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  • 1.
    Basińska, Beata A.
    et al.
    Gdansk University of Technology, Poland.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Work Values of Police Officers and their Relationship with Job Burnout and Work Engagement2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Values represent people’s highest priorities and are cognitive representations of basic motivations. Work values determine what is important for employees in their work and what they want to achieve in their work. Past research shows that levels of both aspects of job-related well-being, job burnout and work engagement, are related to work values. The policing profession is associated with high engagement and a risk of burnout. There is a gap in the literature regarding the hierarchy of work values in police officers, how work values are associated with job burnout and work engagement in this group, and whether work values in police officers are sensitive to different levels of job burnout and work engagement. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the relationships between work values and job burnout and work engagement, in a group of experienced police officers. We investigated: (a) the hierarchy of work values based on Super’s theory of career development, (b) relationships between work values and burnout and work engagement, and (c) differences between the work values in four groups (burned-out, strained, engaged, and relaxed). A group of 234 Polish police officers completed the Work Values Inventory (WVI) modeled upon Super’s theory, the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. The results show that police officers gave the highest priority to extrinsic work values. Job burnout was negatively correlated with the cognitive intrinsic work values (Creativity, Challenge, and Variety), while work engagement was positively correlated with the largest group of intrinsic work values (Creativity, Challenge, Variety, Altruism, and Achievement), as well as with the extrinsic work values (Prestige and Co-workers). The police officers showed significant differences, between levels of job burnout and work engagement, for intrinsic work values such as Variety, Challenge, and Creativity (large effects), and for Altruism and Prestige (moderate effects). The findings are discussed within the context of the Conservation of Resources theory, which explains how people invest and protect their personal resources, and how this is connected with preferred work values. We conclude that intrinsic work values are sensitive to different levels of burnout and engagement.

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  • 2.
    Buchanan, Christy M
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, (USA).
    Zietz, Susannah
    Duke University (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, (USA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome, (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza” (ITA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University (USA) and King Abdulaziz University (SAU).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Department of Psychology, Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín 050001, (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Department of Psychology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education (ARE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Neapel, (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau (MAC).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002, (USA).
    Typicality and trajectories of problematic and positive behaviors over adolescence in eight countries.2022In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, article id 991727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examine the predictions of a storm and stress characterization of adolescence concerning typicality and trajectories of internalizing, externalizing, and wellbeing from late childhood through late adolescence. Using data from the Parenting Across Cultures study, levels and trajectories of these characteristics were analyzed for 1,211 adolescents from 11 cultural groups across eight countries. Data were longitudinal, collected at seven timepoints from 8 to 17 years of age. Results provide more support for a storm and stress characterization with respect to the developmental trajectories of behavior and characteristics from childhood to adolescence or across the adolescent years than with respect to typicality of behavior. Overall, adolescents' behavior was more positive than negative in all cultural groups across childhood and adolescence. There was cultural variability in both prevalence and trajectories of behavior. The data provide support for arguments that a more positive and nuanced characterization of adolescence is appropriate and important.

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  • 3.
    Clausén Gull, Ingela
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Norman, Åsa
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (SWE).
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, (SWE) School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Eninger, Lilianne
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Neighborhood conditions in a Swedish context: Two studies of reliability and validity of virtual systematic social observation using Google Street View2023In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, p. 1-16, article id 1020742Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The goal of these studies was to investigate the reliability and validity of virtual systematic social observation (virtual SSO) using Google Street View in a Swedish neighborhood context.

    METHODS: This was accomplished in two studies. Study 1 focused on interrater reliability and construct validity, comparing ratings conducted in-person to those done using Google Street View, across 24 study sites within four postal code areas. Study 2 focused on criterion validity of virtual SSO in terms of neighborhoods with low versus high income levels, including 133 study sites within 22 postal code areas in a large Swedish city. In both studies, assessment of the neighborhood context was conducted at each study site, using a protocol adapted to a Swedish context.

    RESULTS: Scales for Physical Decay, Neighborhood Dangerousness, and Physical Disorder were found to be reliable, with adequate interrater reliability, high consistency across methods, and high internal consistency. In Study 2, significantly higher levels of observed Physical Decay, Neighborhood Dangerousness, and signs of garbage or litter were observed in postal codes areas (site data was aggregated to postal code level) with lower as compared to higher income levels.

    DISCUSSION: We concluded that the scales within the virtual SSO with Google Street View protocol that were developed in this series of studies represents a reliable and valid measure of several key neighborhood contextual features. Implications for understanding the complex person-context interactions central to many theories of positive development among youth were discussed in relation to the study findings.

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  • 4.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Basinska, Beata A.
    Gdansk University of Technology, Faculty of Management and Economics, Poland.
    Job Demands, Engagement, and Turnover Intentions in Polish Nurses: The Role of Work-Family Interface2016In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7, article id 1621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Poland has lower ratios of employed registered nurses per 1,000 inhabitants than the EU average. Polish nurses work under miserable conditions without assisting personnel, and they reconcile their professional demands with responsibilities for their families; 96% of them are women.

    Rationale/Aims: This study uses Hobfoll’s conservation of resources (CORs) theory to explain the role of various resources in the improvement of work conditions in the nursing profession. Work-family conflict (WFC) and family work conflict (FWC) threaten to deplete nurses’ resources. This paper set out to (1) examine the extent to which perceived job demands (workload and interpersonal conflicts at work) and engagement (vigor, dedication, and absorption) are associated with turnover intentions (the intention to leave the present workplace and the intention to leave the nursing profession); (2) attempt to determine whether levels of WFC and FWC moderate these associations.

    Design/Method: This study comprised 188 female registered nurses. The inclusion criterion was to live with a partner and/or have children.

    Results: WFC was moderately related to FWC. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that only high job demands and low vigor were significantly associated with turnover intentions. WFC was experienced more intensively than FWC. Job demands, vigor, dedication, and turnover intentions had a strong effect on WFC, while absorption had a strong effect on FWC. However, levels of WFC and FWC did not significantly moderate these associations.

    Originality/Conclusion: The study produces new knowledge by examining a constellation of job demands, work engagement and WFC, which reflect the management of personal resources. Results from such a constellation in nurses from countries with a post-transformational economic system have not previously been discussed in the light of COR theory. Most importantly, we conclude that WFC does not intensify turnover intentions.

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  • 5.
    Johansson, Catrin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Kullgren, Carina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Bador, Kourosh
    Agera KBT AB, Gothenburg; Center for Holistic Psychiatry Research (CHoPy), Mölndal (SWE).
    Kerekes, Nora
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Gender non-binary adolescents' somatic and mental health throughout 2020.2022In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, article id 993568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Non-binary gender adolescents are particularly vulnerable and more likely to be exposed to several socio-psychological difficulties and disorders. It is vital to discover and act on the vulnerabilities they encounter. The present study aims to describe the somatic and mental health, affect state, frequency of risk behaviors, victimization and negative psychosocial factors, as well as the personality profiles of non-binary adolescents. In this study the concept of gender non-binary is used and captured respondents who selected "neither of these" as their gender from the possible options (female/male/neither of these).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data was collected between September 2020 and February 2021 in Sweden, Morocco, Serbia, Vietnam, and the United States. The cross-sectional, retrospective study utilized the electronic version of the Mental and Somatic Health without borders (MeSHe) survey. From the over 5,000 responses of 15-19-year-old adolescents, 58 respondents identified as being non-binary, and built our study population. Their data was analyzed with descriptive statistic methods.

    RESULTS: Close to a fourth of adolescents identifying as non-binary reported the existence of at least one somatic disease. The most prevalent somatic disease was allergies. Almost one-third had suffered from pain either often or all the time in the past 12 months. The highest levels of perceived psychological distress were measured using obsessive-compulsive symptoms, depression, and interpersonal sensitivity. The average level of alcohol and drug use during the past 12 months was low. About 40% of non-binary adolescents reported having experienced physical abuse, and half of them experienced psychological abuse at some point in their lives. Seventeen percent reported living with adults with alcohol-use problems. Non-binary adolescents' personalities were found to be dominated by high scores in Openness, Neuroticism, and Agreeableness.

    CONCLUSION: This study presents a detailed biopsychosocial picture of a multinational sample of non-binary adolescents. Our study suggests that awareness and support are required from all fields of society, including family, school, healthcare, and educational institutions, for cis-normative culture to progress toward a greater understanding of and respect for gender diversity.

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1 - 5 of 5
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  • fi-FI
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  • Other locale
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  • text
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