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  • 1.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Josefsson, Pernilla
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Challenges in designing virtual environments training social skills for children with autism2006In: Proceedings of 6th International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies, University of Reading , 2006, p. 35-43Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to explore particular challenges faced when designing virtual environments for children with autism, with the purpose of training social skills. Our findings are based on studying autistic behaviour during three years (primary and secondary sources), analysis of related system and other computer mediated assistive technology, as well as general game design. From these studies we have identified eight critical design parameters that need to be adjustable in a system suitable for autistic persons. The parameters importance, their variation range, as well as the need for independent adjustment of these were estimated and verified by experienced expert pedagogues.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Josefsson, Pernilla
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Challenges in designing virtual environments training social skills for children with autism2006In: International Journal on Disability and Human Development, ISSN 1565-012X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 105-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore particular challenges faced when designing virtual environments for children with autism, with the purpose of training social skills. Our findings are based on studying autistic behavior during three years (primary and secondary sources), analysis of related system and other computer mediated assistive technology, as well as general game design. From these studies, we have identified eight critical design parameters that must be adjustable in a system suitable for autistic persons. The importance of the parameters, their variation range, as well as the need for independent adjustment of these were estimated and verified by experienced expert pedagogues. Copyright © Freund Publishing House Limited.

  • 3.
    Babaheidari, Said Morad
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Högberg, Karin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Norström, Livia
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Willermark, Sara
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Work-integrated Learning in a Doctoral Course in Informatics2016In: Proceedings of IRIS39, Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, Ljungskile, August 7-10, 2016 / [ed] Pareto, Lena, Svensson, Lars, Lundin, Johan, Lundh Snis, Ulrika Lundh Snis, 2016, p. 1-11Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Being the first university in the world to provide doctoral program in Work-integrated Learning (WIL), we face the challenge of how to integrate doctoral courses into the WIL philosophy, which is the profile of the University West, Sweden. To exemplify what we mean by such a notion of integration, we introduce and demonstrate our proposed ontological approach to integrate a PhDcourse into the fundamental concepts underpinning WIL. The WIL within the context of informatics research (which is a subfield of the IS discipline) playsfive different roles of (1) the main course content, (2) the target occupation ofthe students and occupational field of the teachers, (3) the analytical perspective of the research activities in the course, (4) the educational method where teachers and students conduct collaborative research activities as a cognitive apprenticeship learning model, and (5) a co-authored research paper as outcome.The outcomes of such a conducted approach and lessons learned from the course will be thoroughly described. In the course, a meta-analysis of WIL informatics research will be performed to examine four dimensions which are: theories relevant for WIL; methods used in WIL research; occupational fields in WIL informatics studies; and roles of technology in WIL research. The course is arranged in the these phases: Local investigation; locally rooted research within the informatics field is examined by the course participants in dialogue with the authors of a number of published articles in order to see the extent and the how aspects of these identified WIL-oriented research work; Local synthesis; both teachers and the PhD students (i.e., course participants) explore the results and synthesize a local WIL-model; Global overview; a number of related international literature is selected and studied; Global synthesis; The local WIL model is compared to the global investigation. Co-authoring; a research paper is co-authored by the course participants and presented at a conference. By doing so, we enhance our understandings and thus contribute to one additional practical application of WIL's pedagogical philosophy, which influences the course content, the course format, the activities, the teaching-learning model,and the outcome of the course.

  • 4.
    Babaheidari, Said Morad
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Spante, Maria
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    A Systematic Process for Selecting a Typical Case in School Setting2013In: Proceedings IRIS 36: August 11-14 2013 at Gran, Norway / [ed] Bratteteig, Tone, Aanestad, Margunn & Skorve, Espen, Oslo: University of Oslo , 2013, p. 461-472Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the rationale behind the concrete steps how we systematically have gone through the case selection process as the first phase of a research project named Consequences of the Digitalization of Schools. The project is a single-case longitudinal (5-year long) study and adopts a so called Whole-School Approach. Previous research has criticized case studies for lack of both systematic approach and transparency in the presentation of the case selection process. The purpose of the presentation of this case selection process is to contribute to enhancing understanding of and broadening knowledge on systematic and transparent case selection techniques. The SIRIS database has been used to select a typical Swedish primary school in the chosen municipality where the project will be conducted. The SIRIS database contains annually statistics from all primary schools in Sweden, and is available online for public use. We demonstrate how and why a particular school representing a so called typical school was selected as our case. 

  • 5.
    Broeren, Jurgen
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Jalminger, J
    Västra Götaland County.
    Johansson, L-Å
    Alkit Communications, Mölndal.
    Parmerud,, A
    Alkit Communications, Mölndal.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Rydmark, Martin
    Gothenburg University.
    Information and communication technology: a person-centered approach to stroke care2012In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies / [ed] P M Sharkey, E Klinger, Readings: University of Readings , 2012, p. 329-335Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes the possibilities of information and communication technology (ICT) in stroke care, addressing a person-centered care (PCC) approach. Attention is paid to user involvement, design, videogames, and communication between health care professionals mutually as well as with patients, and how to share performance data with an electronic health record. This is the first step towards a supportive ICT system that facilitates interoperability, making healthcare information and services available to citizen’s across organizational boundaries. 

  • 6.
    Broeren, Jurgen
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Johansson, Britt
    NU-sjukvården, Uddevalla kommun.
    Ljungberg, Christer
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Rydmark, Martin
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Götebrog Universitet.
    Stroke rehabilitation using m-Health Care and 3D virtual environments: work in progress2010In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies / [ed] Sharkey, Paul & Sánchez, Jaime, 2010, p. 115-122Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     We have now started testing a telehealth system for stroke rehabilitation in a rural area in Sweden (NU- Hospital Group Area). For collection of assessments and audiovisual communication, the telehealth system has bidirectional contact with the home-based units. To date, three stroke subjects’ participated; they were instructed to play 3D computer games with the hemiplegic upper extremity. The intervention led to clinical changes for all subjects. The analysis of the audiovisual communication revealed that the both stroke subjects and therapists were not yet effective in regulating their turn taking process. The data suggests the feasibility of a distance based approach using 3D virtual environments for upper extremity rehabilitation after stroke.

  • 7.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    The Goalkeeper: a tool for monitoring learning outcomes in PhD education2015In: ICERI2015 Proceedings, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The journey from being a new Ph. D.-candidate towards passing the doctorate grade is often a bumpy road with both unexpected and complex challenges that has to be turned in to learning experiences that adds to progression. In this paper we describe the development and use of a tool (the Goalkeeper) designed to support, structure and visualize this journey. It is a tool for supervisors, doctorate students as well as people responsible for quality assurance of a doctorate education. Based on our experiences of having utilised the tool we argue that it is important that the implementation of such a tool is firmly grounded in a quality culture where support of progression and formative assessment dominate over summative assessment and control.

  • 8.
    Gråsjö, Urban
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Law, Politics and Economics.
    Jansson, Elisabeth
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lindh, Kristina
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lundh-Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Experience Design: Understanding the Role of Technology for Virtual Experiences2006In: Proceedings of 29th Information System Research Seminar in Scandinavia, IRIS 29: Paradigms, Politics, Paradoxes, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New technologies have always teased the imagination of avant-garde artists on how to challenge existing cultural paradigms. For instance, experience design for the creative industries of today provides exciting challenges with a potential to innovate practices and creating new ways of interaction between the artist and her audience. In an ongoing research project we aim at framing the design space for virtual experiences. The paper presents and discusses the role of technology in such context and use three ongoing case studies where ICT has been used to augment and support consumers of cultural experiences. The analysis shows how technology-driven interventions are less oriented towards radical change compared to interventions that are rooted in their nondigital origins.

  • 9.
    Heldal, Ilona
    et al.
    Högskolan i Bergen, Norge.
    Hammar Wijkmark, Cecilia
    Myndighetens för Samhällsskydd och Beredskap.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Simulation and serious games for firefighter training: challenges for effective use2016In: NOKOBIT - Norsk konferanse for organisasjoners bruk av informasjonsteknologi, ISSN 1892-0748, E-ISSN 1894-7719, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main criteria of effectively managing emergency and crisis situations is good preparedness. Simulation and serious games (SSG) are often advocated as promising technologies supporting training and increasing the skills necessary to deal with new, complex and often unexpected situations. This paper is based on an investigation of why a seemingly appropriate SSG technology was not used long after procurement. We identified potential obstacles and challenges of SSG implementation in organizations responsible for societal safety. The focus is on fire fighter training and is based on 33 interviews with major stakeholders from seven countries, from organizations with successful as well as unsuccessful experiences of SSG use. By contrasting the different incentives and views regarding the technology use, this paper contributes to a better understanding of challenges related to SSG implementation and use. The results confirm the possible benefits of SSGs, but also highlight an urgent need for new approaches to integrate these new technologies into organizational practices. Only by formulating local, organizational strategies with the SSG use can the technology be implemented successfully

  • 10.
    Karlsson, Marianne
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Engelbrektsson, Pontus
    Chalmers.
    Larsson, Lena E.
    Chalmers.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Berndtsson, Bo
    University West, Department of Economics and IT.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Use-centred design ofmedical and health care technology: A pilot study of fieldtests as a development tool2011In: International Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology, ISSN 1752-6418, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 11-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the project has been to develop a process through which users, staff as well as patients, can be involved in field evaluations of medical and healthcare technology. Interviews with different stakeholders and the experiences from four case studies have led to the following conclusions. Users have the potential to act as active evaluators rather than passive subjects or participants only. However, user involvement in field evaluations must be supported by a formation of facilitators or 'door openers' to the healthcare organisation, moderators enhancing the dialogue between developers and users, and mentors for the users acting as evaluators.

  • 11.
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Atienza, Ricardo
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    The Sound Bubble: A context-sensitive space in the space2017In: Organised Sound, ISSN 1355-7718, E-ISSN 1469-8153, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 130-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of sonic environments is in need of more active strategies, taking into account not only the physical but also the social and sensorial aspects of a place. This implies abandoning traditional, mono-disciplinary responses in favour of interdisciplinary methods and approaches. In this study we explored the possibility of inserting context-sensitive sound textures to improve the experience of an activity-based office workplace. For this purpose, we developed the concept of the ’sound bubble’ - a micro-space in which the user is embedded by a semi-transparent added sound environment that will operate as a subtle sound mask, attracting the attention without needing to hide the disturbing environment. This should help users (the workers) to stay in an ’everyday listening’ mode. This means, not focusing on the environment in particular but on their tasks, while preserving the link with the surrounding space and activities. 

  • 12.
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Designing activity-based and context-sensitive ambient sound environments in open-plan offices2015In: Proceedings of the 38th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia (IRIS 38), Oulo, Finland, 9-12 August, 2015. / [ed] Anssi Öörni, Netta Iivari, Kari Kuutti, Harri Oinas-Kukkonen and Mikko Rajanen, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper address the problem of sound disturbance in open office environments. We have in a design-based research study explored how digital, real time generated sound can be added to a work environment and how these sound environments are perceived by respondents when performing work tasks. Being such a complex situation, we have in this first explorative study chosen to focus on designing a digital sound system for activity-based offices, where the physical environment is already designed for particular activities. Our approach is to explore if workplaces can be enhanced by adding appropriate acoustic designs to the ambient environment. Our results show that test subjects perceived that acoustic design could enhance the ambient environments if the acoustic design is pertinent with the environment as a whole. 

  • 13.
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Designing Activity-Based and Context-Sensitive Ambient Sound Environments in Open-Plan Offices2015In: IRIS Selected Papers of the Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, ISSN 1891-9863, E-ISSN 2387-3353, no 6, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the problem of sound disturbance in open office environments. We have in a design-based research study explored how digital, real time generated sound can be added to a work environment and how these sound environments are perceived by respondents when performing work tasks. In this first explorative study we have chosen to focus on designing a digital sound system for activity-based offices, where the physical environment is already designed for particular activities. Our approach is to explore if adding appropriate acoustic designs to the ambient environment can enhance workplaces. Our results show that test subjects perceived that acoustic design could enhance the ambient environments if the acoustic design is pertinent with the environment as a whole.

  • 14.
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sound Bubbles for Productive Office Work2016In: Nordic Contributions in IS Research: 7th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 2016 and IFIP8.6 2016, Ljungskile, Sweden, August 7-10, 2016, Proceedings / [ed] Ulrika Lundh Snis, Cham: Springer International Publishing , 2016, Vol. 259, p. 29-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing number of organizations are moving towards more open and collaborative workplaces. In these offices workers share a common open space, often with flexible seating based on activities, so called activity-based offices. Most problems in these workplaces are related to sound. Thus, the question of how to design suitable acoustic environments, supporting both collaborative and individual work, has emerged. Noise-reduction approaches do not suffice. In this study we explored the possibility of adding context-sensitive, activity-based sound environments to enhance the office workplace. For this purpose, we developed the “sound bubble,” a prototype for individual work, sonically immersing the listener and generating a sensation of an encapsulating sonic environment. A total of 43 test subjects participated in an experience-based test using the sound bubble prototype while conducting self-selected, ordinary work tasks in their office landscape. Their behaviors during the test were observed and documented. All participants took a post-experience questionnaire about experiences working in the sound bubble, and two subjects were interviewed. The responses show that the sound bubble can enhance auditory work conditions for individual work that demands concentration.

  • 15.
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Atienza, Ricardo
    Konstfack, University College of Arts, Crafts and Design 126 27 Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Sound Bubble: An Aesthetic Additive Design Approach to Actively Enhance Acoustic Office Environments2016In: Proceedings of 13th conference on Sound and Music Computing, Hamburg 2016, 2016, p. 253-260Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Moving towards more open and collaborative workplaces has been an emerging trend in the last decades. This change has led to workers sharing a common open space, with seating’s based on current activity, so called activity-based offices. Consequently, it becomes difficult to design sonic environments that cater to different needs in the same space. In this study we explored the possibility of adding site-specific but location-adaptive sound environments to enhance the experience of an activity-based office workplace. For this purpose, we developed the concept of the “sound bubble,” a micro-space in which the user is embedded by a semi-transparent sound environment. The purpose of the bubble is to help the user ignore irrelevant and disturbing noise while working in an open landscape. The sound bubble supports the user to stay in “everyday listening” mode, i.e., not focusing on anything particular in the surrounding environment while being able to keep a link with it. The sound bubble was evaluated by a total of 43 test subjects participating in an experience-based test, conducting their usual work tasks in an office landscape. Our results show that the sound bubble can enhance auditory work conditions for individual work requiring concentration.

  • 16.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Nilsson, Ann
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Nilsson, Lena A.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Petersen, Ann-Louise
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Sofkova Hashemi, Sylvana
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Spante, Maria
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Wicke, Kurt
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Nordic Innovation Networks in Education: Dealing with Educational Challenges with Cross Boarder Collaboration and User Driven Design2012In: Uddevalla Symposium 2012 : Entrepreneurship and Innovation Networks. Revised papers presented at the 15th Uddevalla Symposium 14-16 June, 2012, Faro, Portugal. / [ed] Bernhard, Irene, 2012, p. 553-571Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is an EU-funded project related to cross boarder collaboration for educational purposes supported by information and communication technologies between Danish, Norwegian and Swedish schools. The project started in 2011 and extends to 2014 so this empirically dominated paper reports on early findings related to cross-border collaboration challenges. The aim of the project is to develop innovative cross-border teaching models by the means of user-driven, practice-based co-design processes between practitioners and researchers. In the first year, 18 classes from 13 schools in Denmark, Norway and Sweden in the Öresund-Kattegatt-Skagerack region participated. Organized in so called Nordic class-match groups (consisting of students and teachers from one class in each country) new cross-border teaching models are co-created, tested and evaluated in an iterative process. Since teaching models are subject dependent, the project develop teaching models in several subject domains, i.e. math, language, science and social studies / history. Heretofore findings show, however, that organizational and technical issues have superseded and squeezed out subject-oriented discussions due to surprisingly many practical issues that needed to be handled first. We have identified three major thresholds to overcome. The first is related to technical difficulties in schools when diverse IT systems are to be synchronized. The second threshold concerns scheduling coordination difficulties in order to allow synchronous cross boarder collaboration. The third threshold concerns linguistic and communication difficulties rooted in participants communicating in their respective Nordic language. Being able to communicate within Nordic languages are explicit learning goals in all three schools systems, and therefore part of the project aim and consequently all participants are expected to use their native languages when communicating. The next phase of the project is therefore to find solutions to these technical, organizational and linguistic barriers, and already now we see some barrier breaking models taking shape in the active network of Nordic teachers, students, school leaders, IT support teams and researchers.

     

  • 17.
    Lundh-Snis, Ulrika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Competence Management Systems in Networking Organisations: Designing for Empowerment?2007In: Proceedings of 30th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia: IRIS 30 / [ed] Tarja Tiainen, Hannakaisa Isomäki,Mikko Korpela, Anja Mursu, Pirkko Nykänen,Minna- Kristiina Paakki & Samuli Pekkola, University of Tampere , 2007, p. 1236-1248Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current trends among business companies imply that sources of human competencies are spread across intra-organisational and inter-organisational units into networks of organisations of different kinds. This paper explores the challenges for design of competence management systems (CMS) raised by inter-organisational collaboration in a network of private companies. We take the point of departure from the co-workers’ abilitly to explore and manage their competence. The research question to be answered is: How can a network perspective on competence management systems empower co-workers? The paper presents findings from an on-going research project aiming at identifying design implications of a network competence management system (nCMS), where the role of the individual is valued crucial for its success. We argue that there is a need to take a critical stand towards common assumptions of CMS as a tool for intra organisational strategic work - instead a nCMS should empower the individual member of the network organization.

  • 18.
    Lundin, Johan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Lundh-Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Practice Based Design for Learning at Work2008In: International Journal of Advanced Corporate Learning, ISSN 1867-5565, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 17-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing for learning at work in a manner that embraces the rich situatedness of practice involves a number of challenges in bridging normative and descriptive perspectives, as well as closing the gap between IS design theory and practice. In this paper, we propose a grounded approach that combines influence from learning theories with studies of existing learning practices. This approach could result in learning models, constituted of a sequence of learning activities that outlines the didactics of the workplace. The arguments are based on the empirical findings from an action-oriented research project in collaboration with six SME:s, and are illustrated through a e-learning model called “The Competence Kick-off”.

  • 19.
    Lundin, Johan
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Lundh-Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Coping With Dualities in Network Action Research:  Methodological Issues2008In: Proceedings of the 31th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia, IRIS 31, Åre, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents lessons learned from an action research venture involving a network of SMEs and a group of IS researchers. The purpose is to discuss some fundamental methodological issues that we learned when doing action research with a network of interrelated organizations, rather than report the action research project itself. Our results are presented as four dualities that should be addressed throughout diagnostic and therapeutical activities in a network action research project. The dualities (teach–learn, local–global, multifaceted–unified, and liquid–crystal) are forwarded as analytical scaffolds to cope with the inherent difficulties of understanding and acting in IS action research projects, especially network action research.

  • 20.
    Nilsson, Ann
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    The Complexity of Integrating Technology Enhanced Learning in Special Math Education: a Case Study2010In: Sustaining TEL: From Innovation to Learning and Practice. 5th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL 2010, Barcelona, Spain, September 28 - October 1, 2010. Proceedings / [ed] Martin Wolpers, Paul A. Kirschner, Maren Scheffel, Stefanie Lindstaedt and Vania Dimitrova, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag , 2010, p. 638-643Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a study of integrating an educational game in special math education, to explore challenges faced during the process. The game promotes an unconventional approach supporting students having math difficulties, through visual representations, learn-by-exploration and learn-by-teaching models. Our conclusion is that integration in special education is more challenging than in the main stream counterpart, due to social vulnerability of the students, learning/teaching challenges in content, motivation and attitude, a non-typical learning situation, and the challenge of matching learning peers.

  • 21.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    A Teachable Agent Game Engaging Primary School Children to Learn Arithmetic Concepts and Reasoning2014In: International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education, ISSN 1560-4292, E-ISSN 1560-4306, ISSN 1560-4292, 1560-4306, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 251-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will describe a learning environment designed to foster conceptual understanding and reasoning in mathematics among younger school children. The learning environment consists of 48 2-player game variants based on a graphical model of arithmetic where the mathematical content is intrinsically interwoven with the game idea. The environment also features teachable agents, which are computer programs that can be taught and behave according to their knowledge. Thus, the environment provides both learning-by-doing (playing the game) and learning-by-teaching (teaching the agent to play). It differs from other learning-by-teaching systems 1) by targeting basic mathematics and primary grade students; 2) by using teachable agents as an extension to educational games in order to leverage engagement, reflection and learning; and 3) by using an agent-driven question dialogue to challenge students’ mathematical thinking, to role-model learner behaviour and to transfer game knowledge to out-of-game mathematics. The teachable agent game is described and evaluated in an authentic classroom study enrolling 443 students from 22 classes in 9 schools. Students range from 2nd to 6th grade of mainstream classes and 7th to 8th grade for students with difficulties in mathematics. Part of the study was designed as a quasiexperimental study with controls; part was designed to examine students’ change in mental models of arithmetic before and after game play. All students took pre- and post mathematics tests. The 314 playing students used the game and taught their agents during regular math-classes for three months, whereas the control classes attended standard instruction and took the tests. A questionnaire was distributed at the end of the study to investigate students’ perceptions and performances of the agent-tutoring task. Results show that 1) there is a significant learning gain for playing students compared to controls, 2) the learning environment can engage children in advanced mathematical thinking in early education, 3) young primary students can act as successful tutors. Thus, we conclude that teachable agents in educational games can help achieve deeper levels of learning that transfer outside the game. This idea combines the motivational power of games with the reflective power of a teachable agent asking thought-provoking, deep questions on the learning material during game play.

  • 22.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    A Teachable Agent Game for Elementary School Mathematics promoting Causal Reasoning and Choice2010In: 1st International Workshop on Adaptation and Personalization in E-B/Learning using Pedagogic Conversational Agents (APLEC 2010): Online Proceedings / [ed] Diana Pérez-Marín, Ismael Pascual-Nieto, Susan Bull (Eds.), Hawaii, 2010, p. 13-19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a mathematics computer game for children designed to promote causal reasoning, choice-making, and other higher-order cognitive activities. The game consists of a choice-based board game, enhanced with a conversational, teachable agent, taught to play the game, by the child, through demonstrations and questions. Game design is motivated by causal reasoning theory and educational psychology. The game is currently evaluated in an ongoing large-scale study that seeks to investigate the game’s effects on the players’ abilities to reason and make productive choices. The study involves 20 elementary-school classes at different levels.

  • 23.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Graphical Arithmetic for Learners with Dyscalculia 2005In: Proceedings of the 7th international ACM SIGACCESS conference on Computers and accessibility , New York: ACM [Association for Computing Machinery] , 2005, p. 214-215Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a model for arithmetic, based on graphical representations, to complement the symbolic language of mathematics. The focus is conceptual understanding of arithmetic. We argue that the graphical model supports understanding concepts known to be difficult for learners with dyscalculia, such as number-sense and decimal system. The proposed graphical representation share properties of the decimal system, but is closer to the semantic representation of numbers vital to the number-sense. The model is evaluated with school-children, but needs to be further tested by learners with dyscalculia. 

  • 24.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Mathematical literacy for everyone using arithmetic games2012In: In Proceedings of the 9th International Confernce on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies / [ed] P M Sharkey, E Klinger, Readings: University of Readings , 2012, p. 87-96Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An innovative mathematics game shown to be effective for low-achieving mainstream students is tested in special education for learners with intellectual disabilities. The game relies on a graphical, intuitive representation for numbers and arithmetic operations to foster conceptual understanding and numbers sense, and provides a set of 2-player games to develop strategic thinking and reasoning skills.  The game runs on computers and interactive white boards, and as an augmented reality application at a science centre. We compare its use in special education and mainstream education with respect to usage, performance levels and learning gain. The game has been used by teachers in special educations, with gains in mathematical understanding, strategic thinking and communication skills as effects.

  • 25.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Mathematical Literacy for Everyone using Arithmetic Games2014In: International Journal of Child Health and Human Development, ISSN 1939-5965, ISSN 1939-5965, Vol. 7, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An innovative mathematics game shown to be effective for low-achieving mainstream students is tested in special education for learners with moderate or severe intellectual disabilities in Sweden, to investigate if the game also can be effective for this group of students. The game relies on a graphical, intuitive representation for numbers and arithmetic operations to foster conceptual understanding and numbers sense, and provides a set of 2-player games to develop strategic thinking and reasoning skills.  The game runs on computers and interactive white boards, and as an augmented reality application at a science centre. The study enrolled 3 teachers and 8 students in 5th to 8th grade with intellectual disabilities who played the game between 4 months and 2 years, one student with Asperger syndrome, and over 300 students in mainstream education as comparison. We compare the use of the game in special education and mainstream education with respect to usage, performance levels and learning gains. Collected data include game playing logs for all students where playing behaviour, performance and progression data was analysed; class room and science centre observations where interaction, collaboration and communication was analysed, and on in-depth interviews with the teachers. Conclusion is that the game in combination with dedicated teachers can be very effective for students with intellectual disabilities, and can result in substantial gains in mathematical understanding and strategic thinking as well as in communication skills, given time and proper support.

  • 26.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Robot As Tutee2017In: Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, ISSN 2194-5357, E-ISSN 2194-5365, Vol. 457, p. 271-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the possible advantages of substituting teachable agents in a learning environment, with a humanoid robot as the non-human tutee. Teachable agents are used as an extension to educational games in order to leverage engagement, reflection and learning. The learning environment is engaging and shown to be effective for learning and promote self-efficacy in experimental studies in authentic classroom settings. Features beneficial for learning which are further enhanced by a robot compared to an agent are identified. These include embodiment of the robot; a social, empathic behaviour, better conversational abilities which together provide a better role model of an ideal learner for the student to identify with.

  • 27.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Teachable Agents that Learn by Observing Game Playing Behavior2009In: AIED 2009, 14th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education, Workshops Proceedings: Volume 3- Intelligent Educational Games / [ed] Scotty D. Craig & Darina Dicheva, Brighton, 2009, p. 31-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An educational game in mathematics targets cognitive skills oincluding pattern finding and generalization from example by teaching an agent. These can be difficult for young children, let alone teaching about them. Therefore, we have designed a new way of teaching an agent, the teach-by-guiding model. We describe the model and its basic implementation. Because this is a work-inprogress, we end by raising questions of how such an agent is perceived, and in what respect it may differ from other pedagogical agents.

  • 28.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Utility Games: gaming as a design strategy to achieve utility effects2007In: LearnIT conference Game in´Action, Gothenburg, 13–15th of June, 2007, Göteborgs universitet , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to introduce the concept of utility games, to develop a characterization of such a game category, and to explore design and evaluation issues particular for this category. By utility games, we refer to games predominantly designed for utility purposes, and where gaming is viewed as a design strategy to achieve the utility. Four utility games were analysed, with the following dimensions: the overall context, the utility objective, the game setting, evaluations performed and challenges related to design and evaluation. The analysis shows that the utility aspects and the game design are highly interrelated and affect each other on all levels of the design, and that evaluations of utility games have many dimensions to consider. A summary of lessons learnt and some recommendations to utility game designers are provided.

  • 29.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Arvemo, Tobias
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Dahl, Ylva
    Uddevalla Schools.
    Haake, Magnus
    Lund University Design Sciences.
    Gulz, Agneta
    Lund University Cognitive Sciences.
    A Teachable-Agent Arithmetic Game’s Effects on Mathematics Understanding, Attitude and Self-efficacy2011In: Artificial Intelligence in Education, Springer, 2011, p. 247-255Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A teachable-agent arithmetic game is presented and evaluated in terms of student performance, attitude and self-efficacy. An experimental pre-post study design was used, enrolling 153 3 rd and 5 th grade students in Sweden. The playing group showed significantly larger gains in math performance and self-efficacy beliefs, but not in general attitude towards math, compared to control groups. The contributions in relation to previous work include a novel educational game being evaluated, and an emphasis on self-efficacy in the study as a strong predictor of math achievements.

  • 30.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Broeren, Jurgen
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Goude, Daniel
    Curictus AB.
    Rydmark, Martin
    Gothenburg University.
    Virtual reality, haptics and post-stroke rehabilitation in practical therapy2008In: Proceedings of 7th International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies / [ed] Paul Sharkey, Pedro Lopes-dos-Santos, Patrice L Weiss, Tony Brooks, University of Reading , 2008, p. 245-252Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We address the question of usefulness of virtual reality based rehabilitation equipment in practical therapy, by letting experienced therapists explore one such equipment during six months in their regular practice under natural circumstances. By protocols, questionnaires and focus group interviews we collect data regarding which activities they considered useful, why these are useful and what might improve usefulness of such activities, based on the therapists’ professional judgement and experiences. This resulted in a set of purposeful activities, identified values for therapeutic work, and design guidelines. The conclusion is that such equipment has benefits beyond real life training, that variation in content and difficulty levels is a key quality for wide suitability and that the combination of challenging cognitive activities which encourage motor training was considered particularly useful.

  • 31.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Gynther, Karsten
    University College Zealand, Denmark..
    Lindhardt, Bent
    University College Zealand, Denmark..
    Spante, Maria
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Vejbaek, Leif
    University College Zealand, Denmark..
    Wølner, Tor Arne
    Vestfold University College, Norway..
    A model for instructional design in virtual Nordic classrooms2013In: Proceedings of ECTC 2013, Brighton, UK, July 11 - 14, 2013,, 2013, p. 230-241Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Haake, Magnus
    Lund University,Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering.
    Lindström, Paulina
    Lund University,Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering.
    Sjödén, Björn
    Lund University Cognitive Science, Kungshuset.
    Gulz, Agneta
    Lund University Cognitive Science, Kungshuset.
    A teachable-agent-based game affording collaboration and competition: Evaluating math comprehension and motivation2012In: Educational technology research and development, ISSN 1042-1629, E-ISSN 1556-6501, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 723-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an educational game in mathematics based on an apprenticeship model using a teachable agent, as well as an evaluative study of how the game affects (1) conceptual understanding and (2) attitudes towards mathematics. In addition, we discuss how collaborative and competitive affordances of the game may affect understanding and motivation. 19 students played the game in pairs once a week during math lessons for 7 weeks (the game-playing group) while another 19 students followed the regular curriculum (the control group). Math comprehension scores increased significantly for the game-playing group but not the control group (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in attitude change between the two groups. Post hoc analyses indicated that game-playing primarily affected students' confidence in explaining math to a peer, but not their enjoyment of doing so. Collaborative and competitive activities seem to carry a strong motivational influence for students to play the game. © 2012 Association for Educational Communications and Technology.

  • 33.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Johansson, B.
    NU-Hospital Organisation, Dep. of Research and Development, Trollhättan.
    Zeller, S.
    NU-Hospital Organisation, Dep. of Research and Development, Trollhättan.
    Sunnerhagen, K. S.
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology.
    Rydmark, M.
    University of Gothenburg,Institute of Biomedicine, Mednet.
    Broeren, J.
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Biomedicine, Mednet.
    Virtual TeleRehab: A case study2011In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 169, p. 676-680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the efficacy of a remotely based occupational therapy intervention. A 40-year-old woman who suffered a stroke participated in a telerehabilitation program. The intervention method is based on virtual reality gaming to enhance the training experience and to facilitate the relearning processes. The results indicate that Virtual TeleRehab is an effective method for motivational, economical, and practical reasons by combining game-based rehabilitation in the home with weekly distance meetings. © 2011 European Federation for Medical Informatics. All rights reserved.

  • 34.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Johansson, Britt
    Department of Research and Development, NU-Hospital Organisation, Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Ljungberg, Christer
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics, Divison of Informatics.
    Zeller, Sally
    Department of Research and Development, NU-Hospital Organisation, Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Sunnerhagen, Katharina
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, SU/Sahlgrenska, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rydmark, Martin
    Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Broeren, Jurgen
    Department of Research and Development, NU-Hospital Organisation, Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Telehealth with 3D games for stroke rehabilitation2011In: International Journal on Disability and Human Development, ISSN 1565-012X, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 373-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the feasibility of a novel telehealth system for stroke rehabilitation in a rural area in Sweden. It addresses two major problems of home-based rehabilitation: training motivation and frequent meetings. Three stroke subjects were equipped with 3D computer games workbenches, and were instructed to play with the hemiplegic upper extremity. On-line coaching meetings were performed using bi­directional audiovisual communication. The intervention led to clinical changes for all subjects. On-line coaching is promising, but not yet as effective as desired. However, a distance based approach using 3D games for upper extremity rehabilitation after stroke is feasible.

  • 35.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lindhardt, Bent
    University College Zealand, Denmark.
    Vejbaek, Leif
    University College Zealand, Denmark.
    Wølner, Tor Arne
    Vestfold University College, Norway.
    Gynther, Karsten
    University College Zealand, Denmark.
    Spante, Maria
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    A Model for Instructional Design in Virtual Nordic Classrooms2013In: The Inaugural European Conference on Technology in the Classroom 2013: The Impact of Innovation: Technology and You, Naka Ward, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan: The International Academic Forum , 2013, p. 222-233Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will report from an on-going EU-financed project aiming at developing innovative cross-border, virtual classroom instructional designs; that is designs where classes from three Nordic countries collaborate by means of technology to enhance teaching and learning. School management, teachers, students, and educational researchers from Denmark, Norway and Sweden collaborate since 2011 in three-country teams on all levels to explore and evaluate novel cross-border instructional designs in four subjects. The research approach is user-driven innovation by means of Action Research and Design-based research. The cross- border instructional designs exhibit several challenges: designs need to be aligned with all national curriculums with respect to 1) subject content and 2) learning goals, and in order to advance learning, we need to address 3) learning benefits due to the collaboration. In Mathematics, such cross-border learning benefits were particular elusive to identify, so some kind of guidance were needed. The model, first proposed for Mathematics but generalizable to other subjects, is a three-dimensional cube that categorizes an instructional design with respect to 1) subject-content, 2) aimed-for competence, and 3) learning-benefit. The subject contents and required competencies were derived and synthesized from the national curricula, whereas the learning benefits were inspired from previous cross-border designs. The model has successfully been used as a classification system for virtual classroom tasks, and also as an innovation tool to generate novel instructional designs where the expected learning benefits became explicit from start, which facilitates design evaluation. 

  • 36.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Ljungberg, Christer
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics, Divison of Informatics.
    Broeren, Jurgen
    GU.
    Johansson, B
    NU-sjukvården.
    Sunnerhagen, KS
    GU.
    Rydmark, Martin
    GU.
    Telehealth using 3D virtual environments in stroke rehabilitation: work in progress2010In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and AssociatedTechnologies. Viña del Mar/Valparaíso, Chile, 31 Aug. – 2 Sept.2010., 2010, p. 115-122Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have now started testing a telehealth system for stroke rehabilitation in a rural area in Sweden (NU- Hospital Group Area). For collection of assessments and audiovisual communication, the telehealth system has bidirectional contact with the home-based units. To date, three stroke subjects’ participated; they were instructed to play 3D computer games with the hemiplegic upper extremity. The intervention led to clinical changes for all subjects. The analysis of the audiovisual communication revealed that the both stroke subjects and therapists were not yet effective in regulating their turn taking process. The data suggests the feasibility of a distance based approach using 3D virtual environments for upper extremity rehabilitation after stroke.

  • 37.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Design Experience from Experience Design: Towards Strategies for Enhancements2007In: Proceedings of the 15th European Conferenceon Information Systems (ECIS2007) / [ed] Hubert Österle, Joachim Schelp and Robert Winter, St Gallen, 2007, p. 1898-1909Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enterprises within the experience-based economy face big challenges when investing in IS applications for their products and services. Especially, organizations and services that offer different kinds of attractions and experiences have realized the emergent use of mobile technology. In this paper we explore in what way an IS (information systems) design can enhance experience-based activities conducted at a Swedish regional museum. The research presents an in-depth analysis of a case study along with requirements and design activities for a location-aware, auditory museum guide, primarily aimed for people with visual and language disabilities was developed. We argue that in order to keep in pace with the on-going growth of experience-based and IS design initiatives, enterprises and designer must consider its value for their businesses. Thus, we have developed a three-level strategy for valuing enhancements of a proposed IS application. The strategy proved to be particular fruitful for both designers and managers when assessing the potential of various enhancements to generate values for the different target groups.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • 38.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT. University West, Department of Economics and Informatics, Divison of Informatics.
    Bernheim, Bo Göran
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundin, Johan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Östlund, Christian
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Designing for Learningin Network Organizations2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Karlsson, Marianne
    Chalmers.
    Engelbrektsson, Pontus
    Chalmers.
    Larsson, Lena E
    Berndtsson, Bo
    Creating an arena foruse-centred development of medical and health care technology2007In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on the Management of Healthcare & Medical Technology, HOF Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, 3-5 October 2007, Pisa, Italy., 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Lundh-Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    An Interactive Visualization Model for Competence Management: an Integrative Approach2007In: Proceedings of I-KNOW ’07, Graz, Austria, September 5-7, 2007, Graz, 2007, p. 440-447Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims at innovative IT support for competence management (CM) integrating organizational, group and individual perspectives. Our method is action case research resulting in a design model. This paper addresses our overall approach towards an integrative CM system, which is usage-oriented. Based on in-depth analysis of seven business companies’ CM activities, we present a new interactive visualization model for CM. The model is suitable for explorative analysis and for communicating competence situations at individual, group or organizational levels. It provides support for constructing competence information incrementally. We view competence descriptions as negotiable estimations with varying verification levels, and use a competence representation which deals with uncertainties of estimations. Our view on competence is novel, and has far reaching consequences. Future work includes a running prototype and planned pilot studies.

  • 41.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Lundh-Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Design Experience from Experience Design : Towards Strategies for Enhancements  2007In: Proceedings of the 15th European conference on information systems (ECIS 2007) : relevant rigour, rigorous relevance  / [ed] Hubert Österle, Joachim Schelp & Robert Winter, University of St. Gallen , 2007, p. 1898-1909Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enterprises within the experience-based economy face big challenges when investing in IS applications for their products and services. Especially, organizations and services that offer different kinds of attractions and experiences have realized the emergent use of mobile technology. In this paper we explore in what way an IS (information systems) design can enhance experience-based activities conducted at a Swedish regional museum. The research presents an in-depth analysis of a case study along with requirements and design activities for a location-aware, auditory museum guide, primarily aimed for people with visual and language disabilities was developed. We argue that in order to keep in pace with the on-going growth of experience-based and IS design initiatives, enterprises and designer must consider its value for their businesses. Thus, we have developed a three-level strategy for valuing enhancements of a proposed IS application. The strategy proved to be particular fruitful for both designers and managers when assessing the potential of various enhancements to generate values for the different target groups.

  • 42.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Schwartz, Daniel L.
    Stanford University, School of Education.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Learning by guiding a teachable agent to play an educational game2009In: Artificial Intelligence in Education: Building Learning Systems that Care: From Knowledge Representation to Affective Modelling / [ed] Vania Dimitrova, Riichiro Mizoguchi, Benedict du Boulay, Art Graesser, 2009, Vol. 200, no 1, p. 662-664Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachable agents are used to support transfer of game playing knowledge to domain knowledge for an educational, arithmetic game. A pre-posttest experiment study show promising learning effects for low ability students.

  • 43.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sharkey, Paul M.School of Systems Engineering, University of Reading, United Kingdom.Merrick, JoavNational Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Technology, Rehabilitation and Empowerment of People with Special Needs2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sharkey, Paul M.
    University of Reading, School of Systems Engineering, Reading, United Kingdom.
    Merrick, Joav G.
    Ministry of Social Affairs Israel, Division for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Using virtual reality technologies to support everyday rehabilitation2016In: Journal of Pain Management, ISSN 1939-5914, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 197-198Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sharkey, PaulSchool of Systems Engineering, University of Reading, United Kingdom.Merrick, JoavNational Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel.
    International Journal of Journal of Child Development: Special Issue: Using technology to enhance rehabilitation and empower people with special needs2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sharkey, Paul
    University of Reading, School of Systems Engineering, United Kingdom.
    Merrick, Joav
    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Introduction: Using technology to enhance rehabilitation and empower people with special needs2015In: Technology, Rehabilitation and Empowerment of People with Special Needs, Nova Science Publishers, Inc. , 2015, p. xi-xiiiChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sharkey, PaulSchool of Systems Engineering, University of Reading, United Kingdom.Merrick, JoavNational Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Journal of Pain Management: Special issue: Using virtual reality technologies to support everyday rehabilitation2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics, Divison of Informatics.
    Snis, Ulrika L.
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics, Divison of Informatics.
    An explorative, operational method supporting usability evaluation of technology changes in work contexts2006In: Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Software Engineering, as part of the 24th IASTED International Multi-Conference on APPLIED INFORMATICS, Innsbruck, 2006, p. 276-281Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we elaborate on the process of designing usability evaluations of technology that is to be integrated into specific real work settings, and where technology is the main target for change. Our research question relates to both what to evaluate and how to evaluate, and the ambition is to support evaluation designers on a practical level. We propose an explorative, operational method for usability evaluation design, which makes the design process explicit and design decisions more tractable. The evaluation design method is illustrated by an empirical example of how to design a comparative usability evaluation study, in a health care setting. The method supports the designer on a conceptual level by describing the different levels in the evaluation design. On an operational level it supports the designers by defining transitions between levels. And, on the analytical level it provides a template for a usability matrix, which allows for an explorative approach of constructing the conceptual content as well as a structured way to define and refine usability measures. However, the method needs to be further tested in other settings.

  • 49.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics.
    Snis, Ulrika L.
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics, Divison of Informatics.
    Design strategies for enhancing experience-based activities2006In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 4161 LNCS, p. 326-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enjoyment and experience-based activities are important in today's society. The purpose of this paper is to explore and better understand how experiences can be enhanced using IS in such experience-based enterprises. The research is based on a case study conducted in collaboration with a Swedish regional museum, where a location-aware auditory museum application for experience enhancement is being designed. The results include design approach recommendations, enhancement strategies and a model for estimating the potential benefits related to enhancements features of the system design. © IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2006.

  • 50.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics, Divison of Informatics.
    Snis, Ulrika L.
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics, Divison of Informatics.
    Understanding users with reading disabilities or reduced vision: Toward a universal design of an auditory, location-aware museum guide2006In: International Journal on Disability and Human Development, ISSN 1565-012X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 147-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present ongoing work on the design of an information system for users with reading disabilities and users with reduced vision. The design target is a portable, auditory, location-aware information system, to complement visually displayed information in exhibitions. Applying a user-centered, we identify non-typical user-groups' specific requirements, which are turned into a design. The first design-iteration, which includes a formative evaluation, using a mock-up prototype, with dyslectic and visually impaired participants, is completed. The evaluation indicates that the user-group's specific aspects we have identified are relevant, while designing for these groups. Copyright © Freund Publishing House Limited.

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