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  • 101.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    The Notion of Users in Design Science Research2015In: Proceedings of the 38th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia (IRIS 38), Oulu, Finland, 9-12 August / [ed] Anssi Öörni, Netta Iivari, Kari Kuutti, Harri Oinas-Kukkonen and Mikko Rajanen (eds.), 2015, p. 1-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design Science Research (DSR) has since the last decade become a paradigm within the field of Information Systems (IS). It provides researchers and practitioners within IS with a rich set of tools in terms of methods, theoretical foundations, research validity and other characteristics. This paper investigates what the notion of users is in DSR. It presents results from a small literature review based on 31 DSR-papers. The results indicate a low presence of how DSR-papers conceptualize the concept of users. The paper suggests that DSR hasn’t reached it’s full potentialities in terms of positioning an explicit notion of users, and that it can be a relevant task for further research for IS-researchers in general, and for DSR-researchers in particular.

  • 102.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    The phenomenon of feeling addicted to social media: why do we feel addicted to social media?2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 103.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    A Duality of Digitalization: How Can We Understand the Tension Between Professional's Beliefs and Affordances with Digital Services in Civic Orientation?2015In: Conference Proceedings: ABSTRACTS All Concurrent Sessions Presented at the 19th World Conference on Cooperative & Work Integrated Education, WACE , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout the last 2 decades, workplaces have been provided with digital services for optimizing work activities and processes. A variety of professions have incorporated their tasks for teaching and learning through the utilization of novel digital services. Teachers and students have the opportunity to interact with each other regardless of geographical locations through distance education and learning. Overall, the phenomenon of digitalization has generated consequences and effects for the society in general, and workplaces and professionals in particular.

        Recently, a notion of digitalization has reached projects conducted on a national level for integrating newcomers in Sweden. The Swedish government has appointed members from University West, together with a municipality in West Sweden to launch a novel digitalization project. The project emphasizes challenges and issues with designing, developing and evaluating an open digital experience in Civic Orientation. This paper examines and discusses a duality of digitalization by investigating how we can understand the tension between professional’s pre-understanding and affordances of digital services in Civic Orientation. We will present results from interviews with professionals at the municipality, together with results from a survey evaluation. We argue in the paper, that it is beneficial for further research, to understand the tension between professional’s beliefs and affordances of digital services.

  • 104.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Bernhardsson, Patrik
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    CollaborGeneous: A Framework of Collaborative IT-Tools for Heterogeneous Groups of Learners2015In: New Horizons in Design Science: Broadening the Research Agenda / [ed] Donnellan, Brian; Helfert, Markus; Kenneally, Jim; VanderMeer, Debra; Rothenberger, Marcus; Winter, Robert, Springer International Publishing , 2015, Vol. 9073, p. 376-380Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present our designed prototype: CollaborGeneous. CollaborGeneous is a framework of collaborative IT-tools for heterogeneous groups of learners in Civic Orientation. It is designed to serve different types of activities for producing, maintaining, distributing and presenting digital learning-material within Civic Orientation. The significance of introducing our prototype is relevant for both practitioners and researchers within Design Science Research. The novelty of our artifact lies in its characteristic of use in the intersection between Civic Orientation and Information Systems, providing different groups of learner's necessary tools to collaborate and create an open digital experience of Civic Orientation.

  • 105.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Bernhardsson, Patrik
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    An information systems design theory for adaptabe E-learning2016In: Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, ISSN 1530-1605, Vol. 2016-March, p. 4414-4423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An Information Systems Design Theory is a prescriptive theory that offers theory-based principles, which can guide practitioners and scholars in the design of effective information systems and set an agenda for on-going research. This paper introduces and describes an ISDT for adaptable E-Learning. We formulate our ISDT based on two cycles of Action Design Research. The cycles were conducted in an authentic organizational setting with end-users, responsible for organizing, producing and distributing civic orientation. Based on our findings, we propose that our ISDT, together with its components, can be used to design, implement and support an information system that incorporates E-Learning, which is not explicitly constrained to the formal context of higher education. © 2016 IEEE.

  • 106.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Rossi, Matti
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Introducing PADRE: Participatory Action Design Research2015In: Workshop Programme and Proceedings: AIS SIGPRAG Pre-ICIS Workshop :Practice-based Design and Innovation of Digital Artifacts, SIGPrag , 2015, p. 1-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Action Design Research (ADR) is a Design Research (DR) method that enriches the DesignScience Research (DSR) paradigm, by providing stages and principles for designing IT artifacts and allowing for their emergence in an organizational context. The method has been used and elaborated by scholars, extending the mode of the method and its stages, incorporating and adopting knowledge from related approaches such as Participatory Action Research(PAR) and Participatory Design (PD). In this paper, we have adopted principles and philosophy from PAR and PD to extend and elaborate the AD R method, by providing afront-end of Action Research (AR) that emphasizes learning through incremental iteration. We will introduce our elaborated method as Participatory Action Design Research (PADRE) and demonstrate how we have used it in our own research. We argue that the ADR method can benefit from incorporating learning within and across each and every stage iteratively. We also argue that learning can be used as an repository of knowledge, which informs and gets accumulated for formalization of learning that can be re-used within different cycles of ADR.Hence, we introduce PADRE and provide a model that consists of a set of key-components, which extends and elaborates the ADR method.

  • 107.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Rossi, Matti
    Information Systems, Aalto University, Finland.
    PADRE: a Method for Participatory Action Design Research2016In: Tackling Society's Grand Challenges with Design Science: 11th International Conference, DESRIST 2016, St. John's, NL, Canada, May 23-25, 2016, Proceedings / [ed] Editors: Parsons, J., Tuunanen, T., Venable, J., Donnellan, B., Helfert, M., Kenneally, J. (Eds.), Springer International Publishing , 2016, Vol. 9661, p. 19-36Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Action Design Research (ADR) is a Design Research (DR) method that enriches the Design Science Research (DSR) paradigm, by providing stages and principles for designing artifacts and allowing for their emergence in an organizational context. The method has been used and elaborated by scholars, extending the mode of the method and its stages, incorporating and adopting knowledge from related approaches such as Participatory Action Research (PAR) and Participatory Design (PD). In this paper, we have adopted principles and philosophy from PAR and PD to extend and elaborate the AD R method, by providing a front-end of Action Research (AR) that emphasizes learning through incremental iteration. We will introduce our elaborated method as Participatory Action Design Research (PADRE) and demonstrate how we have used it in our own research. We argue that the ADR method can benefit from incorporating learning within and across each and every stage iteratively. We also argue that learning can be used as a learning nexus, which informs and gets accumulated for formalization of learning that can be re-used within different cycles of ADR. Hence, we introduce PADRE and provide a model that consists of a set of key-components, which extends and elaborates the ADR method

  • 108.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Chandra Kruse, Leona
    University of Liechtenstein, Vaduz, Liechtenstein.
    Iivari, Juhani
    University of Oulu, Information Systems, Pentti Kaiteran katu 1, 90014 Oulu, Finland.
    Flensburg, Per
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    How Habermas' Philosophy can Inspire the Design of Information Systems: The Case of Designing an Open Learning Platform for Social Integration2016In: Proceedings of IRIS39, Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, Ljungskile, August 7-10, 2016. Ljungskile, Sweden, August 7-10, 2016 / [ed] Pareto, Lena, Svensson, Lars, Lundin, Johan, Lundh Snis, Ulrika, 2016, Vol. 7, p. 1-13Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The notions of immigration and social integration have increasingly become central themes in public discourse,particularly in the European Union. Besides opportunities, this phenomenon also poses challenges to the host nations of promoting social integration of immigrants. Continuing an earlier Design Science Research project that developed an open learning platform for Civic Orientation in Sweden, this paper attempts to extend this platform using Jürgen Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action as an inspiration. We aim at designing a more inclusive open learning platform for social integration that supports instrumental, strategic, normatively-regulated, dramaturgical, and communicative action. We expect to further the relevance of philosophy in IS research by not only making sense of phenomena through philosophical lens, butalso attaining inspirations from philosophy in designing sociotechnical information systems.

  • 109.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Flensburg, Per
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Conceptualizing the Essence of Presence in Distance Education through Digital Dasein2017In: International Journal on E-learning, ISSN 1537-2456, E-ISSN 1943-5932, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 149-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: In order to learn, presence is necessary. If we experience a genuinely rich presence, exams, tests and other forms of evaluating knowledge are not crucial for learning. In distance learning, the concept of presence is not obvious. Presence in distance and network contexts usually means being active on social media. However, in distance and network learning, something more is needed. It is the face-to-face interaction that needs to be "digitalized". In order to investigate this, we have turned to Heidegger (1927) and the concept of Dasein. The concept of Dasein means to apprehend the existence of the world and not only the world itself. Digital Dasein means to transcend the digital medium and reveal the essence of presence for a more translucent form of e-learning. The need for an artefact mediating Digital Dasein has been identified.

  • 110.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Flensburg, Per
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Conceptualizing the essence of presence in E-learning through digital dasein2017In: International Journal on E-learning, ISSN 1537-2456, E-ISSN 1943-5932, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 149-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to learn, presence is necessary. If we experience a genuinely rich presence, exams, tests and other forms of evaluating knowledge are not crucial for learning. In distance learning, the concept of presence is not obvious. Presence in distance and network contexts usually means being active on social media. However, in distance and network learning, something more is needed. It is the face-to-face interaction that needs to be “digitalized”. In order to investigate this, we have turned to Heidegger (1927) and the concept of Dasein. The concept of Dasein means to apprehend the existence of the world and not only the world itself. Digital Dasein means to transcend the digital medium and reveal the essence of presence for a more translucent form of e-learning. The need for an artefact mediating Digital Dasein has been identified. © 2017, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education. All rights reserved.

  • 111.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Flensburg, Per
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Winman, Thomas
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Designing a Web-Based Education Platform for Swedish Civic Orientation2014In: Proceedings of the 37th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia (IRIS 37), Ringsted, Denmark, 10-13 August. / [ed] Ahmad Ghazawneh, Jacob Nørbjerg and Jan Pries-Heje, Ringsted, 2014, p. 1-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Newcomers in Sweden face a problem of learning the Swedish society with respect to laws, culture, democratic values, education system, labor market and aspects of taking the role as a parent. The municipality of Gothenburg and the county administrative board in Västra Götaland are appointed by the Swedish government to educate newcomers in civic orientation. This paper describes some problems in providing distance education for Swedish civic orientation in forms of advanced learning modules (ALM). Requirements for implications for design were gathered through several conducted workshops together with relevant stakeholders through a participatory design approach. We concluded that our design for implications can be processed for future research and used together with a system solution.

  • 112.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Flensburg, Per
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Conceptualizing the Essence of Presence in Distance Education through Digital Dasein2014In: Proceedings of World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2014, Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2014, p. 746-754Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to achieve learning, presence is necessary. If we have good presence, no tests are necessary. In distance learning, the concept of presence is not obvious. Presence in distance and network contexts usually means being active on social media. However, in distance and network learning, something more is needed. It is the face-to-face interaction that needs to be “digitalized”. In order to investigate this, we have turned to Heidegger (1927) and the concept of Dasein. The need for an artifact mediating Dasein has been identified. The concept of Dasein is not easy, not even in philosophical terms. It means being somewhere else, and not on the place you are present. We have extended the The Community of Inquiry Model originating from Garrisson & Andersson (2003) by introducing the concept of digital Dasein.

  • 113.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Flensburg, Per
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Thapa, Devinder
    University of Agder, Department of Information Systems, Gimlemoen 25, Kristiansand.
    Imparting social values through eLearning platform: A social learning approach2016In: Proceedings of IRIS39, Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, Ljungskile, August 7-10, 2016 / [ed] Pareto, Lena, Svensson, Lars, Lundin, Johan, Lundh Snis, Ulrika Lundh Snis, 2016, p. 1-15Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we have identified a gap with regard to imparting social values in an eLearning platform that was designed for orienting immigrants entering Sweden (newcomers). We identified that an existing eLearning platform is more oriented towards creating awareness rather than imparting transformative learning. Therefore, we propose a conceptual framework suggesting how to bring in the social values in eLearning platform,by subsequently applying social learning approach to promulgate transformative learning in which the learner also internalize the values in their attitude and behavior. The proposed framework makes a theoretical contribution by combining the notion of value, value content, value systems and social learning approach in the eLearning platform. The contribution also has practical implications in terms of providing transformative learning to newcomers. We argue that the contents on social values through the eLearning platform should be transformative, and not only informative. We suggest to integrate social values in the eLearning platform; make the learning transformative, and impart those values through social learning approaches such as triple-loop learning, connecting various communities of practices and to make the platform more interactive and engaging

  • 114.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Purao, Sandeep
    Information and Process Management, Bentley University, USA.
    Rossi, Matti
    Information Systems, Aalto University, Finland.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Action Design Research as a Method-in-Use: Problems and Opportunities2017In: Designing the Digital Transformation: DESRIST 2017 Research in Progress Proceedings / [ed] Maedche, Alexander [Hrsg.]; Brocke, Jan vom [Hrsg.]; Hevner, Alan [Hrsg.], Karlsruhe: KIT Publishers, 2017, p. 110-118Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the results of a study to investigate how scholars engage with and use the action design research (ADR) approach. ADR has been acknowledged as an important variant of the Design Science Research approach, and has been adopted by a number of scholars, as the methodological basis for doctoral dissertations as well as multidisciplinary research projects. With thisuse, the research community is learning about how to apply ADR's central tenets in different contexts. In this paper, we draw on primary data from researchers who have recently engaged in or finished an ADR project to identify recurring problems and opportunities related to working in different ADR stages, balancing demands from practice and research, and addressing problem instance vs. class of problems. Our work contributes a greater understanding of how ADR projects are carried out in practice, how researchers use ADR, and pointers to possibilities for extending ADR.

  • 115.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Purao, Sandeep
    Bentley University, Bentley, USA.
    Rossi, Matti
    Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Action Design Research in Practice: Lessons and Concerns2018In: Proceedings ECIS 2018, 2018, article id 1755Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the results of a study of how scholars engage with and use the action designresearch (ADR) method. Since its publication, ADR has been acknowledged as an importantvariant of DSR, and has been adopted by a number of researchers. It has been adopted as theprimary research method for doctoral dissertations as well as research projects in severaldisciplines. With the increasing use of ADR, the research community is also learning about how toapply ADR in different contexts. In this paper, we focus on how researchers are using the method.Drawing on primary data from researchers who have recently engaged in or finished an ADRproject, we identify several recurring themes: managing expectations with actual outcomes ofADR-projects, coordinating work across different ADR-stages, and balancing the focus on probleminstance versus class of problems. Our work contributes a greater understanding about how ADRprojects are carried out in practice, how researchers can avoid some of the common pitfalls, andhow the method can be applied more effectively.

  • 116.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Designing for Heterogeneous Groups of End-Users Towards a Nascent Design Theory2014In: Proceedings of World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2014, Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2014, p. 765-776Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poverty, war, conflicts, and other forces of global turmoil are constantly challenging how developed nations design their processes for immigration in general, and civic orientation in particular. This paper focuses on an exploratory study of the challenges coupled with the digitalization of civic orientation in a region of West Sweden – and concludes with a set of five tentative design guidelines for how to design for heterogeneous groups of end-users.

  • 117. Hansson, Anders
    et al.
    Larsson, Lena G
    Närhälsan, FoU Primärvård, Västra Götalandsregionen och NU-akademin.
    Svensson, Ann
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Alsén, Pia
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, undergraduate level.
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Forsman, Berit
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Vem tar bollen?: går vården för de mest sjuka äldre att förbättra?2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund Flera svenska rapporter visar att de mest sjuka äldre ofta far illa på grund av bristande samordning och oklar ansvarsfördelning mellan olika behandlingsinstanser. Primärvården, hemtjänsten och den kommunala hemsjukvården anses i otillräcklig omfattning ta över ansvaret efter utskrivningen av de sjuka äldre från sjukhuset. Svenska erfarenheter stämmer väl med vad man funnit i flera internationella studier: sjukvården är illa rustad för att möta de mest sjuka äldres komplexa behov av vård och omsorg.

  • 118.
    Hansson, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Jobe, William
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Frontrunners in ICT: Kenyan runners'€™ improvement in training, informal learning and economic opportunities using smartphones2014In: ijEDict - International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology, ISSN 1814-0556, E-ISSN 1814-0556, Vol. 10, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 119.
    Hassen, Yasin Ali
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Ann
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    The Role of ICT for the Growth of Small Enterprises in Ethiopia2014In: Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries, ISSN 1681-4835, E-ISSN 1681-4835, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small enterprises strive to survive and grow in the business they are involved. They make efforts to utilize different resources and technologies available to this end as long as it is affordable and productive. Information Communication Technology or e-commerce are among those technologies that take the front line. This paper aims to define an adoption level of e-commerce in small Ethiopian enterprises and show that their business requirements and perceived benefits of e-commerce are related to business growth. It takes five small enterprises involved in import and export business to perform case study research on the issue and examines their utilization level of the technology. The findings show that small enterprises in the country have low levels of e-commerce utilization due to: (1) the scarcity of infrastructure development and expertise in the area, and (2) barriers created by government policy and bank regulations. However, this study found good understanding of the business opportunities and benefits that could be exploited from e-commerce.

  • 120.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Eriksson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Malmsköld, Lennart
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    E-learning Readiness and Absorptive Capacity in the Manufacturing Industry2014In: International Journal of Advanced Corporate Learning, ISSN 1867-5565, E-ISSN 1867-5565, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing industry constantly strive to develop the competencies of their expert production engineers in order to achieve and maintain a competitive advantage. Research shows that the absorptive capacity of a firm is central in order to reach such a goal. The absorptive capacity is the firm´s ability to recognize the value of new external information, assimilate it, and apply it to commercial ends, and thereby exploit the conditions for innovation. In this paper the concept of absorptive capacity is used as a lens for analyzing managerial rationales for engaging in technology enhanced competence development projects. Through interviews with key informants in 15 manufacturing firms we study the capabilities and readiness that organizations need for participation in e-learning initiatives. We present a framework of readiness for technology enhanced competence development comprised of the following interrelated constructs; awareness, e-learning maturity, dynamic capability and co-creativity. Results show a broad variation of levels within the constructs among the firms. Notable is the low level of e-learning maturity and dynamic capability. We argue that e-learning maturity is dependent on all four constructs.

  • 121.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Eriksson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Malmsköld, Lennart
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems. Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Product and Production Development,.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Work-Integrated Learning and Co-creation of Knowledge: Design of collaborative technology enhanced learning activities2014In: Proceedings of the 37th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia (IRIS 37) / [ed] Ahmad Ghazawneh, Jacob Nørbjerg and Jan Pries-Heje, Ringsted, 2014, p. 1-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we aim to understand management’s perceptions of knowledge and competence development to inform the design of technology enhanced learning activities integrated in the workplace. Work-integrated learning can be viewed with the university lens on studies of formal education integrated in the workplace setting, but here we rather emphasize the conditions of the workplace as implications for design of successful e-learning initiatives. We conducted interviews with 15 manufacturing industries in Sweden and used qualitative content analysis approach to interpret the text data. Results show that companies describe a rich variation of work-integrated learning activities, but the step towards external collaboration with academia for co-production of knowledge is marginal. Also, broad-minded work for innovations is limited. This imply the need for well-planned design of richer collaborative acitivites between academia and organizations through use of media technology to encourage competence development.

  • 122.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Spante, Maria
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Situated and Mediated Engineering Education: Researchers Design Conceptions of e-Learning targeting Industry Practitioners Competence needsIn: International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning, ISSN 1560-4624, E-ISSN 1741-5055Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 123.
    Hattinger, Monika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Spante, Maria
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Ruijan, Du
    Mediated and Situated Engineering Education2014In: Proceedings of World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2014, Cheasapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2014, p. 810-817Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This small-scale interview study explore engineering expert teachers’ experiences and ideas of e-learning within engineering education. The aim is to capture teachers`experiences entering educational situations that forces them towards new modes of teaching as well as towards a closer collaboration with the industry engineering professional practice. The study addresses challenges crucial for engineering teachers to master when designing e-learning courses that manufacturing industry needs. In the paper we highlight how teachers’perspectives effect the design of work-integrated e-learning courses. In particular we investigate how teacher express their ideas regarding the transition of campus courses into work-integrated e-learning courses as a new teaching situation. Findings show that teachers are content experts in the engineering knowledge field but lack experiences and support for design of e-learning courses.

  • 124.
    Hedlund, Annie
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundgren, Martin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    En mobil evenemangsapplikation i Trollhättans utveckling mot en mer attraktiv stad2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a prototype of a mobile application that collects local event information, has been created. Local events are a contributing factor to increased economic growth and how individuals experience a city as a whole. Because of this, it is vital that information about local events reaches inhabitants. This information is currently distributed in both social media, websites, newspapers and bulletin boards. Due to the fact that the information is currently scattered, inhabitants in the city feel that they are not reached by all information about local events. The aim of the study is to develop a design proposal on a mobile application that can be used in future development and implementation of the application. Through qualitative interviews with students at the University of West, a need for an event application has been identified, proposals for features and content have been developed. Based on these interviews and previous research within areas of usability, user experience, design principles and interaction design a prototype has been designed. To confirm that the prototype produced was considered useful and had good usability five structured usability tests were performed with potential end users. The result of these shows that the study has developed a useful interface and that the general perception of both the interface and the application was its simplicity. The conclusion of the study is that the designed prototype is appropriate and useful which will enable the interface to be used as a basis for future development of the application.

  • 125.
    Hedqvist, Ann-Therese
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Det digitala mötet: Personcentrerad samordnad vård- och omsorgsplanering via videokonferens2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We are becoming older and more people remain in their home with the need for care. When these persons for some reason have been hospitalized and are to return to their homes, care planning is performed in order for the person to be able to leave the ward in a safe manner. With an increasing number of elderly persons in need of care interventions in their home, the need for coordinated care planning in hospitals will also increase. Such planning is today being performed increasingly often via video conferencing. This form of digital encounters poses new challenges for the nurse in creating and maintaining a mutuality.

    Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the conditions for coordinated care planning via video conferencing and how this affects the ability of health care professionals to understand and interpret the patient’s situation from a holistic perspective, thus performing a person-centered meeting at a distance.

    Method: A qualitative research approach was used to gain an understanding of nurses' experience of coordinated care planning via video conferencing. The method consisted of an initial exploratory literature study and individual personal semistructured interviews. The sample consisted of a total of seven nurses in primary care, primary care and municipal home nursing. The analysis of the interview material was conducted with an inductive approach inspired by phenomenology.

    Result: The result shows that the communication is affected and that meetings via video technology lose proximity and thus a part of the human contact. This can disrupt the possibility of seeing each other as persons but can be compensated by a person-centered approach. The technology can act as a means of human interaction, but not as a compensation for it. The main themes found in the result are loss of proximity compensated by multiple gains with associated themes screen as a barrier and benefits for healthcare professionals, patients and relatives as well as technology as means of human interaction with associated themes decidedly dependent on the people in the meeting and high quality in equipment and performance.

    Conclusion: Coordinated care planning via video conferencing involves challenges in conveying presence and genuine interest that compensates for the loss of physical presence. This form of meeting can make it more difficult to see each other as persons, however this obstacle can be compensated by a person-centered approach. The nurse needs to be well acquainted with person-centered care in order to meet the patient despite the barrier that the screen may create. Technology is a means, not an end in itself. Proper use of information and communication technology can be used with great time gains to access each other regardless of geographical location and can contribute to human interaction but not replace it.

  • 126.
    Hoti, Egzon
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Yeretzian, Andro
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Mobila betalningar: Vilka upplevda risker finns det bland svenska konsumenter2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we have examined what perceived risks Swedish users of mobile payments have. The study focuses on the risks consumers experience in mobile payments, including user habits, as well as social influences regarding how users first started using mobile payments. Previous studies have shown that there are concerns among Swedish users of mobile payments, including the perceived risks associated with the security aspect of using mobile payments, aswell as psychological risks. The purpose of this study is thus to identify what risks Swedish users experience when using mobile payments. To carry put the study and the empirical data collection, a qualitative study effort has been applied, through personal interviews with a total of six respondents. The respondents consisted of six students at the University of West, which are divided into two different programs that they study. A literature study has also been made, through a theoretical review. We found through the interviews that there are several perceived risks among mobile payment users. The three most important risks were theft of sensitive information, malicious software, and fraud as a serious and realistic perceived risk of mobile payments. We also found that the perceived risks are judged to be greater if users have previously suffered from mobile payment risks or have acquaintances that hafe suffered from it. The tendency to use mobile payments also reduces if they previously suffered from risks, which is in line with earlier studies. The study also shows that social influences have a significant factor in how users first start using mobile payments, especially the influence of family and friends. The conclusion we can deduce from the study are that factors affecting personal integrity appear to be the most important perceived risks among the users interviewed, and other security risks are also perceived as serious. We also found a direct correlation betwen previous experiences of mobile payments and how risks are perceived. Although several respondents perceive that there are risks with mobile payments, they continue to be used because the mobile payments services are perceived as practical, easy and convenient. The risks are not perceived to be big enough to stop them from using mobile payments, although they do exist.

  • 127.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    An mHealth artifact in home care: Professional progression through work integrated learning: Towards an IT supported caring conversations2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to study a problematic grocery-shopping situation within a home care organization, in one studied municipality in Sweden and for this, a qualitative action design research method is applied. As a solution to this problem, an mHealth (mobile health) artifact was developed and the thesis aims to study the developed solution and the WIL effects on the organization and the caring situation. The purpose is to emphasize on the perceptions of an mHealth artifact for the grocery shopping process as well as capture the early perceptions focusing on the values and effects for the different levels of engagement spanning the user groups involved. Then, finally investigating the effects on the caregivers’ competence development in relation to the mHealth artifact and the work integrated learning. This leads to the recognition of the need for a conversation between the caretakers and the caregivers. This results in the developed artifact, being found a conversational starter, nurturing and triggering a caring conversation, which leads to professional progression. This consequently, leads to higher quality of care and to the caregivers having more pride in their profession as well as having more time for the caretakers. This all concludes that technology will not replace caregivers. But caregivers, who use technology, will probably replace caregivers who don’t. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • 128.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Platformization: Co-Designing Digital Platforms in Practice2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital platforms are slowly becoming an important part of both research and everyday work. However, much of the research focus has been on platforms that are already established. Little focus has been on platformization (i.e., design, development and use of platforms in the nascent phases) and the socio-technical aspects of designing platforms for specific practices or purposes, i.e., practicebased platforms. While it is truly important to understand technological aspects and market logics of platform efforts, it is also to understand how platforms become platforms, when designing them alongside end-users. This thesis contributes to the platform discussion with research that focuses both on the technological sides of building platforms while also unpacking the social aspectsof the collaborative design situation (i.e., co-design) and development where endusers meet and later use the platforms. This thesis explores the research questions:How can practice-based platforms be designed and developed? What impact does end-user engagement in platformization have on the practices involved? How can platformization efforts be approached and researched? through a study of the design of platforms in care settings, one 2.5–year study within home care and one 2.5–year study within cancer rehabilitation where the end-users' practices involved in the co-design processes are caregivers and care recipients in bothstudies. This thesis thereby unpacks the platformization process through a roughly five–year longitudinal AR project, based on these two studies. With thehelp of the boundary literature, the design, development and use of platforms inthe nascent phases of platformization is analysed in these two studies. Through aco-design effort in both studies, the practices that are going to use the platforms contribute to a) the design of which boundary resources (i.e., modules in terms of code blocks) will be developed within the platform; b) the design of the boundary object (i.e., working tools in terms of apps) that they are using together inconsensus; and c) the design of a boundary practice in which they will later use the digital artifacts together. The end-users' practices had impact on the design of all layers of the platform through the co-design approach, including an influence on the boundary resources that were developed within the platform. The platforms also had impact on the practices, which designed new ways of interacting. The results thereby both show the impact of the end-users' practices (caregivers and care recipients, which are heterogeneous) on the platform design, as well as the impact of the platform on the design of their boundary practice. In this thesis, the design and development of the two platforms is thereby researched and the design of the platforms is validated by studying the use of the platformsas well. The main contribution of this thesis is a conceptualization of the platformization process where the key characteristics of designing such platforms with heavy user engagement are illustrated in a platformization model and in seven platformization principles.

  • 129.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Sørensen, Carsten
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Co-creation and Fine-Tuning of Boundary Resources in Small-Scale Platformization2016In: Nordic Contributions in IS Research: 7th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 2016 and IFIP8.6 2016, Ljungskile, Sweden, August 7-10, 2016, Proceedings / [ed] Ulrika Lundh Snis, Springer, 2016, Vol. 259, p. 149-162Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most research on platform innovation studies the phenomena from a distance due to lack of access. This paper reports from within an action research case of platform development in a small-scale context. The case is based on a regional business initiative with the goal to establish an arena for mobile commerce and stimulate local industry growth. It was conducted in collaboration between researchers and third-party developers. The article shows how the initial phases of platformization are characterized by socio-technical arrangements, co-creation of boundary resources and intimate knowledge communication. The paper contributes to platform research by acknowledging a small-scale context for platform research. It further develops distributed tuning of boundary resources into an intimate fine-tuning process that we illustrate is valid for a small-scale context.

  • 130.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    University of Gothenburg, Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundin, Johan
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, IT Faculty, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Co-Designing a Digital Platform with Boundary Objects: Bringing Together Heterogeneous Users in HealthcareIn: Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare is increasingly permeated with digital platforms supporting cooperative care involving different professional groups and also patients. New mobile technologies allow for patients to continuously monitor and document their symptoms to support better healthcare, as well as self-care. The successful design of such multi-user platforms calls for new design approaches involving heterogeneous conditions and goals. This paper analyzes theuse of boundary objects in design as a mediator for different users' needs and conditions. Our research is conducted at a clinic supporting cancer survivors in their struggles with treatment induced illnesses, a treatment heavily dependent on new medical research as well as on patient involvement. The data is collected ethnographically over two years following a design project that developed a digital platform to support the care provided by the clinic. We describe how useful boundary objects transform over time, from rich narratives, to conceptual formulations and finally into concrete prototypes of the platform. We argue that understanding such a transformation can inform the design of healthcare platforms and guide future design processes, where co-designing with boundary objects can be especially useful as a design approach when doing design complex settings, such as healthcare settings.

  • 131.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    From Co-Design to Co-Care: Designing a Collaborative Practice in Care2018In: Systems, Signs & Actions, ISSN 1652-8719, E-ISSN 1652-8719, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of digital artifacts in general and mobile apps in particular has not been investigated fully from a practice perspective. Mobile apps are commonly designed from a distant, armslength relationship where they are developed without taking the users' practices into account.This paper problematizes this notion and takes the point of departure from a collaborative design (co-design) process where the goal was to design a mobile app supporting grocery shopping forthe home care sector. We analyse the role of designing a mobile app as a facilitator for collaboration between the elderly's everyday practice and the caregivers work practice and investigatehow these two practices become intertwined. The research questions are: How can the design process be organized in order to foster the formation of a prospective collaborative care practice? What aspects are important to consider when designing with a boundary practice perspective? The findings of this study indicate that organizing the design activities in a certain collaborative manner empowered the elderly and their caregivers and led to the formation of a common, collaborative care practice (herein called co-care). The focus of the design process thereby shifted from designing the digital artifact (framed as a boundary object) to designing the co-carepractice (framed as a boundary practice). Our contribution is discussed in terms of design considerations,which can be applied for the facilitation of a collaborative boundary practice. The considerations are of particular relevance for settings where two or more practices are to collaborate and where new conditions are to be created for future co-practice.

  • 132.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Learning in home care: a digital artifact as a designated boundary object-in-use2017In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 29, no 7-8, p. 577-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to understand how the role of an mHealth artifact plays out in home care settings. An mHealth artifact, in terms of a mobile app, was tested to see how the quality of home care work practice was enhanced and changed. The research question is: In what ways does an mHealth artifact re-shape a home care practice and how does this affect the interaction between caregivers and the elderly and learning opportunities for the caregivers? Design/methodology/approach: An action research approach was taken and the study was conducted in a home care organization in a Swedish municipality. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and observations that were conducted during home visits. Concepts of learning and boundary objects were used to analyze and distinguish interactions and conversations with the mHealth artifact. Findings: The study shows how an mHealth artifact is re-shaping a home care practice and how this affects interactions and identifies learning opportunities. Views on the mHealth artifact as a designated boundary object as well as a boundary object-in-use must co-exist. Originality/value: The study provides qualitative descriptions from using an mHealth artifact for home care, which is an emerging area of concern for both research and practice. It focuses on the interactional and organizational values generated from the actual use of the designed mobile application. © 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 133.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    MHealth in Home Care: a designated boundary object-in-use2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to understand how the role of an mHealth artifact is played out in home care settings. An mHealth artifact, in terms of a mobile app (primarily for tablets) was tested to see how the quality of home care work practice was enhanced and changed. The research question the paper explores is: In what ways is an mHealth artifact re-shaping a home care practice and how does this affect the interaction between the caregivers and the elderly and learning opportunities for the caregivers? This research has an action research approach and it was conducted in a home care organization in a Swedish municipality. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and observations that were conducted during home visits. Concepts of boundary objects were used to analyze and distinguish interactions and conversations with the designed mHealth artifact. Using the mHealth artifact as a boundary object in the caring situation triggered a caring conversation between the caregivers and the elderly. They grew closer and started having deeper conversations. The shift in responsibility, due to new processes enabled the caregiver to stay for a longer time putting the correct care in centrum. The findings reveal that views of the mHealth artifact as a designated boundary object as well as a boundary object-in-use must co-exist in order to understand the emergent properties situated in a technology mediated caring conversation. The study provides qualitative descriptions from early tests of mHealth applications for home care, an emerging area of concern for both research and practice. It focuses on the interactional and organizational values generated from the actual use of the designed mobile application.

  • 134.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    mHealth in Home Care: A Digital Health Initiative Triggering a Caring Conversation and Revealing the Value of Learning2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 135.
    Jakobsson, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Myhrman, Linnéa
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Vilka indikatorer används för att förutse framtida arbetsprestation?: Utformning och bedömningskriterier för rekryteringsprocesser2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Faktorerna som påverkar arbetsprestationen är många och inte alla går att förutse under en rekryteringsprocess. Organisationer försöker med olika verktyg minska den upplevda risken vid nyanställningar. Rekrytering har två huvudsakliga svårigheter, att sortera bort de kandidater som inte skulle utföra en tillfredställande arbetsprestation och att undvika felaktig bortsortering av mer kvalificerade kandidater.

    Åtta intervjuer har genomförts med rekryterare inom tre olika segment av marknaden, Bank och försäkringsbolag, Rekryteringskonsulter och Offentligt finansierad verksamhet. Materialet har sedan sammanställas per segment och ställas mot de andra segmenten, materialet har även ställts mot tidigare forskning om hur väl vilka indikatorer korrelerar med framtida arbetsprestation. På så sätt kunde styrkor och svagheter i rekryteringsprocesserna identifieras och ett litet bidrag lämnas till hur de i framtiden kan komma att genomföras mer effektivt. Ett högst aktuellt ämne då nyanställningarna under 2016 förväntas öka med 1,5 procent från de 1,4 miljoner gjorde under 2015.

    Studien visar att de indikationer som organisationer idag förlitar sig på för att förutspå framtida arbetsprestation är de som enligt forskningen korrelerar minst med framtida arbetsprestation. Dessa är referenser, privata intressen och arbetslivserfarenhet mer mera. Det samma gäller omvänt, generell intelligens och kunskapstester som enligt tidigare forskning korrelerar väl med framtida arbetets prestation används endast stödjande till mer subjektiva bedömningar. Trots detta framkommer inget missnöje med rekryteringsprocesserna under intervjuerna.

  • 136.
    Jannesson, Sofia
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Waligora, Anna
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Vårdpersonalens upplevelse av videoteknik vid distansmöten Vid samordnad vård- och omsorgsplanering i Västra Götalandsregionen2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To enable primary care to participate from a distance in meetings regarding patient discharge planning, Västra Götalandsregionen (VGR) implemented video technology in 2016. Without video technology, primary care could not participate in planning meetings due to resource shortage. Implementing new technology will result in increased quality of care, but the healthcare providers must accept the new efforts. It is common for healthcare organizations to fail when introducing new technologies because users do not accept the changing work environment. In order to increase the chances of user acceptance, the organization should consider certain success factors in the implementation. Research has been conducted to study user acceptance by following the innovation-decision process, which consists of five different steps: knowledge, persuasion, decision, implementation and confirmation. The process has been developed to study how, why and at what rate new technologies are accepted by users within the organization. This study was conducted using a qualitative approach and data was collected through semi-structured interviews with six respondents who worked in primary care. Previous research was used that studied the recommended success factors for the implementation of video technology and the factors that affect the acceptance of new technologies. Video technology used during distance meetings increase access to healthcare specialists for patients in real-time. Through a live video conversation, participants can join the meeting regardless of distance. The primary care was very positive towards the implementation of video technology, as it allows them to participate in discharge planning meetings. Before the introduction of video technology, healthcare providers were worried about how a video meeting would work. Even if the healthcare providers were worried, they were still positive about the introduction of video technology, as it allows them to participate in planning meetings. The healthcare providers were pleasantly surprised at how well the video technology worked at distance meetings and they thought the technology was easy to use. However the findings of this study also showed that there were some minor technical problems with the connection and some problems with scheduling the meetings. The healthcare providers experienced that difficulty with scheduling was the biggest challenge with distance meetings. Despite some difficulties with the technology and scheduling the healthcare providers thought that video technology was still easy to use.

  • 137.
    Jobe, William
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    A Kenyan Cloud School: Massive Open Online & Ongoing Courses for Blended and Lifelong Learning2013In: Open Praxis, ISSN 2304-070X, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 301-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research describes the predicted outcomes of a Kenyan Cloud School (KCS), which is a MOOC that contains all courses taught at the secondary school level in Kenya. This MOOC will consist of online, ongoing subjects in both English and Kiswahili. The KCS subjects offer self-testing and peer assessment to maximize scalability, and digital badges to show progress and completion to recognize and validate non-formal learning. The KCS uses the Moodle LMS with responsive web design to increase ubiquitous access from any device. Access is free and open, and the KCS intends to be a contextualized open educational resource for formal secondary institutions to support blended learning and a free source of non-formal education for lifelong learning. The expected outcomes are that this effort will reduce secondary school dropout rates, improve test scores, become a quality resource for blended learning, as well as validate and recognize lifelong learning in Kenya.

  • 138.
    Jobe, William
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Bridging the learning gap in Kenya with mobile learning: Challenges and future strategies2015In: Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 / [ed] curtis Ho & Grace Lin, University of Hawaii, USA, Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2015, p. 1319-1325Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching aim of this research was to study how mobile technology can catalyze informal learning and bridge the gap between informal and non-formal learning. In this study 30 Kenyan elite runners were equipped with a simple Android smartphone and free Internet for one year. The original research project focused on studying how a smartphone in the hands of impoverished Kenyans could assist and enhance informal learning. This project used log data, workshops and interviews to track the users’ progress. During the course of the study a huge desire for more formalized learning developed. Thus, a non-formal course on Human Rights was developed and made available for all Kenyans via any Internet connected device. In this way the intersection of these two projects provided an opportunity to satiate interests gained from unguided informal learning with structured non-formal learning. Key findings were that the smartphone empowered marginalized groups, augmented informal learning opportunities, and provided a means to bridge informal and non-formal learning to deliver educational opportunities to any device in the form of a non-formal MOOC. This research made a significant impact in the participants’ lives and the most common statement from the interviews was the statement “it helps us a lot”.

  • 139.
    Jobe, William
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Do-It-Yourself Learning in Kenya: Exploring mobile technologies for merging non-formal and informal learning2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The educational landscape is changing and a variety of technologies and techniques are blurring the lines between traditional and non-traditional learning. This change is substantial in low-income countries: individuals in developing countries have a great desire to educate themselves and improve their quality of life. Kenyans are adequately literate and accustomed to mobile technology despite being a largely impoverished, poorly educated populace. Kenya represents an optimal setting in which to research the use and feasibility of modern mobile and educational technologies. The broad aim of this dissertation is to explore how mobile devices can catalyze and enhance both informal and non-formal learning. In particular, this dissertation explores how technologies and concepts such as mobile web apps, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), and learning incentives via a smartphone specifically affect informal and non-formal learning in Kenya. The primary research question is how can learning efforts that utilize mobile learning, MOOCs, and learning incentives combine non-formal and informal learning to develop and contribute to a do-it-yourself (DIY) approach to learning in Kenya? The primary method is action research. The first contribution of this dissertation is the finding that mobile web apps are currently better suited for data exchange than producing new content. The second contribution is the finding that a smartphone can enhance informal learning in a developing country with little or no scaffolding. The third contribution is the finding that non-formal learning efforts as a MOOC are shown to be a viable means of delivering non-formal learning in a developing country via a smartphone. The fourth contribution is the finding that the use of incentives such as digital badges provide a means by which to validate non-formal learning and contribute to a DIY attitude towards learning creation, where individuals can freely complement or replace a traditional curriculum.

  • 140.
    Jobe, William
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Native Apps Vs. Mobile Web Apps2013In: International Journal of Interactive Mobile Technologies (iJIM), ISSN 1865-7923, E-ISSN 1865-7923, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 27-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extensive growth and expansion of smartphones and tablets and therewith the use of mobile web applications that utilize HTML5 and related technologies are frequently discussed and debated in media as possible replacements for native applications. The aim of this study was to explore the viability of replacing native applications with mobile web applications in a developing country setting. Two mobile web applications were developed. The first mobile web application tracked runs and the second mobile web application was a booking system for scheduling "slum runs". The subjects who tested these apps were elite, semi-professional Kenyan runners primarily from the Kibera slum area outside of Nairobi. After a 6-month test period the participants concluded and results indicated that the mobile web application for tracking runs performed poorly compared to native applications due to poor GPS performance, while the mobile web application for booking slum runs performed well. The conclusion from this study is that mobile web applications that require hardware interaction such as using the GPS, GPU, or camera are not yet viable alternatives for native applications. However, mobile applications that only require a native interface and content consumption are suitable substitutes for native applications.

  • 141.
    Jobe, William
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    No University Credit, No Problem?: Exploring Recognition of Non-Formal Learning2014In: 2014 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference Proceedings, IEEE Computer Society, 2014, 2420-2426, 2014, p. 2420-2426Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are disrupting traditional, higher education and redefining how learning takes place online. These open courses typically offer some form of recognition, such as a certificate of completion and/or digital badge, to recognize, validate, and in some cases even accredit learning. A general problem with MOOCs is the uncertainty regarding the use and goals of recognition, validation, and accreditation (RVA), and participants' acceptance and perception of such techniques. This research effort addresses this problem by exploring course partici-pants' attitudes and levels of acceptance of non-formal learning recognition compared to traditional university credit in both devel-oped and developing countries. The actual study uses both certifi-cates of completion and digital badges to recognize and validate learning in an introductory, university level course in web pro-gramming using HTML5/CSS. The course is available to anyone, but was specifically marketed to participants from Sweden and Kenya. Empirical data was gathered using interviews and online surveys in the course. The preliminary results are that participants from developing countries value digital recognition to a greater extent than their counterparts in Europe. However, both Swedes and Kenyans see open courses with digital recognition as a com-plement to traditional learning to individually construct an educa-tion.

  • 142.
    Jobe, William
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Hansson, Per-Olof
    Linköping University.
    Putting a MOOC for Human Rights in the Hands of Kenyans: The Haki Zangu Case for Non-Formal Learning2014In: Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries, ISSN 1681-4835, E-ISSN 1681-4835, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research goal of this project was to explore the use and effects of non-formal education and incentives in the context of a developing country. The practical aim of this project was to create, implement, and evaluate a platform about human rights that was available to any Kenyan for free in order to increase knowledge and engagement. Therefore, a non-formal massive open online course (MOOC) about human rights was designed and launched. The course was free and open to anyone in Kenya and offered both a digital badge and certificate from Stockholm University in Sweden upon completion. The course was called Haki Zangu (Kiswahili for "My Rights"), and it explored how using incentives such as a digital badge and certificate of completion affected learning outcomes. This course offered ubiquitous access based on principles of responsive web design and used audio recordings of the entire course content. The course is perpetual and still on-going, but after six months there were 160 participants who had enrolled, and ten participants had completed the course and received certificates and digital badges. The participants showed extensive enthusiasm and engagement for human rights issues, and they expressed desires to learn more and further spread knowledge about human rights. The current findings suggest that the availability of digital badges and certificates increased interest for participation and positively affected learning outcomes. Moreover, the use of a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) format with incentives proved successful, combined with the contextualization and accessibility of the course content. Furthermore, the technical platform proved adequate for disseminating education for free in a developing country, and allowed for unencumbered access regardless of device. Lastly, a key challenge for future non-formal learning efforts in developing countries is the cost of Internet access.

  • 143.
    Jobe, William
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Designing the CloudBoard: an innovative tool for collaborative e-learning environments using HTML52011In: Proceedings of 24th ICDE World Conference 2011, Universitas Terbuka , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to summarize the concepts of e-learning, LMS/VLE and cloud-based computing and present how the use of these technologies trends towards collaboration and interactive multimedia. Another purpose is to define and explain this trend in e-learning environments and technologies by presenting research grounded in constructivist learning theory. Subsequently, this paper summarizes the current situation of online whiteboard tools and the new HTML5 standard and key attributes. Next, this paper outlines how an open HTML5 solution for a collaborative, cloud-based, online whiteboard can improve accessibility, performance, collaboration, and security plus offer enhanced multimedia opportunities. Finally, this paper concludes with a presentation of an early prototype of an open, cloud-based online whiteboard, an e-learning cloudboard, which utilizes the advancements found in HTML5 and modern JavaScript libraries such as JQuery. 

  • 144.
    Jobe, William
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Bernhardsson, Patrik
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Rask, Anders Bindslev
    University College Nordjylland, Energi- og miljøuddannelserne, Professionshøjskolen University Colleges.
    Improving the creation, curation and discovery of open educational resources for work integrated and lifelong learning2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns open education (OER) resources, and more specifically the process of publishing OER material to make it easier to find on the web. The overarching goals are to improve the creation and discovery of OER material for workplace learning as well as strive towards UNESCO’s Sustainable Development Goal 4, which aims to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. As we see it, there are two key challenges. The first challenge regards the content creation and curation side; i.e. the process of making OER material available to the general public, how to maintain the resource and how to get feedback on it. The second challenge regards discovery i.e. for OER consumers to easily find OER material and discern its usefulness in their specific learning context. We are in the process of developing a web based system that aids content creators in publishing and maintaining their OER material. The system helps the content creator by generating semantic metadata about the resource based on the Dublin Core system and creates a package of the material itself along with said metadata in a search engine optimized HTML5 file, ready for publishing on a web server or a video streaming site like YouTube, or other media sharing sites. This approach primarily utilizes common search engines to find the material, thus making the OER material decentralized and not necessarily specific to a specific OER repository. The metadata created by the system does, however, enable developers to create systems specialized in collecting and aggregating OER material, further enhancing the capability of the decentralized ecosystem of OER resources to be used by learning management systems. The key contribution is a suggestion as to how to automatically generate and use an OERID so that all resources can be discovered, curated, and reused.

  • 145.
    Jobe, William
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Östlund, Christian
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    MOOCs for Professional Teacher Development2014In: Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2014 / [ed] M. Searson & M. Ochoa, Chesapeake, VA: AACE , 2014, p. 1580-1586Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A MOOC is a trending concept in education that is disrupting traditional methods oflearning consumption. The emergence and use of MOOCs for professional teacher development isstill uncommon, but on the verge of gaining a foothold. Research regarding MOOCs typicallyfocuses on impacts for higher education and lifelong learning. However, the specific intersection ofMOOCs and professional teacher development is poorly researched. This concept papercontemplates the benefits and drawbacks of using MOOCs for professional teacher developmentand calls for more practical studies and explorative research. This paper also speculates on the basicMOOC design criteria and principles needed to maximize engagement and course completion,which are currently common issues with general MOOCs. The conclusion is that MOOCs can be acost- and resource-effective means to deliver quality education in order to further professionalteacher development. However, possible risks are employers' reluctance to accept MOOCaccreditation as equivalent professional development and the lack of relevant MOOC courses forprofessional development.

  • 146.
    Johansson, Alexander
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Vasarhelyi, Christian
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    M-spänn: En kvalitativ studie om mobila transaktioner med fokus kring användbarhet och säkerhet2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim with this study was to examine how people in Sweden use mobile transactionsas well as to discover what roll usability and security play in this context. One main andtwo secondary questions were formulated and resulted in how Swedes considertransferring money via smartphones as well as the meaning of usability and security inthis matter. The research will contribute to a deeper understanding into how individualssee present and future transactions through the use of a mobile phone. A qualitativemethod with semi-structured interviews was undertaken with ten individuals of differentages and genders.In order to investigate the phenomenon that is surrounding mobile transactions anempirical case was implemented which in this instance was the application Swish. Theempirical material was thematised which lead on to several conclusions within our threeareas of focus; mobile transactions, usability and security which has been presentthemes through out the entire study. The results demonstrated that the overallimpression of mobile transactions is that of a positive nature. However, the largernumber of informants stated that they would not replace cash and credit payments butrather see mobile transactions as a complement to already available methods ofpayment. In regards to the usefulness of the service; functionality and structure are vitalaspects during the usage of mobile transactions. Conclusively the study resulted andshowed that the knowledge in regards to security is very limited.

  • 147.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, .
    Bjuhr, Helena
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, .
    Karlsson, Magdalena
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, .
    Karlsson, Jan-Olof
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Rönnbäck, Lars
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, .
    Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) Delivered Live on the Internet to Individuals Suffering from Mental Fatigue After an Acquired Brain Injury2015In: Mindfulness, ISSN 1868-8527, E-ISSN 1868-8535, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 1356-1365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An acquired brain injury often leads to long-lasting mental fatigue, which can have a considerable effect on work and social interactions. Fortunately, the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program has been found to alleviate mental fatigue. The purpose of this feasibility study was to evaluate the success of an interactive MBSR program delivered live online to individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury or stroke. We included the following three groups in our study: an Internet group, a face-to-face MBSR group, and an active control group who took weekly walks in natural environments. Thirty-four participants completed the study, and all were suffering from long-lasting mental fatigue after either a traumatic brain injury (16 participants) or a stroke (18 participants). However, seven did not accept to attend an Internet MBSR, and Internet was the only choice for others. We found that, according to the Mental Fatigue Scale (MFS), the program leads to significantly reduced mental fatigue in the Internet group compared with the face-to-face and the control group. Individuals in the MBSR groups also exhibited an improved ability to process two temporally close targets (attentional blink task), while this was not detected in the control group. In conclusion, we believe that it is possible for individuals suffering from mental fatigue after an acquired brain injury to obtain positive results through enrollment in a live, interactive, online MBSR program. This is promising, as the Internet is accessible to many individuals, irrespective of where they live. Further randomized control studies comparing are warranted.

  • 148.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, .
    Karlsson, Jan-Olof
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Rönnback, Lars
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, .
    Use the app-Measure mental fatigue-Take control2014In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 28, no 5-6, p. 574-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVESFatigue after an acquired brain injury is common, and is characterized by limited energy reserves to accomplish ordinary daily activities. A typical characteristic of mental fatigue is that the mental exhaustion becomes pronounced during sensory stimulation or when cognitive tasks are performed for extended periods without breaks. There is a drain of mental energy upon mental activity in situations in which there is an invasion of the senses with an overload of impressions, and in noisy and hectic environments. Another typical feature is a disproportionally long recovery time needed to restore the mental energy levels after being mentally exhausted. The mental fatigue is also dependent on the total activity level as well as the nature of the demands of daily activities. For many people, there is an increased risk of doing too much and becoming even more fatigued.METHODSWe have developed an application for Windows Phone for assessment of mental fatigue. The Mental Fatigue Scale is used. The MFS is a multidimensional questionnaire containing 15 questions. The questions included in the MFS are based on symptoms described following longitudinal studies of patients with TBI, brain tumours, infections or inflammations in the nervous system, vascular brain diseases, and other brain disorders. The app also includes information about mental fatigue.   RESULTSThis application can help people determine the level of mental fatigue and it can also serve to provide an overall picture of the severity of the condition, and detect changes in mental fatigue over time. The scores will be added up and the results will be presented in the form of a rating scale and a diagram. People can then see their results for one week ago, one month ago or a whole year ago. Today, the most important recommendations are to adapt to the energy available by doing one thing at a time, resting regularly and not overdoing things. However, this is challenging for most people and it may take a long time, even years, to adapt to a sustainable level. It may also be difficult for the person to learn by himself/herself and it can take several years of considerable struggle, frustration, despair and depression, to find the right balance between rest and activity. This app can help people to be aware of mental fatigue. If they connect the results to daily activities, the app may also help them to be more aware about what may alleviate and what may make mental fatigue worse. CONCLUSIONSWith regular assessment of mental fatigue, this app may give feedback and support in order to achieve an enduring balance between activities and rest.

    The application can be downloaded without cost: http://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/store/app/mental-fatigue/87d4cb88-c9b5-4ac9-9a92-b63a5d8f4d82

  • 149.
    Johansson, Kristina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Spante, Maria
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Is everyone on board: A study investigating the implementation of a programme with a "new " learning design.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 150.
    Johansson, Kristina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Thång, Per-Olof
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Förord2014In: Nordic Journal of Vocational Education and Training, ISSN 2242-458X, E-ISSN 2242-458X, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
1234567 101 - 150 of 314
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