Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Galan, Nataliya
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    What happens after rapid growth?: A study of sustainable high-growth entrepreneurship in Sweden2016In: Academy of Management: Proceedings / [ed] John Humphreys, 2016, article id 16942Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurial high-growth firms contribute significantly to the economy by scaling up new innovative products, services, and business models as well as creating jobs and fostering economic growth. In this study we examine the incidence of sustainable high growth entrepreneurship in a sample of Swedish firms that have previously been experiencing rapid growth. We acknowledge growth as a multi-dimensional phenomenon by distinguishing between employee growth and sales growth. Overall, the statistical analysis suggests that the different growth trajectories shown by firms can be related to different industry life cycle positions. We also find differences related to the time that has passed since the firm were experiencing rapid growth. In addition, ex-gazelles operating in knowledge intensive sectors or with a higher degree of novelty in their market offer are not more likely to show a subsequent period of growth. Copyright © 2016, Academy of Management

  • 2.
    Galan, Nataliya
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Adjunct professors at professional service firms: Just links between the industry and the academy or…?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aims at contributing to the literature on university-industry relations by examining professional service firms’ motives and beneficial outcomes related to their involvement in relations with universities. As a study context a specific form of such relations – appointment of firms’ key employees as adjunct professors – is chosen. The study adopts a qualitative research strategy and relies mainly on collecting data via semi-structured interviews with both top managers and adjunct professors employed by five engineering consultancy firms operating in the construction industry in Sweden.

    Preliminary findings suggest that motives and benefits of professional service firms, related to engagement in this particular type of interactions with universities, differ from those which have been reported for manufacturing firms in university-industry relations literature. While stability seeking motives are major determinants for professional services to engage in such partnerships with universities, which is quite similar to previous evidence reported in the literature for manufacturing firms, professional service firms highpoint the significance of reciprocity and legitimacy motives, which have been reported to be of lower importance for manufacturing firms. When it comes to benefits, professional service firms seem to benefit substantially from engagement in such a partnership with universities, both in terms of tangible and intangible outcomes. The most significant outcomes are attributed to firms’ core capabilities development.

  • 3.
    Galan, Nataliya
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    " One foot in industry, the other in academia ": Why professional services want adjunct professors as employees?2018In: Baltic Journal of Management, ISSN 1746-5265, E-ISSN 1746-5273, Vol. 4, no 13, p. 433-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine professional service firms'€™ (PSFs) motives and benefits related to their engagement in knowledge transfer interactions with universities via their employees also acting as adjunct professors (APs).Design/methodology/approach The study adopts a qualitative approach relying mainly on data collected via semi-structured interviews with both top managers and APs employed by five engineering consultancies operating in Sweden. Findings The findings suggest that, while seeking stability is the major determinant of engagement in relations with universities via APs, PSFs highpoint the significance of reciprocity and legitimacy motives. The most substantial benefits appear to be related to firms’ access to academic research, core competencies and human resource development as well as marketing outcomes. Benefits are found to be dynamic in character with higher-order benefits being generated by low-order over time. Research limitations/implications The findings rely on a small sample of PSFs and should be verified by future research with larger samples of PSFs operating in a broader range of industries and national contexts. Practical implications The study results may be of interest to managers of both firms and universities interested in establishing, formalising or broadening university-industry interactions. Originality/value The study advances the current knowledge on the rationales of service firms engaged in various university-industry knowledge transfer interactions by making empirical and conceptual contributions to the understanding of adjunct professorship as a particular form of such interactions.

  • 4.
    Galan, Nataliya
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Khodabandehloo, Akbar
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Learning with LinkedIn: Students' perceptions of incorporating subject-related blogging in an international marketing course2016In: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, ISSN 1741-5659, E-ISSN 1758-8510, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 166-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose This paper aims to report the results of implementation of blogging within a LinkedIn discussion group in an international marketing course for a multicultural group of students focusing on the students' perceptions of the subject-related blogging. Design/methodology/approach: This study adopts a qualitative approach; data have been collected through online observations of the students' activity in a LinkedIn discussion group and structured interviews with volunteers after the completion of the course.Findings The results indicate the students' positive attitudes towards blogging in LinkedIn. Blogging perceptibly contributed to the students' acquisition of knowledge in the subject area, development of multicultural awareness and writing skills and improvement of critical thinking. In most cases, this type of activity had an impact on the development of the students' creativity and personal expression. Some patterns are only identified for subgroups of students with a certain cultural background (Chinese, Asian, German-speaking and European students).Research limitations/implicationsThe results of this qualitative study are specific for a particular setting (a small international class of students) and a certain type of assignment (in terms of its structure and instructor involvement).Originality/valueThis study contributes to the growing body of literature on using social media-based assignments in business education by generating a better understanding of how participants in a multicultural group perceive the process of experiential learning while blogging in a LinkedIn discussion group.

  • 5.
    Galan, Nataliya
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Khodabandehloo, Akbar
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Use of Social Media Based Assignments in Teaching International Marketing: Results and Reflections2015In: Proceedings of Cross-Cultural Business Conference 2015, 21-22 May, School of Management, University of Applied Sciences of Upper Austria, Steyr Campus: Intercultural Perspectives in Global Business and Human Resource Management; Global (B2B) Marketing, Sales Management and Service Innovation; Higher Education Research; Informatics, Communication & Media / [ed] Margarethe Uberwimmer et al., Aachen: Shaker Verlag, 2015, p. 233-242Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes the implementation of a social media based assignment (blogging in a LinkedIn discussion group) within an international marketing course for an international group of students and presents the students’ perceptions of the assignment. The results indicate that the students had very positive attitudes towards blogging within the online discussion group and perceived it as a more interesting and more effective activity than traditional written assignments. LinkedIn blogging perceptibly contributed to the students’ acquisition of knowledge in the subject area, development of multicultural awareness and writing skills, improvement of critical thinking, reasoning, analysis and interpretation. In most cases this type of activity had an impact on the development of the students’ creativity and personal expression. Some patterns (as an increased motivation to work harder while learning, feeling of comfort/discomfort in the online learning environment) are only identified for a subgroup of Chinese students.

    Key words: Social media, LinkedIn, Blogs, International Marketing, Experiential learning

  • 6.
    Galan, Nataliya
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Torsein, Ellinor
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Crossing the Border in a Cross-border Region: The Role of Networks in Small Firms' Internationalization2018In: Sustainable entrepreneurship: A win-win strategy for the future, Toledo, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Galan, Nataliya
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Torsein, Ellinor
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Internationalization by means of networks: A case study of small firms in a cross-border region2018In: Book of Abstracts: The 22nd McGill International Entrepreneurship Conference, Halmstad: Högskolan i Halmstad , 2018, p. 21-22Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims at gaining a deeper understanding of the role of networks in internationalization of small firms originating from a cross-border region. Internationalization is viewed as the process of identification and exploitation of international opportunities. The present study specifically seeks to understand how different kind of networks enable small firms to identify and exploit their first and subsequent international opportunities and where (within or beyond the cross-border region). The study employs a multiple-case study design and is built on empirical evidence mainly collected via face-to-face semi-structured interviews with managers/owners/founders of five small firms located in the cross-border region Northern Fyrbodal (Sweden) – Southern Østfold (Norway). Preliminary findings suggest that the roles of business, institutional and social networks as well as regional and international networks differ with regard to i) international opportunities identification and exploitation; ii) geographically/institutionally proximate and distant markets as well as iii) discovery or creation as a means of international opportunities formation.

  • 8.
    Galan, Nataliya
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Torsein, Ellinor
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Internationalization of small firms originating from a cross-border region: The role of social and business networks2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms’ small size is commonly considered as a disadvantage in internationalization (Jansson, 2007), which is mainly associated with the lack of resources needed to expand internationally (Jansson & Sandberg, 2008). Consequently, internationalization of small firms differs noticeably from that of large firms (Musteen et al., 2010). In particular, compared to large firms, small firms rely more extensively on networks relationships, thus trying to overcome barriers to internationalization related to their size (Zahra, 2005). Previous research reports a wide use of different kinds of networks (business vs. social, local vs. foreign) by small firms in the process of their internationalization (e.g., Kuhlmeier and Knight, 2010; Musteen et al., 2010, Dubois, 2016). Fletcher (2004) and Dubois (2016) stress the need to further investigate the relational context of small firms’ internationalization in order to understand how these firms start and manage their international expansion. Further, Dubois (2016) arguments for bringing in a geographical context for conceptualising the process of small firms’ internationalization and calls for more research to be done in order to get a better understanding of how the contextual elements influence the actions of individual actors.The proposed study takes into focus the context of cross-border regions, which implies that the firms located in such areas benefit from a spatial proximity to a neighbouring foreign market and its potential (Niebuhr and Stiller, 2004). However, the empirical evidence, obtained for various cross-border regions, often shows the contrary, i.e. that these areas are characterised with weak economic dynamism involving local firms, which do not benefit remarkably from a spatial proximity to a neighbouring foreign market (Leick, 2012). The purpose of this study is to generate a better understanding of the internationalization process of small firms originating from a cross-border region using the network perspective (Johansson and Matsson, 1988). In particular, the study aims to examine the role of relationships in the process of international expansion of firms located in the cross-border region Northern Fyrbodal (Sweden) – Southern Ostfold (Norway), with regard to their choice of the first and consequent markets, mode and time of internationalization.The study uses a multiple-case study design (Yin, 2014) and is built on empirical evidence collected via face-to-face semi-structured interviews with managers/owners/founders of seven small firms located both in Sweden and Norway in a relative proximity to the Swedish-Norwegian border. Preliminary findings suggest that both business and social networks are of extreme importance for small firms from a cross-border region with regards to the identification of international opportunities in foreign markets, making a decision to internationalize as well as the choice of mode of internationalization. It is found that local networks are equally important for small firms from cross border regions to reach distant markets as foreign networks. Reliance on social networks seem to contribute to exploring international opportunities by small firms in the neighbouring markets while reliance on business networks appear to help them to reach distant markets at early stages of internationalization.

  • 9.
    Siverbo, Sven
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Andersson, Morgan
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Galan, Nataliya
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Hellman, Stefan
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Jansson, Elisabeth
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lindh, Kristina
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Myhrman, Linnea
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Nehls, Eddy
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Staxäng Torbäck, Louise
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Svensson, Ann
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    #metoo-management2018Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Just over a year ago the #metoo movement began, which is a reminder that there are faults in society even if everything looks fine on the surface. There are many signs that #metoo is not a passing phenomenon. This is not a coordinated action with a clear goal, nor is there any one leader of the movement. The #metoo movement is self-organized, a way to make visible what over basically all of human history has been silenced, denied and trivialized, even though everyone has known about it. This report takes a look at the #metoo movement's impact on organisations from a management perspective. We are interested in the phenomenon of "#metoo management", which we define as organisations' work to prevent and deal with sexual harassment (or assault) as a result of the #metoo movement. The primary purpose of the report is to find out if #metoo management exists. The second purpose is to investigate how organisations work with #metoo management. A third purpose is to explain why organisations choose to work with #metoo management in different ways. Based on interviews with representatives of ten organisations, in several cases quite different, we have determined that the #metoo movement has indeed given rise to #metoo management. More precisely, #metoo management refers to a number of different measures and activities. Organisations have restated and specified their policies about sexual harassment. The programs have been given renewed distribution at workplaces and additional measures for program compliance have been taken. Procedures for complaint processing have been developed, trainings have been initiated and risk factors have been identified and reduced. Not least, the occurrence of problems with sexual harassment has been quantified. Somewhat surprisingly, we noted that there was no example that the programs against sexual harassment were evaluated and that plans were lacking for reducing dependency relationships between supervisors and employees in the organisations where these were significant. It is important to emphasize that there are significant differences between organisations in how intensively the work with #metoo management has been pursued. The differences seem to depend on several different factors. One is that the incidence of sexual harassment varies, and another is that organisations make varying assessments of how much damage publicized cases would have on the employer's brand. Additional explanations for the intensity of the work are differences in how ambitious the process was prior to the #metoo movement, and that in certain organisations there is greater awareness of risk factors than in others. Finally, the organisation's size and visibility appear to play a role in that those that are more closely monitored have greater reason to avoid problems that attract negative attention.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf