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  • 1.
    Forsgren Gebring, Susanne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Forsman, Berit
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, undergraduate level. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Working with Manchester Triage-job satisfaction in nursing2012In: Montreal 2012 International Biomedical & Nursing Forum, Sept 27-28, Program & Abstract Book, Montreal, 2012, p. 1-1Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Forsgren Gebring, Susanne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Forsman, Berit
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, undergraduate level. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Carlström, Eric
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Working with Manchester triage: job satisfaction in nursing2014In: International Emergency Nursing: Oral abstracts – 1st Global Conference on Emergency Nursing & Trauma Care: Dublin, Ireland, 18–21 September 2014, Elsevier, 2014, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 254-254Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This study covers nurses' job satisfaction during triage at emergency departments in Western Sweden. Method: Data were collected from 74 triage nurses using a questionnaire containing 37 short form open questions. The answers were analysed descriptively and by measuring the covariance. Two open questions were analysed by content analysis. Results: The results showed a high degree of job satisfaction (88%). Triage as a method, the interesting nature of the work, and a certain freedom in connection with the triage tasks contributed to job satisfaction (R2 = 0.40). The nurses found their work interesting and stimulating, although some reported job dissatisfaction due to a heavy workload and lack of competence. Most of the nurses thought that Manchester Triage System (MTS) was a clear and straightforward method but in need of development. One result from the content analysis was difficulties in decision-making during the assessment of patients with multiple diseases. Since this patient group had increased in number, greater demands were placed on the nurses' competence. Conclusions: The rational modelling structure by which the triage method is constructed is unable to distinguish all the parameters that an experienced nurse takes into account. When the model is allowed to take precedence over experience, it can be of hindrance and contribute to certain estimates not corresponding with the patient's needs. The participants requested regular exercises solving and discussing patient scenarios, which can contribute to develop the instrument.

  • 3.
    Forsman, Berit
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, undergraduate level. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Forsgren Gebring, Susanne
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, undergraduate level. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Carlström, Eric
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Nurses working with Manchester triage: The impact of nursing experience on patient safety2012In: Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal, ISSN 1574-6267, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 100-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There is in Sweden an ongoing debate about the extent to which the practice of triage contributes to patient safety. This paper reports the findings of a study of nurses’ perceptions of the impact of experience and safety of the Manchester Triage System (MTS) within emergency departments in Western Sweden.

    Methods

    Data was collected from 74 triage nurses using a questionnaire containing 37 short form questions of Likert-type, analyzed descriptively and measured the covariance. Data was also collected with two open questions by using the critical incident technique and content analysis.

    Results

    The results described that the combination of the MTS method, the nurses’ experience and organizational factors accounted for 65% of patient safety. The study indicated that nurses’ experience contributed to higher patient safety than the model itself. A standardized assessment model, like MTS, can rarely capture all possible symptoms, as it will always be constrained by a limited number of keywords and taxonomies. It cannot completely replace the skills an experienced nurse develops over many years in the profession.

    Conclusions

    The present study highlights the value of triage nurse's experience. The participants considered experience to contribute to patient safety in emergency departments. A standardized triage model should be considered as additional support to the skills an experienced nurse develops.

  • 4. Hansson, Anders
    et al.
    Larsson, Lena G
    Närhälsan, FoU Primärvård, Västra Götalandsregionen och NU-akademin.
    Svensson, Ann
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Alsén, Pia
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, undergraduate level.
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Forsman, Berit
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Vem tar bollen?: går vården för de mest sjuka äldre att förbättra?2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund Flera svenska rapporter visar att de mest sjuka äldre ofta far illa på grund av bristande samordning och oklar ansvarsfördelning mellan olika behandlingsinstanser. Primärvården, hemtjänsten och den kommunala hemsjukvården anses i otillräcklig omfattning ta över ansvaret efter utskrivningen av de sjuka äldre från sjukhuset. Svenska erfarenheter stämmer väl med vad man funnit i flera internationella studier: sjukvården är illa rustad för att möta de mest sjuka äldres komplexa behov av vård och omsorg.

  • 5.
    Hansson, Anders
    et al.
    University Health Care Research Centre, Region Örebro County; Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Academy of Sahlgrenska, Institute of Medicine, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ann
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Larsson, Lena G.
    University of Gothenburg, Academy of Sahlgrenska, Institute of Medicine, Sweden.
    Forsman, Berit
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Alsén, Pia
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Flawed communications: Health professionals’ experience of collaboration in the care of frail elderly patients2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 680-689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Frail elderly patients who have multiple illnesses do not fare well in modern health care systems, mainly due to a lack of care planning and flawed communication between health professionals in different care organisations. This is especially noticeable when patients are discharged from hospital. The aim of this study was to explore health care professionals’ experience of obstacles and opportunities for collaboration. Methods: Health professionals were invited to participate in three focus groups, each consisting of a hospital physician, a primary care physician, a hospital nurse, a primary care nurse, a municipal home care nurse or an assistant officer, a physical or occupational therapist and a patient or a family member representative. These individual people were then asked to discuss the obstacles and opportunities for communication between themselves and with the patients and their relatives when presented with the case report of a fictitious patient. Content analysis was used to identify categories. Results: Several obstacles were identified for effective communication and care planning: insufficient communication with patients and relatives; delayed collaboration between care-givers; the lack of an adequate responsible person for care planning; and resources not being distributed according to the actual needs of patients. The absence of an overarching responsibility for the patient, beyond organisational borders, was a recurring theme. These obstacles could also be seen as opportunities. Conclusions: Obstacles for collaboration were found on three levels: societal, organisational and individual. As health care professionals are well aware of the problems and also see solutions, management for health care should support employees’ own initiatives for changes that are of benefit in the care of frail elderly patients with multiple illnesses.

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