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  • 1.
    Andrén, Ulla
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Kinnander, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Kerekes, Nora
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Skyvell Nilsson, Maria
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Utveckling av ett nytt yrke inom socialpsykiatrisk vård2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The program in Social Psychiatric Care is a three-year program at the university level leading to a vocational qualification in social psychiatric care and a bachelor's degree in the field of Health Sciences. Until the spring of 2018, six litters have graduated. Students in the social psychiatric care program often have personal interest, previous professional experience from the business areas or inspiration from related friends working in the field of activity. Personal experiences of problems in the fields of activity are also prominent among the students. Students believe that personal experience, willingness and ability is important in order to work within the profession. Characteristics of the students are also an interest and a clear empathetic willingness to work with people and they consider that the profession primarily requires characteristics such as altruism, empathy, social skills and deeper knowledge and understanding in the field. Upon completion of education, students want a career role where they can help other people, feel motivated, or they aim for specific positions or areas of activity. Both managers and alumni from the Social Psychiatric Care program value the broad professional competence that the program leads to. Psychiatric competence is emphasized as particularly valuable by both alumni and managers. This competence means that they also complement the other professions in the activities. Students consider themselves possessed a professional identity that involves introducing psychiatric and custody skills to organizations that previously lacked these perspectives. Something that also brings new approaches to patients, users and clients. Being able to use knowledge from several disciplines are considered to be a strength and competence that are well-needed in environments where people with mental ill health are cared for. The alumni perceive their knowledge as both interdisciplinary and interprofessional.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Monica
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Kerekes, Nora
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Brink, Peter
    NU Hospital Group, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    The level of sense of coherence among Swedish nursing staff2019In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To explore the level of sense of coherence among Swedish nursing staff.

    Design: An explorative quantitative study design was adopted using a short form for measuring sense of coherence.

    Methods Data were collected in January 2018 from nurses working in full‐time positions at two hospitals in Western Sweden. A total of 93 nurses completed the 13 item questionnaire measuring sense of coherence. Descriptive statistics were applied to obtain means and standard deviations. Spearman's rank correlation was used to describe strength of association between sense of coherence and socio‐demographic categories. Between‐group differences were defined using the nonparametric tests of Mann Whitney U test and Kruskal‐Wallis test.

    Results The internal consistency of the SOC‐13 was low. An inter‐item‐correlation test indicated that two items decreased the internal consistency of the scale. The level of the three dimensions of sense of coherence varied; manageability was weakest and decreased the total sense of coherence. The meaningfulness dimension was as strongest.

    Conclusion On a national level, nurses reported weaker SOC than the general population, but stronger in an international comparison of nurses. They found their work difficult to manage, but meaningful.

    Impact On a national level, the nurses report weaker SOC than the general population, but stronger in an international comparison of nurses. Findings from this study will have an impact on how nurses can manage work related stress in terms of sense of coherence. There will also be an impact on nurses' well‐being, which in a long run benefits patients.

  • 3.
    Jönsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Region of Halland,Department of Research, Development and Education (FoUU).
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Berglund, Inger J.
    Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde.
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Hedelin, Birgitta
    Gjøvik University College, Department of Nursing, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences.
    Problematization of perspectives on health promotion and empowerment in mental health nursing: within the research network "MeHNuRse" and the Horatio conference, 20122014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, p. 22945-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental illness is increasing worldwide, while society's response seems to be a trend toward narrower and more specialized mental health care. This development is creating great demands on mental health nurses to include a health promotion perspective in care and support of persons with mental illness. A health promotion perspective emphasizes cooperation and communication with people who suffer from long-term mental illness, focusing on their independence and health. From a health perspective, every human being is an actor in his/her own life, with an inherent ability to make his/her own choices. However, persons who suffer from long-term mental illness are at risk of losing power and control over areas of their lives and their health. Mental health nurses are in a position to support these individuals in promoting health and in maintaining or regaining control over their lives. The emphasis of this paper is to problematize mental health nurses' responsibility to provide health-promoting nursing care in relation to empowerment by means of emancipation, self-efficacy, and self-management. We argue that mental health nurses can work from a health-promoting perspective by using these concepts and that this challenges some of the traditional ideas of health promotion in mental health nursing. The theoretical background discussions in this paper have their origin in the research network ''Mental Health Nursing Research in Scandinavia'' (MeHNuRse) and from the professional discussions developed during a 2012 workshop that included mental health nurses and researchers at the European Horatio Festival in Stockholm.

  • 4.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, undergraduate level.
    Johansson, Mona
    Gebremariam, Tomas
    Föräldrars strategier för atthantera relationen med sin psykisktsjuka son eller dotter2014In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 10-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe strategies that parents use in managing their everyday relationship with their mentally ill son ordaughter.Background: When a son or daughter is suffering from mental illness, the parents’life arenas become affected. To help individuals with a lackof coping strategies handle the stress that can arise in mental ill health situations, it is important to develop more knowledge about howparents handle everyday life with their son or daughter with mental illness.Methods: Qualitative interviews with open-ended questions were conducted with ten parents. The data were analysed through manifest contentanalysis.Findings: Three categories were found, all with subcategories: finding power in everyday life; the need for external support; and preparednessfor coping.Conclusion: The management strategies the interviewed parents used consisted of gaining power every day by taking out moments to dispeltheir thoughts, and by creating both an openness in the family and the opportunity to practice leisure activities to temporarily distancethemselves from the relationship with their son or daugher with mental illness. They also mentioned the need to be prepared to handle differentsituations that may arise. In this regard, both routines and flexibility are important management strategies for these parents. When ason/daughter is receiving treatment at a psychiatric ward, support from health professionals is important for parental management strategies

  • 5.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Experiences of Major Depression: Individuals’ Perspectiveson the Ability to Understand and Handle the Illness2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, ISSN 0161-2840 print / 1096-4673 online, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 271-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In all social groups, major depression is an increasingly serious

    problem in modern society. Important aspects of a person’s capacity

    for recovery are the person’s own understanding of the illness

    and the ability to use this understanding to manage the illness.

    The aim of this study is to describe how individuals with major

    depression understand their illness and use their understanding to

    handle it. Twenty participants treated in community care formajor

    depression as determined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual

    of Mental Disorders were interviewed between February and

    June, 2008. Content analysis of the interviews revealed threemajor

    themes: (1) awakening insight, (2) strategies for understanding and

    managing, and (3) making use of understanding, each with additional

    subthemes. Individual understandings of the illness varied

    and led to differences in the ways participants were able to handle

    their depression. In clinical care it is essential to support an

    individual’s understanding of depression and his or her use of that

    understanding to handle the illness.

  • 6.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences.
    The portfolio method as management support for patients with major depression2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 11-12, p. 1639-1647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To describe how patients with major depression in psychiatric outpatient care use the portfolio method and whether the method helps the patients to understand their depression. Background Major depressive disorder is an increasing problem in society. Learning about one’s depression has been demonstrated to be important for recovery. If the goal is better understanding and management of depression, learning must proceed on the patient’s own terms, based on the patient’s previous understanding of their depression. Learning must be aligned with patient needs if it is to result in meaningful and useful understanding. Design Each patient’s portfolio consisted of a binder. Inside the binder, there was a register with predetermined flaps and questions. The patients were asked to work with the questions in the sections that built the content in the portfolio. Methods Individual interviews with patients (n = 5) suffering from major depression according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) (American Psychiatric Association 1994) were repeatedly conducted between April 2008 and August 2009 in two psychiatric outpatient clinics in western Sweden. Data were analysed using latent content analysis. Results The results showed that the portfolio was used by patients as a management strategy for processing and analysis of their situation and that a portfolio’s structure affects its usability. The patients use the portfolio for reflection on and confirmation of their progress, to create structure in their situation, as a management strategy for remembering situations and providing reminders of upcoming activities. Conclusions Using a clearly structured care portfolio can enable participation and patient learning and help patients understand their depression. Relevance to clinical practice The portfolio method could provide a tool in psychiatric nursing that may facilitate patient understanding and increase self-efficacy.

  • 7.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Portfoliometoden: Ett pedagogiskt verktyg för att integrera teori och praktik i sjuksköterskeprogrammet2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Portfolio is a systematic, purposeful, consolidated and structured collection of study works that the teacher and students use to follow up the development of knowledge, skills and attitudes in some area. Work integrated learning (WIL) can be seen as a process and an educational strategy for an active exchange of knowledge, reflected action and lifelong learning. The purpose of this report is to describe and discuss portfolio as a pedagogical method and WIL as a pedagogical strategy in the clinical education in the nursing program at University West. One of the main ideas behind the WIL-portfolio method isthat students have the opportunity to take control of their learning and thereby become more active in the learning and better understand the generated learning. The WIL-portfolio can create opportunities for nursing students to develop professional skills, systematized by using the portfolio structure and content. WIL-portfolio methodical process consists of the six phases; prereflection, reflection-in-action, reflection-on-action, self-evaluation, metareflection and knowledge-in-action. WIL-portfolio can serve as a basis for reflection and become a mirror image of learning, both in the present and in the future. The WIL-portfolio method can thus contribute to a deeper understanding of one's own knowledge of the process of lifelong learning.

  • 8.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Alsén, Pia
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Patients' Variations of Reflection About and Understanding of Long-term Illness: Impact of Illness Perception on Trust in Oneself or Others2017In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 11, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients' understanding of their illness is of great importance for recovery. Lacking understanding of the illness is linked with the patients' level of reflection about and interest in understanding their illness. Objective: To describe patients’ variations of reflection about and understanding of their illness and how this understanding affects their trust in themselves or others. Method: The study is based on the “Illness perception” model. Latent content analysis was used for the data analysis. Individual, semi-structured, open-ended and face-to-face interviews were conducted with patients (n=11) suffering from a long-term illness diagnosed at least six months prior to the interview. Data collection took place in the three primary healthcare centres treating the participants. Results: The results show variations in the degree of reflection about illness. Patients search for deeper understanding of the illness for causal explanations, compare different perspectives for preventing complication of their illness, trust healthcare providers, and develop own strategies to manage life. Conclusion: Whereas some patients search for deeper understanding of their illness, other patients are less reflective and feel they can manage the illness without further understanding. Patients' understanding of their illness is related to their degree of trust in themselves or others. Patients whose illness poses an existential threat are more likely to reflect more about their illness and what treatment methods are available.

  • 9.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Alsén, Pia
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Strategies for healthcare professionals to facilitate patient illness understanding.2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 23-24, p. 4696-4706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe how healthcare professionals facilitate patient illness understanding.

    BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals and patients differ in their illness understanding. If the information provided by healthcare professionals is not adapted to the patient's daily life it may be unusable for the patient. Previous research has found that healthcare professionals should individualise the information to enable the patient to apply the knowledge to the personal situation and to develop illness understanding. However, little is known of how healthcare professionals can facilitate patient illness understanding.

    METHOD: A qualitative descriptive study based on individual, semi-structured, open-ended and face-to-face interviews was conducted with healthcare professionals (n=11) concerning how they facilitate patients illness understanding. Three health centres were involved during the period of March to November 2014. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: The result identified a continuous and collaborative process with three strategies used by healthcare professionals to facilitate the patient's illness understanding: 1) assess the patient's illness understanding, 2) interact with the patient to develop illness understanding, and 3) support the patient's personal development for illness understanding. The steps in the process depend on each other.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results of our analysis indicate that healthcare professionals can use the continuous and collaborative process to enhance the patient's self-care ability and turn his or her knowledge into action for improving illness understanding.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The three continuous and collaborative process strategies involving pedagogical approaches can create conditions for healthcare professionals to obtain a holistic view of the patient's life and to be a key resource for person-centred care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 10.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    The work-integrated learning combined with the portfolio method: A pedagogical strategy and tool in nursing education for developing professional competence2017In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 8-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During nursing education students obtain knowledge and skills to develop their professional competence. Teachers may elect to provide pedagogical tools preparing students for current and future healthcare needs. The purpose of this theoretical article was to highlight Work-Integrated Learning combined with the Portfolio Method as a pedagogical strategy and tool for nursing students to develop professional competence for lifelong learning. This strategy contains six phases: pre-reflection, reflection-in-action, reflection-on-action, self-evaluation, meta-reflection and knowledge-in-action, which can help nursing students, during their clinical education, develop deeper understanding of their future profession, while also providing a teaching planning tool.

  • 11.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Learning Through Reflection: The Portfolio Method As A Tool To Promote Work-Integrated Learning In Higher Education2019In: INTED2019 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, Valencia: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2019, p. 729-739Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students need to develop meta-reflection to strengthen their learning process and to be able to manage the continuous changes encountered both higher education and in workplaces. Reflection is the most important for achieving progress within work integrated learning. For students to develop meta-reflection and achieve progression within work integrated learning, they need a systematic structure and conscious tools. The Portfolio method can be one of those tools.In this article we are going to discuss, from a theoretical standpoint, how teachers can develop a better structure for students so that they can strengthen their learning-process and progression of work integrated learning in higher education during internships which in turn promote lifelong learning. This progression of work integrated learning will be discussed in relation to the “WIL4U” model together with examples of reflection questions, learning outcomes, learning activities and examination forms. The “WIL4U” model was developed from the “AIL 4E (DUCATION)” model created by Bernhardsson, Gellerstedt and Svensson.The purpose of this conceptual discussion article is to highlight the portfolio method as a structure and tool for progress work integrated learning by reflection.With support of the portfolio method, the students can develop their ability to make well-balanced, and reflected choices in planning actions for work integrated learning. This requires well-developed self-regulation and the ability to meta-cognition and systematic meta-reflection to evaluate the effects of various actions. The portfolio method can also improve the reflection-process to develop the student's ability to emphasize strengths and increase the ability to achieve the learning outcomes in higher education.

  • 12.
    Winman, Thomas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Vesterlind, Marie
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tynkkinen, Mona
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Eriksson, Marita
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Lärande inom och mellan verksamhetsfält2015Conference paper (Other academic)
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