Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, H. Robert H.
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mathematics, Computer and Surveying Engineering.
    de Blanche, Andreas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mathematics, Computer and Surveying Engineering.
    Lundqvist, Thomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mathematics, Computer and Surveying Engineering.
    Flipping the Data Center Network: Increasing East-West Capacity Using Existing Hardware2017In: 2017 IEEE 42nd Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN), 9-12 Oct. 2017, IEEE, 2017, p. 211-214, article id 8109355Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today's datacenters, there is an increasing demand for more network traffic capacity. The majority of the increase in traffic is internal to the datacenter, i.e., it flows between different servers within the datacenter. This category of traffic is often referred to as east-west traffic and traditional hierarchical architectures are not well equipped to handle this type of traffic. Instead, they are better suited for the north-southbound traffic between hosts and the Internet. One suggested solution for this capacity problem is to adopt a folded CLOS topology, also known as spine-leaf, which often relies on software defined network (SDN) controllers to manage traffic. This paper shows that it is possible to implement a spine-leaf network using commodity-ofthe-shelf switches and thus improve the east-west traffic capacity. This can be obtained using low complexity configuration and edgerouting for load balancing, eliminating the need for a centralized SDN controller.

  • 2.
    Lundqvist, Thomas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mathematics, Computer and Surveying Engineering.
    de Blanche, Andreas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mathematics, Computer and Surveying Engineering.
    Andersson, H. Robert H.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mathematics, Computer and Surveying Engineering.
    Thing-to-thing electricity micro payments using blockchain technology2017In: Global Internet of Things Summit (GIoTS), 2017: Proceedings of a meeting held 6-9 June 2017, Geneva, Switzerland, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017, p. 261-266, article id 8016254Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thing-to-thing payments are a key enabler in the Internet of Things (IoT) era, to ubiquitously allow for devices to pay each other for services without any human interaction. Traditional credit card-based systems are not able to handle this new paradigm, however blockchain technology is a promising payment candidate in this context. The prominent example of blockchain technology is Bitcoin, with its decentralized structure and ease of account creation. This paper presents a proof-of-concept implementation of a smart cable that connects to a smart socket and without any human interaction pays for electricity. In this paper, we identify several obstacles for the widespread use of bitcoins in thing-to-thing payments. A critical problem is the high transaction fees in the Bitcoin network when doing micro transactions. To reduce this impact, we present a single-fee micro-payment protocol that aggregates multiple smaller payments incrementally into one larger transaction needing only one transaction fee. The proof-of concept shows that trustless, autonomous, and ubiquitous thing-to-thing micro-payments is no longer a future technology.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf