Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ericsson, Mikael
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Johansson, Dahniel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Stjern, David
    AI-Based Quality Control of Wood Surfaces with Autonomous Material Handling2021In: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 11, no 21, p. 9965-9965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The theory and applications of Smart Factories and Industry 4.0 are increasing the entry into the industry. It is common in industry to start converting exclusive parts, of their production, into this new paradigm rather than converting whole production lines all at once. In Europe and Sweden, recent political decisions are taken to reach the target of greenhouse gas emission reduction. One possible solution is to replace concrete in buildings with Cross Laminated Timber. In the last years, equipment and software that have been custom made for a certain task, are now cheaper and can be adapted to fit more processes than earlier possible. This in combination, with lessons learned from the automotive industry, makes it possible to take the necessary steps and start redesigning and building tomorrows automated and flexible production systems in the wood industry. This paper presents a proof of concept of an automated inspection system, for wood surfaces, where concepts found in Industry 4.0, such as industrial Internet of things (IIoT), smart factory, flexible automation, artificial intelligence (AI), and cyber physical systems, are utilized. The inspection system encompasses, among other things, of the shelf software and hardware, open source software, and standardized, modular, and mobile process modules. The design of the system is conducted with future expansion in mind, where new parts and functions can be added as well as removed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Eriksson, Kristina M.
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, (SWE).
    Myrelid, Paulina
    Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, (SWE).
    Ericsson, Mikael
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, (SWE).
    Håkansson, Lars
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, (SWE).
    Johansson, Dahniel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Experiences in Running a Professional Course on Digitally-Enabled Production in Collaboration Between Three Swedish Universities2022In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering, ISSN 2352-751X, Vol. 21, p. 653-664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract. Needs for new competences and knowledge arise as industry 4.0 evolves

    in increasingly digitalized production. This development entails that job

    transformations and future skills need attention from the perspective of industry 5.0,

    where human and machine find ways of working together to improve production

    performance. Facing this perspective, one challenge is a growing need for novel

    lifelong learning initiatives, to meet emerging and altering occupations for the

    fulfilment of future skill requirements. This challenge is addressed here by

    portraying a case where three Swedish universities have formed a distinctive

    collaboration to develop a flexible (i.e. blended) course for professionals, in the

    subject of Digitally-enabled production. The purpose is to develop a sustainable

    collaboration between the universities and create a course format on master level

    addressing lifelong learning for the increasingly digitalized production. The

    ambition is to increase the impact of the universities respective efforts by sharing

    resources and utilizing individual specialized expertise to develop a practical and

    relevant course that can reach a larger target group. The course encompasses

    industry 4.0 readiness on three levels of production systems; plant-, production cell-,

    and component level; to adopt a holistic view of digitalization in production. We

    followed an action research approach for continuously collecting and documenting

    our experiences during the course development, implementation, and dissemination

    of the course. Within the frame of action research, an explorative case study

    describes and analyzes the initiative. The results highlight challenges and

    opportunities for succeeding with this form of co-produced course. The joint course

    gives professionals possibilities to work on cases from their own companies with

    expert supervision from three manufacturing levels to address complex challenges

    in industry 4.0 implementation. To conclude, the importance of lifelong learning in

    relation to the human-centric approach of industry 5.0 is emphasized as a future

    direction.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf