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  • 1.
    Arghavan Shahlaei, Charlotte
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Rangraz, Masood
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Stenmark, Dick
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied Information Technology.
    TRANSFORMATION OF COMPETENCE: THE EFFECTS OF DIGITALIZATION ONCOMMUNICATORS' WORK2017In: Proceedings of the 25th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS),: ECIS 2017 Proceedings, 2017, p. 195-209Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying human competence in relation with digitalization is currently an under-researched area within information systems scholarship. This paper presents a response to the contemporary calls within the IS field for studying the changes brought on by the advent of digitalization. Based on indepth interviews with professional communicators, we illustrate the effects of digitalization on the formation of work related competences. Employing a new sociotechnical system approach (Neo-STS), we analyze and illustrate the effects of digitalization in multiple ways. First, we propose that any further study of competence cannot be inadvertent to the phenomenon of digitalization. Second, we suggest a new approach for studying competence in relation with digitalization as opposed to studying "digital competence". Third, by applying a Neo-STS perspective, we provide a substantiated explanation of the transformation of competences in the work of communicators.

  • 2.
    Rangraz, Masood
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    The mastery of assembly work2019In: VILÄR 5-6 december 2019, University West, Trollhättan: Abstracts / [ed] Kristina Johansson, Trollhättan: University West , 2019, p. 14-15Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is about a close interaction and a lived experience between human agents and material objects. On the surface, the work of the shop floor assemblers has to do routinely with different work tasks. Secure placements of stations, persistence display of machines and tools, identical flow of end-products and, most importantly, the order and the rhythm of movement give an impression of routine doings devoid of any skillful performance.To reveal the mastery attached to the assembly work, we use detailed field observations, actors' anecdotes, photographs and video recordings. We ask how does the status of the assembled products get examined, assessed and adjusted by the actors? We show how assembly-line workers and some rudimentary tools like hammers, pliers and gauges come together to yield qualified output — verified and certified by the direct engagement of human agents.Categorized into four sections of tacit knowledge, skill development, assessment and adjustment, we make explicit how the measuring happens, connects to the geometry of the assembled piece, translates into observable actions and is idiosyncratically performed for each and every piece of assembled product. We reveal that what might seem simple and routine assembly work involves unseen calculations and is carried out by a skillful performance.

    This study distances itself from conceptual models and narrow interpretations and employs ethnomethodology as a theoretical modal to connect meaningfully the dots from empirical setting. The argument here is against the impoverished conception and indispensable nature of skill at the shop floor. This paper provides critical contribution to the ongoing discussion of ‘future of work’ in general and to the debate on the ‘growing risk of replacement of work force by sophisticated algorithms’ in particular.

  • 3.
    Rangraz, Masood
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Robotics and quality: A sociomaterial analysis of assembly line2019In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, ISSN 1613-0073, E-ISSN 1613-0073, Vol. 2398, p. 123-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automation of manufacturing industry has been on agenda for nearly five decades now. Today, the affordability and efficiency of automated solutions make them increasingly relevant to Small and Medium-size Enterprises (SMEs). Their continued survival depends on the quality of the end product and as much as any SME might intend to increase its business potential, it can’t afford to lose quality by the time it turns to automated solutions. Here, we focus on an assembly line soon to leave its manual processes to automation. It is a case from a manufacturing plant, and we ask what happens to quality once the automation solutions are in place? Exploiting the five notions of Sociomateriality, we explore the changes in the socio-technical configurations of the workplace each of which, we discuss, are consequential for quality. We show while quality is an ultimate business goal for any SME; it is first and foremost a practical problem at the shop-floor. We discuss how quality originates from socio material configurations and distinguish the process-quality from product-quality while attending to working-life quality. We address the challenge of translating the quality which once was in hands, tools, and the relationship among them, to the quality of exact calculations of automated solutions. ©Copyright held by the author(s).

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