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  • 1.
    Hallberg, Jonas
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. .
    Adolescents in a Digital Everyday Environment2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis is to examine different aspects of Swedish adolescents’ everyday environment in a digital world. Drawing on ecological and psychosocial developmental theories I will discuss social, sexual, and biological aspects of the Internet as an everyday environment, an environment in which most adolescents spend a great deal of time. The thesis comprises four studies, all examining different aspects of the developmental stage of adolescence. Study I focused primarily on the extent to which adolescents encounter explicit online content, such as pornographic, violent, and/or hateful material, and how they react to it. What feelings are associated with explicit online content? And how do adolescents deal with those feelings? In study I we analyzed questionnaire data collected from 226 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 15 (47% girls and 53% boys). In line with other studies on the subject, the results showed that many Swedish adolescents are exposed either intentionally or unintentionally to explicit online content. Adolescents in this study showed surprisingly low emotional response to their exposure to explicit content. Their coping strategies center on personal agency, with most choosing to avoid or block unwelcome content rather than turn to parents or siblings for support and advice. Almost no significant gender differences were found in the choice of coping strategies, except that young men were more likely to avoid a site than were young women. Study II focused on the association between various parental and child factors and the parents’ attitudes toward adolescents’ online sexual activities. The study was based on questionnaire data collected from parents (78% mothers) and adolescents (54% girls) in 496 families. Results showed that parental attitudes toward adolescents’ offline and online sexual activities are closely related, although parents are more permissive in the offline setting. Parents’ attitudes toward online sexuality are not only correlated with their attitudes toward sexuality in traditional settings, but also by their preferences on the Internet. Parental attitudes were found to differ by the sex of the parent and the sex and age of the child. The link between fathers’ attitudes and adolescents’ online sexual activities was mediated by parental rules, suggesting that communication is part of the transmission of values. The focus of study III was on the link between adolescent boys’ pubertal timing and their offline and online romantic and sexual activities. The study was based on questionnaire data obtained from 142 early adolescent Swedish boys. Participants reported on stagenormative (physical) and peer-normative aspects of pubertal timing, and on offline and online romantic and sexual activities. Both aspects of pubertal timing were related to romantic and sexual activity offline, but only the stage-normative measure was linked to sexual activities online. In study IV the focus was on the relationship between sexual and romantic activity in a traditional offline context and similar activities online. Longitudinal questionnaire data were obtained from 440 adolescents over three years. Results revealed that both offline and online sexual activity increased over time within the group. We found that results for girls showed a somewhat larger effect, indicating that the link between offline and online sexual activity is largest within the female group. Results also revealed a small but significant increase in the slope for participation in offline sexual activity with online sexual activity as a predictor – but only for boys – indicating that the link between online and offline sexual activity (i.e., the other way around) only exists within the male group. Thus, as boys’ participation in sexual activity increases online, so it also does offline. The article concludes that adolescents’ romantic and sexual activities online are tied to their physical, offline equivalent and so the Internet can be regarded as an important context for sexual development. Taken together, the individual studies suggest that The Internet, as an everyday environment is linked to several aspects of the developmental phase of adolescence. Further studies should continue to explore the effect of the Internet on adolescents’ developmental tasks.

  • 2.
    Hallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy. Department of Psychology University of Gothenburg.
    Hwang, Philip
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. University of Gothenburg.
    Swedish adolescents’ exposure to pornographic, violent, and hateful content online.In: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Hallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Karppinen, Nina
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics.
    Löytynoja, Leena
    University West, Department of Economics and Informatics.
    Livsstil på webben: semiotisk analys av marknadsföring på Internet2004Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree)Student thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 4.
    Hallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Lönn, Ann-Sofe
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies.
    Media och dess inverkan: exponering av idealiserade könsroller och dess inverkan på unga människor2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact that idealised body images found in media have on the body-image and wellbeing of young men and women. The study was carried out using questionnaires based on the BAQ and HAD scales to examine the participants' views of themselves as well as symptoms of anxiety and depression. Time spent by the participants using different kinds of media, as well as their degree of social support, was used with the purpose of examining relations and differences in body-image between men and women. The questionnaire contained advertising images to examine whether short time exposure had any impact on the participants. In order to determine this, one half of the questionnaires contained idealised body-images, whilst the other half contained images without human objects. The results showed a clear difference between men and women. Women had a more negative body-image than that of men. There was also a clear relation between the level of anxiety and depression symptoms to be found. Participants with higher levels of depression and anxiety often had a more negative body-image. In the case the relation between of short time exposure and body-image, no significant relations were found, which indicates that the participants\2019 body-image and levels of anxiety and depression thus seem to be similar both before and after the study was conducted.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 5.
    Hallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy. Department of Psychology University of Gothenburg.
    Skoog, Therese
    Center for Developmental Research, School of Law , Psychology, and Social Work, Örebro University , Örebro , Sweden.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Adolescents’ Sexual Activity Offline and Online: A Longitudinal StudyIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Skoog, Therese
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Hallberg, Jonas
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Boys’ Pubertal Timing Measured on the Pubertal Development Scale is Linked to Online Sexual Activities2013In: International Journal of Sexual Health, ISSN 1931-7611, E-ISSN 1931-762X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 281-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explored the link between boys’ pubertal timing and offline and online romantic and sexual activities using a sample of 142 Swedish early adolescent boys. Boys reported on two aspects of pubertal timing, a stage-normative (measured by five indicators of physical development related to puberty) and a peer-normative, and on offline and online romantic and sexual activities. Both aspects of pubertal timing was related to being romantically and sexually active offline, but only the stage-normative measure was linked to corresponding activities online. Thus, the implications of stage-normative pubertal timing on sexual activities seem to extend to online contexts.

  • 7.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Hallberg, Jonas
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, Centre for Developmental Research.
    Parental attitudes and young people’s online sexual activities2015In: Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning, ISSN 1468-1811, E-ISSN 1472-0825, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 129-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental attitudes towards young people’s sexuality in traditional (i.e. non-online media) settings have been associated with young people’s sexual activities. In this study, we explored the association between key parent and youth characteristics and parental attitudes towards young people’s online sexual activities. We also examined the association between young people’s self-reported online sexual activities and parents’ attitudes. Questionnaires were completed by parents and young people in 496 families. Parents’ attitudes towards young people’s offline and online sexual activities were closely related, although parents are more accepting in an offline setting. Parents’ attitudes towards online sexuality are related to their sexual attitudes and their preferences with regard to the Internet. Parents’ attitudes differ depending on the sex of the parent and the sex and age of the child. The link between parents’ attitudes and young people’s online sexual activities appears to be mediated by parental rules.

1 - 7 of 7
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