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  • 151.
    Vassen, Robert
    et al.
    IEF-1, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, Germany.
    Cernuschi, Federico
    CESI RICERCA, Power Generation Systems Dep. Milano, Italy.
    Rizzi, Gabriele
    Turbocoating.
    Scrivani, Andrea
    Turbocoating.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Östergren, Lars
    Surface Technology, Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Kloosterman, Arjen
    National Aerospace Laboratory NLR, Gas Turbines & Structural Integrity Department, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Meverel, Remy
    ONERA, Chatillon Cedex, France.
    Feist, Jörg
    Southside Thermal Sciences (STS) Ltd, London, United Kingdom.
    Nicholls, John
    Cranfield University, Cranfield, United Kingdom.
    Recent activities in the field of thermal barrier coatings including burner rig testing in the european union.2008In: Advanced Engineering Materials, ISSN 1438-1656, E-ISSN 1527-2648, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 907-921Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 152.
    Vassen, Robert
    et al.
    Institute of Energy Research, Jülich, Germany.
    Nylen, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Stöver, Detlev
    Institute of Energy Research, Jülich, Germany.
    Editorial2009In: Journal of Thermal Spray Technology, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 131-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 153.
    Vouristo, P.
    et al.
    Tempere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Industrial and research activities in thermal spray technology in the Nordic region of Europe2009In: Expanding Thermal Spray Performance to New Markets and Applications - 2009 International Thermal Spray Conference, ITSC 2009: 4-7 May, Las Vegas, 2009, p. 517-522Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal spraying is used widely in many industrial sectors in the North European Countries: Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark. Important areas where thermal spraying is used petroleum, paper, metals, transport, defence and high-tech machinery industries. In Finland thermal spray technology has wideest use in the pulp and paper industries with several companies spraying various types of rolls and cylinders. In Sweden, thermal spray technology is of great importance in the manufacture of aero engines and in industrial gas turbine applications. In Norway thermal spraying is widely used in various offshore applications, including subsea oil drilling enterprises. Development and innovation in thermal spray technology in the Nordic countries is dominated by research conducted in Finland and Sweden, followed by Denmark and Norway. In particular, research groups from Sweden and Finland, as well as from Norway, have routinely presented their research results at international conferences and in international journals.

  • 154.
    Wanner, Bertil
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Cutter Exit Effects during Milling of Thin-walled Inconel 7182012In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 590, p. 297-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During milling of thin-walled components, chatter vibrations give rise to process issues. These include dimensional inaccuracy, damaged and scrap parts, and damaged cutting tools. This, in turn, leads to loss of production time with increasing cost as a consequence. This paper identifies the force profile during a single cut milling process. It focuses on the exit and post-exit behavior of the cut and discusses the process dynamics. The force profiles of various tool-to-workpiece positions are analyzed as regards the exit and post exit phases. A standard on-the-market cutter and a specially designed zero rake cutter are used in the investigation. Finally, a time-domain simulation of the force is performed and compared to the experimental results. The study concludes that a small change in exit angle may result in a considerable improvement in cutting behavior. In addition, the tool position should be chosen so that the cutter exits in the least flexible direction possible for the workpiece.

  • 155.
    Wanner, Bertil
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Milling Strategies for Thin-walled Components2012In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 498, p. 177-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent developments in the Aerospace industry have led to thin-walled, reduced-weight engine designs. Due to demands in manufacturing, production speeds and material removal rates (MRR) have increased. As component wall thickness gets thinner, the consequence oftentimes is an increase in chatter vibrations. This paper suggests that a correctly chosen tool-to-workpiece offset geometry may lead to a robust and chatter-free process. The results show the differences in force response for three geometries while varying the overhang of the workpiece. This is part of a concerted effort to develop a robust methodology for the prediction of chatter vibrations during milling operations of thin-walled Aerospace components. This paper outlines certain robust machining practices. It also analyzes the criticality of the choice of offset between tool and workpiece during milling setup as well as the effects that the entry and exit of cut have on system vibrations.

  • 156.
    Wanner, Bertil
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Process Stability Strategies in Milling of Thin-walled Inconel 7182012In: The 4th Manufacturing engineering society international conference (MESIC 2011): 21–23 September 2011, Cadiz, Spain / [ed] M. Marcos, J. Salguero, American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2012, Vol. 1431, p. 465-472Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trends in Aerospace development have led to thin-walled, reduced-weight engine designs. The demands in manufacturing have forced production speeds and material removal rates (MRR) to increase. As component wall thickness gets thinner, the consequence oftentimes is an increase in chatter vibrations. This paper suggests that a correctly chosen tool-to-workpiece offset geometry may lead to a robust and chatter free process. The results show the differences in force response for three geometries while varying the height overhang of the workpiece. This is part of a concerted effort to develop a robust methodology for the prediction of chatter vibrations during milling operations of thin-walled Aerospace components. This paper gives guidelines on how to accomplish robust machining practices. It also answers the following questions: How critical is the choice of offset between tool and workpiece during milling setup? And what effects do the entry and exit of cut have on system vibrations?

  • 157.
    Zhao, Y.
    et al.
    University of Manchester, School of Materials.
    Shinmi, A.
    University of Manchester, School of Materials.
    Zhao, X.
    University of Manchester, School of Materials.
    Withers, P. J.
    University of Manchester, School of Materials.
    Van Boxel, S.
    University of Manchester, School of Materials.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Xiao, Ping
    University of Manchester, School of Materials.
    Investigation of interfacial properties of atmospheric plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings with four-point bending and computed tomography technique2012In: Surface and Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, Vol. 206, no 23, p. 4922-4929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A modified four-point bending test has been employed to investigate the interfacial toughness of atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) after isothermal heat treatments at 1150°C. The delamination of the TBCs occurred mainly within the TBC, several to tens of microns above the interface between the TBC and bond coat. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the TBC was mainly tetragonal in structure with a small amount of the monoclinic phase. The calculated energy release rate increased from ~50J/m -2 for as-sprayed TBCs to ~120J/m -2 for the TBCs exposed at 1150°C for 200h with a loading phase angle about 42°. This may be attributed to the sintering of the TBC. X-ray micro-tomography was used to track in 3D the evolution of the TBC microstructure non-destructively at a single location as a function of thermal exposure time. This revealed how various types of imperfections develop near the interface after exposure. The 3D interface was reconstructed and showed no significant change in the interfacial roughness after thermal exposure. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  • 158.
    Zou, Zhonghua
    et al.
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced High-temperature Materials and Precision Forming, Shanghai 200240, China .
    Donoghue, Jack
    University of Manchester, School of Materials, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS, UK .
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Yang, Lixia
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced High-temperature Materials and Precision Forming, Shanghai 200240, China .
    Guo, Fangwei
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced High-temperature Materials and Precision Forming, Shanghai 200240, China .
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Zhao, Xiaofeng
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced High-temperature Materials and Precision Forming, Shanghai 200240, China .
    Xiao, Ping
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced High-temperature Materials and Precision Forming, Shanghai 200240, China .
    A comparative study on the performance of suspension plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings with different bond coat systems2015In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 275, p. 276-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of suspension plasma sprayed (SPS) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) after isothermal treatment at 1150. °C was investigated. The NiCoCrAlY bond coats were applied by air plasma spray (APS) and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) techniques. It was found that the microstructure of SPS TBCs depends on the surface morphology of the bond coat. The SPS TBCs with a rough APS bond coat exhibited a longer lifetime than those with a smooth HVOF bond coat. To understand this phenomenon, the evolution of the microstructure, mechanical properties and the residual stresses in the TBCs and TGO were systematically studied. Results showed that the surface roughness and oxidation behavior of the bond coat play dominant roles in the SPS TBC failure. © 2015.

  • 159.
    Öberg, Anna
    et al.
    Volvo.
    Hammersberg, Peter
    Chalmers, Material- och Tillverkningsteknik.
    Svensson, Lars-Erik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Selection of Evaluation Methods for New Weld Demands: Pitfalls and Possible Solutions2012In: NDT in Service of Society, in Safety Assurance, Quality Control and Condition Monitoring: The 18th World Conference on Nondestructive Testing, WCNDT-2012 / [ed] M. Johannes, AOSIS, 2012, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New demands often create a need for new evaluation methods. However, there are several pitfalls when choosing those methods that can endanger the expected benefits.

    This study shows examples from the implementation of a new welding standard at several sites in the same company. It focuses on possible pitfalls as well as probable causes and potential solutions with a push- and pull-approach. The examples cover the problems with unclear or too simplified demands, lack of evaluation method and incapable evaluation methods.

    The ability to handle and prevent the described issues is a prerequisite in order to be able to develop the organisation in means of quality assurance for light weight structures.

1234 151 - 159 of 159
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