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  • 151.
    Åkerman, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Setterberg, Jenni
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    "Jag är inte rädd för att tolka men jag är rädd för att missa någonting. Det är ett stort ansvar.": En intervjustudie om språktolkens erfarenhet2015Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It is important to use a language interpreter in health care meetings where patients do not speak Swedish to increase the understanding and participation among the patients. The use of a language interpreter in the health care meeting requires the interpreter and the caregiver to follow the regulations and guidelines at hand. It is a challenge for the language interpreters to be able to efficiently convey whatever is said during the meeting since there can be obstacles such as for the interpreter to be misunderstood or mistrusted in their job.

    Aim: To describe the language interpreter´s experiences of being a tool in the health care meeting. Methods: A qualitative study where interviews have been made with eleven language interpreters. The interviews have been analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Result: The language interpreter found his or her work rewarding with a great responsibility in conveying messages correctly between the parts. In some cases the language interpreter experienced that the caregiver or the patient didn't trust the interpretation to be correct. It was found hard to perform a proper interpretation when the caregiver or the patient lacked knowledge of the interpreter's role. According to the informants, the quality of the interpreted conversation increased significantly if both the language interpreter and the caregiver had experience in language interpretation. Conclusion: There is doubt about how to use a language interpreter in the health meeting according to the interviewed language interpreters. Even though there are regulations on, and guidelines to, how to conduct a meeting where a language interpreter is used, there are few caregivers who have knowledge about what their own role and the language interpreter role should be in the health care meeting.

  • 152.
    Öster, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Egberg Thyme, Karin
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Psychiatry, Umeå University.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Psychiatry.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Åström, Sture
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Art therapy during radiotherapy: A five-year follow-up study with women diagnosed with breast cancer2014In: The arts in psychotherapy, ISSN 0197-4556, E-ISSN 1873-5878, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 36-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Follow-up studies on art therapy are lacking. In a randomised art therapy intervention study from 2001 to 2004 with women with breast cancer, results showed that patients benefitted from participating in art therapy for up to four months after the intervention. The aim of this study was to describe the coping resources and quality of life amongst women treated for breast cancer five to seven years after participating in individual art therapy during radiotherapy as compared to a control group. In 2009, thirty-seven women, 18 from the intervention group and 19 from the control group, answered questionnaires about their coping resources and quality of life. The results showed no significant difference between the groups regarding their coping resources or quality of life, except for an unexpected significantly lower score in the domain ’Social relations’ in the study group as compared to baseline, at the time of the follow up. However, our study from 2001 to 2004 supports various positive effects of art therapy within six months of participation as compared to a control group. Consequently, attending art therapy during the treatment period for breast cancer can be of great importance to support health, coping and quality of life in a short-term perspective. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 153.
    Økland Lier, Haldis
    et al.
    Haugesund Hospital, Section of Mental Health Research, Helse Fonna HF, Haugesund, Norway.
    Åström, Sture
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Rørtveit, Kristine
    Stavanger University Hospital, Psychiatric Nursing, Stavanger District Psychiatric Centre, Stavanger, Norway.
    Patients’ daily life experiences five years after gastric bypass surgery – a qualitative study2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 3-4, p. 322-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objective The objective was to explore and describe patients’ daily life experiences five years after gastric bypass surgery. Background Bariatric surgery markedly decreases body weight. Previous studies describe positive consequences, as well as physical, social and emotional challenges during the first few years after surgery. An understanding of how patients adjust to and cope with postsurgical changes in the long term is crucial to help them obtain a successful outcome after bariatric surgery. Method A qualitative method was employed. In-depth interviews with 10 men and women were conducted five years after bariatric surgery in a Norwegian hospital. Results One overarching theme – a multitude of daily life changes following bariatric surgery – was developed based on three main themes: relational aspects related to weight loss, the new body and changes in self-esteem. Six sub-themes are described. Conclusion Those who undergo gastric bypass surgery experience enormous changes in their daily lives. Their social lives, their relationship to their body and their self-esteem may be altered by the weight loss. Relevance to clinical practice The results of this study suggest directions for patient education, health staff education and peer education. A patient education programme focusing on changes in daily life experiences when undergoing gastric bypass surgery is suggested due to the changes experienced by the patients involved in this study.

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