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  • 1.
    Lundin, Johan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pongolini, Malin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Communication in boundary practices: from media choice to interaction negotiation?2009In: Proceedings of the 32nd Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, IRIS 32: Inclusive Design / [ed] Judith Molka-Danielsen, Molde University College , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research presented in this paper is an initial analysis of an ongoing project build on work in, what we call, boundary practices. These new professional roles emerge in the border lands between existing practice communities. This change effect knowledge production, decision making, collaboration and a range of other aspects in work. However, the study at hand focus how work is conducted and coordinated through and with new media technologies, and in particular how media are put to use. We have conducted ethnographical studies within a global automotive manufacturing company. The organization has recently introduced a new role, subsystem manager, i.e. a technical expert that is given strategic responsibilities for shared parts and platforms within the organization. The subsystem manager is to participate in a number of global meetings with other experts within the subsystem or with other managers for closely related or integrated subsystems. Three different global meetings have been observed and preliminary findings indicate that some of the fundamental assumptions built into the concept of media choice and media richness might be problematic as an analytical perspective used on our empirical context. The work we have studied is characterized by negotiations, not only concerning how to solve a task, but also concerning what the task actually is. The choice of media is in itself is a matter of negotiations. Practitioners are adding new media to ongoing interactions, rather than using media in sequence and one medium is not used exclusively. Rather a number of media are used in parallel.

  • 2.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Hattinger, Monika
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pongolini, Malin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Designing the CloudBoard: an ICT Tool for Online Tutoring in Higher Education2011In: Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 / [ed] Matthew Koehler & Punya Mishra, Chesapeake, VA: AACE , 2011, p. 589-592Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns online tutoring in higher education. Observation studies of online tutoring sessions in two masters level engineering courses were conducted where teachers on campus tutored students located at different manufacturing plants doing their masters project. The tutoring regarded problems surrounding the construction of advanced 3D-models for manufacturing and required the shared view of the 3D-models as well as synchronous voice communication, e-mail and image sharing using a flora of different services. While advanced screen sharing applications like WebEX and TeamViewer were central in the tutoring sessions, the research presented here focus on the tools that supplemented the use of the screen sharing applications. Addressing issues such as the need to record historical data to be able for teachers to follow the progression of the project, sharing media files between participants and discussing the results, we here present a system to support online tutoring in higher education.

  • 3.
    Pongolini, Malin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundin, Johan
    Avdelningen för tillämpad IT, Göteborgs universitet.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Global Online Meetings in Virtual Teams: from Media Choice to Interaction Negotiation2011In: Proceedings of the Fifth Communities and Technologies Conference 2011, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane Australia / [ed] Jesper Kjeldskov and Jeni Paay, Brisbane, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on an ethnographical study of a community of technology experts within a global automotive manufacturing company that uses information technology to communicate and collaborate in global virtual teams. Our findings show that discussions, negotiations, compromises and joint problem solving characterize media choices made in virtual teamwork. Practitioners are adding new media to ongoing interactions, rather than using media in sequence. Furthermore, one medium is not used exclusively, rather a number of media can be used in parallel. This shows that some of the fundamental assumptions built into the concept of media choice theories, are somewhat problematic as an analytical perspective when virtual teams are researched in real settings outside of laboratories and hypothetical scenarios.

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