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  • 1.
    André, Frida
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Einarsson, Isak
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skane, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Trebbin Harvard, Sunna
    Civic Centre Children and Youth, The Social Services Administration, Copenhagen (DNK).
    Franzén, Leonard
    Social Services, Malmö (SWE).
    Möttus, Annika
    Region Skane, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Håkansson, Anders
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, (SWE); Region Skåne, Malmö Addiction Centre, Gambling Disorder Unit, Malmö (SWE).
    Claesdotter-Knutsson, Emma
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skane, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Relapse prevention therapy for internet gaming disorder in Swedish child and adolescent psychiatric clinics: a randomized controlled trial2023In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of relapse prevention (RP) as a treatment for internet gaming disorder (IGD).

    Design: Randomized controlled trial.

    Setting: Three child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) units in Region Skåne, Sweden.

    Participants: Children aged 13-18 years, coming for their first visit to CAP during 2022, were screened for gaming behavior. Those who met the proposed DSM-5 criteria for IGD were offered participation in the trial, if they had the capacity to provide written informed consent and if they spoke Swedish. A total of 111 CAP patients agreed to participate. Out of those, 11 patients were excluded due to incorrect inclusion such as young age (n = 1), or due to the absence of responses to follow-up measures (n = 9). After exclusion, 102 participants remained (intervention = 47, control = 55).

    Interventions: The intervention, RP, is based on cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) and was provided individually, comprising of five to seven 45-min sessions over a period of 5 to 7 weeks versus treatment as usual.

    Outcome measures: Participants were assessed with Game Addiction Scale for Adolescents pre-treatment (GASA) (baseline), post-treatment (treatment group only), and 3 months after baseline (follow-up).

    Results: The repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant interaction effect between treatment and time. Both the control group and treatment group lowered their mean GASA score from baseline to follow-up significantly, but the improvement was greater in the treatment group (mean difference in control group -5.1, p < 0.001, 95% CI = - 3.390 to -6.755, mean difference in treatment group -9.9, p < 0.001, 95% CI = -11.746 to -8.105).

    Conclusion: RP was found to be superior to treatment as usual in terms of reduction of IGD symptoms. Future research should address which aspects within a given treatment are effective, who benefits from treatment, in what aspects, and why.

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  • 2.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Adolescents’ voices on organization via social media2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adolescents are industrious users of social media (i.e. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter) and most of 9-16 years old in EU´s 25 countries have a profile on a social network where they can socialize, express their thoughts and feelings. In Sweden there have been recent actions where adolescents have organized themselves with help from social media very quickly and with many participators. Studies have shown both positive and negative effects of using social media. Positive, since almost everyone can share experiences or make their voice heard. Negative, since young people can expose themselves and others to situations that can be difficult to manage. There are concerns that adolescents online can be socially isolated from their friends in “real life”, while others mean that social media increases the possibility for adolescent to make new friends and develop existing relationships. Significance: Earlier studies have focused on use of social media in school and social resisting gatherings, but not as many studies on adolescents’ use of social media for organizing their activities in everyday life. Young people can be considered to be digital natives and adults, that constitute a certain power in the society, can be considered as digital immigrants. From that perspective it is important to let young people’s own voices be heard on a central arena for daily activities. Hence, the aim the presented study was to examine how adolescents describe social media as an arena for organizing themselves and how the organizational actions affect their everyday life. Data derives from interviews with 13-19-year old pupils, and were recruited from the Western part of Sweden. The interviews were analyzed with thematic analysis in several steps. Results revealed that social media is perceived both positive and negative. Social media was described as an arena where young people can experience feelings of being free, but also as an arena that contributes to major problems. The adolescents describe social media as a platform where social power is performed, but that the users are unaware about the responsibilities that follow such power. Conclusions drawn from this study is that young people reason about the complexity of what social media means for organizing events and relationships in everyday life and social medias are seen as both problematic and enabling. The study contributes, by letting young people´s own voices being heard, a better understanding of adolescents’ experience of social organization in new medias.

    Adolescents' voices on organization via social media. Available from: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/281280719_Adolescents'_voices_on_organization_via_social_media [accessed Oct 29, 2015].

  • 3.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Risk discourses in Swedish tabloids2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: People of all ages participate in activities that can pose a risk to their health. However, it is important not only to see risks as threats, but also something that can enhance positive experiences and opportunities. The media has a huge influence on young people and thus there are good reasons to investigate how risks and risk-taking are portrayed. Significance: The communication in the media can be described as bi-directional, with subjects covered from many different perspectives, for example the reporting of views and values held by the authorities, politicians, residents and other community stakeholders. The human identity is constructed from self-experiences, but also through the different public discourses (collectively agreed discussions or arguments) that are present in the media and in everyday speech. For adolescents in particular, contact with the media affects their lives and the development of their identity. Hence, the media plays an important role in the presentation of how the world is constituted. The aim of this study was therefore to explore how risks and risk taking are described in media targeting young people in Sweden. Methods: 270 adolescents aged 15-20 years were surveyed on which newspapers they primarily read. Two daily tabloids were identified, both in paper format and on the Internet. Hence, the data consisted of two daily tabloids, each studied over a 14 day period. Each article that mentioned risks and risk taking was analyzed using discourse analysis from three perspectives: 1) what is stated, 2) by whom and 3) how such statements are articulated. Results showed that risks were mainly addressed in four ways; 1) News reports by journalists and press spokespersons articulating the theme “offender, heroes and victims”, e.g. news about crimes and accidents. 2) Reports about sports by athletes, coaches, doctors and columnists on the theme “enduring punches and injuries”, e.g. reports about violence and injuries in sports. 3) Reports, about entertainment by actors, performers, presenters and columnists about “Idols, drugs and confessions”, e.g. celebrities’’ confession stories, and 4) Expert- and opinion reports by journalists, experts, panels about “opinions and influence”, e.g. columnists writing about current events. The Conclusion drawn is the importance of discussing the discourses media create and reproduce, and that all levels of society need to take responsibility for what risks are reported, how and, by whom. For example, the media can reproduce outdated gender roles and may obstruct equal opportunities for young men and women. This study contributes in several ways, one being to bring awareness on how discourses are presented in the media and the impact on young peoples’ opportunities to create balanced and conscious attitudes to risk.

    Risk discourses in Swedish tabloids. Available from: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/281280598_Risk_discourses_in_Swedish_tabloids [accessed Oct 29, 2015].

  • 4.
    Clausén Gull, Ingela
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Norman, Åsa
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (SWE).
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, (SWE) School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Eninger, Lilianne
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Neighborhood conditions in a Swedish context: Two studies of reliability and validity of virtual systematic social observation using Google Street View2023In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, p. 1-16, article id 1020742Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The goal of these studies was to investigate the reliability and validity of virtual systematic social observation (virtual SSO) using Google Street View in a Swedish neighborhood context.

    METHODS: This was accomplished in two studies. Study 1 focused on interrater reliability and construct validity, comparing ratings conducted in-person to those done using Google Street View, across 24 study sites within four postal code areas. Study 2 focused on criterion validity of virtual SSO in terms of neighborhoods with low versus high income levels, including 133 study sites within 22 postal code areas in a large Swedish city. In both studies, assessment of the neighborhood context was conducted at each study site, using a protocol adapted to a Swedish context.

    RESULTS: Scales for Physical Decay, Neighborhood Dangerousness, and Physical Disorder were found to be reliable, with adequate interrater reliability, high consistency across methods, and high internal consistency. In Study 2, significantly higher levels of observed Physical Decay, Neighborhood Dangerousness, and signs of garbage or litter were observed in postal codes areas (site data was aggregated to postal code level) with lower as compared to higher income levels.

    DISCUSSION: We concluded that the scales within the virtual SSO with Google Street View protocol that were developed in this series of studies represents a reliable and valid measure of several key neighborhood contextual features. Implications for understanding the complex person-context interactions central to many theories of positive development among youth were discussed in relation to the study findings.

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  • 5.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Bacikova-Sleskova, Maria
    University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik, Košice (SVK).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Community series in the consequences of COVID-19 on the mental well-being of parents, children and adolescents, volume II: Editorial2023In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 14, p. 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 6.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Einarsson, Isak
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skåne, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Boson, Karin
    Department of Psychology, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences (NOR).
    Claesdotter-Knutsson, Emma
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skåne, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Adolescents’ Perceptions of a Relapse Prevention Treatment for Problematic Gaming: A Qualitative Study2023In: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 11, no 17, p. 2366-2366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the increasing prevalence of problematic gaming, in 2013, the diagnosis “Internetgaming disorder (IGD)” was included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5) as a potential diagnosis. With a new diagnosis, it is important to determine treatment options. The importance of the parent–child relationship has been emphasised in problematic gaming and its treatment. This study aims to provide more knowledge about adolescents’ perceptions of a treatment for problematic gaming and understand whether such treatment may have a bearing on the parent–child relationship. We conducted individual interviews with nine adolescents who completed a treatment for problematic gaming. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis revealed three themes.

    Theme 1: adolescents’ experiences of the new treatment;

    Theme 2: adolescents’ perceptions of the effect of the treatment on their gaming behaviour; and

    Theme 3: adolescents’ perceptions of changes in their parent–child relationships.

    The adolescents viewed the treatment as a way of gaining control of their gaming, a process in which a therapist played an integral part. For the majority of the adolescents in our study, the main effects of treatment were gaining insight into how their gaming and gaming-related behaviours affected other parts of their lives. The participants felt that the treatment improved their relationship with their parents through reducing everyday conflicts. This new knowledge can be used for the development of future interventions involving children and adolescents.

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  • 7.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Mutual actions: developmental links between aspects of the parent-adolescent relationship and adolescent risk behaviors2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescence is a critical time for the onset or intensification of engagement in risk behaviors, such as delinquency and alcohol use. Parents are often advised to supervise adolescents or set rules for behavior control in order to protect their adolescents from harm. But are such parenting strategies advantageous in preventing adolescents from engaging in risk behaviors? Little is known about what role adolescents play in the parent- adolescent relationship and their own psychosocial development? The overall aim of the dissertation was to investigate how parent- and adolescent-driven communication efforts occurring in the parent-adolescent relationship relate to risk behaviors in early to mid- adolescence.Findings show that adolescent-driven communication efforts (i.e. disclosure about their everyday activities) play a prominent role in the parent-adolescent relationship and adolescent engagement in risk behaviors. Adolescent disclosure is linked to parental knowledge of an adolescent's whereabouts, parent-adolescent emotional connectedness, and decreases in adolescent risk behaviors over time. While parental behavioral control of adolescent whereabouts can indeed be protective of adolescent engagement in risk behaviors, parents' soliciting efforts are related to higher levels of engagement in delinquency and substance use. This is particularly true for boys and adolescents with detached and fearless temperament. However, when adolescents are willing to communicate, parents can elicit more disclosure from their adolescents through soliciting efforts.This dissertation suggests that parents and adolescents both play important roles in parenting and parent-adolescent relationships. Parents can protect their adolescents from engagement in risk behaviors, especially when adolescents share information with their parents.

  • 8.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Spelar områdets ekonomiska resurser roll för effekten av en strukturerad tidig insats för barn i förskolan?2023In: Abstracts för DecemberkonferensenInstitutionen för individ och samhälle 13 december 2023, Trollhättan, Sweden, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2023, p. 1-1Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) en tidig insats som syftar till att främja socioemotionell kompetens (SEK) bland barn i förskolan. Syftet med studien var att undersöka 1) potentiella skillnader med avseende på aspekter av SEK som finns bland barn i skolor områden med olika ekonomiska resurser (hög/låg) och 2) om effekten av PATHS på barns SEK kan skiljas åt beroende på ekonomiska resurser i området. N = 275 barn (år 4–5) randomiserades i intervention och kontrollgrupp (RCT-design) där 42.0 % av barnen gick i förskola i ekonomiskt utsatt område. Vi fann att 1) barn i ekonomiskt utsatta områden uppvisade bristande exekutiva färdigheter (inkl arbetsminne och uppmärksamhet) som är aspekter av SEK; 2) Pedagogers arbete med PATHS var gynnsamt på olika sätt för barn i olika områden, men PATHS var särskilt gynnsam för barns sociala och kognitiva aspekter av SEK bland barn i ekonomiskt utsatta områden.

    Kapetanovic, S., Ginner Hau, H., Eichas, K., Olsson, T. M., Ferrer-Wreder, L., & Eninger, L. (2022, September). Does attending preschool in an economically advantaged or disadvantaged neighborhood moderate the effects of the preschool edition of promoting alternative thinking strategies®?. In Frontiers in Education (Vol. 7, p. 978662).

  • 9.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ander, Birgitta
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Adolescent smoking, alcohol use, inebriation, and use of narcotics during the Covid-19 pandemic.2022In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to investigate how general family relations, reported changes in family interaction and involvement with peers during the Covid-19 pandemic, and following rules and recommendations during the pandemic relate to adolescent smoking, alcohol use, inebriation, and use of narcotics during Covid-19.

    METHODS: An online national survey of Swedish adolescents (n = 1818) aged 15-19 years was conducted in June 2020. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to predict adolescents' reported change in substance use during the pandemic. Person-oriented analyses, were used to identify clusters of participants characterized by similar patterns of substance use following ANOVA analysis with Scheffe post hoc tests testing differences between clusters in terms of family relations, reported changes in family interaction and involvement with peers during the Covid-19 pandemic, and following rules and recommendations during the pandemic.

    RESULTS: Higher general family conflict, increased involvement with peers, a strained relationship with parents, and less compliance with rules and restrictions during the pandemic predicted a reported increase in adolescent substance use during this period. The grouping of scores for adolescent smoking, alcohol use, inebriation, and use of narcotics resulted in a six-cluster solution. One cluster (n = 767) either did not use or had decreased use of substances during the Covid-19 pandemic. Five other clusters, thus risk clusters, had retained or increased use of substances during the pandemic. Poor general family relations, increased peer involvement, and difficulties to conform to the rules and restrictions during the covid-19 pandemic were characteristics of risk clusters.

    CONCLUSIONS: Most of adolescents in our study did not increase their substance use during the pandemic. However, adolescents with poor family relations who turn to peers during stressful times and who have difficulty following the government's rules and restrictions, are at risk of increased substance use during the pandemic. This is a potential threat both to adolescents themselves and others in their surroundings which is why at-risk adolescents and their families need more attention from public health and social services during this time of crisis.

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    BMC Psychology
  • 10.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Boele, Savannah
    Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherland.
    Skoog, Therése
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Parent-Adolescent Communication and Adolescent Delinquency: Unraveling Within-Family Processes from Between-Family Differences.2019In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1707-1723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the factors that predict adolescent delinquency is a key topic in parenting research. An open question is whether prior results indicating relative differences between families reflect the dynamic processes occurring within families. Therefore, this study investigated concurrent and lagged associations among parental behavioral control, parental solicitation, adolescent disclosure, and adolescent delinquency by separating between-family and within-family effects in three-wave annual data (N = 1515; Mage = 13.01 years at T1; 50.6% girls). At the within-family level, parental behavioral control negatively predicted adolescent delinquency. Adolescent disclosure and delinquency, and adolescent disclosure and parental solicitation, reciprocally predicted each other. Parental solicitation negatively predicted parental behavioral control. The findings indicate a prominent role of adolescent disclosure in within-family processes concerning parental-adolescent communication and adolescent delinquency.

  • 11.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Impact of parent-child communication and adolescent interpretation of parental monitoring efforts on risk behavior in early adolescence.2016In: Nordic Youth Research Symposium: Youth Moves – Voices – Spaces – Subjectivities, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2016, p. 75-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study investigates how interaction between parents and early adolescent boys and girls, influences different types of risk behaviour. Special focus is given to parental knowledge and monitoring strategies, as well as adolescent interpretation of parental efforts. Usinga sample of 1520 early adolescent boys and girls, we examine the structures in relations between adolescent disclosure parental control, solicitation and knowledge and adolescent feelings of being overly controlled

  • 12.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Göteborgs universitet.
    Skoog, Therese
    Gothenburg University, Department of Psychology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Gothenburg University, Department of Psychology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Structural relations between sources of parental knowledge, feelings of being overly controlled and risk behaviors in early adolescence2020In: Journal of Family Studies, ISSN 1322-9400, E-ISSN 1839-3543, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 226-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we have investigated parental knowledge and its sources, namely adolescent disclosure, parental control, and parental solicitation; and how they relate to adolescents' feelings of being overly controlled, and to three types of adolescent risk behaviors, namely bullying, substance use, and delinquent behavior. This was studied in a sample of 1520 Swedish early adolescent boys and girls (M age = 13.0). A structural equation path model showed that adolescent disclosure and parental control were positively associated with parental knowledge, which in turn related to all three risk behaviors. Adolescent disclosure was related to lower levels of risk behaviors, while parental solicitation was linked to higher levels of adolescent engagement in risk behaviors, especially for boys, through feelings of being overly controlled. The findings support the idea of a functional role of open communication, as well as adequate levels of autonomy granting, for managing boys' and girls' risk behavior.

  • 13.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Boson, K.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Differences in parents' and adolescents' reports on parental knowledge and longitudinal associations to adolescents' psychological problems2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthy parent-adolescent relationships are central for positive adolescent development. However, parents and their adolescentchildren often perceive the aspects of their relationship differently. This could stem from underlying problems in parentadolescent relationship, which in turn is related to poor adolescent behavior or health. In this study, we investigate in what waydisagreement between parents' and adolescent reports on adolescent disclosure, parental solicitation, control and knowledgeare longitudinally related with psychological problems (internalizing and externalizing) and well-being in adolescence.Data from matching parent and child dyads (n=477), from the research program LoRDIA were included. The adolescents' meanage was 13.0 years (SD = 0.56) at T1 and 14.30 years (SD = 0.61) at T2, evenly distributed between boys (51.6%) and girls (48.4%)at baseline. Discrepancy score was calculated by subtracting child's score from the parent's score, meaning that higher scoreindicated that a parent responded with a higher number than the child.Structural analyses showed that higher levels of adolescent disclosure discrepancy were related to higher levels of adolescentinternalizing problems and lower levels of adolescent well-being over time. Higher levels of parental solicitation discrepancywere related to higher levels of adolescent externalizing problems over time and lower levels of well-being. Parental controldiscrepancy was related to lower levels of externalizing and internalizing problems at T1. Parental knowledge discrepancy wasrelated to higher levels of adolescent well-being over time and to higher levels of adolescent externalizing problems at T1.Discrepancies in parents' and adolescents' reports of aspects in their relationship matter in terms of healthy adolescentdevelopment. Adolescent healthy development is harmed when parents overestimate the level of knowledge of adolescentwhereabouts and parent-adolescent communication. However, when parents rate their behavioral control higher than theiradolescents, the adolescents tend to show less psychological problems.

  • 14.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Jönköping University, Jönköping, 553 18, Sweden.
    Boson, Karin
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology,Gothenburg.
    Discrepancies in parents' and adolescents' reports on parent-adolescent communication and associations to adolescents' psychological health2020In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental knowledge of adolescents’ whereabouts is central for healthy adolescent development. However, parents and their adolescent children often perceive parenting practices differently. Using data from matching parent and adolescent dyads (n = 477) from the longitudinal research program LoRDIA, we investigated in what way disagreement between parents’ and adolescents’ reports on parental knowledge, solicitation and behavioral control and adolescent disclosure, is longitudinally related to girls’ and boys’ psychological problems (internalizing and externalizing) and well-being. The adolescents’ mean age was 13.0 years (SD = .56) at T1 and 14.30 years (SD = .61) at T2, evenly distributed between boys (52.6%) and (47.4%) girls at baseline. The discrepancy scores were calculated by subtracting the adolescent’s scores from the parent’s scores. Parent-adolescent discrepancies had somewhat different patterns of associations with boys’ and girls’ psychological problems and well-being. Parental knowledge discrepancy was related to higher levels of girls’ externalizing problems while parental solicitation discrepancy was related to higher levels of boys’ externalizing problems and lower levels of girls’ wellbeing. Adolescent disclosure discrepancy was related to higher levels of girls’ internalizing problems and lower levels of well-being. Negative concurrent associations were shown between parental control discrepancy and adolescents’ internalizing problems. Parents’ overestimating the level of parent-adolescent communication, including adolescent disclosure, and parental solicitation in particular, is disadvantageous for adolescent psychological health. © 2020, The Author(s).

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  • 15.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Ginner Hau, Hanna
    Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Eichas, Kyle
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX (USA).
    Olsson, Tina M.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE), Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Eninger, Lilianne
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Does attending preschool in an economically advantaged or disadvantaged neighborhood moderate the effects of the preschool edition of promoting alternative thinking strategies®?2022In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early interventions that foster the participation, engagement, and development of children attending preschools, including those in economically disadvantaged (low-income) neighborhoods, are of high priority. One such intervention is a universal socioemotional learning (SEL) program called Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS®) which aims to promote social emotional competence and positive adjustment in children, in general, and may have unique benefits for children attending preschool in low incomes areas. In the SEL field, areas in need of exploration include the possible role that neighborhood income level (i.e., all residents’ income in a postal code that a preschool is located in) could have for children’s social emotional competence and positive adjustment and how neighborhood income level may relate to benefits of an intervention such as PATHS. The study aims were to investigate 1) the baseline group differences in social emotional competence and adjustment depending on the neighborhood income level and 2) to determine if neighborhood income level moderated the effects of PATHS on children’s social emotional competence and adjustment from pre to posttest. Participants were 275 children aged four to five years old, from the preschools randomized into an immediate intervention (n = 145 children) or a wait-list control group (n = 130 children). Overall, 42.9% (n = 118) of the children attended preschools in economically disadvantaged neighborhoods and 57.1% (n = 157) of the children attended preschools in economically advantaged neighborhoods. Children’s social emotional competence and adjustment were assessed through child tasks, child observations and teacher reports. The moderation of intervention effects by the preschools’ neighborhood income was tested in a series of just-identified structural equation models (SEM) that explored interaction effects (income*PATHS interactions). At baseline, relative to children attending preschool in economically advantaged preschools, children attending preschool in economically disadvantaged neighborhoods showed lower levels of inhibitory control, working memory, task orientation and higher levels of inattention. Children attending preschools in economically disadvantaged neighborhoods participating in PATHS also showed reductions in inattention, social withdrawal and anxiety compared to control group children also attending preschool in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Additionally, PATHS children from advantaged neighborhoods improved their prosocial behavior, but not their social independence, relative to control group children who also attended preschool in advantaged neighborhoods. Offering PATHS as an SEL intervention in early childhood education and care settings could help to reduce disparities among children in a number of key outcomes.

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  • 16.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Ander, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping,.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Reported Changes in Adolescent Psychosocial Functioning during the COVID-19 Outbreak2021In: Adolescents, E-ISSN 2673-7051, no 1, p. 10-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What effect the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has had on adolescents’ psychosocial functioning is currently unknown. Using the data of 1767 (50.2% female and 49.8 male) adolescents in Sweden, we discuss adolescents’ thoughts and behaviors around the COVID-19 outbreak, as well as reported changes in substance use, everyday life, relations, victimization, and mental health during the outbreak. Results showed that (a) the majority of adolescents have been complying with regulations from the government; (b) although most adolescents did not report changes in their psychosocial functioning, a critical number reported more substance use, conflict with parents, less time spent with peers, and poorer control over their everyday life; and (c) the majority of adolescents have experienced less victimization, yet poorer mental health, during the COVID-19 outbreak. Adolescent girls and adolescents in distance schooling were likely to report negative changes in their psychosocial functioning during the COVID-19 outbreak. Based on these findings, we suggest that society should pay close attention to changes in adolescents’ psychosocial functioning during times of crisis.

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  • 17.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Ander, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ungdomars vardag och psykiska hälsa under COVID-19-pandemin2021In: BarnBladet, p. 16-19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Einarsson, Isak
    Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic, Region Skåne, Malmö (SWE).
    Werner, Marie
    Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic, Region Skåne, Lund (SWE).
    André, Frida
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Håkansson, Anders
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Malmö Addiction Center and Competence Center Addiction, Region Skåne, Malmö (SWE).
    Claesdotter-Knutsson, Emma
    Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic, Region Skåne, Lund (SWE); Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Relapse Prevention Therapy for Problem Gaming or Internet Gaming Disorder in Swedish Child and Youth Psychiatric Clinics: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial2023In: JMIR Research Protocols, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 12, p. e44318-e44318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Although gaming is a common arena where children socialize, an increasing number of children are exhibiting signs of problem gaming or internet gaming disorder. An important factor to the development of problem gaming is parent-child relationships. A cognitive behavioral therapy-based form of treatment, labeled relapse prevention, has been developed as a treatment for child and adolescent problem gaming or internet gaming disorder. However, no study has evaluated the effect of this treatment among Swedish children and youth nor the role of the parent-child relationships in this treatment.

    Objective:

    This study aims (1) to evaluate a relapse prevention treatment for patients showing signs of problem gaming or internet gaming disorder recruited from child and youth psychiatric clinics and (2) to test whether the quality of parent-child relationships plays a role in the effect of relapse prevention treatment and vice versa-whether the relapse prevention treatment has a spillover effect on the quality of parent-child relationships. Moreover, we explore the carer's attitudes about parent-child relationships and child gaming, as well as experiences of the treatment among the children, their carers, and the clinicians who carried out the treatment.

    Methods:

    This study is a 2-arm, parallel-group, early-stage randomized controlled trial with embedded qualitative components. Children aged 12-18 years who meet the criteria for problem gaming or internet gaming disorder will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either intervention (relapse prevention treatment) or control (treatment as usual), with a total of 160 (80 + 80) participants. The primary outcomes are measures of gaming and gambling behavior before and after intervention, and the secondary outcomes include child ratings of parent-child communication and family functioning. The study is supplemented with a qualitative component with semistructured interviews to capture participants' and clinicians' experiences of the relapse prevention, as well as attitudes about parent-child relationships and parenting needs in carers whose children completed the treatment.

    Results:

    The trial started in January 2022 and is expected to end in December 2023. The first results are expected in March 2023.

    Conclusions:

    This study will be the first randomized controlled trial evaluating relapse prevention as a treatment for child and adolescent problem gaming and internet gaming disorder in Sweden. Since problem behaviors in children interact with the family context, investigating parent-child relationships adjacent to the treatment of child problem gaming and internet gaming disorder is an important strength of the study. Further, different parties, ie, children, carers, and clinicians, will be directly or indirectly involved in the evaluation of the treatment, providing more knowledge of the treatment and its effect. Limitations include comorbidity in children with problem gaming and internet gaming disorder and challenges with the recruitment of participants.

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  • 19.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Rothenberg, W. Andrew
    Duke University, Duke Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA): University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Mailman Center for Child Development, Miami, FL, USA (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London, UK (GBR).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Amherst, MA, USA (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology , Rome, Italy (ITA) .
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA (USA) ; King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia (SAU).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Department of Psychology, Bogota,Colombia (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand (THA).
    Peña Alampay, Liane
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, 1000 Metro Manila National Capital Region, Philippines (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Department of Special Education, Zarqa, Jordan (JOR); Counseling, Special Education, and Neuroscience Division, Emirates College for Advanced Education, Abu Dhabi, UAE (ARE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples Federico II, Department of Humanistic Studies, Napoli, Italy (ITA).
    Cross-Cultural Examination of Links between Parent-Adolescent Communication and Adolescent Psychological Problems in 12 Cultural Groups.2020In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 1225-1244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internalizing and externalizing problems increase during adolescence. However, these problems may be mitigated by adequate parenting, including effective parent-adolescent communication. The ways in which parent-driven (i.e., parent behavior control and solicitation) and adolescent-driven (i.e., disclosure and secrecy) communication efforts are linked to adolescent psychological problems universally and cross-culturally is a question that needs more empirical investigation. The current study used a sample of 1087 adolescents (M = 13.19 years, SD = 0.90, 50% girls) from 12 cultural groups in nine countries including China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States to test the cultural moderation of links between parent solicitation, parent behavior control, adolescent disclosure, and adolescent secrecy with adolescent internalizing and externalizing problems. The results indicate that adolescent-driven communication, and secrecy in particular, is intertwined with adolescents' externalizing problems across all cultures, and intertwined with internalizing problems in specific cultural contexts. Moreover, parent-driven communication efforts were predicted by adolescent disclosure in all cultures. Overall, the findings suggest that adolescent-driven communication efforts, and adolescent secrecy in particular, are important predictors of adolescent psychological problems as well as facilitators of parent-adolescent communication.

  • 20.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skog, Therése
    Jönköping University, Jönköping; Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Norwegian University of Science and technology, Norway (NOR).
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Does one Size Fit All?: Linking Parenting With Adolescent Substance Use and Adolescent Temperament2020In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795, Vol. 30, no suppl 2, p. 443-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using longitudinal Swedish data from 1,373 early‐adolescent youths, this study aims to answer the question of whether the previously established protective function of parental knowledge and its sources — adolescent disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental control—on substance use among early‐adolescents is moderated by the adolescent's temperament. Adolescent temperament moderated several links between parental knowledge and its sources and adolescent substance use. The most pronounced moderating results were found for those adolescents with fearless, socially detached and thrill‐seeking tendencies. For these "detached thrill‐seekers", bidirectional links between adolescent disclosure and substance use, and negative links between parental solicitation and substance use were found. We recommend, therefore, that adolescent temperament is considered when designing parenting programs.

  • 21.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Skoog, Therese
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdner, A.
    Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Does one size fit all?: Linking parenting wirh adolescent substgance use and adolescent temperament2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parenting strategies, such as solicitation and behavioral control, as well as adolescent voluntary disclosure of their everyday activities can be protective of adolescent substance use involvement. But is that true for all adolescents? In this study, we explore whether adolescent temperament moderates the longitudinal associations between adolescent disclosure, parental knowledge, parental solicitation, parental control and adolescent substance use. We used longitudinal data from (N = 1373) early-adolescent Swedish youth of 13.02 years of age at the baseline (51.6 % girls). We performed cluster analysis to identify temperament configurations (of novelty seeking, harm avoidance and reward dependence) and conducted cross-lagged panel design to test the reciprocal associations between the constructs. Multi-group analyses were used to test moderation by temperament. Main results showed five distinct temperament clusters: detached and fearless, unstable, avoidant, sociable thrill-seekers, social and content. The bidirectional, negative associations between adolescent disclosure and substance use, and the positive longitudinal link between parental solicitation and adolescent substance use were moderated by temperament cluster. The link between T1 adolescent disclosure and T2 substance use was significant for adolescents in the detached and fearless and the unstable cluster, whereas the negative link between T1 adolescent substance use and T2 adolescent disclosure and the positive link between T1 parental solicitation and T2 substance use were significant for adolescents in the detached and fearless cluster. Individuals and their contexts, in this case adolescents and their parents, are dynamically interactive in the process of an individual's development. We suggest that parental soliciting efforts may be disadvantageous, while open communication between parents and adolescent is beneficial for adolescent psychosocial development, especially for adolescents who rate high in thrill-seeking, fearlessness, and low in sociability, thus detached and fearless adolescents.

  • 22.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Skoog, Therése
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Role of the Family’s Emotional Climate in the Links between Parent-Adolescent Communication and Adolescent Psychosocial Functioning2021In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 49, p. 141-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study was designed to extend the parenting literature by testing the moderating role of the family’s emotional climate, operationalized with parent-adolescent emotional closeness and adolescent feelings of being overly controlled by parents on the longitudinal associations between parent-driven communication efforts (i.e. parental behavioral control and solicitation of information from their adolescent), adolescent-driven communication efforts (i.e. adolescent disclosure and secrecy) and adolescent psychosocial functioning (i.e. emotional problems, conduct problems, delinquency, and wellbeing). We conducted a series of cross-lagged models controlling for adolescent gender and ethnicity using a two-wave Swedish longitudinal set of self-report data (N = 1515, 51% girls, M age = 13.0 and 14.3 years at T1 and T2, respectively). Multi-group analyses revealed that the negative links between T1 parental control and T2 adolescent delinquency, T1 parental solicitation and T2 adolescent conduct problems and delinquency, and T1 emotional problems and T2 adolescent disclosure were moderated by the family’s emotional climate. When the family’s emotional climate was positive, the parenting strategies had a more positive effect on adolescent psychosocial functioning, and adolescents with emotional problems communicated more openly with their parents. These findings suggest that the relational context in the family is an important protective factor and add specificity to the previously established role of parent-adolescent communication in adolescent psychosocial development. In terms of preventive interventions, strategies to enhance the family’s emotional climate should be considered prior to teaching specific parenting strategies.

  • 23.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skoog, Therése
    Göteborgs universitet.
    ”TRYGGA FÖRÄLDRAR”: Presentation av den programteoretiska analysen samt rekommendationer för programutveckling2019Report (Other academic)
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  • 24.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sverige.
    Skoog, Therése
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Aspects of the Parent–Adolescent Relationship and Associations With Adolescent Risk Behaviors Over Time2019In: Journal of family psychology, ISSN 0893-3200, E-ISSN 1939-1293, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents' actions and knowledge of adolescents' whereabouts play key roles in preventing risk behaviors in early adolescence, but what enables parents to know about their adolescents' activities and what links there are to adolescent risk behaviors, such as substance use and delinquent behavior, remain unclear. In this study,we investigated whether different aspects of the parent–adolescent relationship predict parental knowledge, and we examined the direct and indirect longitudinal associations between these aspects of the parent–dolescent relationship and adolescents' self-reported delinquent behavior and substance use. The participants were 550 parents and their adolescent children from two small and two midsized municipalities in Sweden. Parental data were collected when the adolescents were 13 years old (mean), and adolescent data on riskbehaviors were collected on two occasions, when they were 13 and 14 years of age (mean). Structural path analyses revealed that adolescent disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental control predicted parental knowledge, with adolescent disclosure being the strongest source of parental knowledge and the strongest negative predictor of adolescent risk behaviors. Parenting competence and adolescents' connectedness to parents were indirectly, through adolescent disclosure and parental solicitation and parental control, associated with substance use and delinquent behavior. Some paths differed for boys and girls. In conclusion, confident parenting and a close parent–adolescent relationship in which adolescent disclosure is promoted, seem protective of adolescent engagement in risk behaviors

  • 25.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Turner, Russell
    Department of Social Work, Gothenburg University, 405 30 Göteborg (SWE).
    Interplay between Parental Knowledge and Adolescent Inebriation, and Their Links to Parent–Child Relationships over Time2024In: Youth, E-ISSN 2673-995X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 163-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While parental knowledge of adolescents’ whereabouts is generally considered to be a key protective factor for adolescent alcohol use, the developmental links during adolescence are unclear. Focusing on within-family processes on a sample of Swedish early to late adolescents (n = 782; 49% female) over four waves of data, we (1) tested the interplay between parental knowledge and adolescent alcohol inebriation, (2) investigated whether changes over time in parental knowledge and adolescent inebriation were linked to the parent–child relationship, and (3) tested the moderating role of adolescent gender and SES on these potential links. The results from random intercept cross-lagged panel models showed that increases in parental knowledge predicted decreases in frequencies of adolescent inebriation the following year as well a more positive parent–child relationship over time. Increases in adolescent inebriation were predicted by less parental knowledge only in late adolescence. These links were not moderated by adolescent gender or SES. The results emphasize the importance of increasing parental knowledge of adolescent activities in order to reduce adolescent involvement in heavy alcohol use as well as the importance of parent–child closeness.

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  • 26.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Zietz, Susannah
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Bacchini, Dario
    niversity of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    NICHD & UNICEF, New York, NY (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Zhuhai (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno (KEN).
    Junla, Daranee
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    niversity of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA 7 Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA (USA) King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (SAU).
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad de San Buenaventura, Bogotá (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Parenting, Adolescent Sensation Seeking, and Subsequent Substance Use: Moderation by Adolescent Temperament2023In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 1235-1254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although previous research has identified links between parenting and adolescent substance use, little is known about therole of adolescent individual processes, such as sensation seeking, and temperamental tendencies for such links. To testtenets from biopsychosocial models of adolescent risk behavior and differential susceptibility theory, this study investigatedlongitudinal associations among positive and harsh parenting, adolescent sensation seeking, and substance use and testedwhether the indirect associations were moderated by adolescent temperament, including activation control, frustration,sadness, and positive emotions. Longitudinal data reported by adolescents (n = 892; 49.66% girls) and their mothers fromeight cultural groups when adolescents were ages 12, 13, and 14 were used. A moderated mediation model showed thatparenting was related to adolescent substance use, both directly and indirectly, through sensation seeking. Indirectassociations were moderated by adolescent temperament. This study advances understanding of the developmental pathsbetween the contextual and individual factors critical for adolescent substance use across a wide range of cultural contexts.

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  • 27.
    Linden, Charlotte
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skoog, Therese
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Goteborg (SWE).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Raising teenage children in disadvantaged neighbourhoods: the experiences and challenges of immigrant mothers in Sweden2022In: Journal of Family Studies, ISSN 1322-9400, E-ISSN 1839-3543, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parenting is arguably the most critical factor in protecting teenagers from problem behaviours, such as delinquency and substance use. For immigrant mothers, however, the ability to care for their children might be negatively affected by challenges related to acculturation and area deprivation. The aim of this study was to raise this issue by examining parenting challenges and needs among immigrant mothers of teenagers living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Sweden. Such knowledge is crucial for society to be able to adequately support families in promoting their teenagers well-being. Based on an intersectional framework and qualitative interviews with 14 mothers, four themes related to challenges and needs emerged: structural challenges, cultural transition, psychosocial problems, and social support. The themes were highly intertwined and demonstrated substantial distress among immigrant mothers in relation to their parenting and protecting their children. Mothers’ were, therefore, highly engaged in parenting and expressed a desire and motivation to improve their parenting through social support. The introduction of culturally sensitive parenting support specifically aimed at this marginalized group of parents is encouraged.

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  • 28.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    CHILD Research Group, Jönköping University; Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Jönköping University; School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, SWE.
    Granlund, Mats
    CHILD Research Group, Jönköping University; Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Jönköping University; School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, SWE.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University.
    Augustine, Lilly
    CHILD Research Group, Jönköping University; Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Jönköping University; School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, SWE.
    Huus, Karina
    CHILD Research Group, Jönköping University; Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Jönköping University; School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, SWE.
    Short-term longitudinal participation trajectories related to domestic life and peer relations for adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental impairments2021In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 7, no 4, article id e06784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    With maturity and development, complexity in demands and roles change. As participation is often restricted in children with disabilities, this process might be delayed in adolescents. Investigating profiles of participation for adolescents with and without neurodevelopmental impairments could provide an understanding of which factors relate to high level of participation. The aim is to investigate trajectories of participation in everyday activities across clusters based on self-rated participation patterns in frequency of participation and perceived importance of activities related to domestic life and peer-related activities for adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental impairments.

    Methods and procedures

    A prospective person-based cohort study design.

    Outcomes and results

    Five typical trajectories were identified. Trajectories between clusters with high perceived involvement in peer relations were associated with sibling support and family communication. Self-reported neurodevelopmental impairments did not predict participation profiles at certain time points, nor movements between clusters when measuring self-reported attendance and importance in domestic life and in peer-related activities.

    Conclusion and implications

    Perceived sibling support and family communication are important for predicting typical trajectories across clusters in frequency of attendance and the perceived importance of domestic life and peer relations. Type of impairment was less important in predicting typical trajectories.

  • 29.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden, Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg (SWE).
    Enebrink, Pia
    Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Solna (SWE).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Stålnacke, Johanna
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Eninger, Lilianne
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Eichas, Kyle
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX (USA).
    Norman, Åsa
    Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Solna (SWE).
    Lindberg, Lene
    Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden, Center for Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Region Stockholm, Stockholm (SWE).
    Gull, Ingela Clausén
    Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Solna (SWE).
    Hau, Hanna Ginner
    Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Allodi, Mara Westling
    Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Sedem, Mina
    Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Study protocol for a non-randomized controlled trial of the effects of internet-based parent training as a booster to the preschool edition of PATHS®: Universal edition of the Parent Web2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 4, p. e0284926-e0284926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Well implemented, universal parental support is often effective in families with younger children, but research on their effects on families with adolescent children is scarce. In this study, a trial of the universal parent training intervention “Parent Web” in early adolescence is added to the social emotional learning intervention Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS®), completed in early childhood. The Parent Web is a universal online parenting intervention based on social learning theory. The intervention aims to promote positive parenting and family interaction through five weekly modules completed over 6–8 weeks.The main hypothesis is that participants in the intervention group will exhibit significant pre to post- intervention-related benefits relative participants in the comparison group.

    The aims of this study are: 1) provide Parent Web as a booster aimed at improving parenting support and practices at the transition into adolescence to a cohort of parents whose children have previously participated in preschool PATHS, and 2) examine the effects of the universal edition of Parent Web. The study has a quasi-experimental design with pre- and post-testing.The incremental effects of this internet-delivered parent training intervention are tested in parents of early adolescents (11–13 years) who participated in PATHS when 4–5 years old compared to a matched sample of adolescents with no prior experience of PATHS. The primary outcomes are parent reported child behavior and family relationships. Secondary outcomes include self-reported parent health and stress. The proposed study is one of the few trials to test the effects of universal parental support in families of early adolescents and will therefore contribute to the understanding of how mental health in children and young people can be promoted across developmental periods through a continuum of universal measures.

    Trial registration: Clinical trials.gov (NCT05172297), prospectively registered on December 29, 2021.

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  • 30.
    Olsson, Tina M.
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden;Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, (SWE).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Psychology, University of Stockholm, Stockholm, (SWE).
    Hollertz, Katarina
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Starke, Mikaela
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, (SWE).
    Skoog, Therése
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, (SWE).
    Advancing Social Intervention Research Through Program Theory Reconstruction2023In: Research on social work practice, ISSN 1049-7315, E-ISSN 1552-7581, p. 642-655, article id 104973152211499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Program theory reconstruction is an often-overlooked aspect of social intervention research. In this paper, we argue that intervention research benefits if the research design is informed by the specific intervention's program theory (i.e., the idea of how the intervention is supposed to lead to the intended outcomes). The purpose of this paper is to offer a comprehensive and accessible guide to program theory reconstruction in research on social interventions and to provide arguments as to how program theory reconstruction can be used to benefit intervention studies. First, we summarize what program theory is and its role in intervention research. Second, we provide a direct “how-to” for researchers, practitioners, and students who may be unfamiliar with the methods of program theory reconstruction but are interested in undertaking a program theory reconstruction. Finally, we conclude with how program theory reconstruction can benefit intervention research.

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  • 31.
    Skoog, Therese
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    The intertwined evolution of sexual harassment victimization and emotional problems among young people2022In: Journal of Social Issues, ISSN 0022-4537, E-ISSN 1540-4560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Associations between sexual-harassment victimization and emotional problems are well-established. Still, the nature of this association, including the temporal order of the construct as well as whether it plays out on the between- or within-individual level is far from being understood. The aim of this study was to examine reciprocal links between sexual harassment victimization and emotional problems over time in early and mid-adolescence by separating between-individual from within-individual effects and by testing the moderating effect of ethnicity and gender. In the study, we made use of three waves of data with 1515 Swedish adolescents (50.6% girls, age 12.59 years at T1). Cross-lagged within-individual analyses showed that sexual harassment and emotional problems were related in a transactional manner. Gender, but not ethnicity, moderated the associations. The associations differed in early and mid-adolescence, perhaps because of normative school transitions. The findings have high theoretical value as it is on the within-individual level that the causal processes between being sexually harassed and experiencing emotional problems unfold. The study makes a unique contribution to the literature on sexual harassment and mental health among young people by revealing transactional associations on the within-individual level during a critical period for psychological and sexual development.

  • 32.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Jönköping University.
    Role of Pubertal Timing in the Development of Peer Victimization and Offending From Early- to Mid-Adolescence2021In: Journal of Early Adolescence, ISSN 0272-4316, E-ISSN 1552-5449, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 5-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used latent growth curve analysis to extend research on associations between early puberty and adverse peer relations by examining the role of pubertal timing in the developmental trajectories of peer victimization and offending from early- to mid-adolescence. We made use of three-wave longitudinal data collected annually from a cohort of Swedish adolescents (N = 1,515, 51% girls, X¯¯¯X¯age at T1 = 13.0 years). The results revealed negative developmental trends for peer victimization and offending. Early pubertal timing was linked to higher initial levels and a steeper decrease of peer victimization and offending. The only effect of pubertal timing that differed between the genders was that the initial level of offending was stronger for boys than girls. In conclusion, the negative impact of early pubertal timing on peer victimization and offending occurs in the early stages of adolescence and disappears thereafter.

  • 33.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology, Goteborg.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    The role of relational support in the longitudinal links between adolescent sexual harassment victimization and psychological health2021In: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 1368-1380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The links between sexual harassment victimization and aspects of psychopathology are well-established in adolescent research, but whether sexual harassment victimization undermines positive aspects of psychological health and the moderating role of relational support in the link between sexual harassment victimization and psychological ill-health remains unknown. Using a cross-lagged model, we examined (a) the bidirectional and longitudinal links between sexual harassment victimization and adolescent psychological health (emotional problems and well-being) and (b) the moderating role of relational support from parents, teachers, and peers (best friends and classmates) in the link between sexual harassment victimization and adolescent psychological health. We used two waves of self-reported data (separated by 1 year) from 676 Swedish adolescents (50% female; mean age = 13.85 years at the point of first data collection). Controlling for the effects of gender and subjective socioeconomic status, the cross-lagged model revealed that sexual harassment predicted emotional problems positively and well-being negatively. Moreover, well-being predicted sexual harassment negatively. Relational support from classmates moderated the link in the direction from sexual harassment victimization to emotional problems. Relational support did not moderate the link to well-being. The findings provide new and important insights into the role of sexual harassment victimization in adolescent psychological adjustment and potential approaches to intervention.

  • 34.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, PO Box 500, 405 30, Göteborg (SWE).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Study protocol for a mixed-design evaluation of self-assured parents2022In: Public Health in Practice, ISSN 2666-5352, Vol. 3, article id 100270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Immigrant parents of adolescents experience challenges in their role as parents in the new country and express a need for parental support. Still, they are underrepresented in existing parenting programs and when they do attend, their parenting practices improve less than what they do among native parents. Self-assured parents (SAP; Swe. Trygga Föräldrar) targets immigrant parents living in deprived areas in Sweden who worry about their adolescents’ adjustment. This study’s purposes are to examine if SAP is a feasible intervention in Swedish municipalities and if SAP is effective in reaching its aims, namely to promote parental self-efficacy and parent-adolescent communication and to reduce parents’ worries in the target group. Methods: SAP will be evaluated when implemented by social workers in three Swedish municipalities using a culturally-informed mixed design procedure. Parents will be recruited to the program by local social workers. Groups leaders will be interviewed, observed, and they will fill out self-reports to measure implementation quality, including fidelity and acceptability. A group of parents will be interviewed to better understand their perceived challenges and needs in their parenting in Sweden and their experience of participating in SAP. An interrupted time series design with three measurements before, two measurements during, and two measurements after the intervention has ended will be employed using self-reports of parental self-efficacy, parent-child communication, and parents’ worries. Informed consent will be collected from all study participants. Discussion: Immigrant parents living in deprived areas is an understudied and marginalized population. There is a lack of culturally-informed, evidence-based parenting programs aimed at this group in Sweden. The need for specifically developed programs for immigrant parents living in deprived areas with teenage children, has been voiced by both immigrant parents themselves and the Swedish government. Thus, this study will contribute not only to the scientific literature, but also to social service practice and potentially policy making. © 2022 The Authors

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