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  • 1.
    Alverbratt, Catrin
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Specialist Nursing programme. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Implementation of a New Working Method in Psychiatric Care2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The implementation of evidence-based methods in hospital settings is challenging and multifaceted. There are several different factors that may affect implementation processes, of which the organisational culture may be one. It is well known that conservative organisational culture can hinder implementations; accordingly, a mix of different organisational cultures is preferable. Aim: The aim of this thesis was to follow the implementation process of an ICF-based assessment tool regarding cultural differences associated with the implementation in a psychiatric clinic. As part of the project, an assessment tool based on the International classifi cation of functioning disability and health (ICF) was developed and implemented. Method: In Study I, three Swedish expert groups participated and analysis of inter-rater reliability was conducted through simulated patient cases. In Study II, data were collected through focus group interviews pre- and post-implementation of the ICF-based assessment tool; thereafter, data were analysed using directed content analysis guided by Normalization Process Theory (NPT). Data from 109 nursing staff who completed the organisational values questionnaire (OVQ) and resistance to change (RTC) were investigated, and the association between the OVQ and RTC was examined with regression analysis (Study III). Patients n=50 representing the intervention hospital and n=64 representing the control hospital answered the Empowerment scale (ES) and Quality in psychiatric care (QPC-IP) (n=45 from intervention hospital and n=64 from control hospital). Staff n=37 at the control hospital answered the OVQ which was presented as descriptive data (Study IV). Results: Inter-rater reliability of the ICF-based assessment tool (DLDA) displayed acceptable kappa values (Study I). The DLDA tool showed the potential for empowering patients. Furthermore, it was considered useful for dialogues, refl ection and for identifying patients’ strengths. Nonetheless, it was diffi cult to implement it in practice due to contributing factors such as time pressure, heavy workload, stress and lack of routine in using the tool (Study II). The intervention hospital was characterised by an organisational culture of trust, belongingness and fl exibility, i.e. a human relation culture. One ward (I.W.3), however, was not dominated by a human relation culture. This ward had an almost equal mix of different cultures (human relation, open system, internal processes and rational goal) (Study III). The results of Study IV were non-signifi cant; however, it indicated that intervention ward 3 proved to be the most prominent ward regarding patient participation and empowerment among the intervention group. The results suggest hospital wards with equal mix of different cultures is more successful than cultural polarisation. Conclusion: Only one of fi ve wards succeeded in implementing the DLDA successfully (ward 5). Ward number three was the most successful of the inpatient intervention wards. The intent of the DLDA method was considered to be good and its use in a psychiatric nursing context can provide structured support in order to improve the dialogue with the patient, but it was not used in practice in all the studied wards. The organisational culture of the intervention hospital was dominated by human relation properties, however with one exception, ward number three. The results tentatively show that organisational culture may affect outcomes of implementation processes. Consequently, it appears that an equal mix of different cultures are more auspicious than cultural polarisations. The results seems to confi rm previous research, where one ward with a balanced mix of different cultures succeeded best to implement DLDA, of the wards representing psychiatric inpatient care. Ward number three did also show the best results in terms of empowerment and patient participation of the intervention wards. Further research aims to continue developing and conducting psychometric testing of the DLDA tool. The DLDAs impact on patient assessed empowerment and patient participation requires studies on larger populations than the current study

  • 2.
    Alverbratt, Catrin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Specialist Nursing programme. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Berlin, Johan
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Åström, Sture
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Kauffeldt, Anders
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Carlström, Eric
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    A New Working Method in Psychiatric Care: the impact of implementation2016In: International Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 0190-0692, E-ISSN 1532-4265, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 295-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An equal mix of organizational cultures is important for a successful implementation process. The aim of this study was to examine the implementation of a new working method in psychiatric hospital wards, representing different cultural characteristics. Descriptive quantitative data were collected at two hospitals (intervention and control). The results revealed one ward characterized by a mix of organizational cultures. This ward, compared with other intervention wards, showed the best results regarding patient assessed empowerment and participation. The result shows tentatively that organizational culture may have an impact on the implementation processes.

  • 3.
    Alverbratt, Catrin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Carlström, Eric
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Åström, Sture
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture. Umeå universitet.
    Kauffeldt, Anders
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Berlin, Johan
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies.
    The process of implementing a new working method - a project towards change in a Swedish psychiatric clinic2014In: Journal of Hospital Administration, ISSN 1927-6990, E-ISSN 1927-7008, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 174-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The implementation of evidence-based methods in hospital settings is difficult and complex. The aim of the present study was to highlight the implementation process concerning a new working method, i.e. a new assessment tool, based on the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF), among psychiatric nursing staff on five participating wards at a Swedish county hospital. Descriptive, qualitative data were collected through focus group interviews pre- and post-implementation. Data were analysed using directed content analysis, guided by Normalization Process Theory (NPT). The results revealed that just one of the five participating wards met the criteria for a successful implementation process. The results confirm previous studies showing the difficulty of implementation. Although participants agreed with the intention of the model, they were reluctant to apply it in practice. The implementation process seemed to be influenced by factors such as: time pressure; heavy workload; stress; lack of routines in using the tool; lack of nursing staff; as well as cultural characteristics and resistance to change.

  • 4.
    Johansson, Catrin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Kullgren, Carina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Bador, Kourosh
    Agera KBT AB, Gothenburg; Center for Holistic Psychiatry Research (CHoPy), Mölndal (SWE).
    Kerekes, Nora
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Gender non-binary adolescents' somatic and mental health throughout 2020.2022In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, article id 993568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Non-binary gender adolescents are particularly vulnerable and more likely to be exposed to several socio-psychological difficulties and disorders. It is vital to discover and act on the vulnerabilities they encounter. The present study aims to describe the somatic and mental health, affect state, frequency of risk behaviors, victimization and negative psychosocial factors, as well as the personality profiles of non-binary adolescents. In this study the concept of gender non-binary is used and captured respondents who selected "neither of these" as their gender from the possible options (female/male/neither of these).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data was collected between September 2020 and February 2021 in Sweden, Morocco, Serbia, Vietnam, and the United States. The cross-sectional, retrospective study utilized the electronic version of the Mental and Somatic Health without borders (MeSHe) survey. From the over 5,000 responses of 15-19-year-old adolescents, 58 respondents identified as being non-binary, and built our study population. Their data was analyzed with descriptive statistic methods.

    RESULTS: Close to a fourth of adolescents identifying as non-binary reported the existence of at least one somatic disease. The most prevalent somatic disease was allergies. Almost one-third had suffered from pain either often or all the time in the past 12 months. The highest levels of perceived psychological distress were measured using obsessive-compulsive symptoms, depression, and interpersonal sensitivity. The average level of alcohol and drug use during the past 12 months was low. About 40% of non-binary adolescents reported having experienced physical abuse, and half of them experienced psychological abuse at some point in their lives. Seventeen percent reported living with adults with alcohol-use problems. Non-binary adolescents' personalities were found to be dominated by high scores in Openness, Neuroticism, and Agreeableness.

    CONCLUSION: This study presents a detailed biopsychosocial picture of a multinational sample of non-binary adolescents. Our study suggests that awareness and support are required from all fields of society, including family, school, healthcare, and educational institutions, for cis-normative culture to progress toward a greater understanding of and respect for gender diversity.

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  • 5.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Johansson, Catrin
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Portfoliometoden som en metod för arbetsintegrerat lärande2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Truong, Anh
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Alverbratt, Catrin
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Ekström, Anette
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. University of Skövde, Department of Nursing and Reproductive, Perinatal and Sexual Health, School of Health Sciences, Skövde (SWE).
    Antonsson, Helena
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå (SWE).
    Caring for Persons With Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behavior: Staff Experiences With a Web-Based Training Program2021In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 12, article id 580923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clear and effective communication is a prerequisite to provide help and support in healthcare situations, especially in health, and social care services for persons with intellectual disabilities, as these clients commonly experience communication difficulties. Knowledge about how to communicate effectively is integral to ensuring the quality of care. Currently, however, there is a lack of such knowledge among staff working in the disabilities sector, which is exacerbated by challenges in the competence provision in municipal health and social care services. Therefore, the aim of the study was to explore staffs' experience of web-based training in relation to their professional caring for persons with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior. The intention is to move toward well-evaluated and proven web-based training in order to contribute to competence provision in this specific context.

    Methods: Fourteen semi-structured interviews were carried out with individual staff members to gather data regarding their experiences with web-based training in relation to their profession. The collected data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis with a focus on both manifest and latent content.

    Results: The staff's experiences with the web-based training program were presented as a single main theme: "Web-based training for staff initiates a workplace learning process by promoting reflections on and awareness of how to better care for persons with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior." This theme contained three categories which are based on eight sub-categories.

    Conclusion and clinical implications: The benefits of web-based training for workplace learning could clearly be observed in the strengthening of professional care for persons with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior. Staff members claimed to have gained novel insights about how to better care for clients as well as about the importance of interactions in their encounters with clients. Professional teamwork is crucial to providing effective care for persons with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior. Hence, future research aimed at investigating the views of other healthcare professionals, such as registered nurses, is recommended to improve the competence provision within municipal health and social care services and thereby enhance the quality of care.

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    fulltext
  • 7.
    Truong, Anh
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Antonsson, Helena
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Johansson, Catrin
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR); Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Staff’s self-reported frequency and management difficulty of challenging behavior among persons with intellectual disabilities in connection with web-based training2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan, 2022, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 42-45Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Healthcare professionals, nationally and internationally, experience that exposure to persons withintellectual disabilities (ID) during education is often insufficient. Professionals within the sector urge enhancedtraining that will better prepare them for working with their clients. Providing care and support to persons with IDis complex and places high demands on the professionals such as knowledge about ID and cha llenging behaviors(CB) as well as communication and interaction. Earlier studies have shown that knowledge deficiencies in theseareas may prevent healthcare professionals from understanding their clients and their behaviors, particularly thosebehaviors considered to be challenging.However, staff working with persons with ID reported CB as a problem they could not always address in thedesired manner while performing their work duties. This predicament was shown to often generate stress, angerand powerlessness among staff, increasing the likelihood of burnout. Helping staff to better understand and bebetter prepared prior to meeting, communicating and interacting with persons with ID, especially concerningaddressing CB, could therefore help to establish and maintain a healthy work environment and sustainable workinglife.In this study, we investigated the impact of web-based training on the staff´s perception of the frequency andmanagement difficulties of CB among persons with ID in residential settings in Sweden. The training addressedthe topics ID and CB as well as communication and interaction and was offered to the staff working in theresidences. Since the basic assumption was that CB is a consequence of interrupted communication and interactionbetween staff and persons with ID, we hypothesized that by introducing web-based training focusing on ID andCB as well as communication and interaction, the frequency of CB and degree of management difficulty of CB indaily care would be reduced.Aim: To explore staff’s perceptions about CB among clients with ID in residential settings before and after a web -based training program, specifically addressing ID and CB as well as communication and interaction.Research questions1. Do staff report a lower frequency of CB among clients with ID in residential settings after the web -basedtraining?2. Do staff report a lower degree of management difficulty of CB among clients with ID in residential settings afterthe web-based training?

    Methods: A within-subjects study design was applied in which the participants were exposed to the treatment –in this case, web-based training – and measurements were made using the survey instrument “Checklist ofChallenging Behavior” (CCB) before and after exposure to examine any potential changes that occurred.Cluster sampling was conducted whereby 20 residential facilities were included. All staff in those residences wereoffered web-based training and invited to participate in this study.A total of 212 participants accepted the invitation to the survey by filling in CCB and accordingly systematicallyrate the frequency of CB among the clients and the own difficulty in managing these behaviors as perceived byparticipating staff. The CCB includes 41 items related to topographies of aggressive and other CB divided alongthe dimensions of physical violence/aggressive behavior, property destruction, miscellaneous behavior and mentalillness. The CCB was developed by Harris and Humphreys, who assessed the instrument’s content validity andinter-rater reliability. The researchers concluded that the instrument was a reliable indicator of the presence orabsence of CB. All measurements were based on five-point scale.43First, descriptive analysis was performed to summarize the characteristics of the sample. Central measurementswere presented as the mean and dispersion by standard deviation. As the data were represented on an ordinal scale,the Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine whether a lterations existed between the responses before andafter training concerning the frequency of CB and management difficulty of these behaviors.Considering the number of calculations performed, a significance value of p < 0.05 was established. In addition,p-values < 0.1 were interpreted as tendencies. In order to contribute to indications of practical significance, acorrelation coefficient r was calculated by converting the z-values, as described by Pautz and Olivier, of those subitems with significant values. According to the rule of thumb for interpretation of Cohen’s r: 0.1 = small effectsize, 0.3 = medium effect size and 0.5 = large effect size.

    Results: The demographic description revealed that, of those who provided information about their job ty pe andlevel of education, approximately 87% worked as support assistants in the facilities, and most had completedsecondary education. The analysis showed that, after training, staff self-reported a significantly lower degree offrequency on the dimension of property destruction, on the sub-item “damaging others’ clothes, furniture, or otherobjects”. Similarly, a significant difference was revealed in the dimension of mental illness. In addition, regardingthe management difficulty of CB, the analysis revealed that, after training, staff self-reported a significantly lowerdegree of management difficulty on all sub-items on the dimension of property destruction. However, the effectsizes were considered small. Apart from that, the calculations also showed tendencies towards significance on anumbers of sub-items e.g biting, throwing things at people, breaking windows and absconding.

    Discussions: The observed reduction in the frequency of CB after the web-based training may have been due toenhanced knowledge and understanding by staff of CB among their clients, which could have consequently ledthem to no longer consider these behaviors as challenging. In earlier research, it was found that the amount ofknowledge possessed by staff could act as a significa nt predictor of their behavioral responses to CB. Accordingly,it is reasonable to suspect that the reduced management difficulty of CB as perceived by staff may have been dueto their enhanced knowledge of such behaviors, which impacted their views and behavioral responses to CB.Considering the formal education the majority of the staff have and the complexity of the job within this sector, itwould be unreasonable to expect all of the staff to have the capability to perform all job duties without sufficientopportunities to expand their knowledge and improve their skills with the support of the relevant healthcareorganization. This aspect has been equally emphasized to promote a healthy and sustainable workplace from theview of Work-Integrated Learning.

    Conclusion: Considering the complexity of meeting the needs of persons with ID, in addition to job -specificknowledge, collaboration with multi-professional teams is also recommended. As such, routinely training tosupport Work-Integrated Learning should be offered to all professionals involved in caring for individuals withintellectual disabilities to reinforce social sustainability in the sector.

  • 8.
    Truong, Anh
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Department of Nursing and Reproductive, Perinatal and Sexual Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde.
    Antonsson, Helena
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå (SWE).
    Johansson, Catrin
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Staff’s self-reported frequency and management difficulty of challenging behaviour among persons with intellectual disabilities in connection with web-based training2022In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Providing care and support to persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) requires in-depth knowledge about ID and challenging behaviour (CB) as well as communication and interaction. Knowledge deficiencies in these areas may prevent staff from understanding their clients and their behaviours, particularly those behaviours considered to be challenging. The aim of this study was to explore staff’s perceptions about CB among clients with ID in residential settings before and after a web-based training programme using the survey instrument ‘Checklist of Challenging Behaviour’ (CCB). The CRe-DEPTH guideline has served as a guide in this study. Upon completion of the training, staff perceived a reduced frequency of CB as well as reduced management difficulty of CB among clients. As such, training should routinely be offered to all staff in residential settings, but also healthcare professionals in general responsible for caring for clients exhibiting CB to ensure, improve and reinforce the quality of care and support provided to them.

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  • 9.
    Truong, Anh
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Johansson (Alverbratt), Catrin
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Antonsson, Helena
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Caring for Persons With Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behavior: Staff Experiences With a Web-Based Training Program2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 39-41Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The quality of care for persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) is affected by many factors, including the knowledge of the professionals. Educational training in, for example, general communication was identified as a priority issue among healthcare professionals working with persons with IDs, as it is the basis for a better understanding of the clients and their behavior, which can otherwise be perceived as problematic and challenging. Challenging behaviors (CB) have been reported by professionals as problems they frequently witness or experience and/or struggle to manage in the daily work. Yet they do not always have access to such training nor to the resources needed to practice skillful communication when supporting persons with IDs. In addition, challenges concerning the competence provision in the sector are likely to contribute to further deterioration of the situation.

    Earlier research has shown that web-based training for staff within healthcare settings can generate good results. In addition to being able to participate during work hours, staff can also overcome access issues in the delivery of training. With this study, we hope to advance an existing web-based training program with the intention to move toward well-evaluated and proven training in order to contribute to competence provision in the context of health and social care.

    Aim: To explore staff experiences with a web-based training program in relation to their professional care for persons with ID and CB. 

    Methods: Staff working in residences for people with ID within municipal health and social care were offered the web-based training. In total 20 residences in a medium-size city in Sweden were included in this study. After completed training, fourteen semi-structured interviews were carried out with individual staff members to gather data regarding their experiences with web-based training in relation to their profession. The informants constituted of 11 women and 3 men, aged 27–55. Of the nine informants who had received upper secondary school education, five had specialized in the care of persons with IDs. More precisely, one informant had received higher vocational education, whereas the remaining four had received university education in the social sciences. The work experience with persons with IDs ranged from 8 to 30 years. The interviews were based on two open -ended questions: “What is your experience of attending the web-based training?” and “What do you think about the web-based training in relation to your daily work with persons with IDs and CB?” Follow-up questions were directed in such a way as to encourage the staff to freely share their experiences. 

    This study has an inductive approach. The collected data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis as described by Graneheim and Lundman (2014). 

    Results: The staff’s experiences with the web-based training program in relation to their professional care for persons with IDs and CB were presented as a single main theme: “Web-based training for staff initiates a workplace learning process by promoting reflections on and awareness of how to better care for persons with IDs and CB”. This theme contained three categories: “Web-based training provides freedom but also requires responsibility, both of which affect the learning outcome”, “The learning process contributes to generating insights about caring” and “The mutual impact of training and the opinions of staff about learning for the care of persons with IDs and CB”. These categories were based on eight sub-categories.

    Overall, the staff claimed that they had gained novel insights into the profession and into the caring process for the clients. Opinions about clients and CB changed somewhat, and the staff was inspired to adopt new ways of working which ultimately benefited interactions with the client. At the same time, requests were made for additional group discussions, and the desire for better planning to enhance learning among the staff was expressed.

    Discussion: In this study, web-based training seemed to have had a stimulating effect on workplace learning. Sharing self-reflections with group members in addition to individual study is essential for stimulating and consequently extracting knowledge from training. In the preparation of the training, close attention was paid to how to enable both individuals and social processes in learning but, judging from the results, further developments should focus on optimizing the effect of social interaction.

    Additionally, organizational support appears to be relevant for improving learning outcomes. However, prior research has shown significant differences in perceived workplace learning support from different occupational groups. Higher-status occupations offer a workplace environment that is more conducive to learning than that of lower-status occupations.These aspects must be addressed and overcome to fully develop the competence provision and counteract potential negative consequences in terms of job satisfaction and well-being among professionals working with persons with IDs.

    Conclusions and clinical implications: Our findings illustrate the complexity of providing staff training in the workplace through a web-based training program. Beyond the benefits of web-based training for workplace learning, some challenges also emerged. We conclude that web-based training, workplace organization, and individuals’ opinions each have an important impact on the learning outcome. To reach the best possible outcome, however, resources need to be invested in all three parts concurrently. This knowledge can contribute to the development of competence provision in municipal health and social care services more generally, where similar circumstances in terms of a notable downward trend in competence provision prevail, a pattern that could have negative impact on the welfare of the professionals.In addition to knowledge, cooperation in both healthcare and social services was also highlighted to improve care for persons with IDs and CB. In order to better meet their needs, professional teamwork is critically important. Hence, future research should investigate the views of other professionals e.g. nurses regarding education and competence development. This approach would enrich our knowledge and understanding of how the competence provision could be enhanced in this context to contribute to social sustainability in the sector. 

  • 10.
    Truong, Anh
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Winman, Thomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Johansson, Catrin
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    A Work-Integrated intervention in health and social care: Professionals´ experiences of joint education2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 97-98Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    Worldwide, educational interventions are carried out continuously as an ongoing activity linked to competence provision and development of the organization. In follow-up and evaluation of the interventions, the result, i.e., the effect of the intervention, has usually been the main concern whereas the mechanism behind the operation of the intervention is often obscured. The aim of this evaluation study is to contribute knowledge to the field of intervention research regarding aspects that should be considered in designing a learning-supportive educational intervention. Such knowledge would increase the likelihood that experiences generated from the intervention are implemented in the daily undertaking.

    Accordingly, knowledge within intervention research increased significantly since the field expanded rapidly in the past decade. However, critical voices have been raised regarding aspects that are often overlooked in the field and highlighted the tendency that intervention studies frequently focus on the meth ods used to test the intervention whereas the rigor of intervention development and design has not received the attention it deserves. When it comes to educational intervention, concerning the aforementioned viewpoint, the process of learning cannot be lef t out. Studying learning processes and studies in designing education to support learners´ learning process is one of the main areas of interests in Work-Integrated Learning (WIL), particularly in the matter of learning in relation to working life, where the goal is to help the learners to integrate knowledge from education into practice. From the perspective of WIL, the social dimension has a certain influential effect on learning, which should be taken into account. A key word in this dimension is interaction. 

    Nationally and internationally, within health care, recurring training, intraprofessional and/or interprofessional is given aiming to improve professionals' knowledge, attitudes, confidence levels and practices in care, in addition, to enhancing the collaboration to safeguard the patient safety and the quality-of-care. In Sweden, one area that has been debated and discussed regarding competence and knowledge scarcity among professionals and urged for measures to support competence provision, is health and social care for people with intellectual disabilities. In this context, the knowledge that can be applied in development and design of effective educational intervention appears to be almost zero. We are in the opinion that this knowledge gap should be a matter of concern and an area that needs to be explored.

    Methods:

    Data was gathered by way of semi structured interviews. Qualitative inductive analysis was applied using qualitative content analysis of Graneheim and Lundman.Totally, 24 individual interviews were conducted with the participating professionals. With guidance of the checklist COREQ, our ambition is to make the research process in this study as transparent as possible which further increases the replicability.

    Results:

    By exploring pa rticipants' experiences of the different components in an intervention with regard to their learning and knowledge development, both individual and of the group, in relation to their profession, finding answers to “what works” and “how it works”. Thereby gaining understanding and knowledge that can be applied in the design of future interventions and consequently, fill the existing knowledge gap.

    Ethics:

    Approval was obtained from the Swedish Ethical Review Authority, Dnr 35 517 for the project as whole. In addition, a supplemental application to phase two has made and is approved, on September 21, 2021, Dnr 2021-0460.

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