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  • 1.
    Ekström, Sara
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    New Critical Imaginaries and Reflections on Robots and Artificial Intelligence: How Teachers’ Programming Knowledge Could Affect Future Educational Technology2020In: INTED 2020: 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference Valencia, Spain. 2-4 March, 2020, International Association for Technology, Education and Development, 2020, p. 3475-3483Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational Robots (ER) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) are rapidly evolving to meet the challenges that characterize school environments. The direction in which these emerging technologies will develop, and the effect they finally have on schools, will partially be shaped by how scholars and practitioners imagine future education. A recent study about the views of teachers and educational researchers regarding the use of ER and AI for learning purposes highlighted this issue [1]. This study revealed that, beside an urgent need for teacher professional development, the participants were concerned about human interrelations, individualization, educational management and ethics. However, both groups showed a rudimentary understanding of the differences between these two technologies. More importantly, there seemed to be a gap in the way teachers and researchers in that study approached new technologies in education. Whereas for teachers the purpose of technology was to enhance current teaching processes, for researchers, technology had a deeper transformational potential. Since then, a large national program aiming at increasing schoolteachers’ computational thinking and coding skills has been put into practice at several Swedish universities to support the introduction of computer programming in the K-12 curriculum. To account for these new developments, we wanted to investigate how these teacher professional development programs could reflect on upcoming school technologies. University teachers in charge of the programming courses could provide insightful information about how ER and AI can mold future school practices since they represent an entrance point for teachers into these technologies. Delegates from several universities involved in the development of programming courses for K-12 teachers were therefore invited to give their vision of a future classroom. In order to compare with the previous study, seventeen university teachers were also asked to imagine a teaching situation in a school in which a) social robots and b) robots with artificial intelligence, were a reality. They were further requested to reflect upon which challenges and possibilities could emerge when using ER and AI in post-digital K-12 education. Which differences appear relevant compared to the participants in the previous study? The analysis showed that the university teachers participating in our study coincide in pointing out potential gains in individualizing teaching and relieving teachers from routine tasks. Our informants adhered to the position of schoolteachers and did not predict any fundamental transformations in the current teaching practices. Unique for our participants was their ability to discern between ER and AI and that, while they were largely sceptic toward the cognitive benefits of a physical robot, they trusted the software to achieve similar results in a traditional computer. Given the premises in this investigation “future teachers that already knew how to program”, the participants in our study did not suggest further need for professional development, which contrasts with the prevalent opinion in the previous study. If university teachers believe that programming knowledge is enough to bridge the competence gap, and they do not expect any radical transformation in education, maybe ER and AI could be fully integrated in the teaching practice more easily than it was predicted earlier

  • 2.
    Fuentes, Ana
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kuchcinski, Krzysztof
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Graph matching constraints for synthesis with complex components2007In: 10th Euromicro Conference on Digital System Design Architectures, Methods and Tools (DSD 2007) / [ed] Hana Kubatova, Lubeck, Germany, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a new method for high-level synthesis that enhances design flexibility, specialization and performance primarily conceived for programmable hardware. New programmable hardware devices often provide fast dedicated components that perform complex computations. Arbitrary complex computations can be efficiently extracted from the CDFG using our new graph matching constraint to produce final implementations that better suit the design to the targeted architecture. Our algorithm also reduces possible syntactic variances detecting semantically equivalent structures in the graph. This new graph matching constraint was integrated in our own Constraint Programming solver engine together with other constraints to naturally model the heterogeneous features present in the synthesis problem. The use of complex functional modules is taken into account in the optimization process during binding and scheduling yielding significantly shorter schedules and gains in terms of area and performance. We demonstrate our technique on a variety of HLS benchmarks and show that efficient design space exploration can be accomplished using this technique.

  • 3.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    A Practice Acceptance Model Beyond Technology When Programming And Mathematics Converge2022In: ICERI2022 Proceedings / [ed] Luis Gómez Chova, Agustín López Martínez, Joanna Lees, iated Digital Library , 2022, p. 6228-6237Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The technology acceptance model (TAM) that guided many behavioristic investigations during the last three decades has been gradually expanded and even replaced by subsequent explanation models that attempt to predict the uptake of digital technologies in organizations. In the era of postdigital education, where the distinction between digital and non-digital becomes inessential to the design and implementation of learning activities (Fawns 2019), we face the challenge of explaining, predicting, and promoting new school practices that go beyond technology. To this endeavor, a Practice Acceptance Model was outlined as a next step to capture the nature of acceptance in relation to technologies, in which the artifacts themselves were not the object of acceptance or rejection, but rather the practices that a technology class brought about (Fuentes-Martinez 2020). In this paper, we delve further into the ideas of a Practice Acceptance Model in the context of interspersing mathematics and computer programming in education. The discussion takes up the preceding ideas that rebrand computer programming as a practice rather than a technology, along with other pedagogical practices of mathematics teachers. Therefore, the parameters that traditionally characterize TAM evaluations are here reframed to better reflect the nuances of teachers’ everyday practices. The present longitudinal study serves to postulate new variables that mediate between the advantages and disadvantages expected when teaching mathematics with elements of programming and the prevalence of this practice in subsequent teaching ventures. Two external variables stand out from these data. First, the teacher’s perceived programming readiness among their students seems to be a decisive factor in whether or not to include coding activities. Also, the perceived frequency of programming opportunities in the national exams appears to have a decisive impact on a conjoint practice. While these two factors resemble the “perceive Ease of Use” and “perceived Usefulness” from TAM, the data suggest that teachers’ internal beliefs on how to practice their discipline play an important role and should be included in a Practice Acceptance Model. Those variables include how teachers regard the intrinsic connection between programming and mathematics, as well as their understanding of which mathematical knowledge is most valuable.

  • 4.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Dual Teaching and Interspersed Programming: Learning to teach with code2021In: ICERI2021 Proceedings, 2021, p. 807-813Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    From a Technology Acceptance Model to a Practice Acceptance Model2020In: Ars Educandi, ISSN 2083-0947, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 61-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article the author presents a critical analysis of the technology acceptance model when applied to teaching mathematics with computer programming. Programming is argued to escape the affordances of the model because of the implications carried by the conception of technology, both as materiality and as an alien element introduced in an existing environment. Instead, a practice acceptance model is outlined to cater for the peculiarities of programming in education, as a practice to be endorsed by the teaching community.

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  • 6.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Gender and prior knowledge factors in pupils’ beliefs about programming in mathematics2019In: ICERI2019 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2019, p. 5703-5703Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent introduction of computer programming in all Swedish school curricula is a significant addition that came along together with several revisions aiming at enhancing pupils’ ICT skills. One of the reasons behind this implementation model was to accelerate the rate at which substantial results would be noticeable. It was also expected that teaching algorithmic thinking from early years would help to reduce the gender gap that has largely been observed in technology and engineering programs in higher education. In this study we wanted to explore students’ beliefs and performance in programming in relation to gender and previous experience. This paper reports on data obtained from first year high school students whose teachers actively attempted to incorporate programming into their mathematics lessons over the course of a school semester during the first year after the reform. We address three questions: a) Is there a difference in in attitudes or beliefs toward programming between students that had programming experience and those who had not? b) Is there a difference in attitudes or beliefs toward programming between male and female students? and c) Is there a difference in code understanding between male and female students? The third question is further analyzed to test the confidence gap hypothesis, which holds that women feel less confident than men in their own abilities. Five student groups from schools across Sweden were selected for the survey among those whose teachers were actively using programming in mathematics. A cross-sectional study was designed addressing the research questions based on data gathered from a group administered questionnaire (N=138). In order to assess students’ understanding of code, three programming exercises in increasing level of difficulty, concluded the survey. Alongside each programming exercise, the respondent had the possibility to express how confident he or she felt about the given answer. For the purposes of data comparison, the chi-squared test of independence was used. The analysis of the data indicates that there are relevant gender differences in students’ views and attitudes towards programming but not in their actual performance when answering code questions. In this case, differences could be attributed to previous programming experience which also seems to influence students’ anxiety toward the reform. However, previous programming instruction did not seem to influence pupil’s beliefs about how useful they thought programming will be in their upcoming education or professional life. Female students were on average less positive regarding how useful they think programming might be for them in the future. We could also confirm the tendency for women to underestimate their programming achievements. Most relevant, female students were more likely to state that they were unsure when the answer was right, whereas male students often felt sure about their wrong answers.

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  • 7.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    Malmö Högskola.
    Implementation of the Computer Programming Curriculum andits Consequences in an Inclusive School2009Student thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med studien är att öka kunskapen om kursplanens förankring bland programmeringslärarna. Dataunderlaget består av en enkätundersökning bland gymnasielärare iProgrammering A i Skåne. Lärarnas syn på de olika delmålen i kursplanen och sättetpå vilket dessa tillämpas i undervisningen, visas i förhållande till andra faktorer som ilitteraturen anses relevanta. Resultaten synliggör att lärarnas förhållningssätt gentemotkursplanen har mestadels gemensamma drag både när det gäller det som undervisas ochdet som utesluts. Variationerna noterades med avseende på lärarnas undervisningsbredd,elevgruppernas framtidsavsikter och språkval. Lärarna som undervisade i era kurser inomämnet tenderade att uppmärksamma er kunskapsmål. Också eleverna som senare skulleläsa Programmering B ck en mer allsidig utbildning. Däremot fanns det inte någotsom tydde på att behöriga lärare skulle skilja sig i kursplanens förverkligande. Utifrånstudieresultatet konstateras att bara hälften av kursplanens mål har ett utbrett stöd blandlärarna, vilket har konsekvenser för tillämpningen av de övergripande styrdokumenten.

  • 8.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Introduktion till programmering2021In: Introduktion till medieteknik / [ed] Pernilla Falkenberg Josefsson, Mikael Wiberg, Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, 1:1, p. 217-225Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Memoirs of an Old Teacher2023In: Postdigital Science and Education, ISSN 2524-485X, Vol. 5, p. 556-557Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 10.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Practice beyond technology when programming and mathematics teaching converge2024Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines how computer programming and mathematics teaching converge in the presence of a revised mathematics curriculum for upper secondary education. The focus is on the stratified policy strategies deployed by the institutions; how teachers tactically navigated the tensions and contradictions that arose in their everyday teaching; and how these tactics later consolidated in practice.

    The empirical data for the study consists of two iterations of individual interviews with nine mathematics teachers who were already proficient inprogramming at the onset of the reform. The teachers’ unit plans and other programming activities, were used as starting points for in-depth discussions about their professional practices. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the context, the author also examined relevant policy documents, including the mathematics curriculum, official guidelines, and a collection of programming exercises and demonstrations provided by the Agency for Education.

    Along with these documents, the official strategies were also informed by the explicit decisions and implicit outcomes surrounding the National Exams. By analyzing teachers’ tactics and policy strategies, the thesis sheds light on the ways in which teachers adapted to the new curriculum and the challenges lenges they faced in integrating programming into their mathematics instruction.

    This research aims to contribute to a critical understanding of the complex relationship between curriculum reforms, teacher practices, and the integration of programming in mathematics education. When mathematics teachers started integrating computer programming into their subject, two tactical approaches became evident: dual teaching and interspersed programming. The teacher’s proclivity to implement dual teaching practices or interspersed programming are tactics shaped by and in response to the conditions of the new curriculum and their own preferences and views on student learning. These two tactics disclose different ontological commitments in relation to the strategies dictated by the curriculum and reflect a cardinal distinction between planning mathematics activities with elements of programming and planning programming activities with elements of mathematics. Of relevance for teachers and curriculum designers is the understanding of (a)how the notion of programming and mathematics as separate subjects oversimplifies teachers’ actual integration practices, and (b) how the curricular choices made by policy can shape the teaching tactics adopted by educators.

    Gradually, both the surrounding constraints and the reasons behind them evolved, rising new practices. The second iteration of interviews was designed to unveil the consequences of latter curricular constraints and delve into the teachers’ practices as they change over time. Teachers’ initial resolutions, trials and experiments with programming in mathematics are sometimes reinforced by means of perseverance and the teachers’ mature reflectionson their past experiences. Other tactics need to be refined or updated and yet some are discarded. Along this distinction, relevant categories emerged that illustrate the processes behind consolidated practices in the presence of new technologies. Furthermore, the thesis provides a discussion on how this transition is characterized by acceptance of new practices rather than acceptance of new technologies.

    Recognizing these aspects can guide educators and curriculum designers towards a better understanding of the complexities and nuances involved in integrating programming into mathematics education. This understanding can inform more effective teaching practices and curriculum development that support meaningful integration and promote students’ learning in mathematics with the help of programming.

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  • 11.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Teachers’ tactics when programming and mathematics converge2021Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers’ everyday practices are embedded in school contexts in which their teaching autonomy is constrained by rules, moral obligations, physical settings,and official directives. When a curricular revision mandated that programming was to be a part of mathematics in upper secondary education, teachers’ conditions changed. How teachers adapted to the new curriculum and how they navigated the tensions and contradictions that they encountered is in this thesis analyzed in terms of teachers’ tactics and policy strategies. The overall goal of the investigation is to contribute to a critical understanding of how mathematics teachers integrate programming in their professional practice and how this integration aligns and diverges from the intentions behind the reform. The empirical material is drawn from nine individual interviews with mathematics teachers that were already proficient in programming. The teachers’ unit plans and other lesson materials featuring programming activities served as a trigger point to delve into further reflections upon their own professional practices. To complete the scene, the policy documents were also examined. These included the mathematics curriculum, as well as related official documents and a collection of institutionally sanctioned programming exercises and demonstrations.

    Two tactical approaches were made apparent when mathematics teachers began to integrate computer programming in their subject: Dual teaching and Interspersed programming. The teacher’s use of dual teaching practices or interspersed programming are tactics shaped by and in response to the conditions of the new curriculum and their own preferences and views on student learning. These two tactics disclose different ontological commitments in relation to the strategies dictated by the curriculum and reflect a cardinal distinction between planning mathematics activities with elements of programming and planning programming activities with elements of mathematics. Of relevance for teachers and curriculum designers is the understanding of (a) how the notion of programming and mathematics as separate subjects oversimplifies teachers’ actual integration practices, and (b) how the curricular choices made by policy can shape the teaching tactics adopted by educators.

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  • 12.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    The perks and perils of learning programming online: The case of teacher training2022In: EDULEARN22 Proceedings / [ed] Luis Gómez Chova, University of Valencia (ESP), Agustín López Martínez, University of Barcelona,(ESP) Joanna Lees, CEU Cardinal Herrera University (ESP), Valencia: IATED Academy , 2022, p. 5571-5579Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As computer programming is widely being introduced in school curricula around the world, many teacher training initiatives are being put into practice to address the competence needs linked to that endeavor. The imperative digitalization catalyzed by governments’ response to the Covid-19 emergency brought about  an  unexpected plot twist largely  affecting  most  professional development  efforts.  After  rapidly reprioritizing resources toward urgent matters of online teaching, some teachers also embraced the new opportunities that distance courses offered for their own education. Findings from these experiences are here synthesized to examine how teacher training in computer programming could be improved to better suit the affordances and constraints of online courses. The principal themes, problems, approaches, and solutions that emerged from this small-scale  qualitative  study are contrasted with the prevalent  ideasidentified in the literature, such that in adult learning experiences, blended and hybrid learning settings, and computer programming education. Among the common characteristics with these earlier paradigms, issues of idle time, asynchronousity, and unreliable tools were highlighted but also similar advantages regarding autonomy and equity. A particular factor that distinguished the  case of online programming training for educators was the gap between the learning that teachers themselves experienced during the programming course and the learning facilitation that they were expected to provide for their pupils in a school environment. This gap was not only related to the different  visions and purposes for their education but also, and to a larger extent, due to different contexts, including assessment traditions and subject  separation.  This work provides  hindsight  towards  an understanding  of  the  significance  and nature of learning programming for teaching and the challenges and benefits associated with adapting to online settings.

  • 13.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Understanding cooperative learning among teachers and pre-service teachers who integrate computer programming activities in their mathematics lessons2020In: INTED2020 Proceedings, International Association for Technology, Education and Development , 2020, p. 3564-3568Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students and professionals with background in technical subjects are increasingly opting for a teaching career as a result of a conscious plan from the Swedish government to facilitate transition and completion of a teaching degree. One of the expected benefits from this measure is that students with broader academical and professional experiences could bring that knowledge into their future teaching practice and share it with in-service teachers during their practicum. The purpose of this study is to understand the subjectivities and practices of teachers and pre-service teachers as they engage in professional development activities together. Michel de  Certeau’s work on practices of everyday life serves as a lens for bringing forward the tensions and opportunities that appear in cooperative learning settings within external policy constrains. The motivations of mathematics teachers and preservice teachers that participate in computer programming training activities are analyzed in terms of tactics and strategies that preserve individual autonomy and group coherence and that allow them to make their own spaces within imposed structures. Some teachers resorted to avoidance tactics to escape reporting about their programming assignment, such as postponing it to future meetings or claiming time constrains, while others considered programming  activities  as  intruders  that  obstructed  their mathematics lessons and introduced moments of struggle, deception, confrontation and resignation. This sheds light upon how the practical and intellectual production that schools expect to reap from the process is disseminated increative alliances but leaves also a sense of deprofessionalization in the community.

  • 14.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    et al.
    Malmö högskola.
    Andersson, Jens
    Johansson, Anders
    Nilsson, Pål
    Gender and Programming: A Case Study2005In: Proceedings 2005: 3:e Pedagogiska inspirationskonferensen 31 maj 2005, Lund, Sweden, 2005, article id 3c9e8a1b-e904-4091-91d3-a5512d3a65fdConference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our study highlights the effects of gender-related learning styles on a computer programming course at introductory level of engineering education. It was triggered by the observation of statistically relevant under-achievements among female students over the years. We try to identify concrete differences in motivation/learning styles between genders and prove that lack of previous relevant computer experience is not the only factor to blame. The paper analyzes the situation at a LTH course from the point of view of the conflicts outlined in the literature. Data from “before-starting” questionnaires and follow ups for subsequent evaluations expose significant gender differences. Analysis of the course materials and interviews with students reveals problems of constructive alignment and discouragements to the motivation of novice programmers. We investigated several pedagogical methods to adapt teaching and evaluation in order to increase all students’ competence and at the same time reduce the gap between genders. Our key recommendation is to make the separation between the teaching of algorithms and the teaching of the specific language syntax clearer. It is our belief that good teaching of engineering subjects will enhance learning for all students

  • 15.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Ekström, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Kritiska föreställningar och reflektioner om robotar och artificiell intelligens i svensk skola: när lärarnas programmeringskunskaper spelar roll2019In: VILÄR 5-6 december 2019, University West, Trollhättan: Abstracts / [ed] Kristina Johansson, Trollhättan: University West , 2019, p. 9-10Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Robotar och artificiell intelligens (AI) är redan en del av verkligheten och kan komma att göra intåg i skolan inom en snar framtid. I en studie av Hrastinski et al (2019) belyses lärares och forskares kritiska reflektioner om vad användningen av robotar och AI kan innebära för en utbildningskontext. Studien konstaterar ett ökat behov av kompetensutveckling, men påvisar också en viss oro över en förändrad lärarroll, mänskliga relationer, individualisering, pedagogisk ledning och etik. Både lärare och forskare visade upp en begränsad förståelse för skillnaderna mellan de två teknologierna. Dessutom framkom det i studien att det finns en skillnad mellan deltagarnas tankar om införandet av robotar och AI; lärarnas resonemang handlade om möjligheter att förbättra den nuvarande undervisningspraktiken medan forskarna såg en potential till att transformera undervisningen.

    I Sverige har läroplanen nyligen reviderats med följden att alla elever, från förskolan till gymnasiet, ska lära sig datalogiskt tänkande och programmering. Förändringen innebär ökade fortbildningskrav på lärarna, vilket har medfört att många svenska universitet erbjuder programmeringskurser för verksamma lärare. För att studera hur de ökade programmeringskunskaperna påverkar lärarnas syn på användningen av robotar och AI i undervisningen ombads sjutton universitetslärare, med ansvar för programmeringskurserna, att i en enkät reflektera över hur dessa teknologier kan forma framtidens undervisningspraktik. För att kunna jämföra med Hrastinskis tidigare studie, fick universitetslärarna föreställa sig en undervisningssituation där (a) sociala robotar och (b) robotar med artificiell intelligens var en realitet. De reflekterade över vilka utmaningar och möjligheter användningen av robotar och AI skulle kunna medföra i ett framtida klassrum. Hur skiljer sig universitetslärarnas reflektioner från resultatet i den tidigare studien?

    Analysen visade att universitetslärarna resonerade kring potentiella vinster med att individualisera undervisning och befria lärare från rutinuppgifter. Deras framtidssyn låg också närmare lärarnas än forskarnas i Hrastinskis studie, då de inte heller förutspådde någon betydande transformation av den nuvarande undervisningspraktiken. Resultatet indikerade att universitetslärarna generellt sett hade mer kunskap om robotar och AI än deltagarna i den tidigare studien. Trots det var de skeptiska till de kognitiva fördelarna med att använda en fysisk robot istället för en traditionell dator. Utifrån framtidsscenariot med programmeringskunniga lärare i klassrummen, föreslog universitetslärarna inte någon ytterligare kompetensutveckling, vilket står i kontrast till reflektionerna i Hrastinskis studie. Om universitetslärare tror att programmeringskunskaper kan överbrygga kompetensgapet, och de inte förväntar sig någon radikal förändring av undervisningspraktiken, då kanske tröskeln för att integrera robotar och AI i undervisning är lägre än vad den tidigare studien förutsåg.

  • 16.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    et al.
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Kuchcinski, Krzysztof
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Multifrequency Test and Diagnosis of Analog Circuits Using Constraint Programming and Interval Arithmetic2003Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Analog circuits are often specified using non-linear equations, which are difficult to analyze. Therefore, test generation and diagnosis are problematic issues in practice. In this paper we propose a new method for diagnosis of analog circuits that uses combined information from tests at different frequencies. By solving simultaneously the resulting equations (one for each test frequency), we get a reliable method that decreases the number of possible answers to the diagnosis problem. The min-max optimization algorithm that we implemented for non-linear transfer functions gives good average runtime for diagnosis parametric faults.

  • 17.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology,Division of Digital Learning, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    Umeå University, Department of Applied Educational Science, Umeå, Sweden.
    Arkenback, Charlotte
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekström, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Ericsson, Elin
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fransson, Göran
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Gävle, Sweden.
    Jaldemark, Jimmy
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Education, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Ryberg, Thomas
    Aalborg University, Department of Communication and Psychology, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Öberg, Lena-Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Computer and System Science, Östersund, Sweden.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Gustafsson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Department of Applied Educational Science, Umeå, Sweden.
    Humble, Niklas
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Computer and System Science, Östersund, Sweden.
    Mozelius, Peter
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Computer and System Science, Östersund, Sweden.
    Sundgren, Marcus
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Education,Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Utterberg, Marie
    University of Gothenburg,Department of Applied IT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Critical Imaginaries and Reflections on Artificial Intelligence and Robots in Postdigital K-12 Education2019In: Postdigital Science and Education, ISSN 2524-485X, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 427-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is commonly suggested that emerging technologies will revolutionize education. In this paper, two such emerging technologies, artificial intelligence (AI) and educational robots (ER), are in focus. The aim of the paper is to explore how teachers, researchers and pedagogical developers critically imagine and reflect upon how AI and robots could be used in education. The empirical data were collected from discussion groups that were part of a symposium. For both AI and ERs, the need for more knowledge about these technologies, how they could preferably be used, and how the emergence of these technologies might affect the role of the teacher and the relationship between teachers and students, were outlined. Many participants saw more potential to use AI for individualization as compared with ERs. However, there were also more concerns, such as ethical issues and economic interests, when discussing AI. While the researchers/developers to a greater extent imagined ideal future technology-rich educational practices, the practitioners were more focused on imaginaries grounded in current practice.

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  • 18.
    Jandrić, Petar
    et al.
    Zagreb University of Applied Sciences, Zagreb (HRV), University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, (GBR).
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design. Katedralskolan (Lund).
    Reitz, Charles
    Kansas City Kansas Community College, Kansas City, MO (USA).
    Jackson, Liz
    Education University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (CHN).
    Grauslund, Dennis
    University College of Northern Denmark (UCN), Aalborg (DNK).
    Hayes, David
    Further Education, Worcester (GBR).
    Lukoko, Happiness Onesmo
    Institute of Development Studies, University of Dar es Salaam, Dar es Salaam (TZA).
    Hogan, Michael
    School of Psychology, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway (IRL).
    Mozelius, Peter
    Department of Computer and System Science (DSV), Mid Sweden University, Östersund/Stockholm (SWE).
    Arantes, Janine Aldous
    Victoria University, Melbourne (AUS).
    Levinson, Paul
    Fordham University, New York City (USA).
    Kihwele, Jimmy Ezekiel
    Department of Education, Mzumbe University, Morogoro (TZA).
    Christensen, Line Lisberg
    Department of Communication and Psychology, Aalborg University, Aalborg (DNK).
    Brown, James Benedict
    Umeå School of Architecture, Umeå University, Umeå (SWE).
    Nejad, Harry G.
    Jindal Institute of Behavioural Sciences, O. P. Jindal Global University, Haryana (IND).
    Gustafsson, Ulrika
    Department of Applied Educational Science, Umeå University, Umeå (SWE).
    Abegglen, Sandra
    School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape, University of Calgary, Calgary (CAN).
    Burns, Tom
    Centre for Professional and Educational Development, London Metropolitan University, London (GBR).
    Sinfield, Sandra
    Centre for Professional and Educational Development, London Metropolitan University, London (GBR).
    Kishore, Pallavi
    Jindal Global Law School, O.P. Jindal Global University, Sonipat (IND).
    Carr, Paul R.
    Département des Sciences d l’éducation, Université du Québec en Outaouais, 283, boulevard Alexandre-Taché, C.P. 1250, succursale Hull, Gatineau, Québec (CAN).
    Batarelo Kokić, Ivana
    Department of Pedagogy, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Split, Split (HRV).
    Prinsloo, Paul
    University of South Africa, Pretoria (ZAF).
    Steketee, Anne
    School of Education, Millikin University, Decatur (USA).
    Achieng-Evensen, Charlotte
    Attallah College of Educational Studies, Chapman University, Orange, CA (USA).
    Komolafe, Blessing Funmi
    Science Education Department, Adekunle Ajasin University, Ondo (NGA), Curriculum and Pedagogy, College of Teacher Education, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua (CHN).
    Suoranta, Juha
    Curriculum and Pedagogy, College of Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University, Tampere (FIN).
    Hood, Nina
    Faculty of Education, University of Auckland, Auckland (NZL).
    Tesar, Marek
    Faculty of Education, University of Auckland, Auckland (NZL).
    Rose, Jennifer
    School of Social Science, Education and Social Work, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (GBR).
    Humble, Niklas
    Department of Computer and System Science, Mid Sweden University, Östersund (SWE).
    Kirylo, James D.
    University of South Carolina, Columbia (USA).
    Mañero, Julia
    University of Seville, Seville (ESP).
    Monzó, Lilia D.
    Julia Mañero & Carlos Escaño Attallah College of Educational Studies, Chapman University, Orange, CA (USA).
    Lodahl, Mikkel
    Institute for Danish Game Development, Dania Academy, Grenaa (DNK).
    Jaldemark, Jimmy
    Department of Education, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall (SWE).
    Bridges, Susan M.
    The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (CHN).
    Sharma, Navreeti
    Global Language Centre, O.P. Jindal Global University, Sonipat, Haryana (IND).
    Davidsen, Jacob
    Aalborg University, Aalborg (DNK).
    Ozoliņš, Jānis
    College of Philosophy and Theology, University of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle (AUS); Faculty of History and Philosophy, University of Latvia, Riga (LVA).
    Bryant, Peter
    University of Sydney, Sydney (AUS).
    Escaño, Carlos
    University of Seville, Seville (ESP).
    Irwin, Jones
    School of Human Development, Institute of Education, Dublin City University, Dublin (IRE).
    Kaur, Kulpreet
    Jindal Global Business School, Jindal Institute of Behavioural Sciences, O.P Jindal Global University, Sonepat (IND).
    Pfohl, Sarah
    Department of Art & Design, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, (USA).
    Stockbridge, Kevin
    Attallah College of Educational Studies, Chapman University, Orange, CA (USA).
    Ryberg, Thomas
    Department of Planning, Aalborg University, Aalborg, (DNK).
    Pyyhtinen, Olli
    Tampere University, Helsinki (FIN).
    SooHoo, Suzanne
    Attallah College of Educational Studies, Chapman University, Orange, CA (USA).
    Hazzan, Moses Kayode
    Department of Educational Management, Faculty of Education, University of Ibadan, Ibadan (NGA).
    Wright, Jake
    Center for Learning Innovation, University of Minnesota Rochester, Rochester, MN (USA).
    Hollings, Stephanie
    Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (CHN).
    Arndt, Sonja
    Melbourne Graduate School of Education, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (AUS).
    Gibbons, Andrew
    School of Education, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland (NZL).
    Urvashi, Shreya
    Centre for Studies in Sociology of Education, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai (IND).
    Forster, Daniella J.
    School of Education, College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle (AUS).
    Truelove, Ian
    Leeds Beckett University, Leeds (GBR).
    Mayo, Peter
    University of Malta, Msida (MLT).
    Rikowski, Glenn
    College of Social Science, University of Lincoln, Lincoln (GBR).
    Stewart, Paul Alexander
    MIMA School of Art and Design, Teesside University, Middlesbrough (GBR).
    Jopling, Michael
    Education Observatory, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton (GBR).
    Stewart, Georgina Tuari
    Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, Aotearoa (NZL).
    Buchanan, Rachel
    School of Education, University of Newcastle, Newcastle (AUS).
    Devine, Nesta
    Faculty of Culture and Society, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland (NZL).
    Shukla, Richa
    OP Jindal Global Business School, OP Jindal Global University, Sonipat (IND).
    Novak, Rene
    BestStart, Christchurch (NZL).
    Mallya, Madhav
    Jindal Global Law School, Jindal Global University, Sonipat, Haryana (IND).
    Biličić, Eva
    Zagreb University of Applied Sciences, Zagreb (HRV).
    Sturm, Sean
    Faculty of Education and Social Work, University of Auckland, Auckland (NZL).
    Sattarzadeh, Sahar D.
    Education Studies, DePauw University, Greencastle (USA); Chair for Critical Studies in Higher Education Transformation (CriSHET), Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth (ZAF).
    Philip, Abey A.
    Department of Banking and Finance, Faculty of Business, Curtin University, Miri (MYS).
    Redder, Bridgette
    Te Rito Maioha Early Childhood New Zealand, Rotorua (NZL).
    White, Jayne E.
    School of Teacher Education, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, Aotearoa (NZL).
    Ford, Derek R.
    DePauw University, Greencastle, IN (USA).
    Allen, Quaylan
    Attallah College of Educational Studies, Chapman University, Orange, CA (USA).
    Mukherjee, Mousumi
    International Institute for Higher Education Research & Capacity Building, O. P. Jindal Global University, Sonipat, Haryana (IND).
    Hayes, Sarah
    Education Observatory, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton (GBR).
    Teaching in the Age of Covid-19—1 Year Later2021In: Postdigital Science and Education, ISSN 2524-485X, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 1073-1223Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Jandrić, Petar
    et al.
    Zagreb University of Applied Sciences, Zagreb, HRV; University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, GBR.
    Fuentes Martinez, Ana
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Reitz, Charles
    Kansas City Kansas Community College, Kansas City, MO, USA.
    Jackson, Liz
    Education University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, HKG.
    Grauslund, Dennis
    University College of Northern Denmark (UCN), Aalborg, DNK.
    Hayes, David
    Further Education, Worcester, GBR.
    Lukoko, Happiness Onesmo
    University of Dar Es Salaam, Dar es Salaam, TZA.
    Hogan, Michael
    National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, IRL.
    Mozelius, Peter
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, SWE.
    Arantes, Janine Aldous
    Victoria University, Melbourne, AUS.
    Levinson, Paul
    Fordham University, New York City, USA.
    Ozoliņš, Jānis John
    University of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle, AUS; University of Latvia, Riga, LVA.
    Kirylo, James D.
    University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA.
    Carr, Paul R.
    Université du Québec en Outaouais, CAN.
    Hood, Nina
    University of Auckland, Auckland, NZL.
    Tesar, Marek
    University of Auckland, Auckland, NZL.
    Sturm, Sean
    University of Auckland, Auckland, NZL.
    Abegglen, Sandra
    University of Calgary, Calgary, CAN.
    Burns, Tom
    London Metropolitan University, London, GBR.
    Sinfield, Sandra
    London Metropolitan University, London, GBR.
    Stewart, Georgina Tuari
    Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, Aotearoa, NZL.
    Suoranta, Juha
    Tampere University, Tampere, FIN.
    Jaldemark, Jimmy
    Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, SWE.
    Gustafsson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Umeå, SWE.
    Monzó, Lilia D.
    Chapman University, Orange, CA, USA.
    Kokić, Ivana Batarelo
    University of Split, Split, HRV.
    Kihwele, Jimmy Ezekiel
    Mzumbe University, Morogoro, TZA.
    Wright, Jake
    University of Minnesota Rochester, Rochester, MN, USA.
    Kishore, Pallavi
    O.P. Jindal Global University, Sonipat, IND.
    Stewart, Paul Alexander
    Teesside University, Middlesbrough, GBR.
    Bridges, Susan M.
    The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, HKG.
    Lodahl, Mikkel
    Dania Academy, Randers, DNK.
    Bryant, Peter
    University of Sydney, Sydney, AUS.
    Kaur, Kulpreet
    O.P Jindal Global University, Sonipat, IND.
    Hollings, Stephanie
    Jilin International Studies University, Jilin, CHN.
    Brown, James Benedict
    Umeå University, Umeå, SWE.
    Steketee, Anne
    Oakland City University, Oakland City, IN, USA.
    Prinsloo, Paul
    University of South Africa, Pretoria, ZAF.
    Hazzan, Moses Kayode
    University of Ibadan, Ibadan, NGA.
    Jopling, Michael
    University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, GBR.
    Mañero, Julia
    University of Seville, Seville, ESP.
    Gibbons, Andrew
    Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, NZL.
    Pfohl, Sarah
    University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Humble, Niklas
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, SWE.
    Davidsen, Jacob
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, DNK.
    Ford, Derek R.
    DePauw University, Greencastle, IN, USA.
    Sharma, Navreeti
    O.P. Jindal Global University, Sonipat, Haryana, IND.
    Stockbridge, Kevin
    Chapman University, Orange, CA, USA.
    Pyyhtinen, Olli
    Tampere University, Helsinki, FIN.
    Escaño, Carlos
    University of Seville, Seville, ESP.
    Achieng‑Evensen, Charlotte
    Chapman University, Orange, CA, USA.
    Jennifer, Rose
    Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland, GBR.
    Irwin, Jones
    Dublin City University, Dublin, IRL.
    Shukla, Richa
    O.P Jindal Global University, Sonipat, IND.
    SooHoo, Suzanne
    Chapman University, Orange, CA, USA.
    Truelove, Ian
    Leeds Beckett University, Leeds,GBR.
    Buchanan, Rachel
    University of Newcastle, Newcastle, AUS.
    Urvashi, Shreya
    Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, IND.
    E. Jayne, White
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, Aotearoa, NZL.
    Novak, Rene
    BestStart, Christchurch, NZL.
    Thomas, Ryberg
    Aalborg University (AAU), Aalborg, DNK.
    Arndt, Sonja
    University of Melbourne, Melbourne, AUS.
    Redder, Bridgette
    Te Rito Maioha Early Childhood New Zealand, Rotorua, NZL.
    Mukherjee, Mousumi
    O.P. Jindal Global University, Sonipat, Delhi, IND.
    Funmi Komolafe, Blessing
    Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba, NGA.
    Mallya, Madhav
    Jindal Global University, Sonipat, Haryana, IND.
    Devine, Nesta
    Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, NZL.
    Sattarzadeh, Sahar D.
    DePauw University, Greencastle, IN, USA; Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, ZAF.
    Hayes, Sarah
    University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, GBR.
    Teaching in the Age of Covid-19: The New Normal2022In: Postdigital Science and Education, ISSN 2524-485X, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 877-1015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On 17 March 2020, Postdigital Science and Education launched a call for testimonies about teaching and learning during very frst Covid-19 lockdowns. The resulting article, ‘Teaching in the Age of Covid-19’ (attached), presents 81 written testimonies and 80 workspace photographs submitted by 84 authors from 19 countries. On 17 March 2021, Postdigital Science and Education launched a call for a sequel article of testimonies about teaching and learning during very first Covid-19 lockdowns. The resulting article, ‘Teaching in the Age of Covid-19—1 Year Later’(attached), consists of 74 textual testimonies and 76 workspace photographs submitted by 77 authors from 20 countries.These two articles have been downloaded almost 100,000 times and have been cited more than 100 times. This shows their value as historical documents. Recent analyses, such as ‘Teaching in the Age of Covid-19—A Longitudinal Study ’(attached), also indicate their strong potential for educational research. As the Covid-19 pandemic seems to wind down, pandemic experiences have entered the mainstream. They shape all educational research of today and arguably do not require special treatment. Yet, our unique series of pandemic testimonies provides a unique opportunity to longitudinally trace what happens to the same people over the years—and this opportunity should not be missed.

    Today, we launch a call for fnal sequel: Teaching in the Age of Covid-19—The New Normal. In this sequel, we would like to hear about ways in which you—contributors to the previous articles—have established your own new normal. We hope that this will be the last iteration in this series of testimony articles. Unless the world faces another strong pandemic outburst, we would like to end the series with this last article.

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