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  • 1.
    Gunnarsson, Maj
    et al.
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Magnusson, Maria
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Rasmusson, Peo
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Less is more: When IT comes to knowledge management2000In: Proceedings of IRIS23, 2000, Vol. 23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we take the point of departure from two thoroughly conducted casestudies, in which we have analysed certain knowledge work activities with followingimplications for design. Both studies clearly stated the call for a ICT-support whensearching information and sharing knowledge. For example, sharing bookmarksamong knowledge workers seemed to be a necessary and useful activity. Importantand valuable bookmarks often mirror what kind of information and knowledgepeople are looking for, and also what kind of forum they usually go to on the worldwide web. In this work we have developed a prototype, KnowMan, which managesbookmarks on the world wide web. The prototype is designed as a user-friendly"pad-interface" in which bookmarks can be collaboratively collected, shared andfurther explored and annotated by other knowledge workers. We end up with ageneral discussion about the possible effects of using KnowMan and what furtherdesign aspects that should be considered.

  • 2.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Sørensen, Carsten
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Co-creation and Fine-Tuning of Boundary Resources in Small-Scale Platformization2016In: Nordic Contributions in IS Research: 7th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 2016 and IFIP8.6 2016, Ljungskile, Sweden, August 7-10, 2016, Proceedings / [ed] Ulrika Lundh Snis, Springer, 2016, Vol. 259, p. 149-162Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most research on platform innovation studies the phenomena from a distance due to lack of access. This paper reports from within an action research case of platform development in a small-scale context. The case is based on a regional business initiative with the goal to establish an arena for mobile commerce and stimulate local industry growth. It was conducted in collaboration between researchers and third-party developers. The article shows how the initial phases of platformization are characterized by socio-technical arrangements, co-creation of boundary resources and intimate knowledge communication. The paper contributes to platform research by acknowledging a small-scale context for platform research. It further develops distributed tuning of boundary resources into an intimate fine-tuning process that we illustrate is valid for a small-scale context.

  • 3.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundin, Johan
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, IT Faculty, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    University of Gothenburg, Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Co-Designing a Digital Platform with Boundary Objects: Bringing Together Heterogeneous Users in Healthcare2019In: Health and Technology, ISSN 2190-7188, E-ISSN 2190-7196, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare is increasingly permeated with digital platforms supporting cooperative care involving different professional groups and also patients. New mobile technologies allow for patients to continuously monitor and document their symptoms to support better healthcare, as well as self-care. The successful design of such multi-user platforms calls for new design approaches involving heterogeneous conditions and goals. This paper analyzes theuse of boundary objects in design as a mediator for different users' needs and conditions. Our research is conducted at a clinic supporting cancer survivors in their struggles with treatment induced illnesses, a treatment heavily dependent on new medical research as well as on patient involvement. The data is collected ethnographically over two years following a design project that developed a digital platform to support the care provided by the clinic. We describe how useful boundary objects transform over time, from rich narratives, to conceptual formulations and finally into concrete prototypes of the platform. We argue that understanding such a transformation can inform the design of healthcare platforms and guide future design processes, where co-designing with boundary objects can be especially useful as a design approach when doing design complex settings, such as healthcare settings.

  • 4.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics. Reykjavik University, School of Computer Science, Iceland.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundin, Johan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shift in translations: Data work with patient-generated health data in clinical practice2019In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on how the introduction of patient-generated health data affects the nurses’ and patients’ data work and unpacks how new forms of data collection trigger shifts in the work with data through translation work. The article is based on a 2.5-year case study examining data work of nurses and patients at a cancer rehabilitation clinic at a Swedish Hospital in which patient-generated health data are gathered by patients and then used outside and within clinical practice for decision-making. The article reports on how data are prepared and translated, that is, made useful by the nurses and patients. Using patient-generated health data alters the data work and how the translation of data is performed. The shift in work has three components: (1) a shift in question tactics, (2) a shift in decision-making, and (3) a shift in distribution. The data become mobile, and the data work becomes distributed when using patient-generated health data as an active part of care

  • 5.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Assmo, Per
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Taking Care Seriously: Transforming Practices by Design2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics. Reykjavik University, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik , Iceland.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundin, Johan
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Cerna, Katerina
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Education, Communication and Learning, Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Oncology, Gothenburg , Sweden.
    The Virtual Clinic: Two-sided Affordances in Consultation Practice2019In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work, ISSN 0925-9724, E-ISSN 1573-7551, Vol. 28, no 3-4, p. 435-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telecare has the potential to increase the quality of care while also decreasing costs. However, despite great potential, efficiency in care practices and cost reduction remain hypothetical. Within computer supported cooperative work (CSCW), one focus of telecare research has been on awareness support in distributed real-time communication in comparison to physical meetings since face-to-face consultations have been known as the “gold standard” of conducting care. Research has shown that it is hard to maintain qualities such as awareness through video-mediated meetings. In this research, the goal has not been to mimic the qualities of face-to-face consultations but rather to document the qualities of three types of patient meetings (consultations) and to understand in what kinds of situations each consultation type is a viable option. In this paper, we focus on the essential qualities of i) face-to-face consultations, ii) video-based consultations, and iii) telephone consultations and shed light on their affordances. The research contribution includes an extension of the affordance lens to incorporate socio-technical, two-sided affordances, that constitute important aspects for understanding complexity when heterogeneous actors co-existing in a practice, where affordances can differ for different “sides” in the complex practice—a view that is fruitful when dealing with heterogeneous actors and a set of analog and digital tools in a practice.

  • 7.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundin, Johan
    Gothenburg University, Applied Information Technology.
    Steineck, G.
    Transition at Work: Introducing Video-mediated Consultation to Cancer Rehabilitation.2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design. Göteborgs universitet, IT-fakulteten.
    Being Multisituated: Characterizing laptoping in networked situations2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last 30 years mobile IT has gone from being an exotic ingredient to an everyday artifact. This thesis presents an ethnographic study of laptop use in a university setting. The thesis concludes that it is no longer enough to describe the use of portable IT as an activity in its own right, i.e. using a laptop computer as an activity similar to reading a book or writing an essay. Additionally, describing a person as merely a user of digital technology fails to capture the intervowennessbetween the technology, situation, person and other actors. In order to find more nuanced answers about laptop use the thesis discuss what characterize the use of laptops in everyday life. With support from Actor-Network Theory, the Interaction Order and Experiential computing the thesis explores the hybrid combination of a person-laptop. The contribution is a framework of the driving forces behind the laptoper’s everyday activities. Additionally a model of the networked situation is presented, that uncovers the effects of the laptoper over time, that is, the laptoping process. The contribution is a framework with key characteristics and typified interactions where the multisituated and network dimensions are understood as fundamental elements of hybrid interaction.

  • 9.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    The laptop as an alibi: Use patterns of unfocused interaction2012In: Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, ISSN 1891-943X, E-ISSN 1891-943X, Vol. 2012, no 2, p. 132-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a qualitative study of laptop-equipped university students, this article investigates the laptop's role in educational practice. Goffman's framework on unfocused interaction was used to develop and analyze three use patterns: screen peeking, online tics and screensaver fear. These patterns advance our understanding of laptop use, unfocused interaction and the the role of the laptop in the studied situations. The laptop introduces an interpretative flexibility that allows a greater range of different behaviors relative to the dominant involvement. © 2012 Universitetsforlaget.

  • 10.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Bergquist, M.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Characterizing the Laptoper: The sustainability struggle of onlineness, content curation and visibilityArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Bergquist, Magnus
    IT-University, Göteborg .
    Breadcrumbs of interaction: situating personal information management2008In: Proceedings of the 5th Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction: building bridges, ACM , 2008, p. 266-273Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Bergquist, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied Information Technology.
    Laptopers in an educational practice: Promoting the personal learning situation2010In: Computers and education, ISSN 0360-1315, E-ISSN 1873-782X, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 311-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article an ethnographical study of laptopers' activities during lectures in a university milieu is analyzed as different kinds of involvements. Through interviews and observations we have focused on how these involvements influence the laptopers' alignment towards the educational practice. The analysis shows the importance of separating the educational practice and the personal learning situation. Studying students' learning intentions, rather than certain laptop related activities, we get a deeper understanding of the role the laptop can take during learning activities. Five general characteristics of laptoping are found. Negotiating the laptops' different roles in the educational practice opens up for an understanding of the students personal learning situation as being more than just listening to a lecturer. Additionally, competent integration of digital tools into the learning situation extends the dimensions of the lecture beyond the lecturing hours and personal note taking. Such knowledge is vital for creating foundations for digital competency in a digitized society. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design. Department of Applied IT, IT Faculty, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundin, Johan
    Department of Applied IT, IT Faculty, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden3.
    Data Supported Practice for Co-Creation of Value in HealthcareIn: Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of information systems in healthcare enables the use of health data for purposes related to data-driven decision-making. The technology "promise" is to make healthcare organizations more efficient. Despite the increased interest in health data in general and patient generated data in particular, there is a need for additional research on how data support health practices. This paper therefore conducts a case study of a nurse-led clinic for cancer rehabilitation to examine how a data-supported practice achieves value. By breaking down the data-gathering process, with a focus on value, we show how value is co-created by a range of different actors, including patients, nurses and researchers. In this case, the value co-creation consist of two parallel processes. A knowledge process revolving around a research practice with the aim to produce new knowledge. It is a process which provide a foundation and structure for the clinical practice. The interactional process work in parallel and describes the interaction with and about data between the different actors and how the interaction is an essential resource to achieve data value.

  • 14.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Steineck, G.
    University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Clinical Science, Sweden.
    Lundin, J.
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, Sweden.
    From narratives to numbers: Data work and patient-generated health data in consultations2018In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics / [ed] Klein G.O.,Karlsson D.,Moen A.,Ugon A., IOS Press, 2018, Vol. 247, p. 491-495Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents preliminary findings on how the introduction of patient-generated health data (PGHD) triggers changes during patient-nurse consultations. This article builds on a two-year case study, examining the work practice at a cancer rehabilitation clinic at a Swedish Hospital using PGHD. The study focuses on how nurses’ use data, gathered by patients with a mobile phone app, during consultations. The use of PGHD introduce a change in the translation work, the work of turning rich patient descriptions and transform them into data, during the consultation for documentation and clinical decision-making. This change affects precision, questions asked and the use of visualizations as well as the patient-nurse decision making. © 2018 European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI) and IOS Press.

  • 15.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundin, Johan
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Laptops in classroom interaction: Deconstructing the networked situation2015In: International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning, ISSN 1560-4624, E-ISSN 1741-5055, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 226-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The screen, as part of networked technologies such as phones, tablets and laptops is at present a debated subject as it affects how people behave in meetings, lectures and other social gatherings. As these networked technologies attract attention and mediates interaction during physical social gatherings, they also change how we perceive and define what a situation is. In this article we focus on the different types of screen related interactions identified in a higher education classroom. Since these networked technologies are commonplace at university campuses it is important to describe their effects on everyday situations such as lectures. While a range of studies have raised questions regarding the negative effects of multitasking, screen peeking and other laptop related side effects this article emphasise the situational impact of student-laptop interaction. The contribution emphasises on the computer mediated interaction with both other students, external others as well as a range of digital resources. The research thus aims at providing educators and researchers with a model to advance their understanding of the laptoped and networked situation.

  • 16.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Gunnarsson, Maj
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Magnusson, Maria
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    KNOWMAN: To Go Where No Man Has Gone Before2000In: Proceedings of WebNet World Conference on the WWW and Internet 2000, San Antonio, Texas: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE) , 2000, p. 815-816Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IT-support for knowledge work should be designed to support and enhance the human interaction and knowledge sharing processes. The specific usage of web-based technology gives the possibilities of putting crucial, knowledge-related interaction on-line. For example, sharing bookmarks among knowledge workers seems to be a necessary and useful activity. Important and valuable bookmarks often mirror what kind of information and knowledge people are looking for and also what kind of forum they use to go to on the world wide web. In this work we have developed a prototype, KNOWMAN, which manages bookmarks on the world wide web. The prototype is designed as a user-friendly "pad-interface" in which bookmarks can be collaboratively collected, shared and further annotated and explored by other knowledge workers.

  • 17.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Asplund, C
    mCity: A place to go for mobile commerce2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    Stahl-Falck, Pia
    Östlund, Christian
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Sorensen, Carsten
    Grundén, Kerstin
    Exploring Tools and Methods for Work-Integrated Learning2002In: Proceedings of E-Learn 2002--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education / [ed] Margaret Driscoll; Thomas C. Reeves, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE) , 2002, p. 2234-2237Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most organizations have high hopes regarding the potential for eLearning to address the increasing demands for constant learning that characterizes life in a knowledge society. However, most existing designs are strongly influenced by traditional classroom-based education, and are consequently poorly adapted to the situated conditions of real work practices. This paper tries to frame a research domain labeled work-integrated learning, where focus is set on developing innovative tools and methods for technology-mediated learning, rooted in understanding of the specific conditions for various organizational settings. The paper proposes a four-level stage model as a framework for both analysis of organizations and design of new tools and methods for eLearning.

  • 19.
    Svensson, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Lundh Snis, UlrikaUniversity West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.Sörensen, C.Fägerlind, H.Lindroth, TomasUniversity West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.Magnusson, M.Östlund, ChristianUniversity West, Department of Informatics and Mathematics.
    Proceedings of IRIS 23. Laboratorium for Interaction Technology2000Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
1 - 19 of 19
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