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  • 101.
    Lundin, Johan
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pongolini, Malin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Communication in boundary practices: from media choice to interaction negotiation?2009In: Proceedings of the 32nd Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, IRIS 32: Inclusive Design / [ed] Judith Molka-Danielsen, Molde University College , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research presented in this paper is an initial analysis of an ongoing project build on work in, what we call, boundary practices. These new professional roles emerge in the border lands between existing practice communities. This change effect knowledge production, decision making, collaboration and a range of other aspects in work. However, the study at hand focus how work is conducted and coordinated through and with new media technologies, and in particular how media are put to use. We have conducted ethnographical studies within a global automotive manufacturing company. The organization has recently introduced a new role, subsystem manager, i.e. a technical expert that is given strategic responsibilities for shared parts and platforms within the organization. The subsystem manager is to participate in a number of global meetings with other experts within the subsystem or with other managers for closely related or integrated subsystems. Three different global meetings have been observed and preliminary findings indicate that some of the fundamental assumptions built into the concept of media choice and media richness might be problematic as an analytical perspective used on our empirical context. The work we have studied is characterized by negotiations, not only concerning how to solve a task, but also concerning what the task actually is. The choice of media is in itself is a matter of negotiations. Practitioners are adding new media to ongoing interactions, rather than using media in sequence and one medium is not used exclusively. Rather a number of media are used in parallel.

  • 102.
    Lundin, Johan
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Practice Based Design for Learning at Work2008In: International Journal of Advanced Corporate Learning, ISSN 1867-5565, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 17-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing for learning at work in a manner that embraces the rich situatedness of practice involves a number of challenges in bridging normative and descriptive perspectives, as well as closing the gap between IS design theory and practice. In this paper, we propose a grounded approach that combines influence from learning theories with studies of existing learning practices. This approach could result in learning models, constituted of a sequence of learning activities that outlines the didactics of the workplace. The arguments are based on the empirical findings from an action-oriented research project in collaboration with six SME:s, and are illustrated through a e-learning model called “The Competence Kick-off”.

  • 103.
    Lundin, Johan
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Coping With Dualities in Network Action Research: Methodological Issues2008In: Proceedings of the 31th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, IRIS 31, Åre, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents lessons learned from an action research venture involving a network of SMEs and a group of IS researchers. The purpose is to discuss some fundamental methodological issues that we learned when doing action research with a network of interrelated organizations, rather than report the action research project itself. Our results are presented as four dualities that should be addressed throughout diagnostic and therapeutical activities in a network action research project. The dualities (teach–learn, local–global, multifaceted–unified, and liquid–crystal) are forwarded as analytical scaffolds to cope with the inherent difficulties of understanding and acting in IS action research projects, especially network action research.

  • 104. Magnusson, J
    et al.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Ahlstedt, S
    Andersson, B
    Bengtsson, U
    Telemo, E
    Hansson, T
    Peterson, C G B
    A kinetic study in adults with food hypersensitivity assessed as eosinophil activation in fecal samples2003In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 33, no 8, p. 1052-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Immune-mediated food hypersensitivity affecting the gut is difficult to evaluate, and objective tools to diagnose local gastrointestinal (GI) inflammatory reactions are lacking. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether allergic manifestations in adults with a history of food-related GI symptoms could be assessed in feces during symptomatic and non-symptomatic periods, using the surrogate markers, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil protein X (EPX) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). METHODS: Thirteen subjects with food hypersensitivity-related GI symptoms, confirmed by a positive double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC), were subjected to an open kinetic food challenge design for 6 weeks. Symptoms were recorded and scored during the 3-week study period and stool samples were obtained every day. The surrogate markers ECP, EPX and MPO were measured in the supernatants from feces samples. RESULTS: A significant increase in abdominal pain, distension and flatulence was observed during challenge, with a gradual decrease during elimination diet. Both between days and subjects, EPX levels were more frequently increased compared to ECP and MPO. Individuals with a history of a short duration of symptoms had significantly higher mean levels of EPX and MPO than those with a longer duration of symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: An overall increase in levels of eosinophil markers, in particular EPX, was observed in feces from patients with food-related GI symptoms. However, rather than being a tool to differentiate symptomatic from non-symptomatic periods, EPX might be used for detecting an ongoing clinical or subclinical chronic inflammation, that may have an impact on the patient's clinical course of GI symptoms.

  • 105.
    Malmsköld, Lennart
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, SAAB Automobile AB.
    Örtengren, Roland
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Carlson, Blair E
    SAAB Automobile AB.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Preparatory virtual training of assembly operators: an explorative study of different learning models2007In: Proceedings of Swedish Production Symposium (SPS) 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study aimed at developing an understanding of how preparatory computer based learning activities can affect the operators’ ability to develop skills for new assembly operations. The study explores two computer based learning models and their potential as a preparation method for making cognitive learning related to new assembly operations more effective. The results indicate that one of the learning models investigated has advantages regarding competence level for the expert/instructor as well for the common understanding of new operations within a team of five operators and a team leader.

  • 106.
    Namaki, Nima
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Exhaustion Dominated Performance: Methodology, Tools and Empirical Experiments2008Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Namaki, Nima
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    de Blanche, Andreas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Mankefors-Christiernin, Stefan
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics. University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Computer Science.
    A Tool for Processor Dependency Characterization of HPC Applications2009In: Proceedings for the HPC Asia & APAN 2009, Hsinchu, Taiwan: National Center for High-Performance Computing , 2009, p. 70-76Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we have implemented and verified Cpugen, a tool for characterization of processor resource utilization of HPC applications .Toward this end we implemented Cpugen, an application with good accuracy for processor load generation. Cpugen was verified through three different phases of passive, active and real world application measurements. The measurement results show that our implemented method is a viable option for non-intrusive, stable and robust load generation. The error range for all generated target loads are between 0.00% minimum and 1.04% maximum, with a median deviation of 0.11%. We can conclude that the method utilized in this investigation provides the ability to generate stable and robust processor load.

  • 108.
    Namaki, Nima
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    de Blanche, Andreas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Mankefors-Christiernin, Stefan
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics. University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Computer Science.
    Exhaustion dominated performance: a first attempt2009In: SAC '09: Proceedings of the 2009 ACM symposium on Applied Computing, ACM , 2009, p. 1011-1012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a first attempt to an analytical method to discover and understand how the available resources influence the execution time. Our method is based on a piecewise linear model for dominating execution limitations and black-box observations. We verify this analysis method by a set of real-world experiments. Finally, we conclude that the different effects follow a linear superposition within a certain range.

  • 109.
    Namaki, Nima
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    de Blanche, Andreas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Mankefors-Christiernin, Stefan
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics. University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Computer Science.
    Exhaustion dominated performance: an empirical method evalutationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Nilsson, Patric
    et al.
    Volvo Aero.
    Appelgren, Anders
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Henrikson, Per
    Volvo Aero.
    Runnemalm, Anna
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Automatic Ultrasonic testing for Metal Deposition2012In: Proceedings 18th World Conference on Non-Destructive Testing: 16 - 20 April 2012, Durban, South Africa, Durban, 2012, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal Deposition (MD) is a method to build three dimensional metal geometries by welding using filler wire or powdered metal. NDT of a MD feature is required when the feature is located in an area of high stress or could be a potential hazard to the part. Ultrasonic testing (UT) can be used to detect pores, linear indications and lack of fusion in welds. This method has limitations when it comes to large parts with complex geometries with various shapes and sizes. A flexible method for inspecting complex geometries is to mount an ultrasonic water flow probe (squirter) on a robot. The robot can then follow a pre-programmed path to achieve full inspection of the feature. This paper shows results and functionality from a system where a squirter probe was used together with a standard industrial robot. Results from a scanning of a three-dimensional MD-structure are also presented.

  • 111.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Hattinger, Monika
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pongolini, Malin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Designing the CloudBoard: an ICT Tool for Online Tutoring in Higher Education2011In: Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 / [ed] Matthew Koehler & Punya Mishra, Chesapeake, VA: AACE , 2011, p. 589-592Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns online tutoring in higher education. Observation studies of online tutoring sessions in two masters level engineering courses were conducted where teachers on campus tutored students located at different manufacturing plants doing their masters project. The tutoring regarded problems surrounding the construction of advanced 3D-models for manufacturing and required the shared view of the 3D-models as well as synchronous voice communication, e-mail and image sharing using a flora of different services. While advanced screen sharing applications like WebEX and TeamViewer were central in the tutoring sessions, the research presented here focus on the tools that supplemented the use of the screen sharing applications. Addressing issues such as the need to record historical data to be able for teachers to follow the progression of the project, sharing media files between participants and discussing the results, we here present a system to support online tutoring in higher education.

  • 112.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Supporting participation in online learning communities with awareness information2012In: International Journal of Web Based Communities, ISSN 1477-8394, E-ISSN 1741-8216, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 537-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article sets out to investigate the relationship between awareness information and participation in an online learning community (OLC). Inspired by the sociocultural notion of learning as social participation, this article will analyse the events that took place in an online photo gallery equipped with a system for visualising co-present users. The article discusses the importance of why social systems should support the creation, recreation and reinforcement of social norms to better facilitate participation. The article concludes by presenting four design implications of educational technologies supporting participation as well as a section referencing the importance of a transactional perspective in order to understand the effects of awareness information.                                                     

  • 113.
    Olofsson, Pia
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Carlström, Eric
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    Triage på akutmottagning: en utvärdering av triage i Västra Götalandsregionen2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Triage är en systematiserad form av prioritering som utförs på de flesta akutmottagningar i Sverige och internationellt. Syftet med triage är att uppnå en medicinskt säkerställd turordning för patienter som söker vård. I Västra Götalandsregionen har akutmottagningarna de senaste två åren implementerat Manchester Triage (MTS). Modellen består av ett medicinskt beslutsstöd i form av ett flödesschema, samt fem triagekategorier, som var och en anger maximal väntetid. Patienterna som bedöms tillhöra kategori 1 behöver omedelbar läkarkontakt. De övriga fyra kategorierna bedöms kunna vänta mellan 10 minuter och upptill 240 minuter. Den här studien utvärderar överensstämmelsen i form av mellanbedömarreliabilitet, samt träffsäkerhet i triagebedömningar hos sjuksköterskor som arbetar med MTS. De 79 sjuksköterskor som deltog i studien var verksamma på sju olika akutmottagningar i Västra Götalandsregionen. Sjuksköterskorna bedömde 13 fiktiva patientfall vardera. Dessa patientfall hade tilldelats en förväntad triagekategori utifrån en expertgrupps samlade bedömning. Mellanbedömar-reliabiliteten för akutmottagningarna totalt var 0,61 i oviktat k-värde vilket innebär god överensstämmelse. Mellan akutmottagningarna varierade k-värdet från 0,56-0,65. Träffsäkerheten gentemot expertgruppens förväntade triagekategori var 73 % totalt. 14 % av patienterna tilldelades en högre triagekategori än den förväntade (övertriage) och 13 % en lägre (undertriage). Träffsäkerheten för MTS var hög i kategori 1 (92 %) och kategori 2 (91 %), men lägre i kategori 3 (66 %) och 4 (63 %). Slutsatsen är att mellanbedömar-reliabiliteten var god och träffsäkerheten hög. Triagekategori 1 och 2 redovisade högst värden, vilket tyder på att denna grupp av patienter bereds vård utan riskfyllda väntetider. De patienter som ges en lägre prioritet visar sig emellertid vara svåra att bedöma. Trots att dessa patienter är mest frekventa på akutmottagningarna var de svåra att särskilja. Detta pekar på ett behov av att ytterligare utveckla bedömningar av kategori 3 och 4 i triagemodellen MTS.

  • 114.
    Olofsson, Pia
    et al.
    Nu-sjukvården, Trollhättan, Department of Emergency Medicin.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Carlström, Eric. D.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Manchester Triage in Sweden: Interrater reliability and accuracy2009In: International Emergency Nursing, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 143-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the interrater reliability and the accuracy of Manchester Triage (MTS) at emergency departments in Western Sweden. Methods: A group of 79 nurses from seven emergency departments assessed simulated patient cases and assigned triage categories using the same principles as in their daily work. K statistics, accuracy, over-triage and under-triage were then analyzed. The nurses performed 1027 triage assessments. Results: The result showed an unweighted κ value of 0.61, a linear weighted κ value of 0.71, and a quadratic weighted κ value of 0.81. The determined accuracy was 92% and 91% for the two most urgent categories, but significantly lower for the less urgent categories. Conclusions: Patients in need of urgent care were identified in more than nine out of 10 cases. The high level of over-triage and under-triage in the less urgent categories resulted in low agreement and accuracy. This may suggest that the resources of emergency departments can be overused for non-urgent patients.

  • 115.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Doing Good: an Exploration of Members' Motivations and Behaviours in Tourism SettingsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 116.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Doing good at a nonprofit tourist attraction2014In: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality, ISSN 1750-6182, E-ISSN 1750-6190, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 74-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to contribute to the growing field of membership research by applying a relationship marketing perspective on members in tourism settings. Focus is on exploring why consumers are members (motivational dimensions) and how motivations are related to member behaviours (retention, participation and co-creation), and to member demographics (gender, age, distance between the member’s home and the supported organization).

     

    Design/methodology/approach -   A survey was conducted among members of a nonprofit tourist attraction (N=755). Classical chi-square tests, t-tests and multivariate analysis using logistic regression were used to analyze data and to test eight hypotheses on member demographics, member motivations and member behaviours.

     

    Findings - Findings show that among the three motivational dimensions, altruism, i.e., doing good for others, was the strongest motive, followed by self-interest, i.e., doing good for yourself, and then the social motive, i.e., doing good with others, which scored lowest. Furthermore, findings show that gender, age and distance were significantly related to member motivations and member behaviours.  Member behaviours were significantly related to motivations.

     

    Research limitations/implications – This study was conducted at a single nonprofit tourist attraction. However, it provides insights into different motivational dimensions for why people pay to become members and what kind of member behaviour they demonstrate. This topic calls for further research to explore the complex membership phenomenon such as extending this study by identifying member motives and behaviour in other contexts.

     

    Practical implications – This explorative study of members of a nonprofit tourist attraction contributes insights into why consumers are members (motivational dimensions), how motivations are related to member behaviours in a membership relationship context, and how member demographics are related to motivations and behaviours. Findings have implications for membership managers and the development of memberships in terms of giving a deeper insight into members as consumers in order to develop memberships as strategic resources and hence use the full potential of memberships especially vital to non-profit organizations. Several aspects of memberships are discussed that may inspire the development of member offerings. The present study contributes to the developing field of membership research as it is a response to the calls for more empirical studies of members to develop an integrated understanding of motivations of memberships. Furthermore it contributes with research of co-creation in customer relationships linking the co-creation concept to research of members in tourism settings.

     

     

    Originality/value –   This study contributes to the developing field of membership research and furthermore gives insights into consumer motivations and behaviours that may inspire development of innovative and competitive membership offerings building membership relationships in tourism settings.

     

  • 117.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lindh, Kristina
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Berndtsson, Leif
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Nehls, Eddy
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    Driving forces for sustainable destination development: A Nordic study based on maritime culture and inland sea-regions2012In: Developing Tourism - Sustaining Regions: Book of Abstracts The 21st Nordic Symposium in Tourism and Hospitality Research / [ed] Ednarsson, M., Hoppstadius, F., Lundmark, L., Marjavaara, R., Müller, D., Pitkänen, K., Åkerlund, U., Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2012, p. 110-110Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on sustainable destination development in a Nordic context. At most destinations stakeholders from private, public and voluntary sectors interact and there is a need for coordination and cooperation. An escalating competition among destinations has raised calls for innovative offerings that are well-coordinated. Studies of tourism destinations show that networks are crucial since successful destinations are based on interrelated stakeholders that understand the concept of the destination and are committed to cooperate in offering a holistic experience to visitors. 

     

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the driving forces of sustainable destination development. In particular the study focuses on stakeholder cooperation and sharing of knowledge and experiences among two Nordic regions based on maritime culture and inland sea-regions.

    The data collection includes a combination of different methods: interviews with main stakeholders, collection of existing documents related to the regions, observation of stakeholder meetings, and participant observations of attractions and events. 

    The project is ongoing but so far we have interviewed a few stakeholders in each destination and gained their insights into how to cooperate in order to develop tourism sustainable regions.

     

  • 118.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Arvemo, Tobias
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics. University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Dahl, Ylva
    Uddevalla Schools.
    Haake, Magnus
    Lund University Design Sciences.
    Gulz, Agneta
    Lund University Cognitive Sciences.
    A Teachable-Agent Arithmetic Game’s Effects on Mathematics Understanding, Attitude and Self-efficacy2011In: Artificial Intelligence in Education, Springer, 2011, p. 247-255Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A teachable-agent arithmetic game is presented and evaluated in terms of student performance, attitude and self-efficacy. An experimental pre-post study design was used, enrolling 153 3 rd and 5 th grade students in Sweden. The playing group showed significantly larger gains in math performance and self-efficacy beliefs, but not in general attitude towards math, compared to control groups. The contributions in relation to previous work include a novel educational game being evaluated, and an emphasis on self-efficacy in the study as a strong predictor of math achievements.

  • 119.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    An Interactive Visualization Model for Competence Management: an Integrative Approach2007In: Proceedings of I-KNOW ’07, Graz, Austria, September 5-7, 2007, Graz, 2007, p. 440-447Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims at innovative IT support for competence management (CM) integrating organizational, group and individual perspectives. Our method is action case research resulting in a design model. This paper addresses our overall approach towards an integrative CM system, which is usage-oriented. Based on in-depth analysis of seven business companies’ CM activities, we present a new interactive visualization model for CM. The model is suitable for explorative analysis and for communicating competence situations at individual, group or organizational levels. It provides support for constructing competence information incrementally. We view competence descriptions as negotiable estimations with varying verification levels, and use a competence representation which deals with uncertainties of estimations. Our view on competence is novel, and has far reaching consequences. Future work includes a running prototype and planned pilot studies.

  • 120.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Design Experience from Experience Design: Towards Strategies for Enhancements2007In: Proceedings of the 15th European conference on information systems (ECIS 2007): relevant rigour, rigorous relevance / [ed] Hubert Österle, Joachim Schelp & Robert Winter, University of St. Gallen , 2007, p. 1898-1909Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enterprises within the experience-based economy face big challenges when investing in IS applications for their products and services. Especially, organizations and services that offer different kinds of attractions and experiences have realized the emergent use of mobile technology. In this paper we explore in what way an IS (information systems) design can enhance experience-based activities conducted at a Swedish regional museum. The research presents an in-depth analysis of a case study along with requirements and design activities for a location-aware, auditory museum guide, primarily aimed for people with visual and language disabilities was developed. We argue that in order to keep in pace with the on-going growth of experience-based and IS design initiatives, enterprises and designer must consider its value for their businesses. Thus, we have developed a three-level strategy for valuing enhancements of a proposed IS application. The strategy proved to be particular fruitful for both designers and managers when assessing the potential of various enhancements to generate values for the different target groups.

  • 121.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Schwartz, Daniel L.
    Stanford University, School of Education.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Learning by guiding a teachable agent to play an educational game2009In: Artificial Intelligence in Education: Building Learning Systems that Care: From Knowledge Representation to Affective Modelling / [ed] Vania Dimitrova, Riichiro Mizoguchi, Benedict du Boulay, Art Graesser, 2009, Vol. 200, no 1, p. 662-664Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachable agents are used to support transfer of game playing knowledge to domain knowledge for an educational, arithmetic game. A pre-posttest experiment study show promising learning effects for low ability students.

  • 122.
    Pongolini, Malin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundin, Johan
    Avdelningen för tillämpad IT, Göteborgs universitet.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Global Online Meetings in Virtual Teams: from Media Choice to Interaction Negotiation2011In: Proceedings of the Fifth Communities and Technologies Conference 2011, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane Australia / [ed] Jesper Kjeldskov and Jeni Paay, Brisbane, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on an ethnographical study of a community of technology experts within a global automotive manufacturing company that uses information technology to communicate and collaborate in global virtual teams. Our findings show that discussions, negotiations, compromises and joint problem solving characterize media choices made in virtual teamwork. Practitioners are adding new media to ongoing interactions, rather than using media in sequence. Furthermore, one medium is not used exclusively, rather a number of media can be used in parallel. This shows that some of the fundamental assumptions built into the concept of media choice theories, are somewhat problematic as an analytical perspective when virtual teams are researched in real settings outside of laboratories and hypothetical scenarios.

  • 123.
    Rönnberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Göteborg University, Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Lind, B.
    Göteborg University, Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Zoega, B.
    Department of Orthopaedics, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Gadeholt-Göthlin, G.
    Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Radiology .
    Halldin, K.
    Göteborg University, Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Brisby, H.
    Göteborg University, Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Peridural scar and its relation to clinical outcome: A randomised study on surgically treated lumbar disc herniation patients2008In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 17, no 12, p. 1714-1720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prospective randomised 2-year follow-up study on patients undergoing lumbar disc herniation surgery. The objective was to investigate the relationship between peridural scarring and clinical outcome, the scar development 6 and 24 months postoperatively by using MRI, and if ADCON-L (a bioresorbable carbohydrate polymer gel) has an effect on scar size and/or improve patients' outcome after lumbar disc herniation surgery. The association between peridural scarring and recurrent pain after lumbar disc herniation surgery is debated. Numerous materials have been used in attempts to prevent or reduce postoperative peridural scarring; however, there are conflicting data regarding the clinical effects. The study included 119 patients whose mean age was 39 years (18-66); 51 (47%) were women. Sixty patients (56%) were perioperatively randomised to receive ADCON-L, and 48 (44%) served as controls. All patients underwent MRI at 6 and 24 months postoperatively, and an independent radiologist graded the size, location and development of the scar, by using a previously described scoring system. Pre- and 2-year postoperatively patients graded their leg pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS). At the 2-year follow-up patients rated their satisfaction with treatment (subjective outcome) and were evaluated by an independent neurologist (objective outcome), using MacNab score. There was no relationship between size or localisation of the scar and any of the clinical outcomes (VAS, subjective and objective outcome). The scar size decreased between 6 and 24 months in 49%, was unchanged in 42% and increased in 9% of the patients. Patients treated with ADCON-L did not demonstrate any adverse effects, nor did they demonstrate less scarring or better clinical outcome than control patients. No significant association between the presence of extensive peridural scar or localisation of scar formation and clinical outcome could be detected in the present study. Further, no positive or negative effects of ADCON-L used in disc herniation surgery could be seen. 

  • 124.
    Rönnberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics.
    Lind, Bengt
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics.
    Zoëga, Björn
    Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Department of Orthopaedics.
    Halldin, Klas
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Brisby, Helena
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics.
    Patients' satisfaction with provided care/information and expectations on clinical outcome after lumbar disc herniation surgery2007In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 256-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN. A prospective study of patients undergoing lumbar disc herniation surgery. OBJECTIVES. To assess patients' satisfaction with care/preoperative information, if expectations on surgical results and ability to return to work are related to baseline characteristics, and/or can predict self-reported outcome. Self-reported outcome was compared with objective outcome. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Patients' expectations on treatment results have been discussed as a predictive factor for postoperative outcome and satisfaction demonstrated to be directly related to patient expectations. METHODS. The study includes 148 patients, 46% women, mean age 40 (range 18-66). Before and 2 years after surgery, questionnaires about given information/care, expected/present work ability, and expectations on/obtained improvement of physical functions/symptoms (leg and back pain, sensibility, and muscle function) were filled in. The visual analog scale leg pain, Zung Depression Scale, and Oswestry Disability Index were used as baseline characteristics. At 2-year follow-up, self-reported and objective outcome was assessed. RESULTS. Satisfaction with given information/care were reported by 46% and 82%, respectively. Zung Depression Scale related to expectations on leg pain recovery (P = 0.022), work ability (P = 0.046), and satisfaction with given information (P = 0.031). Patients who expected to return (76%) and not return (24%) to work, returned in 78% and 26%, respectively (P = 0.021). A high agreement between self-reported outcome and objective outcome were found (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS. Patients undergoing lumbar disc herniation surgery are mostly satisfied with provided care before and after surgery, however, less satisfied with information provided. Further, patients with preoperative positive expectations on work return and realistic expectations on pain and physical recovery have a greater chance to be satisfied with the surgical results. © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  • 125.
    Silverplats, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics.
    Lind, Bengt
    Gothenburg Spine Center.
    Zoega, Bjöörn
    Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik.
    Halldin, Klas
    University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Rutberg, Lena
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation.
    Brisby, Helena
    University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics.
    Health-related quality of life in patients with surgically treated lumbar disc herniation: 2- and 7-year follow-up of 117 patients2011In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 198-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instruments have been of increasing interest for evaluation of medical treatments over the past 10-15 years. In this prospective, long-term follow-up study we investigated the influence of preoperative factors and the change in HRQoL over time after lumbar disc herniation surgery. Methods: 117 patients surgically treated for lumbar disc herniation (L4-L5 or L5-S1) were evaluated with a self-completion HRQoL instrument (EQ-5D) preoperatively, after 2 years (96 patients) and after 7 years (89 patients). Baseline data (age, sex, duration of leg pain, surgical level) and degree of leg and back pain (VAS) were obtained preoperatively. The mean age was 39 (18-66) years, 54% were men, and the surgical level was L5-S1 in 58% of the patients. The change in EQ-5D score at the 2-year follow-up was analyzed by testing for correlation and by using a multiple regression model including all baseline factors (age, sex, duration of pain, degree of leg and back pain, and baseline EQ-5D score) as potential predictors. Results: 85% of the patients reported improvement in EQ-5D two years after surgery and this result remained at the long-term follow-up. The mean difference (change) between the preoperative EQ-5D score and the 2-year and 7-year scores was 0.59 (p < 0.001) and 0.62 (p < 0.001), respectively. However, the HRQoL for this patient group did not reach the mean level of previously reported values for a normal population of the same age range at any of the follow-ups. The changes in EQ-5D score between the 2- and 7-year follow-ups were not statistically significant (mean change 0.03, p = 0.2). There was a correlation between baseline leg pain and the change in EQ-5D at the 2-year (r = 0.33, p = 0.002) and 7-year follow-up (r = 0.23, p = 0.04). However, when using regression analysis the only statistically significant predictor for change in EQ-5D was baseline EQ-5D score. Interpretation: Our findings suggest that HRQoL (as measured by EQ-5D) improved 2 years after lumbar disc herniation surgery, but there was no further improvement after 5 more years. Low quality of life and severe leg pain at baseline are important predictors of improvement in quality of life after lumbar disc herniation surgery. © Nordic Orthopaedic Federation.

  • 126.
    Spante, Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Ericsson, Thommy
    Department of Applied IT, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg.
    Sunnerstam, Maria
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Huang De-Voss, Cammy
    Virtual Labs, Stanford University, Stanford.
    Axelsson, Michael
    Department of Zoology, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg.
    Unlock the rigidity and design for flexibility2010In: US-China Education Review, ISSN 1548-6613, Vol. 7, no 11, p. 44-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports findings from a project implementing the VL (virtual labs) site featuring

    flash-based animations developed at Stanford University. The main conclusion in this paper stresses the need to

    design for flexibility and adaptability of interactive media to better suit the specific situation teachers encounter in

    their everyday work, in order to allow them to build their own audiovisual presentation kits based on various

    available resources. Ambitious but rigid visualization products might otherwise end up not being used at all. 

  • 127.
    Svanberg, Pia
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Incentives for Participation in Organised Business Networks2009In: Proceedings of the 32nd Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, IRIS 32: Inclusive Design / [ed] Molka-Danielsen, J., Molde University College , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much research shows several implications that business collaboration and knowledge exchange takes place across several inter-organisational network constellations. As organisational boundaries become inter-connected into networks of people and resources there is a need to consider the value and effects of such non-traditional networking businesses. This paper portrays how business managers perceive the role of an organised business network and what values cross-company business networking generate. 16 in-depth interviews form the foundations of this preliminary findings. The research question is: Which are the incentives for participation in business networks? The aim is to better understand incentives and values for participation in order to design and manage the business network organisation more effectively. Our argument is that the specifics of incentives and preconceptions of business networking have big impact on how valuable the actual effects of such network participation are. From this study we also discuss implications of how the network can facilitate and coordinate for increased business opportunities.

  • 128.
    Svensson, Ann
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Development of the Road Carriers Cluster in the Western Region of Sweden2007In: Uddevalla Symposium Tenth Anniversary 2007: Institutions for Knowledge Generation and Knowledge Flows - Building Innovative Capabilities for Regions: Revised papers presented at the 10th Uddevalla Symposium, 14-16 June, 2007, University West, Uddevalla, Sweden / [ed] Iréne Johansson, Trollhättan: University West , 2007, p. 701-712Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The road carriers business in West Sweden is described as a cluster of the Swedish business world. This cluster has been exposed to great competitiveness and deregulation during about the last ten years. The road carrier cluster has been analysed by Porter´s diamond model. The preconditions for the successful growth of the cluster are presented. Especially the road carrier cluster´s opportunities and limitations have been taken into consideration. The study has been performed as a literature study, complemented by studies of magazines in the branch. Furthermore three interviews have been performed of an owner of a road carrier firm. One day has been spent as carrying out an ethnographical study as a driver of a trailer truck. The conclusion of the study is that there are many factors influencing the development of the road carriers business. The road carriers business furthermore has a strong influence from the general business cycle.

  • 129.
    Svensson, Ann
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Instructional-design theories applied on a web-based learning application2008In: Proceedings - International Conference on Information Technology: New Generations, ITNG 2008,  Fifth International Conference on7-9 April 2008, 2008, p. 845-850Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Svensson, Ann
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Utvärdering av nätbaserad utbildning 2007In: Högskoleverkets kvalitetskonferens, 10-11 oktober, 2007., Stockholm: Högskoleverket , 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Svensson, Ann
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Johansson, Caroline
    Lund University.
    Growth of Ecological Production in the Agricultural Sector2008In: Uddevalla Symposium 2008: Spatial Dispersed Production and Network Governance : Revised papers presented at the 11th Uddevalla Symposium, 15-17 May, 2008, Kyoto, Japan  / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Trollhättan: University West , 2008, p. 359-372Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The agricultural sector in Sweden has been experienced rather large changes through the last twenty to thirty years. The ecological production of foodstuff has increased during the last years. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the marketing strategies performed by the ecological farmers and its cluster. Then the paper will analyse and discuss how sucessful the marketing strategies have been, in comparison to the marketing strategies theories. There is now a cultural shift in food consuming, where more people choose ecological produced KRAV-foodstuff. It depends on that people has been more aware of environmental- and climate issues. Consumers chose to buy ecological products, as KRAV-products, because their values accord with a good environment, good caring of animals, and also because of health and social responsibility. In the marketing communication process it is important to inform and make potential customers aware of a firm´s or an organization´s offering. Therefore for example the Internet is a fruitful tool to convey different types of messages to the customers. We believe that the consumption of ecological products could increase more and faster if there is effective and lasting environment marketing. Until now there has been some restrictions of contracs for ecological farmers.

  • 132.
    Svensson, Ann
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Svanberg, Pia
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Attitudes to information technology in health care professions2009In: The 17th European Conference on Information Systems, Verona, june 8-10, 2009., 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore attitudes towards IT among various categories of health care staff; health care professions. We will identify problem areas that may be the reasons for why different attitudes among different professions at a healthcare organisation exist, and subsequently we will analyse how this may have impact on how to make sense of IT use. The research question is: What factors may explain differences regarding attitudes to IT among different professions in a health care organisation?

    The paper reports from a particular study of the “NU” healthcare organisation in west Sweden. The results reveal two main problem areas: i) the infrastructural and; ii) the socio-organisational. These are discussed as analytical implications for bridging the gaps between different professions in health care organisations.

  • 133.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Me, myself and Genre : Bridging IS Design Theory and Distance Educational Practice withTechno-Pedagogical Genres 2006In: 2nd International Workshop on Digital Genre, Halmstad, June 15-16, 2006, Halmstad University , 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 134.
    Svensson, Lars
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Bernheim, Bo-Göran
    Volvo Aero.
    Lundin, Johan
    Gothenburg university.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Supporting Competent Acting in the new Workplace2008In: Proceedings of E-Learn2008: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education / [ed] Curtis J. Bonk, Mimi Miyoung Lee & Tom Reynolds, Las Vegas, 2008, p. 3934-3941Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 135.
    Svensson, Lars
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Lundin, Johan
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media Production. University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Vad gör dom duktiga duktiga?: Att artikulera kompetens i informationssystem och samtal2009In: Samhälle, teknik och lärande / [ed] Thomas Karlsohn, Stockholm: Carlsson , 2009, p. 104-121Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 136.
    Svensson, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svanberg, Pia
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Learning Models in Online Education: On the Transformation from Tutors to Producers2010In: Proceedings of Global Learn Asia Pacific 2010 / [ed] Zoraini Wati Abas, Insung Jung & Joseph Luca, AACE , 2010, p. 3707-3712Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years online and blended learning has scaled up from being a pilot endeavor driven by pioneers, to constituting a large portion of many institutions of higher education. In the process, the conditions for the online teacher has gradually changed, and the situation of today is in many ways problematic where student interaction and dialogue has to stand back in favor of time consuming content production, material delivery, and technical problem solving. This paper draws on the experiences from a Scandinavian University to illustrate how this transition can be understood in the light of rapid technological development in combination with slow evolution of pedagogical models for online education.

  • 137.
    Svensson, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Svanberg, Pia
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Johansson, Lars-Olof
    Halmstad University, Halmstad.
    From Tutor to Producer: Changes in the design space of online education2010In: Proceedings of the 33rd IRIS Seminar. 2010. / [ed] Hanne Westh Nicolajsen, John Persson, Lise Heeager, Gitte Tjørnehøj, Karlheinz Kautz, Peter Axel Nielsen, Rebild, Denmark, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years online and blended learning has scaled up from being a pilot endeavour driven by pioneers, to constituting a large portion of many institutions of higher education. In the process, the conditions for the online teacher has gradually changed, and the situation of today is in many ways problematic where student interaction and dialogue has to stand back in favour of time consuming content production, material delivery, and technical problem solving. This paper draws on the experiences from a Scandinavian University to illustrate how this transition can be understood in the light of rapid technological development in combination with slow evolution of pedagogical models for online education.

  • 138.
    Svensson, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Östlund, Christian
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Framing work-integrated e-learning with techno-pedagogical genres2007In: Journal of Educational Technology & Society, ISSN 1176-3647, E-ISSN 1436-4522, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 39-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Svensson, M
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Ydenius, A
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Christiernin, Linn
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Christiernin, Stefan
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics. University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Computer Science.
    UML: How to model user interfaces - An exploratory study2009In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference Informatics 2009, Part of the IADIS Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems, MCCSIS 2009, Algarve, 2009, p. 59-66Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    When creating software, people from many different areas are involved. To make them work efficiently together they need to communicate but communication requires a common language and common understanding. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is often used as a common ground for understanding when modeling and designing software products. However, after practically working with many large projects we have found UML to have shortcomings in the area of modeling Graphical User Interface (GUI). There are many other ways to model GUIs but it could be beneficial to use a modeling method that the more technical developers are familiar with and also beneficial to be able to put in the interface into the framework of UML when it comes to drawing applications and code generation. In this study we first of all have investigated the possibility of adding GUI design to UML and then we have explored different solutions for what a GUI UML-diagram could look like and what problems there are with diagrams when it comes to visualizing objects. We have then put forward an idea for a GUI diagram or an UML extension; a graphical element diagram, and discussed its benefits and drawbacks. © 2009 IADIS.

  • 140.
    Theliander, Jan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies.
    Grundén, KerstinUniversity West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.Mårdén, BjörnUniversity West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies.Thång, Per-OlofUniversity West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies. Göteborgs universitet.
    Arbetsintegrerat lärande2004Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 141.
    Östlund, Christian
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Kautz, Karlheinz
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Towards adapting authentic learning for formal workintegrated e-learning2009In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Design Science Research in Information Systems and Technology, DESRIST '09, 2009, p. Aricle 29-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This poster reports from the initial steps of formulating a prescriptive design theory to support the development of scholastic/formal work-integrated e-learning systems. For this purpose a framework for authentic learning, developed andevaluated in a school setting and the eight components of design theories by Gregor and Jones has been used to guide two elearning activities in a work setting. Adapting authentic learning to a formal work-integrated e-learning context calls for a simplification of the framework where some elements of authentic learning become peripheral whereas others become more central. Copyright 2009 ACM.

  • 142.
    Östlund, Christian
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Kautz, Karlheinz
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Multimedia instruction in a workintegrated e-learning environment: Findings from the early stages of a design researchproject2007In: Proceedings of 30th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia: IRIS 30, University of Tampere , 2007, p. 683-698Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports from a design process within an e-learning project. An e-learning web lecture on how to search the World Wide Web was created based on narrated screen captures and power point slides. A framework grounded in situated learning was used to create the multimedia instruction for the web lecture. Flexibility vs. collaboration, multimedia instruction vs. multimedia interaction and situated content vs. situated use headlines the discussion on challenges where theory and practice deliver conflicting implications for system design.

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