Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Adolescents’ voices on organization via social media2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adolescents are industrious users of social media (i.e. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter) and most of 9-16 years old in EU´s 25 countries have a profile on a social network where they can socialize, express their thoughts and feelings. In Sweden there have been recent actions where adolescents have organized themselves with help from social media very quickly and with many participators. Studies have shown both positive and negative effects of using social media. Positive, since almost everyone can share experiences or make their voice heard. Negative, since young people can expose themselves and others to situations that can be difficult to manage. There are concerns that adolescents online can be socially isolated from their friends in “real life”, while others mean that social media increases the possibility for adolescent to make new friends and develop existing relationships. Significance: Earlier studies have focused on use of social media in school and social resisting gatherings, but not as many studies on adolescents’ use of social media for organizing their activities in everyday life. Young people can be considered to be digital natives and adults, that constitute a certain power in the society, can be considered as digital immigrants. From that perspective it is important to let young people’s own voices be heard on a central arena for daily activities. Hence, the aim the presented study was to examine how adolescents describe social media as an arena for organizing themselves and how the organizational actions affect their everyday life. Data derives from interviews with 13-19-year old pupils, and were recruited from the Western part of Sweden. The interviews were analyzed with thematic analysis in several steps. Results revealed that social media is perceived both positive and negative. Social media was described as an arena where young people can experience feelings of being free, but also as an arena that contributes to major problems. The adolescents describe social media as a platform where social power is performed, but that the users are unaware about the responsibilities that follow such power. Conclusions drawn from this study is that young people reason about the complexity of what social media means for organizing events and relationships in everyday life and social medias are seen as both problematic and enabling. The study contributes, by letting young people´s own voices being heard, a better understanding of adolescents’ experience of social organization in new medias.

    Adolescents' voices on organization via social media. Available from: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/281280719_Adolescents'_voices_on_organization_via_social_media [accessed Oct 29, 2015].

  • 2.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Risk discourses in Swedish tabloids2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: People of all ages participate in activities that can pose a risk to their health. However, it is important not only to see risks as threats, but also something that can enhance positive experiences and opportunities. The media has a huge influence on young people and thus there are good reasons to investigate how risks and risk-taking are portrayed. Significance: The communication in the media can be described as bi-directional, with subjects covered from many different perspectives, for example the reporting of views and values held by the authorities, politicians, residents and other community stakeholders. The human identity is constructed from self-experiences, but also through the different public discourses (collectively agreed discussions or arguments) that are present in the media and in everyday speech. For adolescents in particular, contact with the media affects their lives and the development of their identity. Hence, the media plays an important role in the presentation of how the world is constituted. The aim of this study was therefore to explore how risks and risk taking are described in media targeting young people in Sweden. Methods: 270 adolescents aged 15-20 years were surveyed on which newspapers they primarily read. Two daily tabloids were identified, both in paper format and on the Internet. Hence, the data consisted of two daily tabloids, each studied over a 14 day period. Each article that mentioned risks and risk taking was analyzed using discourse analysis from three perspectives: 1) what is stated, 2) by whom and 3) how such statements are articulated. Results showed that risks were mainly addressed in four ways; 1) News reports by journalists and press spokespersons articulating the theme “offender, heroes and victims”, e.g. news about crimes and accidents. 2) Reports about sports by athletes, coaches, doctors and columnists on the theme “enduring punches and injuries”, e.g. reports about violence and injuries in sports. 3) Reports, about entertainment by actors, performers, presenters and columnists about “Idols, drugs and confessions”, e.g. celebrities’’ confession stories, and 4) Expert- and opinion reports by journalists, experts, panels about “opinions and influence”, e.g. columnists writing about current events. The Conclusion drawn is the importance of discussing the discourses media create and reproduce, and that all levels of society need to take responsibility for what risks are reported, how and, by whom. For example, the media can reproduce outdated gender roles and may obstruct equal opportunities for young men and women. This study contributes in several ways, one being to bring awareness on how discourses are presented in the media and the impact on young peoples’ opportunities to create balanced and conscious attitudes to risk.

    Risk discourses in Swedish tabloids. Available from: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/281280598_Risk_discourses_in_Swedish_tabloids [accessed Oct 29, 2015].

  • 3.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Mutual actions: developmental links between aspects of the parent-adolescent relationship and adolescent risk behaviors2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescence is a critical time for the onset or intensification of engagement in risk behaviors, such as delinquency and alcohol use. Parents are often advised to supervise adolescents or set rules for behavior control in order to protect their adolescents from harm. But are such parenting strategies advantageous in preventing adolescents from engaging in risk behaviors? Little is known about what role adolescents play in the parent- adolescent relationship and their own psychosocial development? The overall aim of the dissertation was to investigate how parent- and adolescent-driven communication efforts occurring in the parent-adolescent relationship relate to risk behaviors in early to mid- adolescence.Findings show that adolescent-driven communication efforts (i.e. disclosure about their everyday activities) play a prominent role in the parent-adolescent relationship and adolescent engagement in risk behaviors. Adolescent disclosure is linked to parental knowledge of an adolescent's whereabouts, parent-adolescent emotional connectedness, and decreases in adolescent risk behaviors over time. While parental behavioral control of adolescent whereabouts can indeed be protective of adolescent engagement in risk behaviors, parents' soliciting efforts are related to higher levels of engagement in delinquency and substance use. This is particularly true for boys and adolescents with detached and fearless temperament. However, when adolescents are willing to communicate, parents can elicit more disclosure from their adolescents through soliciting efforts.This dissertation suggests that parents and adolescents both play important roles in parenting and parent-adolescent relationships. Parents can protect their adolescents from engagement in risk behaviors, especially when adolescents share information with their parents.

  • 4.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Boele, Savannah
    Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherland.
    Skoog, Therése
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Parent-Adolescent Communication and Adolescent Delinquency: Unraveling Within-Family Processes from Between-Family Differences.2019In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1707-1723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the factors that predict adolescent delinquency is a key topic in parenting research. An open question is whether prior results indicating relative differences between families reflect the dynamic processes occurring within families. Therefore, this study investigated concurrent and lagged associations among parental behavioral control, parental solicitation, adolescent disclosure, and adolescent delinquency by separating between-family and within-family effects in three-wave annual data (N = 1515; Mage = 13.01 years at T1; 50.6% girls). At the within-family level, parental behavioral control negatively predicted adolescent delinquency. Adolescent disclosure and delinquency, and adolescent disclosure and parental solicitation, reciprocally predicted each other. Parental solicitation negatively predicted parental behavioral control. The findings indicate a prominent role of adolescent disclosure in within-family processes concerning parental-adolescent communication and adolescent delinquency.

  • 5.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Impact of parent-child communication and adolescent interpretation of parental monitoring efforts on risk behavior in early adolescence.2016In: Nordic Youth Research Symposium: Youth Moves – Voices – Spaces – Subjectivities, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2016, p. 75-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study investigates how interaction between parents and early adolescent boys and girls, influences different types of risk behaviour. Special focus is given to parental knowledge and monitoring strategies, as well as adolescent interpretation of parental efforts. Usinga sample of 1520 early adolescent boys and girls, we examine the structures in relations between adolescent disclosure parental control, solicitation and knowledge and adolescent feelings of being overly controlled

  • 6.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Göteborgs universitet.
    Skoog, Therese
    Gothenburg University, Department of Psychology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Gothenburg University, Department of Psychology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Structural relations between sources of parental knowledge, feelings of being overly controlled and risk behaviors in early adolescence2017In: Journal of Family Studies, ISSN 1322-9400, E-ISSN 1839-3543, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we have investigated parental knowledge and its sources, namely adolescent disclosure, parental control, and parental solicitation; and how they relate to adolescents' feelings of being overly controlled, and to three types of adolescent risk behaviors, namely bullying, substance use, and delinquent behavior. This was studied in a sample of 1520 Swedish early adolescent boys and girls (M age = 13.0). A structural equation path model showed that adolescent disclosure and parental control were positively associated with parental knowledge, which in turn related to all three risk behaviors. Adolescent disclosure was related to lower levels of risk behaviors, while parental solicitation was linked to higher levels of adolescent engagement in risk behaviors, especially for boys, through feelings of being overly controlled. The findings support the idea of a functional role of open communication, as well as adequate levels of autonomy granting, for managing boys' and girls' risk behavior.

  • 7.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Boson, K.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Differences in parents' and adolescents' reports on parental knowledge and longitudinal associations to adolescents' psychological problems2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthy parent-adolescent relationships are central for positive adolescent development. However, parents and their adolescentchildren often perceive the aspects of their relationship differently. This could stem from underlying problems in parentadolescent relationship, which in turn is related to poor adolescent behavior or health. In this study, we investigate in what waydisagreement between parents' and adolescent reports on adolescent disclosure, parental solicitation, control and knowledgeare longitudinally related with psychological problems (internalizing and externalizing) and well-being in adolescence.Data from matching parent and child dyads (n=477), from the research program LoRDIA were included. The adolescents' meanage was 13.0 years (SD = 0.56) at T1 and 14.30 years (SD = 0.61) at T2, evenly distributed between boys (51.6%) and girls (48.4%)at baseline. Discrepancy score was calculated by subtracting child's score from the parent's score, meaning that higher scoreindicated that a parent responded with a higher number than the child.Structural analyses showed that higher levels of adolescent disclosure discrepancy were related to higher levels of adolescentinternalizing problems and lower levels of adolescent well-being over time. Higher levels of parental solicitation discrepancywere related to higher levels of adolescent externalizing problems over time and lower levels of well-being. Parental controldiscrepancy was related to lower levels of externalizing and internalizing problems at T1. Parental knowledge discrepancy wasrelated to higher levels of adolescent well-being over time and to higher levels of adolescent externalizing problems at T1.Discrepancies in parents' and adolescents' reports of aspects in their relationship matter in terms of healthy adolescentdevelopment. Adolescent healthy development is harmed when parents overestimate the level of knowledge of adolescentwhereabouts and parent-adolescent communication. However, when parents rate their behavioral control higher than theiradolescents, the adolescents tend to show less psychological problems.

  • 8.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skog, Therése
    Jönköping University, Jönköping; Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Norwegian University of Science and technology, Norway.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Does one Size Fit All?: Linking Parenting With Adolescent Substance Use and Adolescent Temperament2019In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using longitudinal Swedish data from 1,373 early‐adolescent youths, this study aims to answer the question of whether the previously established protective function of parental knowledge and its sources — adolescent disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental control—on substance use among early‐adolescents is moderated by the adolescent's temperament. Adolescent temperament moderated several links between parental knowledge and its sources and adolescent substance use. The most pronounced moderating results were found for those adolescents with fearless, socially detached and thrill‐seeking tendencies. For these "detached thrill‐seekers", bidirectional links between adolescent disclosure and substance use, and negative links between parental solicitation and substance use were found. We recommend, therefore, that adolescent temperament is considered when designing parenting programs.

  • 9.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Skoog, Therese
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdner, A.
    Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Does one size fit all?: Linking parenting wirh adolescent substgance use and adolescent temperament2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parenting strategies, such as solicitation and behavioral control, as well as adolescent voluntary disclosure of their everyday activities can be protective of adolescent substance use involvement. But is that true for all adolescents? In this study, we explore whether adolescent temperament moderates the longitudinal associations between adolescent disclosure, parental knowledge, parental solicitation, parental control and adolescent substance use. We used longitudinal data from (N = 1373) early-adolescent Swedish youth of 13.02 years of age at the baseline (51.6 % girls). We performed cluster analysis to identify temperament configurations (of novelty seeking, harm avoidance and reward dependence) and conducted cross-lagged panel design to test the reciprocal associations between the constructs. Multi-group analyses were used to test moderation by temperament. Main results showed five distinct temperament clusters: detached and fearless, unstable, avoidant, sociable thrill-seekers, social and content. The bidirectional, negative associations between adolescent disclosure and substance use, and the positive longitudinal link between parental solicitation and adolescent substance use were moderated by temperament cluster. The link between T1 adolescent disclosure and T2 substance use was significant for adolescents in the detached and fearless and the unstable cluster, whereas the negative link between T1 adolescent substance use and T2 adolescent disclosure and the positive link between T1 parental solicitation and T2 substance use were significant for adolescents in the detached and fearless cluster. Individuals and their contexts, in this case adolescents and their parents, are dynamically interactive in the process of an individual's development. We suggest that parental soliciting efforts may be disadvantageous, while open communication between parents and adolescent is beneficial for adolescent psychosocial development, especially for adolescents who rate high in thrill-seeking, fearlessness, and low in sociability, thus detached and fearless adolescents.

  • 10.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sverige.
    Skoog, Therése
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Aspects of the Parent–Adolescent Relationship and Associations With Adolescent Risk Behaviors Over Time2019In: Journal of family psychology, ISSN 0893-3200, E-ISSN 1939-1293, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents' actions and knowledge of adolescents' whereabouts play key roles in preventing risk behaviors in early adolescence, but what enables parents to know about their adolescents' activities and what links there are to adolescent risk behaviors, such as substance use and delinquent behavior, remain unclear. In this study,we investigated whether different aspects of the parent–adolescent relationship predict parental knowledge, and we examined the direct and indirect longitudinal associations between these aspects of the parent–dolescent relationship and adolescents' self-reported delinquent behavior and substance use. The participants were 550 parents and their adolescent children from two small and two midsized municipalities in Sweden. Parental data were collected when the adolescents were 13 years old (mean), and adolescent data on riskbehaviors were collected on two occasions, when they were 13 and 14 years of age (mean). Structural path analyses revealed that adolescent disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental control predicted parental knowledge, with adolescent disclosure being the strongest source of parental knowledge and the strongest negative predictor of adolescent risk behaviors. Parenting competence and adolescents' connectedness to parents were indirectly, through adolescent disclosure and parental solicitation and parental control, associated with substance use and delinquent behavior. Some paths differed for boys and girls. In conclusion, confident parenting and a close parent–adolescent relationship in which adolescent disclosure is promoted, seem protective of adolescent engagement in risk behaviors

1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf