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  • 1.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ylva
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Korol, Liliia
    National University of Ostroh Academy, Ukraine.
    Schools can be supporting environments in disadvantaged neighborhoods2019In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 383-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as in many other European countries, poor neighborhoods with ethnically diverse inhabitants and high crime rates have grown up around big cities in the last decades. We hypothesized that, compared with adolescents in advantaged neighborhoods, adolescents in disadvantaged neighborhoods would perceive their schools as relatively safe, due to their contrast with the more threatening and dangerous neighborhoods they lived in. Also, they would perceive their schools as relatively more open to their influence, due to the contrast with a lack of influence in their families. More broadly, they would experience their schools as supporting environments to a greater extent than adolescents in advantaged neighborhoods. We tested these ideas using a sample of 1390 adolescents (M age = 14.34, SD = 1.01) in a Swedish city. The hypotheses were supported, and the findings were most salient for immigrant adolescents in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Thus, particularly for immigrant adolescents in disadvantaged neighborhoods, schools can be supporting environments, which should have implications for local policies regarding resource allocation to schools and student influence. Overall, schools seem to be able to play an important role in students€™ lives by functioning as a positive contrast to negative out-of-school experiences in disadvantaged neighborhoods. © The Author(s) 2019.

  • 2.
    Svensson, Ylva
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    A Master Narrative Approach to the Negotiation of an “Immigrant Identity” in Sweden.2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A Master Narrative Approach to the Negotiation of an "Immigrant Identity" in Sweden

    In Sweden, and many European countries, the concepts of race and ethnicity are not as relevant, and a division between immigrants and non-immigrants is more salient as the basis for in-group definitions. This would have consequences for identity work of young people with an immigrant background living in those societies. Master narratives are shared cultural stories of what types of behaviors are normative and valued (McLean & Syed, 2015) and defines the acceptable frameworks for defining the self ( McLean et al., 2017). Personal narratives are then form in alignment or misalignment with the master narratives (McLean & Syed, 2015).

    This study aims to understand the interplay between societal expectations and individual identity work in how immigrants negotiate their identities, in relation to the master narrative of being Swedish and the misaligning alternative narratives of being immigrant. Specifically, two research questions guided the work: 1) what narratives of being immigrant are told, and 2) how are identities negotiated their in relation to the master narrative of being Swedish, and the alternative, stereotypical narratives of being immigrant.

    Data was from a larger study addressing ethnic identity in Sweden, the Gothenburg Research on Ethnicity-related Experiences and identity Narratives (GREEN) project. The current sample comprised of 251 participants (74% female), age 16-25. Participants wrote stories about a time when they felt that their personal life story diverged from what is considered appropriate, normal or accepted (Alpert, Marsden Szymanowski, & Lilgendahl, 2013). Written narratives were analysed using thematic analyses (Braun & Clark, 2006). Results showed two main types of experiences of being immigrant:1) "Immigrant" as a self-chosen identity, and as an in-group. Feelings of sameness and belonging was based either on a shared immigrant experience or being in a minority (regardless of a shared ethnicity or language), or based on having the same view of life. 2) "Immigrant" as ascribed by others, and not an in-group. Participants described being viewed as immigrants regardless of being born in Sweden, and by being grouped together with other immigrants regardless of culture, language or ethnicity. Thus, the label "immigrant" was described as denying them a Swedish identity and their ethnicity of origin, resulting in a feeling of not belonging anywhere.

    Further, results of thematic analyses showed two main themes in how immigrant identities were negotiated in relation to the master narrative of being Swedish and the stereotypical immigrant narrative. The first, the "stereotypical immigrant" was in line with the stereotypical image of the immigrant as inferior to, and in direct contrast to the Swedish identity. The second type, the "successful immigrant" resisted the stereotype by proving it wrong, and being "more Swedish" than Swedes. This included stories of performing and behaving well, having good grades, by dressing neat, speaking impeccable Swedish, and not showing any religious symbols. Findings highlight how individual identity negotiation is affected by societal structures, where personal narratives are formed in adherence and adoption to an alternative narrative, or by resisting and proving the master narrative wrong. 100 words: Using a master narrative framework, the study explored the interplay between societal expectations and individual identity work in how immigrants negotiate their identities, in relation to the master narrative of being Swedish and the misaligning alternative narratives of being immigrant. 251 written narratives were thematically analyzed. Results indicate that "immigrant" can be both a self-chosen in-group, and an ascribed label. Identity negotiation included the "stereotypical immigrant" as inferior to, and in direct contrast to the Swedish narrative, and the "successful immigrant" as resisting and proving the immigrant narrative wrong by exceeding the Swedish narrative.

  • 3.
    Svensson, Ylva
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Identity Work in the Intersection between Self and Society2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Svensson, Ylva
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Syed, Moin
    University of Minnesota, Psychology Department, Minneapolis, United States.
    Linking self and society: Identity and the immigrant experience in two macro-contexts2019In: Journal of applied developmental psychology, ISSN 0193-3973, E-ISSN 1873-7900, Vol. 64, article id 101056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to compare identity processes associated with the immigrant experience in two macro-contexts, the U.S and Sweden. Using a qualitative narrative approach, we explored how immigrant and non-immigrant youth negotiate their identities in the intersection between individual selves and society, by studying how they experience deviations from societal expectations and whether such deviations were associated with alternative group belonging. The sample consisted of 59 narratives written by 1st and 2nd generation immigrants and non-immigrants (age 16–25). Results indicated that the U.S. participants were more likely to define themselves using racial and multi-ethnic categories, whereas Swedish participants relied on national labels. Additionally, U.S. participants showed clear evidence of deviations from societal norms, but also found belonging in social groups from those deviations. Swedish participants showed some deviations, but little evidence of group belonging. The findings highlight the contextual nature of identity development within an immigrant context. © 2019 Elsevier Inc.

  • 5.
    Syed, Moin
    et al.
    University of Minnesota, USA.
    Juang, Linda P.
    University of Potsdam, Germany.
    Svensson, Ylva
    Gothenburg university, Sweden.
    Toward a new understanding of ethnic/racial settings for ethnic/racial identity development2018In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 262-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this conceptual article is to advance theory and research on one critical aspect of the context of ethnic–racial identity (ERI) development: ethnic–racial settings, or the objective and subjective nature of group representationwithin an individual's context. We present a new conceptual framework that consists of four dimensions: (1) perspective(that settings can be understood in both objective and subjective terms); (2) differentiation (how groups are defined in asetting); (3) heterogeneity (the range of groups in a setting); and (4) proximity (the distance between the individual andthe setting). Clarifying this complexity is crucial for advancing a more coherent understanding of how ethnic–racial set-tings are related to ERI development.

  • 6.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Svensson, Ylva
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Depressive symptoms and non-suicidal self-injury during adolescence: Latent patterns of short-term stability and change2019In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 75, p. 163-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    Depressive symptoms and non-suicidal self-injury not only increase in prevalenceduring adolescence, but they can also occur together. Both psychological problems seem to have similar precipitating conditions, suggesting they have transdiagnostic conditions—personal or contextual characteristics that contribute to co-occurrence. We sought to understand when these two problems co-occur and what is related to their co-occurrence.

    Methods:

    Using a pattern-centered approach and two waves of longitudinal data collected an-nually, we examined latent profiles of depressive symptoms and self-injury among a Swedish sample of adolescents aged 12 to 16 (MageT1= 13.65 years,SD= 0.64), 53.7% boys and 47.3% girls. Most of the adolescents were Swedish (89%), with parents who were married or cohabitating (68%). We also examined the transitions between profiles over time.

    Results:

    Our results suggest that during this time frame, depressive symptoms and self-injury tend to emerge and stabilize or abate together. We also examined a broad array of predictors, including individual characteristics, emotion dysregulation, experiences with friends, parents' negative reactions to behavior, and school stress. The significant unique predictors suggest that adolescents who reported being subjected to relational aggression, having negative experienceswhile drinking, and low self-esteem had a greater probability of moving from moderate to high levels or maintaining high levels of depressive symptoms and self-injury, compared to adolescents classified in the other statuses.

    Conclusions:

    Focusing on negative interpersonal experiences and selfesteem as transdiagnostic conditions may guide research and aid clinicians in supporting adolescents who feel depressed and engage in self-injury. Symptoms of depression increase during adolescence (Hankin et al., 1998;Lewinsohn, Rohde, Seeley, Klein, & Gotlib, 2000) as doself-injurious behaviors (Hilt, Nock, Lloyd-Richardson, & Prinstein, 2008; Lloyd-Richardson, Perrine, Dierker, & Kelley, 2007; Ross &Heath, 2002). Defined as direct and intentional destruction of one's own body tissue without suicidal intent, non-suicidal self-injury(NSSI) includes cutting, hitting, burning, and scratching (Nock, 2010). Although rates of NSSI are typically lower than those of depressive symptoms, they often covary (Auerbach et al., 2014; Lloyd-Richardson et al., 2007; Nock, Joiner, Gordon, Lloyd-Richardson, & Prinstein, 2006; Zetterqvist, Lundh, Dahlström, & Svedin, 2013). In this study, we focused on the co-occurrence of depressive symptoms and NSSI. We aimed to understand when these problems occurred together, in comparison to when adolescents exhibit only one problem or none and to explore how co-occurrence arises.https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2019.07.013

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