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  • 1.
    Carlén, Urban
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Den ensamma löparens kollektiva meningsskapande på nätet: en förändrad löparkultur2016In: Idrottsforskaren informationsorgan för SVEBI, Svensk förening för beteendevetenskaplig idrottsforskning, no 3, p. 50-64Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln är indelad i tre övergripande avsnitt. Det första avsnittet är baserad på teorier om löpning utifrån skilda vetenskapliga studier om löpare och deras sociala praktiker med eller utan digitala verktyg, sociala medier och internet, samt hur forskning om löpare genomförts tidigare. Vidare presenteras den empiriska studiens inplacering som en social praktik bestående av ensamma löpare som deltar med stöd av ett socialt nätverk. Därefter följer ett andra avsnitt om resultatet från den empiriska studien vilken presenteras i form av övergripande berättelser om de tre teman som framkom i undersökningen. Artikeln avslutas med ett tredje avsnitt vilken utgör egna reflektioner.

  • 2.
    Carlén, Urban
    University of Gothenburg, University of Skövde.
    Letter from Urban Carlen: Online Learning Communities revisited: a critique of ‘the rationale of OLC2014In: International Journal of Web Based Communities, ISSN 1477-8394, E-ISSN 1741-8216, ISSN 1741-8216 (online), Vol. 10, no 2, p. 5p. 142-146Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    OLC revisited: a critique of ‘the rationale of OLC’ as creating a future vision of web-based communities – looking back on the research of web-based communities (WBC), which has been published in IJWBC for a period of ten years, it provides an impressing compilation of both depth and extent of scientific knowledge, and a fascinating rapid and exceptional development of web-based tools, and not least, a deepened understanding of the increasing digital competencies among people in networked societies. In my capacity as one of many researchers who have followed the progress of the journal, I am honored to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of International Journal of Web Based Communities(IJWBC) by writing a letter to you about my vision of the future research field. My vision of WBC takes its departure in a socio-cultural perspective that deals with three intertwined areas; the research approach, the development of tools, and themes of digital competence that concern online participation. My suggestions of future research of WBC are founded within the interplay between individuals and collectives of people communicating and using various tools situated in social practices, which I consider requires further examination. But first, I would like to take the opportunity to briefly reflect upon the article ‘The rationale of online learning communities’, published in 2005, volume 1 number 3 (Carlén and Jobring, 2005). We used the term online as it offered a mix of communication forms rather than exploring web-based environments only. However, in this letter, I intend to revisit the text and give some critique that will generate ideas for the research carried out in the future.

  • 3.
    Carlén, Urban
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Löpning i det digitala samhället: en förändrad löparkultur2016In: Idrottsforskaren : informationsorgan för SVEBI, Svensk förening för beteendevetenskaplig idrottsforskning, ISSN 0348-9787, no 3, p. 30-49Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna populärvetenskapliga text kommer löpning som fysisk aktivitet att diskuteras och problematiseras utifrån vad som händer när allt fler löpare väljer att använda digitala verktyg och deltar i nätbaserade miljöer. Artikeln består av fyra sammanhängande avsnitt om löpningens sociala, kulturella och historiska dimensioner, användningen av sociala medier och internet, som en del i utvecklingenav en löparkultur, och som avslutas med egna reflektioner om den förändring som pågår i ett digitaliserat samhälle.

  • 4.
    Carlén, Urban
    et al.
    University of Skövde.
    Lindström, Berner
    Göteborg University.
    Design for Co-moderation in Online Learning Communities2012In: International Journal of Web Based Communities, ISSN 1477-8394, E-ISSN 1741-8216, ISSN 1477-8394 (print), Vol. 8, no 4, p. 408-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to generate implications for organising co-moderation within online learning communities (OLCs) in higher education. Data have been collected from a larger empirical study of a professional OLC in general medicine. By using a social perspective on learning, undertaken as a transactional approach, co-moderation can be understood in shared actions, independently of roles. Results indicate how conditions for organising co-moderation emerge as a collaborative affair, by shifting the focus away from the moderator role towards continual discussions on how to participate online. The implications guide organisers and participants of OLCs to create co-moderation that maintains engagement. As students make progress in learning and online participation, they need to continually negotiate their involvement in such a way that further realises the contract created at the beginning of the course.

  • 5.
    Carlén, Urban
    et al.
    University of Skövde.
    Lindström, Berner
    Göteborg University.
    Informed design of educational activities in online learning communities2012In: Informed Design of Educational Technologies in Higher Education: Enhanced Learning and Teaching / [ed] Anders D. Olofsson, & J. Ola Lindberg, Hershey, Pennsylvania: IGI Global, 2012, p. 118-134Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this chapter is to sketch design implications for organizing online educational activities in higher education that will intentionally engage medical students and professionals in the field together. When using an online forum, which is already embedded in the work practice, participants can build an online learning community (OLC) to discuss specialist subjects. This chapter is based on findings derived from a larger case study about participation in a professional OLC in general medicine. The proposal of an educational activity will complement numerous online activities with a more structured form of learning. As long as participants are challenged in learning about the specialist subject, they will contribute to the collective account. Online participation can be one way to foster students in becoming doctors. Together with qualified professionals, medicine students can create and sustain relationships over their professional careers.

  • 6.
    Carlén, Urban
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Exploring the role of digital tools in running: the meaning-making of user-generated data in a social networking site2017In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 18-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to examine how runners make meaning of digitaltools in the dialogues published on a social networking site (SNS) createdby and for runners who choose to run alone. The study explores the digitaldata generated by the runners using global positioning systems, such as howmany kilometres have been covered, the average pace, the geographicallocation, the total climb, health information related to pulse rate and thenumber of calories burned. Some runners share this kind of data whenpublishing postings on the SNS. The empirical data consists of publishedpostings of visual graphs and photographs with comments in threadsretrieved from the online archives. A transactional approach and practicalepistemology analysis are employed to focus on and analyse the meaningmakingprocesses that are located in the social practices that the runnerscreate when participating online. The participants make meaning of digitaltools (such as sport watches and associated apps) by: (1) sharing detailsabout their running performances, (2) signalling their presence in the socialnetwork of lone runners and (3) planning running events. Digital informationis primarily used to reinforce the runners’ identity formation. The meaningmakingof digital tools thus becomes a way of highlighting an individual’ssocial affinity to a runners’ collective. Surprisingly, lone runners do notuse the performance-related feedback and health information offered bythe digital tools to enhance their running progress when participating inthe SNS.

  • 7.
    Carlén, Urban
    et al.
    University of Skövde.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde.
    The Meaning of "Running" Online2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: An online community has been created by and for Swedish runners who choose to run alone. AIM: The aim of the study is to examine how lonesome runners create meaning in regard to digital tools in relation to running as it appears in online social networks. This study will explore how these runners adopt mobile applications when running alone to register information, based on Global Positioning Systems (GPS) that generate feedback such as “performed kilometres”, “average pace”, “location”, “total climb”, “pulse rate” and “calories burned”. Method: Data material consists of postings and comments in threads derived from the online social networks as analyzed in a transactional approach. The data is defined as small stories in order to highlight the planned, imminent kind of narrative that render them distinct in relation to the lengthy, monologic narrative accounts elicited in social science research interviews. Findings: The main theme in runners use of digital tools is to show others/fellow online participants their running performance. Minor themes appearing in the stories are the credibility of measured information and a sense of community based on geographical location. Conclusion: Digital tools are used foremost to reinforce the runner identity. Runners make meaning of digital information as a way to highlight their social belonging: even if they are running alone they are a part of a community sharing the same experience online. Surprisingly, these runners do not use the performance-related feedback and health information offered by digital tools to enhance their progress in training and competition.

  • 8.
    Carlén, Urban
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde.
    Understanding athlete's online participation: a ticket to qualitative research of online arenas in sport2017In: Digital qualitative research in sport and physical activity / [ed] Bundon, Andrea, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 59-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Nowé Hedvall, Karen
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Gärdén, Cecilia
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Ahlryd, Sara
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Michnik, Katarina
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Carlén, Urban
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Byström, Katriina
    Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Department of Archivistics, Library and Information Science, Oslo; Norway.
    Social media in serious leisure: themes of horse rider safety2017In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 22, no 4, article id 772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. The aim of this study is to gain insight into how issues of safety are discussed and understood by horse riders on social media. Safety issues are omnipresent in the leisure activity of horse riding. Social media affords user-generated content, which provide arenas for information interactions and informal discussions that complement more official arenas.

    Method. An extensive number of postings and comments were derived from selected social networking sites, blogs and web forums engaged in by Swedish horse riders.

    Analysis. An iterative, qualitative content analysis was conducted on the basis of analytical questions and emerging themes on rider safety. The analysis generated five themes that together portray rider safety as an issue in need of greater attention.

    Results. Safety issues are downplayed in social media dealing with horse riding. The findings show that safety for humans is given lower priority than the safety of horses. There is a tendency to disregard safety and to project personal experiences of fear onto the horse, and there is no agreement on what constitutes safety.

    Conclusion. The results highlight a renewed need for explicit attention to be paid to safety issues especially in riding schools, since safety remains elusive and negotiable in discussions in social media, and thus becomes a risk in itself. Participants try to emulate embodied knowledge (intentionally and unintentionally) through stories and series of pictures and film sequences. The lack of support for a corporeal information modality in social media generates uncertainty, which may distort the meanings and intentions latent in the conversations.

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