview participants tended to prefer a certain conflict style while the social context for the conflict situation alsobecame of importance for which conflict style that was actually being used. A critical approach should be taken to the quantitative result as the internal consistency of TKI was low.

  • 156.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    et al.
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, China.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Medellín, Colombia.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Within- and between-person and group variance in behavior and beliefs in cross-cultural longitudinal data2018In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 62, p. 207-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This study grapples with what it means to be part of a cultural group, from a statistical modeling perspective. The method we present compares within- and between-cultural group variability, in behaviors in families. We demonstrate the method using a cross-cultural study of adolescent development and parenting, involving three biennial waves of longitudinal data from 1296 eight-year-olds and their parents (multiple cultures in nine countries). Family members completed surveys about parental negativity and positivity, child academic and social-emotional adjustment, and attitudes about parenting and adolescent behavior. Variance estimates were computed at the cultural group, person, and within-person level using multilevel models. Of the longitudinally consistent variance, most was within and not between cultural groups—although there was a wide range of between-group differences. This approach to quantifying cultural group variability may prove valuable when applied to quantitative studies of acculturation.

  • 157.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    et al.
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad San Buenaventura,Consultorio Psicologico Popular, Medellín, Colombia.
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan; Emirates College for Advanced Education.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples Federico II, Department of Psychology, Italy.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psycholog , Rome, Italy .
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA ; King Abdulaziz University.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Chaos, Danger, and Maternal Parenting in Families: Links with Adolescent Adjustment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries2019In: Developmental Science, ISSN 1363-755X, E-ISSN 1467-7687, Vol. 22, no 5, article id e12855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current longitudinal study is the first comparative investigation across Low- and Middle- Income Countries (LMICs) to test the hypothesis that harsher and less affectionate maternal parenting (child age 14 years, on average) statistically mediates the prediction from prior household chaos and neighborhood danger (at 13 years) to subsequent adolescent maladjustment (externalizing, internalizing, and school performance problems at 15 years). The sample included 511 urban families in six LMICs: China, Colombia, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, and Thailand. Multigroup structural equation modeling showed consistent associations between chaos, danger, affectionate and harsh parenting, and adolescent adjustment problems. There was some support for the hypothesis, with nearly all countries showing a modest indirect effect of maternal hostility (but not affection) for adolescent externalizing, internalizing, and scholastic problems. Results provide further evidence that chaotic home and dangerous neighborhood environments increase risk for adolescent maladjustment in LMIC contexts, via harsher maternal parenting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 158.
    Denny, Kathrina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Nilsson, Hanna
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Det är ingen lätt uppgift men viktig så det är därför vi gör den: En kvalitativ studie om räddningstjänstpersonals upplevelser av suicidlarm och deras organisatoriska förutsättningar att hantera denna uppgift2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Suicide is a major worldwide public health problem. In Sweden, it is estimated that in 2020 around 1441 people died as a result of suicide (NASP, 2021). The government established a national action plan in 2008 to reduce the number of people who succumb to suicide where the fire & rescue service is mentioned as a relevant professional group regarding suicide prevention work. The current study aimed to gain an increased knowledge of fire & rescue personnel experiences of suicide calls and their experiences in the encounter with suicidal individuals. The analysis of the data collected using a semistructured interview guide was carried out through a thematic analysis in which it resulted in four themes: mental strain, professional competence, social support and the strength of the fire & rescue service. The theory KASAM was used to try and understand the respondents' experiences. The respondents' experiences varied regarding the conditions when dealing with suicide calls in terms of training and practice. The majority of respondents had undergone training in suicide prevention yet the same amount wished for more. Additionally, the respondents stated there was some uncertainty when on a suicide call yet displayed being positive towards being called out on such calls. If there are plenty of work resources it can better help with dealing with difficult working conditions. The results show the complexity of the interplay between the demands of work requirements and resources within the fire & rescue service.

  • 159.
    Detlín, Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Lindberg-Nyman, Viola
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE); NU-hospital Group, Trollhättan (SWE).
    Eklund, Annika
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Nilsson, Maria Skyvell
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    The experience of new nurses’ early working life: learning in a hospital care context – An interview study2022In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 65, article id 103506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore how nurses during their early working life learn to provide high-quality care in relation to organisational prerequisites in a hospital setting.BackgroundWhen nurses enter employment in contemporary hospital settings, they face multiple learning challenges. Organisational prerequisites that have been identified to affect their ability to learn to provide high-quality care are related to staffing turnovers, large patient groups and a lack of experienced staff to support their learning.

    Design: Qualitative.

    Methods: The study was conducted between 2018 and 2019 at a medium-sized hospital in Sweden. Data from interviews with 10 nurses with fewer than two years’ work experience were subjected to qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The results describe the nurses’ learning during their early working life in two categories: Performing tasks in relation to organisational prerequisites and Making use of clinical experiences to grasp the complexity of nursing care. The first theme reflected a learning process that was initially characterised by seeking confirmation and instructions from colleagues of how to act safely and by balancing the demands of time efficiency and sustaining patient safety. The second theme reflected that, after addressing organisational prerequisites, the nurses tried to understand and make use of clinical experiences to grasp the complexity of nursing care by encountering and processing clinical patient situations.

    Conclusions: The results of this study revealed that nurses’ learning during early working life seemed to be primarily directed towards handling tasks, with sometimes limited opportunities to grasp the complexity of nursing care. Their learning depended largely on their own initiative and motivation and was strongly influenced by organisational prerequisites. The limited availability of experienced nurse colleagues and lack of time devoted for reflection needs to be dealt with to support nurses’ learning.

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  • 160.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    et al.
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology , Rome, Italy (ITA) .
    Rothenberg, W. Andrew
    Duke University, Duke Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA)..
    Lunetti, Carolina
    Sapienza University of Rome,Department of Psychology, Italy (ITA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy (ITA).
    Eisenberg, Nancy
    Arizona State University, Department of Psychology, USA (USA).
    Thartori, Eriona
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy (ITA).
    Basili, Emanuele
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy (ITA).
    Favini, Ainzara
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy (ITA).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand (THA).
    Peña Alampay, Liane
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, 1000 Metro Manila National Capital Region, Philippines (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Department of Special Education, Zarqa, Jordan (JOR); Counseling, Special Education, and Neuroscience Division, Emirates College for Advanced Education, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emeriates (ARE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples Federico II, Department of Humanistic Studies, Napoli, Italy (ITA)..
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London, UK (GBR).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Amherst, MA, USA (USA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya (KEN).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA (USA); King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia (SAU).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Department of Psychology, Bogota, Colombia (COL).
    Longitudinal associations between mothers' and fathers' anger/irritability expressiveness, harsh parenting, and adolescents' socioemotional functioning in nine countries.2020In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 458-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines parents' self-efficacy about anger regulation and irritability as predictors of harsh parenting and adolescent children's irritability (i.e., mediators), which in turn were examined as predictors of adolescents' externalizing and internalizing problems. Mothers, fathers, and adolescents (N = 1,298 families) from 12 cultural groups in 9 countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and United States) were interviewed when children were about 13 years old and again 1 and 2 years later. Models were examined separately for mothers and fathers. Overall, cross-cultural similarities emerged in the associations of both mothers' and fathers' irritability, as well as of mothers' self-efficacy about anger regulation, with subsequent maternal harsh parenting and adolescent irritability, and in the associations of the latter variables with adolescents' internalizing and externalizing problems. The findings suggest that processes linking mothers' and fathers' emotion socialization and emotionality in diverse cultures to adolescent problem behaviors are somewhat similar. 

  • 161.
    Dinu, Serena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Järleby, Petter
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Medarbetares upplevelser av autonomi under påtvingat distansarbete: En kvalitativ studie gjord på kontorsanställda i Västra Götalandsregion2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There are already a number of studies published on the view of telework before and during the Covid-19 pandemic, however, we saw a lack of knowledge about perceived autonomy regarding telework when we looked for research in this area. In addition, knowledge needs to be developed as this type of telework is relatively new due to the fact that we are currently living under a prevailing Covid19 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to find out how employees view the opportunities to be able to control the choice of the physical workplace, and to investigate the extent to which they experience control of the work situation when it comes to teleworking. The focus of the study is to create understanding and examine the importance of autonomy for office employees around Västra Götaland who telework part-time or full-time. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten office employees around Västra Götaland via digital video platforms. Collected data were analyzed using thematic analysis methods and divided into three themes: independence, social support and the boundary between work and leisure. The results show that freedom means being able to plan and structure your working day during teleworking, but the boundary between work and private life is easily erased. Autonomy is important for a balance between freedom, demands and control to be able to function optimally. The study contributes to the fact that autonomy is important for the employees job satisfaction during teleworking, which considers both the employees health and the working environment

  • 162.
    Dragin, Apilou
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Harlos Lundin, Camilla
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Är resiliens en framgångsfaktor på arbetsmarknaden?: - Personlighet som prediktor för resiliens2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the Swedish labor market jobseekers are largely judged based on their CV, despite the fact that employers increasingly require personal qualities like resistance to stress and ability to handle complex situations. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether personality factors or common recruitment factors have the highest predictive validity for resilience in work life. A digital questionnaire was compiled to quickly and easily reach respondents online. Measuring instruments IPIP30, COPSOQ II and The Resilience Scale were used to measure personality, perceived stress, quantitative requirements at work, risk of burnout and resilience. Data regarding age, sex, education level, grades, time in current employment and occupational area as well as total work experience were collected in order to collect classical recruitment factors. Data was analyzed from 252 professionals in the ages 17-62 (M = 34, SD = 10), 62% women and 38% men. At the time of the study the majority of the respondents worked full-time and their education level was primarily a secondary education or a bachelor's degree. To calculate the predictability for the current factors, a two-step hierarchical linear regression analysis was implemented. Results showed that personality factors can predict an individual's ability to handle work-related stress more reliably than common recruitment factors. Our analysis also indicated that classical recruitment methods such as CV review could not contribute with a reliable resilience assessment. Hopefully, our results could help enhancing

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  • 163.
    Drevenhorn, Christoffer
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Rudholmer, Patrik
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Mellanchefers upplevelse av kommunikation som strategiskt verktyg: Hur kommunikation påverkas under en organisationsförändring2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to capture middle managers' experience of communication as a strategic tool in the event of an organizational change. The question that was raised for this study was: How do middle managers experience the communicative process in the event of an organizational change? In order to answer the question, five interviews with middle managers at regional or local level were conducted. From the collected data, a thematic analysis was conducted in which four main themes were developed. The result showed that middle managers feel that communication should be characterized by clarity and that the role of a manager means considering the differences of individuals. It also emerged that management influences the middle manager in terms of what they may communicate at the same time as they feel that they have an influence in terms of possessing the communication. The study shows that communication is a vital function during an organizational change where proven theories are applied to the business but need to be developed to reach its full potential

  • 164.
    Drysdale, Maureen
    et al.
    Faculty of Health, University of Waterloo Director, Well-Link Research Lab, St. Jerome’s University, Waterloo (CAN).
    Johansson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Callaghan, Sarah
    Faculty of Health, University of Waterloo Lab Manager, Well-Link Research Lab St. Jerome’s University, Waterloo (CAN).
    Folger, Miriam
    Baden-Heidenheim Cooperative State University(DHBW), Heidenheim an der Brenz (DEU).
    Mahr, Andreas
    Faculty of Technology, Baden-Heidenheim Cooperative State University (DHBW), Heidenheim an det Brenz (DEU).
    Belongingness, peer support, social connections, and well-being of WIL students in Canada, Germany, and Sweden2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 30-31Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    WIL in the context of higher education is a model of experiential education as per Kolb’s theory (Kolb, 1984; Kolb & Kolb, 2012) - which intentionally integrates students’ theoretical academic studies within a workplace or practical environment The purposeful integration of theory with practice supports learning, with the workplace serving as the mechanism for the enhanced learning, and while students are the primary focus of WIL, the essential philosophy is an educational partnership between universities, employers, and communities with the aim of providing students with an enriched learning experience (Blom, 2013; Johnston, 2017).

    Students who participate in a work-integrated learning (WIL) program during their higher education studies are often better prepared for work after graduation compared to students who do not receive discipline specific practical experience (Mandal & Edwards, 2021; Smith et al., 2019; Weldon & Ngo, 2019). But does this better preparedness come with a price? Do these students - who often spend months away from their campus community – have adequate access to important support networks and/or do they struggle with their well-being? Research has shown that overall well-being, social and peer support, social connections, and establishing a strong sense of belonging are believed to be important in a successful school-to-work transition and achieving a strong career identity (Conely et al., 2014; Huegaerts et al., 2020; Ruschoff et al., 2018). Students who participate in WIL – however have less access to their peers and the university community due to being away for work terms (McBeath et al., 2018). It is unknown whether this influences their overall well-being and subsequent transition to full-time work after graduation. As such, they deserve attention in the research on participation in WIL programs and the subsequent transition to the labour market.

    Goal and Research Questions

    This study furthers our understanding of how support systems and sense of belonging impact student mental health and well-being during work-terms. The results can inform the design of a support intervention aimed at improving and maintaining health and well-being outcomes for WIL students. Results also contribute to the literature regarding WIL, sense of belonging, peer support, social connections, well-being, and preparedness for school-to-work transitions.

    The study involved developing and administering a quantitative measure to examine aspects of, and the importance of, peer support and sense of belonging on improved mental health and well-being for WIL students. We also examined the role that social media and social connections played in this relationship. More specifically, we addressed the following research questions:

    1. What perceptions do WIL students have about sense of belonging and peer support?

    2. What demographic factors impact sense of belonging and peer support?

    3. How does WIL influence peer support and sense of belonging?

    4. How are peer support and sense of belonging related to mental health, and other psychological and health related outcomes in our WIL students?5. What role does social media and in particular virtual social connections play in sense of belonging, peer support, and well-being?6. What is the relationship between sense of belonging, peer support, social connections, mental health, and preparedness for school-to-work transitions? 

    Methods

    Data was collected from three institutions of higher education, namely University of Waterloo in Ca nada, University West in Sweden, and Baden-Heidenheim Cooperative State University (DHBW) in Germany. Ethical clearance was secured at all three institutions prior to data collection. Participants (WIL students) completed an online survey addressing sense of belonging, social and peer support, school-to-work self-efficacy, social media use, and well-being during their WIL placements. In addition to demographic variables (sex, age, year of study, and number of WIL placements) and constructed items measuring school-to-work efficacy and social media use for support and belonging, the survey also contained the following published scales:

    • Sense of Belonging Instrument (SOBI: Hagerty & Patusky, 1995)
    •  Psychological Sense of School Membership (PSSM: Goodenow, 1993)
    •  Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL -shortened version: Cohen et al., 1985)
    • Self-Description Questionnaire III (SDQ-III: Marsh & O’Neill, 1984)
    • Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS: Diener et al., 1985)
    •  Well-Being Manifestation Measure Scale (WBMMS: Massé et al., 1998) 

    Consent to participate was indicated by the participant’s voluntary completion of the online survey. The survey took approximately 15 to 20 minutes to complete. After correcting for missing data, the final data set had a sample size of 480 (University of Waterloo, n=190; University West, n=112, DHBW, n=178).

    Data Analysis

    Descriptive analyses provided frequencies, percentages, means, and standard deviations for the demographic variables. A series of t-tests were run to determine significant differences on the dependent variables as a function of country and demographics. A series of ANOVAs followed by Tukeys’ HSD post hoc analysis, were run to determine significant main effects. Levene’s test was performed for the demographic independent variables and the assumption of homogeneity of variance was satisfied. Finally, correlational analysis was run to examine significant relationships between the dependent variables – Sense of Belonging, Peer Support, school-to-work efficacy, Mental Health, and Well-Being. Incomplete scales (i.e., missing data) were eliminated from the analysis.

    Results

    Results indicated that WIL students from the three institutions reported only moderate levels of sense of belonging, however they perceived high levels of support from their peers. Higher levels of sense of belonging to the university community and access to high quality peer support was strongly related to better overall mental health and well-being. Interestingly, while WIL students perceived social media and virtual social connections during work terms as playing an important role in supporting their sense of belonging to peers and the university community, they preferred face to face social interactions for promoting their well-being. Additional results and implications will be provided in the presentation.

  • 165.
    Duell, Natasha
    et al.
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Icenogle, Grace
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Silva, Karol
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Chein, Jason
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Banich, Marie T.
    University of Colorado at Boulder, Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, United States.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Fanti, Kostas A.
    University of Cyprus, Department of Psychology, Cyprus.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia .
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Takash, Hanan M. S.
    Hashemite University, Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, Jordan.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Department of Psychology, Italy.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Chaudhary, Nandita
    University of Delhi, Department of Human Development and Childhood Studies, Lady Irwin College, India.
    A cross-sectional examination of response inhibition and working memory on the Stroop task2018In: Cognitive development, ISSN 0885-2014, E-ISSN 1879-226X, Vol. 47, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors examined the association between working memory and response inhibition on the Stroop task using a cross-sectional, international sample of 5099 individuals (49.3% male) ages 10–30 (M = 17.04 years; SD = 5.9). Response inhibition was measured using a Stroop task that included "equal" and "unequal" blocks, during which the relative frequency of neutral and incongruent trials was manipulated. Competing stimuli in incongruent trials evinced inhibitory functioning, and having a lower proportion of incongruent trials (as in unequal blocks) placed higher demands on working memory. Results for accuracy indicated that age and working memory were independently associated with response inhibition. Age differences in response inhibition followed a curvilinear trajectory, with performance improving into early adulthood. Response inhibition was greatest among individuals with high working memory. For response time, age uniquely predicted response inhibition in unequal blocks. In equal blocks, age differences in response inhibition varied as a function of working memory, with age differences being least pronounced among individuals with high working memory. The implications of considering the association between response inhibition and working memory in the context of development are discussed.

  • 166.
    Duell, Natasha
    et al.
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA ; King Abdulaziz University.
    Icenogle, Grace
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Chein, Jason
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States.
    Chaudhary, Nandita
    Lady Irwin College, Department of Human Development and Childhood Studies, LUniversity of Delhi, India.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology , Rome, Italy .
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Fanti, Kostas A.
    University of Cyprus, Department of Psychology, Cyprus.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Department of Psychology, Bogota,Colombia.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Department of Special Education, Zarqa, Jordan; Counseling, Special Education, and Neuroscience Division, Emirates College for Advanced Education, Abu Dhabi, UAE.
    Takash, Hanan M. S.
    Hashemite Univ, Queen Rania Fac Childhood, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples Federico II, Department of Humanistic Studies, Napoli, Italy..
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Correction: Age Patterns in Risk Taking Across the World (vol 47, pg 1052, 2018)2019In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 835-836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the original publication, the legends for Figs 4 and 5 were incorrect, such that each regression line was mislabeled with the incorrect country. Below are the correctly labeled countries. The authors apologize for any confusion or misinformation this error may have caused.

  • 167.
    Duell, Natasha
    et al.
    Temple University, Department of Psychology,Philadelphia, USA.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University,Department of Psychology, Philadelphia, PA, USA and King Abdulaziz University.
    Icenogle, Grace
    Temple University, Department of Psychology,Philadelphia, USA.
    Chein, Jason
    Temple University, Department of Psychology,Philadelphia, USA.
    Chaudhary, Nandita
    University of Delhi, Department of Human Development and Childhood Studies, Lady Irwin College, New Delhi, India..
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA..
    Fanti, Kostas A.
    University of Cyprus, Department of Psychology, Kallipoleos, Cyprus..
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA..
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma, La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Roma, RM, Italy.
    Skinner, Anne T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand..
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia .
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, Metro Manila, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education, Al Zafranah, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Takash, Hanan M. S.
    Hashemite University, Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, Zarqa, Jordan..
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Department of Psychology, Caserta, CE, Italy .
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology,Zhuhai Shi, China..
    Age patterns in risk taking across the world2018In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 1052-1072Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiological data indicate that risk behaviors are among the leading causes of adolescent morbidity and mortality worldwide. Consistent with this, laboratory-based studies of age differences in risk behavior allude to a peak in adolescence, suggesting that adolescents demonstrate a heightened propensity, or inherent inclination, to take risks. Unlike epidemiological reports, studies of risk taking propensity have been limited to Western samples, leaving questions about the extent to which heightened risk taking propensity is an inherent or culturally constructed aspect of adolescence. In the present study, age patterns in risk-taking propensity (using two laboratory tasks: the Stoplight and the BART) and real-world risk taking (using self-reports of health and antisocial risk taking) were examined in a sample of 5,227 individuals (50.7% female) ages 10-30 (M = 17.05 years, SD = 5.91) from 11 Western and non-Western countries (China, Colombia, Cyprus, India, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the US). Two hypotheses were tested: (1) risk taking follows an inverted-U pattern across age groups, peaking earlier on measures of risk taking propensity than on measures of real-world risk taking, and (2) age patterns in risk taking propensity are more consistent across countries than age patterns in real-world risk taking. Overall, risk taking followed the hypothesized inverted-U pattern across age groups, with health risk taking evincing the latest peak. Age patterns in risk taking propensity were more consistent across countries than age patterns in real-world risk taking. Results suggest that although the association between age and risk taking is sensitive to measurement and culture, around the world, risk taking is generally highest among late adolescents

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  • 168.
    Dunkel, Caroline
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Eriksen, Liv
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Generationsskillnader och work-life balance2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Work-life balance has been found to be of importance to the physical and mental well-being, and statistics show that sick leave due to stress and mental illness has increased in Sweden in recent years.

    Generational differences are a debated topic, let alone in an occupational context. Therefore, this study aims at investigating if there are differences between how generation X and generation Y in Sweden, experience the ability to balance work and private life.

    To investigate this, a quantitative survey was conducted in the form of a questionnaire based on an already validated instrument for measuring work-life balance and some background questions. A total of 324 individuals in the ages 20-53, evenly distributed between generation X and Y, participated.

    The result shows that there is no difference between the generations concerning experienced work-life balance. However, the result shows that work and private life affect each other in both generations, and that it is to a greater extent the work that inhibits the balance between work and private life. Other factors that prove to correlate with work-life balance are weekly working hours, level of education and gender. More worked hours/week and higher completed education meant higher levels of perceived imbalance between work and private life of both generations. The women of generation X were found to experience a greater degree of imbalance than men. The study shows that there is no need to take into account generation in the prevention of imbalance, but also the importance of employers' awareness of the impact of work for the individual's ability to maintain balance between work and private life.

  • 169.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    et al.
    Stockholm universitet.
    Haas, Linda
    Indiana University.
    Hwang, Philip
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sweden country note2017In: International Review of Leave Policies and Research 2017 / [ed] Koslowski A., Blum S. and Moss P. (eds.), Wien: Austrian Institute for Family Studies University of Vienna , 2017, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 170.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Basinska, Beata A.
    Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology, Gdansk, Poland.
    Evolutionary benefits of personality traits when facing workplace bullying2021In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 177, article id 110849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Facing workplace bullying negatively affects physical and mental health, and consequently quality of life and well-being. Personality traits that can help an individual survive and reproduce entail more benefits than costs. Building on  two evolutionary theories, Life History Theory and Costly Signaling Theory, this study aims to provide novel insights into how and why personality traits are associated with facing workplace bullying and health-related quality of life. A heterogeneous group of 324 employees in Sweden provided data on workplace bullying, perceived health-related quality of life, and personality traits, controlling for sex and age. We found that openness (HEXACO model) and Machiavellianism (Dark Triad model) served as moderators. Employees with high values of  these traits experienced significantly less affected health-related quality of  life  when facing workplace bullying. Our results indicate evolutionary origins of the personality traits openness and Machia-vellianism. A new finding is that possessing, exhibiting, and maintaining traits reflecting a more creative and competitive interpersonal style increases an employee’s ability to survive aversive environments.  

  • 171.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Basinska, Beata A.
    Gdansk University of Technology, Faculty of Management and Economics, Poland.
    Job Demands, Engagement, and Turnover Intentions in Polish Nurses: The Role of Work-Family Interface2018In: Psychosocial job dimensions and distress/well-being: issues and challenges in occupational health psychology / [ed] Renato Pisanti, James Campbell Quick, Montgomery Anthony, Frontiers Media S.A., 2018, 1, p. 91-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Poland has lower ratios of employed registered nurses per 1,000 inhabitants than the EU average. Polish nurses work under miserable conditions without assisting personnel, and they reconcile their professional demands with responsibilities for their families; 96% of them are women.

    Rationale/Aims:

    This study uses Hobfoll's conservation of resources (CORs) theory to explain the role of various resources in the improvement of work conditions in the nursing profession. Work-family conflict (WFC) and family work conflict (FWC) threaten to deplete nurses' resources. This paper set out to (1) examine the extent to which perceived job demands (workload and interpersonal conflicts at work) and engagement (vigor, dedication, and absorption) are associated with turnover intentions (the intention to leave the present workplace and the intention to leave the nursing profession); (2) attempt to determine whether levels of WFC and FWC moderate these associations.

    Design/Method:

    This study comprised 188 female registered nurses. The inclusion criterion was to live with a partner and/or have children.

    Results:

    WFC was moderately related to FWC. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that only high job demands and low vigor were significantly associated with turnover intentions. WFC was experienced more intensively than FWC. Job demands, vigor, dedication, and turnover intentions had a strong effect on WFC, while absorption had a strong effect on FWC. However, levels of WFC and FWC did not significantly moderate these associations.

    Originality/Conclusion:

    The study produces new knowledge by examining a constellation of job demands, work engagement and WFC, which reflect the management of personal resources. Results from such a constellation in nurses from countries with a post-transformational economic system have not previously been discussed in the light of COR theory. Most importantly, we conclude that WFC does not intensify turnover intentions.

  • 172.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Forensic Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet.
    Hallberg, Angela
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skog, Sandra
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    A Leadership Meta-Resource Factor Explicates Task Performance, Work Engagement, and Perceived Stress2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research links emotional leadership resources (e.g., emotional intelligence) positively with important working life outcomes, such as health, job satisfaction, job performance, organizational commitment, and leadership effectiveness. However, no study has yet described emotional leadership resources based on traits linked with work motivation and stress resilience. The aim was to describe emotional leadership resources based on traits in a novel fashion (meta-traits, based on structural trait analysis). Our hypothesis was that an emotional leadership meta-resource factor would converge with motivation and stress resilience. Participants (N = 344) were leaders aged between 23 and 65 years (M = 49, SD = 8.6; 58% women) who completed an online questionnaire including measures of common traits (e.g., trait emotional intelligence, Big Six), and coping resources. We estimated work motivation by self-rated work engagement, and stress resilience by the level of perceived stress. We used an exploratory factor analysis approach to describe and structure our data, and structural equation modelling (SEM) to test whether an emotional leadership meta-resource factor would converge with work motivation and stress resilience. Our findings revealed that the investigated traits and resources could be described along four broad emotional leadership resource factors, namely (1) Externalizing, (2) Moral goodness, (3) “Destrudo”, and (4) Rational mastery. As expected, the emotional leadership meta-resource factor showed a strong convergence (~.80) with both work motivation and stress resilience. “Externalizing” and “Rational mastery” were the most important emotional resource factors. The findings are discussed using Hobfoll’s motivational Conservation of Resources (COR) theory. It is concluded that common traits, including personality traits, and coping resources comprise an emotional leadership meta-resource factor, which to a high degree converges with work motivation and stress resilience. The results imply that organizations may strengthen work motivation and reduce stress by recruiting leaders possessing valuable emotional leadership resources.

  • 173.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Hallberg, Angela
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skog, Sandra
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Emotional Leadership in Relation to Task Performance, Work Engagement, and Perceived Stress2019In: Working for the greater good: Inspiring people, designing jobs and leading organizations for a more inclusive society / [ed] Prof. Franco Fraccaroli, Turin, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe and explore emotional leadership meta-resources based on traits (self-esteem, emotional intelligence, leadership intelligence, empathy, Big Six, narcissism) and coping resources (e.g. cognitive), using Hobfoll’s motivational Conservation of Resources (COR). Our hypothesis was that leadership resources would be positively related to work engagement and negatively to perceived stress.

    Methodology: Participants (N = 344) were leaders aged between 23 and 65 years (M = 49, SD = 8.6; 58% women) who completed an online questionnaire including measures of common traits and coping resources. Work engagement was measured by Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9; Schaufeli & Bakker, 2004), and stress by Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10; Cohen & Williamson, 1988). We used an exploratory factor analysis approach to describe and structure our data, and structural equation modelling (SEM) to test whether an emotional leadership meta-resource factor would be positively related to work engagement and negatively to perceived stress.

    Results: The investigated traits and resources could be described along four broad emotional leadership resource factors: (1) Externalizing; (2) Moral goodness; (3) Destrudo; (4) Rational mastery. As expected, the emotional leadership meta-resource factor showed a strong convergence (~.80) with both work engagement (positively) and perceived stress (negatively). 

    Research/Practical Implications: The results imply that organizations may strengthen work engagement and reduce stress by recruiting leaders possessing valuable emotional leadership resources.

    Originality/Value: Our study is the first to describe emotional leadership resources based on traits linked with work engagement and perceived stress in a novel fashion (meta-traits, based on structural trait analysis).

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  • 174.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Hellström, Åke
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Interrater Reliability of Psychopathy Checklist-Revised: Results on Multiple Analysis Levels for a Sample of Patients Undergoing Forensic Psychiatric Evaluation2018In: Criminal justice and behavior, ISSN 0093-8548, E-ISSN 1552-3594, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 234-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scores from the Psychopathy Checklist–Revised (PCL-R) are used to support decisions regarding personal liberty. In our study, performed in an applied forensic psychiatric setting, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for absolute agreement, single rater (ICCA1) were .89 for the total score, .82 for Factor 1, .88 for Factor 2, and .78 to .86 for the four facets. These results stand in contrast to lower reliabilities found in a majority of field studies. Disagreement among raters made a low contribution (0%-5%) to variability of scores on the total score, factor, and facet level. For individual items, ICCA1 varied from .38 to .94, with >.80 for seven of the 20 items. Items 17 (“Many short-term marital relationships”) and 19 (“Revocation of conditional release”) showed very low reliabilities (.38 and .43, respectively). The importance of knowledge about factors that can affect scoring of forensic instruments (e.g., education, training, experience, motivation, raters’ personality, and quality of file data) is emphasized.

  • 175.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Hjalmarsson, Annica
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Relationship between emotional intelligence, personality and work performance: A cross-sectional study2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The background of this study is the observation that people with high emotional intelligence (EI) perform well at work. The aim of this study was to further validate the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short Form (TEIQue-SF) by (1) investigating its relationships with the Mini International Personality Item Pool-6 Inventory (Mini-IPIP6), the Short Dark Triad Assessment (SD3), and the Individual Work Performance Questionnaire (IWPQ), (2) identifying which personality traits best explain variations in trait EI, and (3) investigating whether trait EI can predict variations in each dimension (Task Performance, Contextual Performance, and Counterproductive Work Behavior, CWB) of self-perceived work performance. A cross-sectional study was done with 228 Swedish participants (M = 34 years, SD = 12.6, range 16-71 years, 66% women) with an average work experience of 14 years (SD = 11.5). One expected result was that all dimensions of trait EI correlated negatively with Neuroticism and Machiavellianism, and positively with Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Openness to Experience, and Narcissism. Self-control and Sociability had, however, almost zero correlation with Machiavellianism. A positive correlation was found between all dimensions of EI and Task Performance and Contextual Performance. Standard regression analyses showed that 26% to 46% of the variation in the different dimensions of EI was explained by the “Big Six” personality traits. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that trait EI accounted for a significant proportion of the variation in Contextual Performance that was not explained by any of the “Big Six” personality traits, and that trait EI did not explain any variation in CWB above Neuroticism and Honesty-Humility. In addition, trait EI explained an additional 6% of the variation in Task Performance when controlling for gender, age, Neuroticism and Conscientiousness. It is concluded that the Swedish version of the TEIQue-SF has shown reasonable theoretically and empirically grounded relationships with relevant variables for the workplace.

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  • 176.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ingelgård, Anders
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Mölnlycke Health Care .
    Koopmans, Linda
    Sustainable Productivity & Employability, Leiden, The Netherlands (NLD).
    Cross-cultural adaptation, from Dutch to Swedish language, of the Individual Work Performance Questionnaire2020In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 97-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for a short, self-rated, validated and reliable instrument for individual work performance suitable for generic use in the Swedish work and organizational context. The Individual Work Performance Questionnaire (IWPQ), comprising originally 47 items, was initially developed in the Netherlands, based on a four-dimensional conceptual framework, in which individual work performance consisted of task performance, contextual performance, adaptive performance, and counterproductive work behavior. During the development process, IWPQ was shortened to 18 items with three scales formally labeled as Task performance, Contextual performance, and Counterproductive work behavior (CWB), capturing three work performance types. The current version of the IWPQ, consisting of 18 items and three scales, was then translated as well as cross-culturally adapted to American-English and Indonesian contexts.

    OBJECTIVES: To translate and adapt the current IWPQ version, consisting of 18 items, from the Dutch to the Swedish context, to assess its content validity through cognitive interviews, to apply it to a pilot group to present descriptive statistics, to calculate the questionnaire’s internal consistency, as well as to clarify whether the translated items capture three or four performance types.

    METHODS: The Dutch version of the IWPQ, consisting of 18 items, was translated into Swedish. A six-stage translation and adaptation process was used: forward translation, synthesis, back translation, harmonization, cognitive interviews, revision, and sampling and analyses of pilot data for 206 managers (149 women) from five Swedish municipalities.

    RESULTS: IWPQ instructions, wording of a few items and one response form were slightly modified. The pilot testing showed Cronbach’s alphas similar to the Dutch version of the IWPQ, ranging between 0.73 and 0.82, good mean-inter-item correlations (all above 0.36). In deciding how many factors to retain, we employed both parallel analysis (PA), and Velicer’s minimum average partial (MAP) test. The number of factors to retain was, as indicated by PA, four, and by MAP, three or four. Exploratory factor analysis (principal axis factoring) revealed clearly separate factors, corresponding to four, rather than three, performance types. A new factor, roughly representing adaptive performance, comprised in the original, longer version of the IWPQ, emerged.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish version of the IWPQ was successfully translated and adapted in a pilot group of managers. Before it is used, it should be validated in a larger group of managers and in more heterogeneous groups of both white- and blue-collar workers.

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  • 177.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    An item response theory analysis of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short-Form (TEIQue-SF) in the workplace2022In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 8, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trait emotional intelligence (EI) predicts important outcomes in the workplace. This study is the first one that reports item and scale functioning in the workplace using item response theory (IRT) analysis of the global 30-item Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short-Form (TEIQue-SF). Past IRT research, performed mostly on undergraduate English-speaking students, showed that several items in TEIQue-SF were poorly informative. Data collected in Sweden from 972 employed persons were analyzed. IRT with a graded response model was utilized to analyze items of the global TEIQue-SF scale. As was found in past research, the lowest response category in all items had extreme difficulty threshold parameter values, and only low and moderate levels of latent trait EI were adequately captured, but most items had good values of the discrimination parameters, indicating adequate item informativeness. Four items, which in past research have also shown weak psychometric properties, were poorly informative. To effectively measure trait EI in today’s organizations, there is an advantage in using the most informative items to best represent this construct. 

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  • 178.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Gärningsmannaprofilering: personlighetens betydelse för utförandet av brott2022Book (Other academic)
  • 179.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Hallberg, Angela
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skog, Sandra
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies.
    Hellström, Åke
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Leading with a cool head and a warm heart: trait-based leadership resources linked to task performance, perceived stress, and work engagement2023In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 42, p. 299559-29580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leaders of today need to achieve well in terms of task performance, perceiving low stress, and having high levels of work engagement. One may ask whether trait-based leadership resource factors can be identified and how such resource factors might relate to task performance, perceived stress, and work engagement. Our aim was to test the hypothesis, derived from Hobfoll’s motivational Conservation of Resources (COR) theory, that there are trait-based leadership resource factors, which are differentially correlated to the leaders’ task performance, perceived stress, and work engagement. Leaders (N = 344) aged from 23 to 65 years (M = 49, SD = 8.6; 58% women) completed an online questionnaire including measures of task performance, perceived stress, work engagement, personality traits, trait emotional intelligence, empathy, performance-related self-esteem, compassionate and rational leadership competence, and coping resources for stress. Using exploratory factor analysis, we identified four trait-based leadership resource factors. With Bonferroni adjustment, and controlling for sex, age, number of years in the current managerial position, self-deceptive enhancement, and impression management, only Rational Mastery was significantly positively correlated with task performance. Rational Mastery, Efficient Coping, and Modesty were negatively correlated with perceived stress, and all factors except Modesty, but including the fourth (Good-Heartedness) were positively correlated with work engagement. Organizations striving for sustainable work conditions should support trait-based leadership, which depends not only on a task-oriented resource such as rational mastery, but also on human-oriented resources such as efficient coping, modesty, and good-heartedness, all of them being differentially related to task performance, perceived stress, and work engagement.  

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  • 180.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ragnestål Impola, Carina
    Basinska, Beata A.
    Gdansk University of Technology, Faculty of Management and Economics, Poland.
    Some Bright And Dark Sides Of Personality May Be Adaptive For Well-Being In Face Of Workplace Bullying2017In: Enabling Change Through Work and Organizational Psychology : Opportunities and Challenges for Research and Practice, Dublin, Irland, 2017, article id Th-OR-S36-2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Targets of workplace bullying tend to have poor health, and we set out to determine whether personality may predict their health quality. 

    Design/Methodology We collected data from 172 people (98 women); social workers, engineers and restaurant employees. To measure health, we used parts of EQ-5D (usual activities, pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression), and EQ VAS, a visual analogue scale. Bright (Big-Six) and dark (Machiavellianism, subclinical psychopathy, and narcissism) personality traits were measured by MiniIPIP6 and Short-D3. NAQ-R was used to determine who feel bullied. The relationships of the traits and bullying with health (outcome) were analyzed using 3-step hierarchical linear regressions, controlling for gender, age and social desirability.

    Results In face of workplace bullying low extraversion, humility-sincerity and low narcissism significantly predicted poor health related to both discomfort and usual activities. Separate regression models regarding both bright and dark sides of personality predicting depression/anxiety became non-significant when NAQ-R was entered.

    Limitations Cross-sectional design and Swedish population.

    Research/Practical Implications These results imply that high extraversion and narcissism may protect aspects of health important for working life in face of workplace bullying, while low levels of these traits make a target’s health more sensitive. 

    Originality/Value The study is the first to analyze different dimensions of health quality with predictors of both bright and dark personality in face of workplace bullying, discussing the results in the light of Hobfoll’s COR theory and evolution theory. 

  • 181.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ragnestål-Impola, Carina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Workplace bullies, not their victims, score high on the Dark Triad and Extraversion, and low on Agreeableness and Honesty-Humility2019In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 5, no 10, article id e02609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most past research has focused mainly on the personality of the victims of bullying and not on the personality of workplace bullies. Some researchers have suggested that bullies and their victims may share bully-typifying personality traits. The aims of this study were to find out what characterizes the personalities of workplace bullies and their victims, and to investigate the relationship between the Dark Triad, HEXACO and workplace bullying. We tested three hypotheses. H1: Machiavellianism and Psychopathy, but not Narcissism, predict the use of bullying tactics (i.e., bullying perpetration). H2: (Low) Honesty-Humility, (low) Agreeableness and (high) Extraversion predict the use of bullying tactics. H3: Honesty-Humility moderates the association between Machiavellianism and the use of bullying tactics. Employees in southwestern Sweden (N = 172; 99 women) across various occupations and organizations were surveyed. Negative Acts Questionnaire-Perpetrators (NAQ-P) and Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) were used to assess the use of bullying tactics and victimization. NAQ-P was correlated with NAQ-R (r = .27), indicating some overlap between the use of bullying tactics and victimization. NAQ-P was correlated with Machiavellianism (.60), Psychopathy (.58), Narcissism (.54), Agreeableness (-.34), Honesty-Humility (-.29) and Extraversion (.28). The results of linear regressions confirmed H1, but only partially confirmed H2: Machiavellianism, Psychopathy, (low) Agreeableness and (high) Extraversion explained 32%, 25%, 27% and 19%, respectively, of the variation in the NAQ-P. Replicating past research, NAQ-R was correlated with Neuroticism (.27), Extraversion (-.22), Openness (-.19) and Conscientiousness (-.16). Neuroticism explained 25% and (low) Extraversion 17% of the variation in the NAQ-R. Confirming H3, Honesty-Humility moderated the relationship between the NAQ-P and Machiavellianism. We conclude that bullies, but not their victims, are callous, manipulative, extravert and disagreeable, and that dishonest Machiavellians are the biggest bullies of all. In practice, the victims of workplace bullying need strong and supportive leadership to protect them from bullies with exploitative and manipulative personality profiles.

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  • 182.
    Edenklint, Louise
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    “Efter man fått jobb kan man bete sig som en svensk”: om ensamkommande ungdomars upplevelser av att skaffa ett arbete på den svenska arbetsmarknaden2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Bakgrund: Flyktingfrågan blev högaktuell under 2000-talet. Detta då en allt större andelen samkommande ungdomar ankom Europa samtidigt som synen alltmer utgår från att dessa urholkar den nationella kulturen, sammanhållning och social välfärd. År 2020 initierades en offentlig utredning där huvuduppdraget innebar att utreda hur en “långsiktigt hållbar” migrationspolitik kan skapas. I samband med detta föreslogs i nämnda utredning bland annat att endast bevilja tillfälliga uppehållstillstånd. Flyktingar uppfattas alltmer som ett hot mot den nationella kollektiva identiteten. De samhälleliga förändringarna och paradigmskiftet påverkar i allra högsta grad nyanlända barn och ungdomar. För den ensamkommande gruppen av barn innebär flykten i sig en särskilt otrygg situation utan egen familj och det skyddsnät som denna utgör. För denna grupp är därför anskaffandet av ett arbete, som är enviktig del av en lyckad integration, av särskilt stor vikt med tanke på att det i många fall avgör möjligheterna att stanna i Sverige. 

    Syfte: Syftet med studien är att undersöka hur ensamkommande ungdomar upplever anskaffandet av ett arbete i Sverige, samt att i denna process undersöka vilket stöd som ungdomarna anser vara mest betydelsefullt. Följande frågeställningar bearbetas i studien:

    ● Vilka utmaningar upplever de ensamkommande ungdomarna när det gäller att erhålla ett arbete i Sverige?

    ● Vilka underlättande faktorer upplever de ensamkommande ungdomarna när det gäller att erhålla ett arbete i Sverige?

    ● Vilket vuxenstöd anses av ungdomarna som mest betydelsefullt på vägen mot anskaffandet av ett arbete?

    Metod: Kvalitativ metod användes i studien och data producerades genom att tolv semistrukturerade intervjuer genomfördes med ensamkommande individer som rekryterades via ett bekvämlighetsurval (privata kontakter), på grund av det rådande pandemiläget. Intervjuerna genomfördes i samverkan med en annan medstudent. Det teoretiska ramverket bestod av ett fenomenologiskt perspektiv. Intervjuerna transkriberades och en tematisk analys gjordes utifrån ett perspektiv på integration. 

    Resultat och slutsatser: De ensamkommande ungdomarnas upplevelser sammanställdes efter tematisk analys, och presenterades i fem olika teman. Språk, avsaknad av körkort och en upplevd rasism skapade hinder för inträde på arbetsmarknaden, samtidigt som de ensamkommande ungdomarna framförde vikten av att uppnå självständighet och att inte ge upp som styrkor. Kontaktnät och att ha ett socialt stöd upplevdes av ungdomarna som avgörande för att finna ett arbete. Juridiska hinder och den oro som dessa skapar, var något som i detta sammanhang stack ut på ett negativt sätt i ungdomarnas berättelser. Området för studien är relativt outforskat, och betoningen på ungdomarnas egna upplevelser bidrar med en ny dimension till barn- och ungdomsforskningen på detta område, där fokus ligger på forskning med i stället för om ungdomarna. När ungdomarnas eget perspektiv lyfts i förhållande till möjligheten till inträde på den svenska arbetsmarknaden, blir detta ett bidrag till den samlade bilden av det praktiska integrationsarbetet.

    Background: The refugee issue became highly topical during the 2000s. This is due to the fact that an increasing number of unaccompanied minors arrived to Europe, but also the more and more widespread view that they erode the national culture, cohesion and social welfare. In 2020, a public inquiry was initiated in which the main task was to investigate how a “sustainable” migration policy can be created. During this time, it was proposed in the saidinquiry, among other things, to grant only temporary residence permits. Refugees are increasingly perceived as a threat to the national collective identity. The societal changes and the paradigm shift affect newly arrived children and young people to a very high degree. Fort he unaccompanied group of children, escape in itself means a particularly insecure situation without one's own family and the safety net that this constitutes. For this group, therefore, the acquisition of a job, which is an important part of a successful integration, is of particular importance, given that in many cases it determines the possibilities of staying in Sweden.

    Aim: The purpose of the study is to investigate how unaccompanied minors experience the acquisition of a job in Sweden, and in this process to investigate which support the group considers most important. The following issues are addressed in the study:

    What challenges do the unaccompanied minors experience when it comes to getting a job in Sweden?

    What facilitating factors do the unaccompanied minors experience when it comes to getting a job in Sweden?

    Which adult support is considered most significant by the unaccompanied minors, when it comes to acquiring a job? 

    Method: Qualitative method was used in the study and data were produced by conducting twelve semi-structured interviews with unaccompanied individuals who were recruited via a convenience sample (private contacts), due to the prevailing pandemic situation. The interviews were conducted in collaboration with another fellow student. The theoretical framework consisted of a phenomenological perspective. The interviews were transcribed and a thematic analysis was implemented, using an integrational perspective. 

    Results and conclusions: The experiences of unaccompanied young people were compiled after implementing the thematic analysis, and presented in five different themes. Language, lack of driving licenses and a perceived racism created obstacles for entry to the labor market, while the unaccompanied young people emphasized the importance of achieving independence and not giving up as strengths. Contact networks and having social support were perceived by the young people as crucial for finding a job. Legal obstacles and the anxiety they create was something that in this context stood out in a negative way in theyoung people’s stories. 

    The area of the study is relatively unexplored, and the emphasis on young people's own experiences contributes a new dimension to child and youth research in this area. When the young people's own perspective is illustrated in relation to the possibility of entering the Swedish labor market, this also becomes a contribution to the overall picture of the practical integration work.

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  • 183.
    Edvardsson, Anneli
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Grandin, Silena
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Historier som smittar: En kvalitativ studie på socialtjänsten, om sekundär traumatisering på enheten för våld i nära relationer2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Sekundär traumatisering är en företeelse som kan drabba en individ till följd av annan individs trauma. Trauma är en händelse som är omtumlande och omskakande för personen som utsätts för den. Sekundär traumatisering är ett begrepp som, vilket namnet antyder, relaterar till trauma. Som företeelse har sekundär traumatisering dock hamnat lite i skymundan, trots alla de yrkesgrupper som i sin dagliga praktik tar del av olika livsöden och trauman, vilket innebär att de själva utsätts för en risk för att bli utsatta för trauma. Sekundär traumatisering innebär att medarbetaren blir exponerad för klientens trauma. Den överföring som sker från klient till professionell kan skapa symptom i form av till exempel minnesbilder av klientens trauma, sömnsvårigheter, koncentrationssvårigheter, huvudvärk och trötthet. Syftet med denna studie är därför att undersöka socialarbetares förståelse och kunskap om sekundär traumatisering, mer specifikt den grupp som arbetar med våld i nära relationer. Ytterligare syfte med studien är att studera hur socialarbetare använder reflektion i situationer av upplevd sekundär traumatisering. Individuella intervjuer (n=7) användes för att producera data. För att analysera materialet användes tematisk analys. Resultatet visar bland annat att socialarbetare efterfrågar mer kunskap kring begreppet sekundär traumatisering och att reflektion är ett viktigt arbetsverktyg för socialarbetaren, samt ett led i att undvika sekundär traumatisering. Sammantaget bidrar studien till ökad insikt och förståelse kring sekundär traumatisering. Detta för att synliggöra och uppmärksamma sekundär traumatisering i det sociala arbetet vilket kan minska riskerna för olika framtida arbetsmiljöproblem.

  • 184.
    Einarsson, Amelie
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Haugen, Matilda
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    På spaning efter tillitsbaserad styrning: En kvalitativ studie om chefers erfarenheter av tillitsbaserad styrning och ledning i praktiken2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In mid-2016, the Government appointed the Trust delegation, with the aim of establishing a more trust-based management of municipalities and county councils. For the public sector, this means among other things, increased trust at all levels in the operations and increased capacity of action. The present qualitative study aims to examine how managers experiences trust-based management in organizations. To investigate this, six managers from a small municipality in western Sweden where interviewed about their experiences of leading with trust.

    The questions that are asked in the study are: How do managers express trust-based management? What practical methods do managers use to work in line with credible governance and management? Collected data from the interviews were analyzed with thematic analysis and presented in the result in two themes with related sub-themes. The study presents two themes, called Trust in interpersonal relations and The steering chain must breathe trust. The first theme consists of four sub-themes, I strongly believe in people's own abilities, Dialogue and communication solves a lot, It is about including employees and We must have people who dare to do things. The other theme consists of three subthemes, My mission is part of a entirety, It is not the council’s part to do decide how we deliver something specific and We are here for the citizens.

    The study stated that it requires a major effort to succeed in implementing and maintaining trust-based management. Structures and working methods are required to enable the work, as well as the right conditions. The managers need tools and methods, such as dialogue, time and coherence at different levels in the organization.

  • 185.
    Eklund, Annika
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Can we be prepared for the next accident or catastrophe?: Potential contributions of emergency collaboration exercises2013In: Proceedings of  The 8th International Conference in Critical Management Studies; 10 Jul 2013-12 Jul 2013; The University of Manchester. Manchester, United Kingdom: The University of Manchester Library; 2013., Manchester: University of Manchester Library , 2013, p. 1-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catastrophes and accidents (natural,technological, or man-made) have been subjected to scientific research from different disciplines and perspectives for a long time. Examples of these perspectives include community risk and vulnerability, human behaviour during crisis, fire behaviour and eco-system management, decision-making, communication, and collaboration issues. This paper deals with different perspectives of preparation and prevention in terms of accidents and catastrophes. The overall aim is to present an overview of different aspects on the possibility for organisations and societies to be prepared for the next incident and to highlight emergency exercises as a part of crisis management. In the second part of the paper the project “Collaboration exercises—from parallelto synchronous”, is introduced. The project is carried out in Sweden, and aims to explore how collaboration between police, ambulance and rescue services is practiced and developed during exercises. Of particular interest is inter-organisational collaboration and learning during exercises. To develop an understanding of these processes, a range of different types of emergency collaboration exercises was observed and participants were interviewed about their experiences. Tentative findings from the studies so far are briefly introduced. Some challenges of using exercises to increase the preparedness for managing the uncertainty and the unexpected are further discussed.

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  • 186.
    Eklund, Annika
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Introduktionsprogram i sjukhusvården för nyutexaminerade sjuksköterskor: en internationell utblick samt forskning om och utvärdering av Kliniskt basår i Västra Götalandsregionen2023Report (Other academic)
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  • 187.
    Eklund, Annika
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Redo att lära, oförberedd på jobbet: sex år med introduktionsprogram för nyutexaminerade sjuksköterskor2023In: Abstracts för Decemberkonferensen, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2023, p. 1-1Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I presentationen berättar jag lite om hur vi arbetat med VGR:s regionala grupp för Kliniskt basår, och lite kort om våra studieresultat i kontexten att skapa förutsättningar för nyutexaminerade.

  • 188.
    Eklund, Annika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Carlström, Eric
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level. Göteborgs universitet, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa .
    Berlin, Johan
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Organisering av en fingerad verklighet: Om övningar mellan blåljusorganisationer2013In: Nordiske organisasjonsstudier, ISSN 1501-8237, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 34-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to elucidate exercise participants’ understanding of critical aspects of organizing and implementation of collaboration exercises with police, fire department and ambulance services. The focus is critical aspects in exercises that have, or are expected to have, bearing on the participants’ ability to learn. Collaboration exercises are used as a tool to reinforce and develop the preparedness for future incidents. The need for such exercises was usually advocated after critique to actions during largescale real-life incidents. The study had a qualitative approach and is based on phenomenographic analysis of interviews with participants from four exercises with different scenarios. The identified critical aspects of exercises were related to realism, acceptance for mistakes, exercise extent and aims and opportunities for joint discussions. The management of an accident can be described to a large extent depend on the organizations’ joint ability to adapt to the prevailing situation and to collaborate. For exercises to contribute to these abilities, they could benefit from shifting the focus to how to organize exercises that allow participants to test different decisions and actions, with less emphasis on the choice of scenario.

  • 189.
    Eklund, Annika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Samverkanskompetens2023In: Samverkan i vården: från system till praktik / [ed] Annika Eklund & Christian Gadolin, Liber, 2023, p. 196-208Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 190.
    Eklund, Annika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery, Centre for Disaster Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå (SWE).
    Karlsson, Sofia
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery, Centre for Disaster Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå (SWE).
    Hylander, Johan
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery, Centre for Disaster Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå (SWE).
    Östlund, Henrik
    F.E, Bricon AB (SWE).
    Gyllencreutz, Lina
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery, Centre for Disaster Medicine, Umeå University,Umeå,(SWE); Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå (SWE).
    Exploring focus group discussions for building knowledge across emergency services organisations: a foundation for road tunnel incidents responses and future research?2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 65-67Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and aim

    Road tunnels are important parts of today’s infrastructure and society, but also with potential for many injured in case of an incident and a challenging work environment for emergency services organisations. If a mass-casualty incident (MCI) occurs in a road tunnel, specific challenges in terms of safety, heat, smoke, long distances to the injured and lack of and contradictory information will impact the response and how collaboration is established (Holgersson et al., 2020; Lockey et al., 2005). In addition, sharing information during responses is, however, often limited due to the lack of knowledge and understanding of each other’s work processes at an individual and organisational level (Sederholm et al., 2021). A key for collaboration here is a good understanding of how their own, and collaborative organisations interpret and operate in a potentially shared task (Edwards, 2012; Wolbers et al., 2017). Thus, the road tunnel environment is one area where research has pointed to the need for a shared understanding of incidents across the organisations (Casse & Caroly, 2019) and for arenas facilitating exchange of experiences and reflections upon work procedures to develop collaboration (Njå & Svela, 2018; Hylander et al., 2022). This calls for activities that could stimulate work-integrated learning. While exercises and simulations are valuable in enhancing response preparedness, the perceived effects have been reported to vary in terms of learning and usefulness (see e.g., Roud et al., 2021). In addition, exercises and simulations are expensive and time consuming, calling for alternative but still effective learning activities for developing collaboration. This abstract aim to present and critically explore an innovative learning activity for development of joint knowledge to improve MCI response in road tunnel environments.

    Design and participants 

    The learning activity analysed for this abstract was a series of four focus groups á 4 to 4,5 hours, conducted online in a region of Sweden. The overall aim of the series was to share experiences and develop joint knowledge across emergency organisations in tunnel environments. The participants in the focus groups represented the organisations that typically respond to tunnel incidents, i.e., ambulance service (EMS), police service, rescue service, Swedish Transport Administration (RTCC, Trafikverket) and emergency dispatch center (EDC, SOS Alarm) (Table 1). The study participants had extensive work experience within their organisations and are expected to have a tactical or operational management function in a major response.

    Table 1 not included in this abstract

    The researchers designed the focus group series with the intention to alternate experiences, with procedural, conceptual and practical elements. The study used a partly participatory design. For this study, rather than being co-interpreters of the results, the participants were involved to shape the sessions content and questions to be discussed in ways they found valuable (Baum et al., 2005). The researchers built the following session from what the participants had asked for, discussed, or found challenging in the prior sessions. One week in advance, the overarching theme, goal, and suggestions for discussion questions for the session, and a summary of bullet points from the previous session, was sent out to the participants. Session I was set out to be an open discussion to familiarize themselves with each other’s ways of working, and to discern the participants’ understandings of specific challenges and needs for responses in tunnels, but also to illuminate the impact of internal decisions and actions for saving lives safely. The first approximate 20 minutes was discussed as crucial for establishing a tunnel response, which is why this phase was focused on during Session II: a best-practice discussion based on the initial 20 minutes of a full-scaled exercise where several of the participants had been involved. Information gathering and sharing was highlighted as both crucial and challenging, which lead to the research group introducing and participants discussing practical implications of concepts of “situational awareness” in Session III. Session IV was a ‘digital exercise’ based on a crash and vehicle fire in a tunnel, aiming to wrap up the identified challenges and practicing information sharing and management during the initial 20 minutes of the response.The analysis was conducted as critical discussions in the research group, in-between the sessions and when the full series was conducted, set out to identify potential strengths and weaknesses/challenges of the design and content for knowledge development. The results will present the preliminary findings and contributions.

    Results 

    The analysis performed for this abstract found that the focus groups series ha s strengths and weaknesses/challenges to build knowledge across organisations regarding potential MCI road tunnel responses. 

    First, the opportunity to discuss the same questions from four “basis”/perspectives, including presenting the organisations own perspectives and exercise experiences, a theoretical concept, and a practical moment was a strength. However, rather than a progression of learning (such as becoming more effective in information sharing), the design primarily allowed analysis of a deeper and more complex understanding of the overall question of joint and timely responses. 

    Second, the iterative and participatory design was a strength in terms of that the sessions could to some extent focus on the issues the participants highlighted. By using this method, the participants also had the possibility to reflect upon prior and upcoming sessions (Baum et al., 2006). This could, however, be a limitation for comparing results across different groups if the issues of concern diverge too much.

    Third, the focus groups could contribute to the organisations’ knowledge development across practices, such as identifying specifically critical moments when establishing a response or sharing thoughts about safety. Using this design could be a complement to the typical focus on actions in exercises and training (Roud et al., 2021). In addition, the nature of focus group data provides opportunities to analyse interactions (Wilkinson, 2021). Still, how the knowledge developed could be further implemented in and across the organisations remains unknown and needs further consideration in research and practice.

    Fourth, the focus groups were effective for researchers to explore how knowledge is shared and possible contradictions in interpretations and actions. This approach is valuable for developing knowledge in cross-practice collaborations (Edwards, 2012). Including materials from a full-scale exercise and a practical digital exercise was valuable due to the obvious connection to their work tasks and potential challenges, and to contextualize their learning. Further, the amount and various types of data obtained from each session, such as discussing a theoretical concept and a practical exercise moment, could pose challenges for analysis. However, including both structured discussions and practical exercises as stimuli could strengthen the internal validity of the findings (e.g., reduce the discrepancies between what they say they do and what they actually do).

    Fifth, using online meetings was time-effective (and safe during the COVID-19 pandemic), allowing participants and researchers to work from where they choose. However, the online setting produced primarily a dialogue between moderator and participants, with less initiatives for dialogues between participants. It co uld be valuable to further evaluate the design in physical meetings. Moreover, it was easier to drop out or pop out, to simultaneously manage other work tasks, from online meetings compared to physical meetings.

    Conclusion

    In conclusion, we would here argue that using inter-organisational focus groups, that acknowledge participants needs for learning and providing various stimuli to engage in a shared problem, can contribute to knowledge development for future tunnel responses. Research and practice should further explore how various interpretations and actions can be used to improve strategies, communication and organizational changes. Further research could 67 also explore how discussion-based learning activities can be used as a platform to develop and main tain collaborative learning networks, and as a complement to exercises and simulations.

  • 191.
    Eklund, Annika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skyvell Nilsson, Maria
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Kliniskt basår för nyutexaminerade sjuksköterskor inom Västra Götalandsregionen: en utvärderingsrapport2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Newly graduate nurses (NGN) transition between basic education and work in a complex health care practice, as well as their intention of leaving the profession during the first year of work and how this can be prevented, is a global concern. NGN experience difficulties integrating workplace environment, expectations, and educational experiences. This is an evaluation study of a one-year transition program, which was implemented as a project during 2016-17, at six hospitals in Sweden.

    An explorative research design was used and data consist of focus group and individual interviews with NGNs, interviews with first-line managers, observations of simulation training, and survey material from the hospitals. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Results show an overarching structure for all hospitals in the region, the NGNs are engaged in the following learning activities; introduction at the ward and a senior RN as preceptor, lectures and/or simulations, change of ward, process-oriented reflection seminars and mentorship.

    The different learning activities contribute to the overall learning in different ways. Continuous supervision and structured reflection are central to NGNs professional learning. Organizational conditions create prerequisites for learning during the transition program and a change of ward is a particular challenge to get organized. The results, also provides a deeper understanding of the foundational components in NGNs early development of expertise, security as professionals, and essential knowledge for bridging the practices of the first cycle program and healthcare practice at hospitals.

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  • 192.
    Eklund, Annika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skyvell Nilsson, Maria
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Program coordinators’ perspectives on implementing a transition program for newly graduated nurses: a qualitative interview study2024In: Journal of Health Organization & Management, ISSN 1477-7266, E-ISSN 1758-7247, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 143-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    While transition programs are widely used to facilitate newly graduated nurses transition to healthcare settings, knowledge about preconditions for implementing such programs in the hospital context is scarce. The purpose of this study was to explore program coordinators’ perspectives on implementing a transition program for newly graduated nurses.

    Design/methodology/approach 

    An explorative qualitative study using individual interviews. Total of 11 program coordinators at five acute care hospital administrations in a south-west region in Sweden. Data was subjected to thematic analysis, using NVivo software to promote coding.

    Findings

    The following two themes were identified from the analysis: Create a shared responsibility for introducing newly graduated nurses, and establish legitimacy of the program. The implementation process was found to be a matter of both educational content and anchoring work in the hospital organization. To clarify the what and why of implementing a transition program, where the nurses learning processes are prioritized, was foundational prerequisites for successful implementation.

    Originality/value 

    This paper illustrates that implementing transition programs in contemporary hospital care context is a valuable but complex process that involves conflicting priorities. A program that is well integrated in the organization, in which responsibilities between different levels and roles in the hospital organization, aims and expectations on the program are clarified, is important to achieve the intentions of effective transition to practice. Joint actions need to be taken by healthcare policymakers, hospitals and ward managers, and educational institutions to support the implementation of transition programs as a long-term strategy for nurses entering hospital care.

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  • 193.
    Eklund, Annika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Individual and Behavioral studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Sterner, Anders
    Department of Work Life and Social Welfare, Faculty of Caring Sciences, University of Borås, Borås (SWE).
    Skyvell Nilsson, Maria
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Larsman, Pernilla
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    The impact of transition programs on well-being, experiences of work environment and turnover intention among early career hospital nurses2024In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Transition programs for newly graduated nurses in hospital settings are reported to provide learning opportunities, strengthening confidence, workplace integration and skills, retention and job satisfaction. Still, our knowledge of long-term effects is scarce and few studies have used control groups.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To explore the long-term impact of having attended a transition program on the nurses’ experiences of the first years of practice. More specifically, ideology-infused psychological contract, ethical stress, perceived organizational support, job satisfaction, opportunities for learning, and intention to stay in the nursing profession, were explored as outcome variables.

    METHODS:

    A questionnaire survey was carried out among registered nurses from November 2019 to January 2020, with a 54% response rate. The analysis was based on 149 nurses who had attended a transition program, and 72 who had not attended. The nurses had seniority between one and three years. Independent samples t-test were used to investigate differences between the groups.

    RESULTS:

    The two groups showed small and non-significant differences in the outcome variables. However, regarding the frequency of ethical value conflicts induced by insufficient resources, as well as experiences of ethical value conflict distress, the group of nurses who had attended a transition program showed statistically significantly higher mean values, although the effect sizes were small.

    CONCLUSION:

    Newly graduated nurses need more than transition programs and skills training to progress in their nursing role and develop competence, increase job satisfaction, and reduce stress. Achieving these goals requires a long-term supportive learning environment that is integrated into everyday work.

  • 194.
    Ekmekҫi, Karolin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Leandersson, Malin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Är alla svenskar kalla, tråkiga och osociala?: En kvalitativ studie om ensamkommande flyktingbarns upplevelser av det svenska samhället2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Our purpose with this study is to highlight the elements of civil society that can help newly arrived youths a sense of connection and belonging in the new society and what impact this may have on their future in the new country. The study is a qualitative method where four semi-structured interviews were conducted. The youths we interviewed are young men from Afghanistan who came to Sweden as an unaccompanied refugee children. The study is based on a phenomenological / hermeneutical approach and empirical data have been analyzed in the analytical unit with IPA. The study is abductive. We have analyzed the empirical basis and in cooperation with Antonovsky's theory of SOC. And the concepts of social inclusion and exclusion. Giddens' theory of ontological security and självreflexivitet have also been used and at last we choose to problematize change of culture using to describe two different society models. The results of our study show that civil society is significant because the youths felt a sense of community and social inclusion within organizations and associations in the community. The importance of having a job is seen as a key aspect of social inclusion. The biggest setback was the loss of their family and culture at home and try to find a new sense of community and belonging in Sweden. Young people tell us that they have encountered limitations in the Swedish society, which means that they sometimes feel excluded. While mention the other situations where they experience social inclusion. Youths feel that they are in Sweden have greater opportunities to influence their own life choices which gives them the motivation to find new challenges and goals to aim for in life. The youths we interviewed strive to feel involved in various ways in the social community.

  • 195.
    Ekmekҫi, Karolin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Leandersson, Malin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Är alla svenskar kalla, tråkiga och osociala?: En kvalitativ studie om ensamkommande flyktingbarns upplevelser av det svenska samhället2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Our purpose with this study is to highlight the elements of civil society that can help newly arrived youths a sense of connection and belonging in the new society and what impact this may have on their future in the new country. The study is a qualitative method where four semi-structured interviews were conducted. The youths we interviewed are young men from Afghanistan who came to Sweden as an unaccompanied refugee children. The study is based on a phenomenological / hermeneutical approach and empirical data have been analyzed in the analytical unit with IPA. The study is abductive. We have analyzed the empirical basis and in cooperation with Antonovsky's theory of SOC. And the concepts of social inclusion and exclusion. Giddens' theory of ontological security and självreflexivitet have also been used and at last we choose to problematize change of culture using to describe two different society models. The results of our study show that civil society is significant because the youths felt a sense of community and social inclusion within organizations and associations in the community. The importance of having a job is seen as a key aspect of social inclusion. The biggest setback was the loss of their family and culture at home and try to find a new sense of community and belonging in Sweden. Young people tell us that they have encountered limitations in the Swedish society, which means that they sometimes feel excluded. While mention the other situations where they experience social inclusion. Youths feel that they are in Sweden have greater opportunities to influence their own life choices which gives them the motivation to find new challenges and goals to aim for in life. The youths we interviewed strive to feel involved in various ways in the social community

  • 196.
    El abed, Karim
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Moradi, Sartip
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Högskolestudenters skolmotivation under Corona pandemin2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The coronavirus pandemic has affected the education system worldwide, including Sweden. The public health authority in Sweden has introduced higher education restrictions throughout the country. Digital education and thus distance learning have become the condition of learning and interacting. In this study, we, therefore, ask: What does socially distanced and digital education mean for college students in Sweden? This study includes seven qualitative interviews with the aim to examine how college students, in their various second higher educational programs, experience digital learning and study motivation. The result shows that the students experience reduced study motivation as the everyday social contacts and relations have been replaced with digital or virtual relations and modes of learning. However, the results differ between the respondents due to individual conditions and different perceived factors for study motivation.

  • 197.
    Elfstrand Corlin, Tinna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kazemi, Ali
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    The older person as a client, customer or service user?2019In: Working with Older People, ISSN 1366-3666, E-ISSN 2042-8790, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 9-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe three different approaches to work in elderly care (i.e. professional, market-oriented and person-centred) and examine whether these theoretically derived approaches can be confirmed empirically. Additional aims were to examine the endorsement of these approaches and whether there were differences in the endorsement of these approaches in nursing home vs home care and municipality vs privately run care units. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected using a cross-sectional survey study of frontline care staff (n=1,342). Exploratory factor analysis was used to investigate the empirical validity of the proposed approaches to work in elderly care. A series of paired and independent samples t-tests were conducted to analyse mean differences between the proposed approaches to work. Findings A principal axis factoring analysis yielded three theoretically meaningful factors as proposed. These results indicated that the respondents were able to differentiate between three distinct but related approaches to work with older persons. The results also showed that the professional care approach was the highest endorsed and the market-oriented the lowest endorsed approach. No notable differences in approaches to work were observed in nursing home vs home care and municipality vs privately run care units. Originality/value This is the first study to examine multiple approaches to work in elderly care as previous research studies mainly have investigated the person-centred care approach. Current findings indicate that these approaches to work often coexist in various combinations and that the care staff adopts all these approaches but to varying degrees. The approaches differ in several important respects (e.g. legitimacy and view of the older person) and most likely affect the way care staff treats the older person and how the older person perceives their relationship with the care staff. Knowledge about these differences facilitates management of the care staff’s work situation and helps to improve the quality of care.

  • 198.
    Eliason, Felix
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Karlsson, Louise
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Vad chefer anser vara väsentligt när de anställer chefer för att nå Employer of Choice2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Employer of choice is a marketing form, where an organization chooses to identify,attract, optimize and retain skilled employees. This includes future and currentemployees. The purpose the present study is to investigate the employer's choicebased on a management perspective. Which leadership qualities are important? Isthe employer "employer of choice" in mind when they recruit senior positions? Thiswas a qualitative study with semistructured interviews, carried out at amanufacturing company. The following themes emerged: (1)Employers ofchoice,(2) executives acting to reach the employer of choice, and (3) managers'thoughts in recruiting other managers to reach the employer of choice. These arediscussed in relation to the essay's approaches and presented theories. Based onidentified themes and questions asked, we can see tendencies that managers haveemployer of choice in mind when recruiting, and that they look whether thecandidates have a genuine interest, stands for what the company does, the motivebehind, and the willingness to take responsibility. The study shows how managersact to reach the employer of choice, and by being a rolemodel, building longtermrelationships, understanding employee needs, being accessible, and beingvisible and open to their surroundings.

  • 199.
    Elmquist, Anna
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kvalitativt förundersökningsledarskap i polisens mängdbrottsutredningar: Vad är viktigt, vad kan påverka beslut?2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The investigations of petty crimes are of public interest. They constitute our most common crimes in society. The purpose of this study was to examine which factors police officers leading preliminary police investigations consider most important to carry out investigations with high quality. Furthermore, factors that influence how easy or difficult the decision-making process becomes, and how police officers handled these factors was studied.

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight police officers working with investigations. The interviews were thematically analyzed and four themes were found: (1) job demands, (2) work attitudes, (3) the basis of decision, (4) take responsibility and feel secure in decision-making.

    Results showed that ability to prioritize, work involvement and values were important in the working process and that easy decision-making was based on experience among other factors. Interestingly, the police officers, seeking for well-funded decisions, handle different kinds of influences and biases, even though they were not aware of the influence factors. Participants also expressed influencing factors such as pressure from investigators, mass media, time-pressure and stereo-types.

    The study showed high workload and that decision-making concerning petty crimes could be complex and demanding. These factors may lead to faster decision-making resulting in bad decisions due to time-pressure and is a major issue to examine further.

  • 200.
    Emanuel, Sara
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Toth, Kristina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Lärande och kompetens i samband med en katastrofövning: en kvalitativ studie om övningens betydelse2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates whether there is learning while performing an emergency exercise and what type of skills or experiences are used during this type of exercise. The study investigates the exercise named Liv 19, which is an exercise that works to practice the cooperation between The Swedish Armed Forces and the Swedish health care system, to ensure a contingency plan in the event of a disaster. The exercise helps to develop new guidelines for cooperation, which is also the focal point of Liv 19.

    The study examines the exercise from the perspective of learning and competence and what factors influence the result and map out areas of improvement. A qualitative approach with the starting point from the method of Critical Incident Technique has been used when gathering and analyzing the data. Participatory observations were made during the exercise and were supplemented with semi-structured interviews.

    The result reveal that the exercise constitutes a basis for learning and it clearly shows that factors such previous knowledge and experiences affect the conditions for what type of competence is used.

    A conclusion is that awareness and reflection is vital when performing the exercise to be able to make use of the knowledge in the organization and thereafter map out areas of improvement.

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