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  • 1.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Surface integrity on post processed alloy 718 after nonconventional machining2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a strong industrial driving force to find alternative production technologies in order to make the production of aero engine components of superalloys even more efficient than it is today. Introducing new and nonconventional machining technologies allows taking a giant leap to increase the material removal rate and thereby drastically increase the productivity. However, the end result is to meet the requirements set for today's machined surfaces.The present work has been dedicated to improving the knowledge of how the non-conventional machining methods Abrasive Water Jet Machining, AWJM, Laser Beam Machining, LBM, and Electrical Discharge Machining, EDM, affect the surface integrity. The aim has been to understand how the surface integrity could be altered to an acceptable level. The results of this work have shown that both EDM and AWJM are two possible candidates but EDM is the better alternative; mainly due to the method's ability to machine complex geometries. It has further been shown that both methods require post processing in order to clean the surface and to improve the topography and for the case of EDM ageneration of compressive residual stresses are also needed.Three cold working post processes have been evaluated in order to attain this: shot peening, grit blasting and high pressure water jet cleaning, HPWJC. There sults showed that a combination of two post processes is required in order to reach the specified level of surface integrity in terms of cleaning and generating compressive residual stresses and low surface roughness. The method of high pressure water jet cleaning was the most effective method for removing the EDM wire residuals, and shot peening generated the highest compressive residual stresses as well as improved the surface topography.To summarise: the most promising production flow alternative using nonconventional machining would be EDM followed by post processing using HPWJC and shot peening.

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  • 2.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Swerea Group.
    Palosaari, Mikko
    Outokumpu Stainless Oy, Stresstech OY.
    Hosseini, Seyed
    Islamic Azad University, Swerea Group.
    Larjosuo, Henri
    Stresstech OY.
    Andersson, Pär Yngve
    Chalmers University of Technology, Orebro University Swerea Group.
    Round Robin Study on Residual Stresses Using X-Ray Diffraction for Shot-Peened Tool Steel Specimens2018In: Residual Stresses 2018, Ecrs-10, Millersville, PA, USA: MATERIALS RESEARCH FORUM LLC , 2018, Vol. 6, p. 51-56Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Residual stress measurements using x-ray diffraction is a well established method used within the industrial and academic community to verify the performance of different processes for metallic materials. The measurement gives an absolute value of the stress state which can be used to design and optimize the process route to induce beneficial compressive residual stresses and avoid detrimental tensile stresses. Investigating the uncertainty and accuracy of the measurement system, operator and the material is therefore of high relevance both from an industrial and scientific point of view. Round robin testing is an important way to quantify the uncertainties that could affect the quality of the measured results and hence how a process is optimized and tuned. Such an investigation allows the operator to understand and reduce variations. Current round robin test includes results from five different laboratories using comparable equipments located in Sweden, Finland, Germany and United States. This work focuses on five shot-peened tool steel specimens produced with identical process settings. Additionally, an investigation of the repeatability of the system, influence of the operator, variations within the specimen, and the long time stability of the specimens has been measured.

  • 3.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Swerea IVF AB, Argongatan 30, Mölndal SE-431 53, Sweden.
    Prieto, Juan Manuel Rodri­guez
    Luleå University of Technology, Division of Mechanics of Solid Materials Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics. Luleå SE-971 87, Sweden.
    Berglund, Johan
    Swerea IVF AB, Argongatan 30, Mölndal SE-431 53, Sweden.
    Sveboda, Ales
    Luleå University of Technology, Division of Mechanics of Solid Materials Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics. Luleå SE-971 87, Sweden.
    Jonsén, Pärr
    Luleå University of Technology, Division of Mechanics of Solid Materials Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics. Luleå SE-971 87, Sweden.
    Experimental and PFEM-simulations of residual stresses from turning tests of a cylindrical Ti-6Al-4V shaft2018In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 71, p. 144-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alloy Ti-6Al-4V is a frequently used material in aero space applications due the high strength and low weight. This material is however often considered as a difficult to machine alloy due to several material properties such as the inherent characteristics of high hot hardness and strength which is causing an increased deformation of the cutting tool during machining. The thermal properties also cause a low thermal diffusion from locally high temperatures in the cutting zone that allows for reaction to the tool material resulting in increased tool wear. Predicting the behavior of machining of this alloy is therefore essential when selecting machining tools or machining strategies. If the surface integrity is predicted, the influence of different machining parameters could be studied using Particle Finite Element (PFEM)-simulations. In this investigation the influence from cutting speed and feed during turning on the residual stresses has been measured using x-ray diffraction and compared to PFEM-simulations. The results showed that cutting speed and feed have great impact on the residual stress state. The measured cutting force showed a strong correlation especially to the cutting feed. The microstructure, observed in SEM, showed highly deformed grains at the surface from the impact of the turning operation and the full width half maximum from the XDR measurements distinguish a clear impact from different cutting speed and feed which differed most for the higher feed rate. The experimental measurements of the residual stresses and the PFEM simulations did however not correlate. The surface stresses as well as the sign of the residuals stresses differed which might be due to the material model used and the assumption of using a Coulomb friction model that might not represent the cutting conditions in the investigated case.

  • 4.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Swerea IVF AB, Argongatan 30, 431 22 Mölndal, Sweden.
    Steuwer, Axel
    Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Gardham Avenue, 6031 Port Elizabeth, South Africa.
    Stormvinter, Albin
    Swerea IVF AB, Argongatan 30, 431 22 Mölndal, Sweden.
    Kristofferson, Hans
    Swerea IVF AB, Argongatan 30, 431 22 Mölndal, Sweden.
    Haakanen, Merja
    Stresstech OY, Tikkutehtaantie 1, 40 800 Vaajakoski, Finland.
    Berglund, Johan
    Swerea IVF AB, Argongatan 30, 431 22 Mölndal, Sweden.
    Residual stress state in an induction hardened steel bar determined by synchrotron- and neutron diffraction compared to results from lab-XRD2016In: Materials Science & Engineering: A, ISSN 0921-5093, E-ISSN 1873-4936, Vol. 667, p. 199-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Induction hardening is a relatively rapid heat treatment method to increase mechanical properties of steel components. However, results from FE-simulation of the induction hardening process show that a tensile stress peak will build up in the transition zone in order to balance the high compressive stresses close to the surface. This tensile stress peak is located in the transition zone between the hardened zone and the core material. The main objective with this investigation has been to non-destructively validate the residual stress state throughout an induction hardened component. Thereby, allowing to experimentally confirming the existence and magnitude of the tensile stress peak arising from rapid heat treatment. For this purpose a cylindrical steel bar of grade C45 was induction hardened and characterised regarding the microstructure, hardness, hardening depth and residual stresses. This investigation shows that a combined measurement with synchrotron/neutron diffraction is well suited to non-destructively measure the strains through the steel bar of a diameter of 20 mm and thereby making it possible to calculate the residual stress profile. The result verified the high compressive stresses at the surface which rapidly changes to tensile stresses in the transition zone resulting in a large tensile stress peak. Measured stresses by conventional lab-XRD showed however that at depths below 1.5 mm the stresses were lower compared to the synchrotron and neutron data. This is believed to be an effect of stress relaxation from the layer removal. The FE-simulation predicts the depth of the tensile stress peak well but exaggerates the magnitude compared to the measured results by synchrotron/neutron measurements. This is an important knowledge when designing the component and the heat treatment process since this tensile stress peak will have great impact on the mechanical properties of the final component.

  • 5.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Swerea-IVF AB, 431 22, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Berglund, Johan
    Grit Blasting for Removal of Recast Layer from EDM Process on Inconel 718 Shaft: An Evaluation of Surface Integrity2016In: Journal of materials engineering and performance (Print), ISSN 1059-9495, E-ISSN 1544-1024, Vol. 25, no 12, p. 5540-5550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The heat generated during EDM melts the work material and thereby allows large amounts to be removed,but an unfavorable surface of a recast layer (RCL) will also be created. This layer has entirely different properties compared to the bulk. Hence, it is of great interest to efficiently remove this layer and to verify that it has been removed. The main objective of this work has been to study the efficiency of grit blasting forremoval of RCL on an EDM aero space shaft. Additionally, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) has been evaluated asa nondestructive measurement to determine RCL presence. The results show that the grit-blasting processing parameters have strong influence on the ability to remove RCL and at the same time introduce beneficial compressive stresses even after short exposure time. Longer exposure will remove the RCL fromthe surface but also increase the risk that a larger amount of the blasting medium will get stuck into the surface. This investigation shows that a short exposure time in combination with a short grit-blasting nozzle distance is the most preferable process setting. It was further found that handheld XRF equipment can be used as a nondestructive measurement in order to evaluate the amount of RCL present on an EDM surface.This was realized by analyzing the residual elements from the EDM wire.

  • 6.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. RISE IVF AB, Argongatan 30, Mölndal, 431 53, Sweden.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Sweden AB, Trollhättan, 461 81, Sweden.
    Berglund, Johan
    RISE IVF AB, Argongatan 30, Mölndal, 431 53, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    A detailed investigation of residual stresses after milling Inconel 718 using typical production parameters for assessment of affected depth2020In: Materials Today Communications, ISSN 2352-4928, Vol. 24, article id 100958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production of superalloy gas turbine parts involves time consuming milling operations typically performed in a sequence from rough to finish milling. Rough milling using ceramic inserts allows high removal rates but causes severe sub-surface impact. A relatively large allowance is therefore left for subsequent cemented carbide milling. With increased knowledge of the affected depth it will be possible to reduce the machining allowance and increase efficiency of the manufacturing process. Milling Inconel 718 using typical production parameters has been investigated using new and worn ceramic and cemented carbide inserts. Residual stresses in a milled slot were measured by x-ray diffraction. Stresses were measured laterally across the slot and below the surface, to study the depth affected by milling. The most important result from this work is the development of a framework concerning how to evaluate the affected depth for a milling operation. The evaluation of a single milled slot shows great potential for determining the optimum allowance for machining. Our results show that the residual stresses are greatly affected by the ceramic and cemented carbide milling; both regarding depth as well as distribution across the milled slot. It has been shown that it is important to consider that the stresses across a milled slot are the highest in the center of the slot and gradually decrease toward the edges. Different inserts, ceramic and cemented carbide, and tool wear, alter how the stresses are distributed across the slot and the affected depth. © 2020 The Authors

  • 7.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Swerea-IVF AB, 431 22, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Berglund, Johan
    Swerea IVF AB, Argongatan 30, 431 22 Mölndal, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Evaluation of surface integrity after high energy machining with EDM, Laser Beam Machining and Abrasive Water Jet Machining of Alloy 7182019In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 100, no 5-8, p. 1575-1591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of future aero engine components based on new design strategies utilising topological optimisation and additive manufacturing has in the past years become a reality. This allows for designs that involve geometries of "free form" surfaces and material combinations that could be difficult to machine using conventional milling. Hence, alternative manufacturing routes using non-conventional high energy methods are interesting to explore. In this investigation, the three high energy machining methods abrasive water jet machining (AWJM), electrical discharge machining (EDM) and laser beam machining (LBM) have been compared in terms of surface integrity to the reference, a ball nosed end milled surface. The results showed great influence on the surface integrity from the different machining methods. It was concluded that AWJM resulted in the highest quality regarding surface integrity properties with compressive residual stresses in the surface region and a low surface roughness with texture from the abrasive erosion. Further, it was shown that EDM resulted in shallow tensile residual stresses in the surface and an isotropic surface texture with higher surface roughness. However, even though both methods could be considered as possible alternatives to conventional milling they require post processing. The reason is that the surfaces need to be cleaned from either abrasive medium from AWJM or recast layer from EDM. It was further concluded that LBM should not be considered as an alternative in this case due to the deep detrimental impact from the machining process.Keywords

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  • 8.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Manufacturing Swerea IVF AB Mölndal Sweden.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Sweden AB Trollhättan Sweden.
    Berglund, Johan
    Manufacturing Swerea IVF AB Mölndal Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Surface integrity after post processing of EDM processed Inconel 718 shaft2018In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 95, no 5-8, p. 2325-2337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is considered as an efficient alternative to conventional material removal concepts that allows for much higher material removal rates. However, EDM generates unwanted features such as re-cast layer (RCL), tensile residual stresses and a rough surface. In order to recover the surface integrity, different post processes has been compared: high-pressure water jet (HPWJ), grit blasting (GB) and shot peening (SP). Surface integrity has been evaluated regarding microstructure, residual stresses, chemical content and surface roughness. The results showed that a combination of two post processes is required in order to restore an EDM processed surface of discontinuous islands of RCL. HPWJ was superior for removing RCL closely followed by grit blasting. However, grit blasting showed embedded grit blasting abrasive into the surface. Regarding surface roughness, it was shown that both grit blasting and HPWJ caused a roughening of the surface topography while shot peening generates a comparably smoother surface. All three post processes showed compressive residual stresses in the surface where shot peening generated the highest amplitude and penetration depths. However, the microstructure close to the surface revealed that shot peening had generated cracks parallel to the surface. The results strongly state how important it is to evaluate the surface at each of the different subsequent process steps in order to avoid initiation of cracks.

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  • 9.
    Jäger, Henrik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Swerea-KIMAB AB, 164 40, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tamil Alagan, Nageswaran
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Swerea-IVF AB, 431 22, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Vretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, 461 81, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    EDS Analysis of Flank Wear and Surface Integrity in Machining of Alloy 718 with Forced Coolant Application2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 45, p. 271-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been extensive research on forced coolant application, usually known as high pressure coolant, in machining heat resistant super alloys. This technology has shown to improve the tool life, chip segmentation, surface integrity and reduce the temperature in the cutting zone. A number of studies have been done on hydraulic parameters of the coolant. This study has been focused on residues on the flank face of the insert and residual stress on the workpiece surface generated by regular and modified cutting inserts. To identify any residual elements, analysis were done by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, EDS, on regular as well as modified inserts in combination with forced coolant application on both rake and flank face. The investigations have shown that the temperature gradient in the insert has changed between the regular and modified cutting inserts and that the tool wear and surface roughness is significantly affected by the modified cutting tool.

  • 10.
    Suárez, Alfredo
    et al.
    Tecnalia R&I, Advanced Manufacturing Department, San Sebastián, 20.009, Spain.
    Veiga, Fernando
    Tecnalia R&I, Advanced Manufacturing Department, San Sebastián, 20.009, Spain.
    Polvorosa, Roberto
    University of the Basque Country, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Spain.
    Artaza, Teresa
    Tecnalia R&I, Advanced Manufacturing Department, San Sebastián, 20.009, Spain.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Swerea IVFAB, Mölndal, 431 22, Sweden.
    López de Lacalle, Luis Norberto
    University of the Basque Country, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Spain.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Surface integrity and fatigue of non-conventional machined Alloy 7182019In: Journal of manufacturing processes, ISSN 1526-6125, Vol. 48, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alloy 718 is a high-strength, corrosion-resistant nickel chromium-based superalloy frequently used for applications, such as aerospace, marine, nuclear reactor and chemical industries, due to its outstanding inherent properties such as high strength and corrosion resistance at high temperatures together with good creep behaviour. Although, the use of conventional manufacturing processes is prevalent for their use on Alloy 718, alternative manufacturing technologies are gaining importance. This work compares the effects of alternative manufacturing processes, such as Abrasive water jet (AWJ), Wire Electrical Discharge Machining (WEDM) and ultrasound vibration assisted milling (UVAM) with conventional milling during the manufacture of Alloy 718 parts. Surface integrity, hardness, residual stress and fatigue strength obtained from these machining processes have been examined for cutting alloy 718. Results show that both residual stresses and surface roughness are correlated with fatigue strength. UVAM results shown an improvement on the surface integrity of the final workpiece. AWJ and WEDM show poorer results, further work on post-process technologies or process condition selection must be carry out to establish them as an alternative in Alloy 718 cutting operations.

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