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  • 1.
    Hrybanova, Yana
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Ekström, Anette
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    First-time fathers' experiences of professional support from child health nurses2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 921-930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, in Sweden, fathers are expected to be active in their father role and to share caring responsibilities for their children equally with mothers. This active role of a father in a family can be challenging, especially for the first-time fathers. Child health nurses’ support is an important factor for fathers to become confident caregivers. The Father Perceived Professional Supportscale (FaPPS scale) can be used in nursing practice for better understanding father’s needs of professional support. The aim of this study was to describe first-timefathers’ experiences of the professional support received from child health nurses and to validate the instrument:‘FaPPS scale’. A qualitative design, with inductive and deductive approaches, was used in this study.Twelve first-time fathers participated in the semi-structuredinterviews, thereafter grading the FaPPS scaleitems and commenting on them. The fathersexperienced nurses’ support positively when nursesprovided practical information and stimulated them to be involved in care of their children. In contrast, thes upport was experienced negatively because of nurses’ lack of commitment, availability and adaptation to the fathers’ individual needs. The fathers also felt inequality between the support received by fathers and by mothers. Although some fathers perceived it as negative, others considered it fair, believing that mothers needed more support. In addition, fathers expect nurses to actively offer support to them and supervise them in childcare. The fathers also needed meeting other parents, for example in parental groups.This study also indicates that FaPPS scale can be used both in research and clinical practice, though still needing further development.

  • 2.
    Huusko, Linda
    et al.
    Narhälsan Skövde Women’s Health Clinic, Skövde, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, S.
    Women’s Health Clinic, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anette
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. University of Skövde, School of Health and Education,Skövde, Sweden.
    Hertfelt Wahn, Elisabeth
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education,Skövde, Sweden.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education,Skövde, Sweden.
    First-Time Fathers´ Experience of Support from Midwives in Maternity Clinics: An Interview Study2018In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, article id 9618036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background.

    Research shows that first-time fathers want to take part in preparation for birth and parenthood but they describe being excluded by health professionals. Aim. The aim of this study was to illustrate first-time fathers' experiences of support from midwives in maternity clinics as a step in the validation of "The Father Perceived-Professional-Support" (The FaPPS) scale.

    Methods.

    A qualitative content analysis with an inductive and deductive approach was used; seven first-time fathers were strategically selected and interviewed. In the inductive part the following open question was asked: "How did you perceive the support from the antenatal midwife/midwives?" In the deductive part, the fathers were asked to respond to the FaPPS scale, in order to receive their thoughts and understanding of the scale, inspired by the "Think-aloud" method. Findings. The inductive results showed two main categories: Experience of not knowing what support they needed and Experience of being excluded. The fathers found support from other fathers in parental education classes, but they lack time to discuss. Overall it seems as if the fathers answered both from their own perspective and from the mothers' perspective. This was not evident in the deductive results. The FaPPs scale should therefore include professionals' ability to strengthen social support from other first-time fathers and professionals' ability to offer support to the mother.

    Conclusion and Clinical Implications.

    The fathers experienced exclusion both by themselves and also by midwives. Midwives should offer both parents the opportunity to pose questions. It is important for expectant fathers that time for discussion is planned in parental education classes. The FaPPS scale is useful but needs further development. Parts of our result are in line with earlier research, for decades; therefore it is necessary to focus more on support for fathers.

  • 3.
    Möller Ranch, Matilda
    et al.
    Neonatal Care Unit, NÄL Hospital Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Jämtén, Sofia
    Pediatric Healthcare Setting, Capio, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences, Skövde, Sweden.
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences, Skövde, Sweden.
    First-Time Mothers Have a Desire to Be Offered Professional Breastfeeding Support by Pediatric Nurses: An Evaluation of the Mother-Perceived-Professional Support Scale2019In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, article id 8731705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although the World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for six months, the rate of breastfeeding has decreased worldwide. Breastfeeding is the natural way of feeding a baby, but it is a process that has to be learnt. It is not unusual for problems to occur and hence support for breastfeeding is vital. The aim of this study was to explore first-time mothers' experiences of the breastfeeding support offered by pediatric nurses, as well as to develop and evaluate the Mother Perceived Support from Professionals (MoPPS) scale.

    Methods: A qualitative design involving both inductive and deductive approaches was chosen. Nine first-time mothers were interviewed regarding their experiences of the breastfeeding support offered by pediatric nurses. Semistructured interviews were conducted. The mothers were also asked to grade their experiences of breastfeeding support on the MoPPS scale. A qualitative content analysis was applied when analyzing the data obtained using both the inductive (interviews) and deductive (MoPPS scale) approaches.

    Results: The results revealed that the mothers felt the desire to breastfeed, although they all experienced some difficulties. They wanted the pediatric nurses to be perceptive and provide professional support based on their own experiences. When the pediatric nurses took time and booked extra appointments, the mothers felt supported. The inductive analysis resulted in one theme: "When wanting to breastfeed, mothers have a desire to be offered professional breastfeeding support". Two main categories were identified, namely "Mothers wanted but lacked breastfeeding support" and "Mothers received professional support." The deductive analysis of the MoPPS scale showed similar results, and the questions were perceived as relevant to the aim. The mothers considered it important that the pediatric nurses had sufficient knowledge about breastfeeding. It was also considered important that the pediatric nurses involved the mothers' partners in the breastfeeding support. Therefore, we suggest that these areas should be included in the MoPPS scale for pediatric nurses.

    Conclusions: The MoPPS scale can be a useful tool for helping pediatric nurses to offer mothers professional breastfeeding support. Indeed, when offering breastfeeding support, pediatric nurses can use the items included on the MoPPS scale as guidance.

  • 4.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    University of Agriculture (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. University of Skövde, School of Health and Education, Skövde, Sweden.
    Berg, Marie
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Buckley, Sarah
    The University of Queensland, School of Public Health, Brisbane, Australia..
    Pajalic, Zada
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences Oslo, Norway.
    Hadjigeorgiou, Eleni
    University of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cyprus, Limassol, Cyprus.
    Kotłowska, Alicja
    Medical University of Gdańsk, Faculty of Health Sciences with Subfaculty of Nursing and Institute of Maritime and Tropical Medicine, Gdańsk, Poland.
    Lengler, Luise
    Midwifery Research and Education Unit, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
    Kielbratowska, Bogumila
    Medical University of Gdańsk, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Gdańsk, Poland.
    Leon-Larios, Fatima
    University of Seville, Faculty of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Podiatry, Seville, Spain.
    Magistretti, Claudia Meier
    Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Department of Social Work Center for Health Promotion and Social Participation, Luzern, Switzerland.
    Downe, Soo
    University of Central Lancashire, Research in Childbirth and Health (ReaCH) group, Preston, UK.
    Lindström, Bengt
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Dencker, Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Maternal plasma levels of oxytocin during physiological childbirth: a systematic review with implications for uterine contractions and central actions of oxytocin2019In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Oxytocin is a key hormone in childbirth, and synthetic oxytocin is widely administered to induce or speed labour. Due to lack of synthetized knowledge, we conducted a systematic review of maternal plasma levels of oxytocin during physiological childbirth, and in response to infusions of synthetic oxytocin, if reported in the included studies.

    METHODS: An a priori protocol was designed and a systematic search was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO in October 2015. Search hits were screened on title and abstract after duplicates were removed (n = 4039), 69 articles were examined in full-text and 20 papers met inclusion criteria. As the articles differed in design and methodology used for analysis of oxytocin levels, a narrative synthesis was created and the material was categorised according to effects.

    RESULTS: Basal levels of oxytocin increased 3-4-fold during pregnancy. Pulses of oxytocin occurred with increasing frequency, duration, and amplitude, from late pregnancy through labour, reaching a maximum of 3 pulses/10 min towards the end of labour. There was a maximal 3- to 4-fold rise in oxytocin at birth. Oxytocin pulses also occurred in the third stage of labour associated with placental expulsion. Oxytocin peaks during labour did not correlate in time with individual uterine contractions, suggesting additional mechanisms in the control of contractions. Oxytocin levels were also raised in the cerebrospinal fluid during labour, indicating that oxytocin is released into the brain, as well as into the circulation. Oxytocin released into the brain induces beneficial adaptive effects during birth and postpartum. Oxytocin levels following infusion of synthetic oxytocin up to 10 mU/min were similar to oxytocin levels in physiological labour. Oxytocin levels doubled in response to doubling of the rate of infusion of synthetic oxytocin.

    CONCLUSIONS: Plasma oxytocin levels increase gradually during pregnancy, and during the first and second stages of labour, with increasing size and frequency of pulses of oxytocin. A large pulse of oxytocin occurs with birth. Oxytocin in the circulation stimulates uterine contractions and oxytocin released within the brain influences maternal physiology and behaviour during birth. Oxytocin given as an infusion does not cross into the mother's brain because of the blood brain barrier and does not influence brain function in the same way as oxytocin during normal labour does.

  • 5.
    Van Dijk, Willeke
    et al.
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology,Amsterdam, Netherland.
    Huizink, Anja C
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology,Amsterdam, Netherland; University of Skövde, School of Health and Education, Skövde, Swede .
    Müller, Jasmin
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education, Skövde, Swede .
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Section of Anthrozoology and Applied Ethology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education, Skövde, Swede .
    The Effect of Mechanical Massage and Mental Training on Heart Rate Variability and Cortisol in Swedish Employees: A Randomized Explorative Pilot Study2020In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 8, article id 82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work-related stress is relatively common in modern society and is a major cause of sick-leave. Thus, effective stress reducing interventions are needed. This study examined the effects of mental training and mechanical massage, on employee's heart rate variability (HRV) and plasma cortisol at their workplaces. Moreover, it was investigated whether baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) can explain differences in effectiveness of the intervention. Ninety-three participants from four workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the five programs: (I) Mechanical massage and mental training combined, II) Mechanical massage, III) Mental training, IV) Pause, or V) Control. HRV and plasma cortisol were measured at baseline and after 4 and 8 weeks. SBP was measured at baseline. On the reduction of cortisol levels, a small effect of the mechanical massage program was found, whereas no effect was found for the other programs. None of the programs showed any effect on HRV. Nonetheless, when the level of systolic blood pressure was taken into account, some small beneficial effects on HRV and cortisol of mental training and the mechanical massage were found. This exploratory pilot-study provides useful information for future studies that aim to reduce stress among employees.

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