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  • 1.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    et al.
    Special Education Department, Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR); Abu Dhabi Early Childhood Authority, Abu Dhabi (ARE).
    Duell, Natasha
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Liu, Qin
    Department of Maternal and Child Health & Adolescent Health, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Global Health Research Center, Duke University, Kunshan (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Department Of Educational Psychology, Maseno University, Maseno (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Department of Psychology, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Department of Psychology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (SAU).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Department of Family Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Department of Psychology, Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellin (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Department pf Psychology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Department of Psychology, Ateneo de Manila University, Manila (PHL).
    Bacchini, Dario
    Department of Humanistic Studies, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Adolescent Health and Human Development, UNICEF, and Institute for Fiscal Studies, Bethesda, MD (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    Department of Psychology, University of Macau, Macau (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Amherst, MA (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Department of Psychology, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome (ITA).
    Parents’ learning support and school attitudes in relation to adolescent academic identity and school performance in nine countries2024Inngår i: European Journal of Psychology of Education, ISSN 0256-2928, E-ISSN 1878-5174, s. 1-26Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    An important question for parents and educators alike is how to promote adolescents’ academic identity and school performance. This study investigated relations among parental education, parents’ attitudes toward their adolescents’ school, parental support for learning at home, and adolescents’ academic identity and school performance over time and in different national contexts. Longitudinal data were collected from adolescents and their parents in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States). When adolescents were 16 years old, their mothers (N = 1083) and fathers (N = 859) provided data. When adolescents were 17 years old, 1049 adolescents (50% girls) and their mothers (N = 1001) and fathers (N = 749) provided data. Multiple-group path analyses indicated that, across cultures, higher parent education was associated with better adolescent school performance. Parents’ attitudes toward their adolescents’ school and parent support for learning in the home were not associated with adolescents’ school performance but were associated with academic identity. The findings suggest somewhat different pathways to school performance versus academic identity. Implications for helping parents and educators in different countries promote adolescents’ academic identity and achievement are discussed.

  • 2.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och organisationsstudier.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Social mobilisering och organisering via sociala medier2016Inngår i: Socialt arbete och internet: att förstå och hantera sociala problem på internet. Liber förlag. Bokkapitel / [ed] K. Daneback & E. Sorbring, Stockholm: Liber, 2016, 1, s. 122-135Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 3.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier. Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Adolescents’ voices on organization via social media2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adolescents are industrious users of social media (i.e. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter) and most of 9-16 years old in EU´s 25 countries have a profile on a social network where they can socialize, express their thoughts and feelings. In Sweden there have been recent actions where adolescents have organized themselves with help from social media very quickly and with many participators. Studies have shown both positive and negative effects of using social media. Positive, since almost everyone can share experiences or make their voice heard. Negative, since young people can expose themselves and others to situations that can be difficult to manage. There are concerns that adolescents online can be socially isolated from their friends in “real life”, while others mean that social media increases the possibility for adolescent to make new friends and develop existing relationships. Significance: Earlier studies have focused on use of social media in school and social resisting gatherings, but not as many studies on adolescents’ use of social media for organizing their activities in everyday life. Young people can be considered to be digital natives and adults, that constitute a certain power in the society, can be considered as digital immigrants. From that perspective it is important to let young people’s own voices be heard on a central arena for daily activities. Hence, the aim the presented study was to examine how adolescents describe social media as an arena for organizing themselves and how the organizational actions affect their everyday life. Data derives from interviews with 13-19-year old pupils, and were recruited from the Western part of Sweden. The interviews were analyzed with thematic analysis in several steps. Results revealed that social media is perceived both positive and negative. Social media was described as an arena where young people can experience feelings of being free, but also as an arena that contributes to major problems. The adolescents describe social media as a platform where social power is performed, but that the users are unaware about the responsibilities that follow such power. Conclusions drawn from this study is that young people reason about the complexity of what social media means for organizing events and relationships in everyday life and social medias are seen as both problematic and enabling. The study contributes, by letting young people´s own voices being heard, a better understanding of adolescents’ experience of social organization in new medias.

    Adolescents' voices on organization via social media. Available from: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/281280719_Adolescents'_voices_on_organization_via_social_media [accessed Oct 29, 2015].

  • 4.
    Boson, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi. Department of Behavioral SDepartment of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg (SWE) ;Department of Psychology, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Lillehammer (NOR).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Claesdotter-Knutsson, Emma
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skåne, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi. Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Adolescent gaming and parent–child emotional closeness: bivariate relationships in a longitudinal perspective2024Inngår i: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to add knowledge of the longitudinal associations between gaming and emotional closeness between parents and their children. We hypothesized that parent–child emotional closeness was linked to less gaming activity over time and that more gaming activity was linked to less parent–child emotional closeness over time. We also tested the moderating efect of child gender on these anticipated links. This study involved a sample of Swedish adolescents, spanning the developmental years from age 12.5 to 17, and included data from two time points (T1; year 2013 and T2; years 2017/2018) with N=782 participants (T1 Mage=12.10, SD=0.40; 49.6% girls). Utilizing a series of Cross-Lagged Panel Models, we found that emotional closeness to both mother and father predicted less time spent on gaming over time. More time spent on gaming predicted less emotional closeness to mother over time. Additionally, gaming activity among girls was specifcally related to less emotional closeness to their father over time. Strengthening parent–child relationships and emotional bonds may be crucial in safeguarding adolescents from developing habits of excessive gaming that could potentially pose problems for their psychosocial development.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Buchanan, Christy M.
    et al.
    Wake Forest Univ, Winston Salem (USA).
    Glatz, Terese
    Orebro Univ, Orebro (SWE).
    Selçuk, Şule
    Hacettepe Univ, Ankara (TUR).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke Univ, Durham, NC (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke Univ, Durham, NC (USA).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Abu Dhabi Early Childhood Authority, Abu Dhabi (ARE); Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Bacchini, Dario
    Department of Humanistic Studies, University of Naples “Federico II” (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda; 0 UNICEF, New York (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London (GBR).
    Chang, Lei
    Department of Psychology, University of Macau (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Department of Psychology, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Liu, Qin
    Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Global Health Research Center, Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Department of Psychology, Maseno University, Maseno (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Department of Psychology, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Rome (ITA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Peace Culture Foundation, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia (USA); King Abdulaziz University (SAU).
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Suthep, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Department of Psychology, Ateneo de Manila University (PHL).
    Developmental Trajectories of Parental Self-Efficacy as Children Transition to Adolescence in Nine Countries: Latent Growth Curve Analyses2023Inngår i: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 53, s. 1047-1065Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the developmental trajectories of parental self-efficacy as children transition into adolescence. This study examined parental self-efficacy among mothers and fathers over 3 1/2 years representing this transition, and whether the level and developmental trajectory of parental self-efficacy varied by cultural group. Data were drawn from three waves of the Parenting Across Cultures (PAC) project, a large-scale longitudinal, cross-cultural study, and included 1178 mothers and 1041 fathers of children who averaged 9.72 years of age at T1 (51.2% girls). Parents were from nine countries (12 ethnic/cultural groups), which were categorized into those with a predominant collectivistic (i.e., China, Kenya, Philippines, Thailand, Colombia, and Jordan) or individualistic (i.e., Italy, Sweden, and USA) cultural orientation based on Hofstede's Individualism Index (Hofstede Insights, 2021). Latent growth curve analyses supported the hypothesis that parental self-efficacy would decline as children transition into adolescence only for parents from more individualistic countries; parental self-efficacy increased over the same years among parents from more collectivistic countries. Secondary exploratory analyses showed that some demographic characteristics predicted the level and trajectory of parental self-efficacy differently for parents in more individualistic and more collectivistic countries. Results suggest that declines in parental self-efficacy documented in previous research are culturally influenced.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Buchanan, Christy M
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, (USA).
    Zietz, Susannah
    Duke University (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, (USA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome, (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza” (ITA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University (USA) and King Abdulaziz University (SAU).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Department of Psychology, Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín 050001, (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Department of Psychology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education (ARE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Neapel, (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau (MAC).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002, (USA).
    Typicality and trajectories of problematic and positive behaviors over adolescence in eight countries.2022Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, artikkel-id 991727Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examine the predictions of a storm and stress characterization of adolescence concerning typicality and trajectories of internalizing, externalizing, and wellbeing from late childhood through late adolescence. Using data from the Parenting Across Cultures study, levels and trajectories of these characteristics were analyzed for 1,211 adolescents from 11 cultural groups across eight countries. Data were longitudinal, collected at seven timepoints from 8 to 17 years of age. Results provide more support for a storm and stress characterization with respect to the developmental trajectories of behavior and characteristics from childhood to adolescence or across the adolescent years than with respect to typicality of behavior. Overall, adolescents' behavior was more positive than negative in all cultural groups across childhood and adolescence. There was cultural variability in both prevalence and trajectories of behavior. The data provide support for arguments that a more positive and nuanced characterization of adolescence is appropriate and important.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Campbell, Cory
    et al.
    University of Washington, Seattle (USA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, (USA).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Amherst, MA, USA (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology , Rome, Italy (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Norham, NC (USA).
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (CHN).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Sapienza, University of Rome (ITA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia (USA).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Private practice (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana
    Universidad de San Buenaventura, Bogota (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Pena Alampay, Liane
    Ateneo de Manila University, Manila (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha
    The Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Baccini, Dario
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Rockville (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Macau (CHN).
    Parallel Growth of Children’s Internalizing Behaviors Predicted by Positive Parenting Behaviors2021Inngår i: SRCD 2021 Virtual Biennial Meeting, 2021Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The global outbreak of COVID-19 has impacted all systems essential to human life and wellbeing (Masten & Motto-Stefanidi, 2020). The complex combination of health and economic stressors together with difficulty accessing protective factors may impact the family system in particular. Families differ in their responses to stressors (Bonanno et al., 2010), and the way in which families adjust to events and transitions related to the pandemic may be related to the distress perceived by children and their long-term wellbeing (Felix et al., 2013).This symposium will examine whether and through which processes families adjust during the global outbreak of COVID-19. We explore 2 research questions: 1)What did families do during the pandemic to maintain resilience? 2)What are the main protective and risk factors within the family context that are related to children’s and adolescents’ adjustment during this stressful and potentially traumatic event?Three strengths characterize the symposium. First, longitudinal designs with pre- and post-onset measurements enabled us to capture the dynamic nature of changes impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak. Second, the global nature of the outbreak is represented in cross-cultural perspective to understand commonalities and specificities of the processes activated by the event in different countries from Europe, North America, and Asia. Finally, mechanisms of resiliency and vulnerability examining the adjustment of the family members are assessed through longitudinal moderation and mediation analyses.

  • 8.
    Gorla, Laura
    et al.
    University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (ITA).
    Rothenberg, W Andrew
    Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (USA).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London (GBR); UNICEF, Bethesda, Maryland (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Macau (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Junla, Daranee
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T
    Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA); King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (SAU).
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane P
    Ateneo de Manila University, Manila (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Abu Dhabi Early Childhood Authority, Abu Dhabi (ARE); Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Adolescents' relationships with parents and romantic partners in eight countries.2024Inngår i: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Creating romantic relationships characterized by high-quality, satisfaction, few conflicts, and reasoning strategies to handle conflicts is an important developmental task for adolescents connected to the relational models they receive from their parents. This study examines how parent-adolescent conflicts, attachment, positive parenting, and communication are related to adolescents' romantic relationship quality, satisfaction, conflicts, and management.

    METHOD: We interviewed 311 adolescents at two time points (females = 52%, ages 15 and 17) in eight countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States). Generalized and linear mixed models were run considering the participants' nesting within countries.

    RESULTS: Adolescents with negative conflicts with their parents reported low romantic relationship quality and satisfaction and high conflicts with their romantic partners. Adolescents experiencing an anxious attachment to their parents reported low romantic relationship quality, while adolescents with positive parenting showed high romantic relationship satisfaction. However, no association between parent-adolescent relationships and conflict management skills involving reasoning with the partner was found. No associations of parent-adolescent communication with romantic relationship dimensions emerged, nor was there any effect of the country on romantic relationship quality or satisfaction.

    CONCLUSION: These results stress the relevance of parent-adolescent conflicts and attachment as factors connected to how adolescents experience romantic relationships.

  • 9.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.
    Children and Parents: Attributions, Attitudes and Agency2015Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Children and parents are both part of children’s development and research on children and on parenting are both areas that, in some way, have changed in recent decades. These changes are related to the new way of seeing children and that children are no longer seen as ‘becomings’ or adults in the making; rather, children are insteadregarded – and seen – as more active in their development and as social agents. With a new way of viewing children and childhood there is also a new way of explaining or understanding parenthood. The general aim of this thesisis to learn more about how parents think about their parenting and how this can be related to children’s agency. Inaddition, children’s own beliefs about their agency are studied. The aim of Study I was to investigate mothers’ and fathers’ (77 participants from each group) attributions and attitudes in Sweden. The results revealed thatSwedish parents are more polarized in their attitudes than in their attributions. Regarding attitudes, mothers and fathers reported more progressive than authoritarian attitudes. Fathers reported higher adult-controlled failure and child-controlled failure attributions than mothers. In Study II the aim was to assess whether mothers’ and fathers’self-reports of acceptance-rejection, warmth, and hostility/rejection/neglect of their children differ in the nine countries. A total of 1996 parents (998 mothers and 998 fathers) participated in the study. Mothers and fathers reported high acceptance and warmth and low rejection and hostility/rejection/neglect (HRN) of their children inall nine countries. Despite the high levels of acceptance and low levels of rejection across all countries, some systematic differences between countries emerged. In Study III Swedish mothers’ and fathers’ warmth towards their children was examined in relation to their children’s agency. It also studied the longitudinal relation between agency and children’s externalizing, internalizing, and school achievement. Swedish children’s parents (N = 93) were interviewed at three time points (when children were 8, 9, and 10 years old) about their warmth towards their children, children’s agency, children’s externalizing and internalizing behaviors and school achievement. Results from this study indicate that Swedish parents’ warmth is directly related to children’s subsequent perceptions of their agency, which in turn are related to subsequently lower child externalizing and internalizing problems and higher academic achievement. Personal agency is studied in Study IV and the aim of this study was to examine how 10-year-old children perceive their agency in three different contexts, family, school and peer-situations. Interviews were conducted with 103 ten-year-old Swedish children. Vignettes concerning three different situations were presented to the children and their answers were written down for subsequent thematic analysis. The resultsshowed that children perceive their agency differently depending upon which context they find themselves in. The difference is not in how they think adults or peers would react to their agency, but in how they themselves would act if their agency was suppressed. It is mainly with other children that they would show assertiveness and try to find a solution together, while they would be more emotional and powerless with adults.In summary, parents in the studies report higher similarity about parenting in some cases, for example concerning acceptance and warmth and hostility/rejection/neglect, but lower in others, such as the Swedish parents’ reports about attributions. It is also revealed that parents’ warmth is related to children’s agency,and that children’s perceptions of their agency depend on whether they interact with adults or other children. Apossible contribution of this thesis is to generate additional knowledge about parental cognitions and the implications that parenting can have on child agency, but also the shedding of light on the ways in which, depending on the context, children’s beliefs of their agency differ.

  • 10.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Exempel 5: FöräldraResursen: att samverka för stöd till föräldrar2019Inngår i: Samverkansforskning: att främja barns och ungas välfärd / [ed] Lena Nilsson & Emma Sorbring (red.), Stockholm: Liber, 2019, s. 65-71Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 11.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Möten i ögonhöjd: Att sätta bemötande i fokus i arbetet med unga vuxna2022Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under två år med start våren 2020 pågick det så kallade Vi-projektets arbete med att hjälpa 1000 unga i åldrarna 15–24 år som var eller riskerade att bli UVAS (unga som varken arbetar eller studerar). Projektägare var Folkhögskoleförvaltningen Västra Götalandsregionen och medfinansiärer var Europeiska socialfonden (ESF). Budgeten var nästan 100 miljoner kronor och projektet hade som övergripande mål att UVAS ska ”äga sin egen framtid, förbättra sin hälsa och närma sig jobb eller studier”. Arbetet involverade samverkanspartners som kommunalförbunden i Fyrbodal och Sjuhärad, Rädda Barnen, fem folkhögskolor, vuxenutbildningen i Borås, Trollhättan och Vänersborg samt 19 kommuner. I denna rapport presenteras resultatet från en del av projektet, nämligen bemötande. I Vi-projektet benämndes bemötande som möten i ögonhöjd, och det stod i fokus redan från början. Enligt projektbeskrivningen ska man i ett möte i ögonhöjd försöka bortse från de maktaspekter som finns i möten mellan till exempel handläggare och unga vuxna och tillgodose individens behov genom att lyssna till vad hen har att säga och medvetandegöra hens roll och aktörskap i samhället. Detta med förhoppningen att möjliggöra en förändring i den unga vuxnas liv. Då möten i ögonhöjd blev ett återkommande inslag i projektet växte intresset för vad sådana möten egentligen syftar till. Med andra ord: hur beskriver medarbetare möten i ögonhöjd och, inte minst, vad har sådana möten betytt för de unga vuxna i Vi-projektet?I rapporten kan du ta del av både medarbetarnas och de unga vuxnas beskrivningar av vad bemötande betyder för dem och hur ett bra möte kan leda till livsförändringar.

  • 12.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Möten i ögonhöjd: att sätta bemötande i fokus i arbetet med unga vuxna2022Inngår i: Child and Youth Studies Conference, University West November 10-11 2022: Growing Up In Challenging Times. Book of abstracts, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, s. 15-16Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under två år med start våren 2020 pågick det så kallade Vi-projektets arbete med att hjälpa 1 000 unga i åldrarna 15–24 år som var eller riskerade att bli UVAS (unga som varken arbetar eller studerar). Projektägare var Folkhögskoleförvaltningen i Västra Götalandsregionen och medfinansiärer var Europeiska socialfonden (ESF). Projektet hade som övergripande mål att UVAS ska ”äga sin egen framtid, förbättra sin hälsa och närma sig jobb eller studier”. Arbetet involverade samverkanspartners som kommunalförbunden i Fyrbodal och Sjuhärad, Rädda Barnen, fem folkhögskolor, vuxenutbildningen i Borås, Trollhättan och Vänersborg samt 19 kommuner.

    Resultatet från en del av projektet, nämligen bemötande presenteras i detta pass. I Vi-projektet benämndes bemötande som möten i ögonhöjd, och stod i fokus redan från början. Enligt projektbeskrivningen är ett möte i ögonhöjd att försöka bortse från de maktaspekter som finns i mötet mellan till exempel handläggare och unga vuxna och tillgodose individens behov genom att lyssna till vad hen har att säga och medvetandegöra hens roll och aktörskap i samhället. Detta med förhoppningen att möjliggöra en förändring i den unga vuxnas liv. Men hur beskriver medarbetare möten i ögonhöjd och, inte minst, vad har sådana möten betytt för de unga vuxna i Vi-projektet?

  • 13.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    När det blir en sjukdom: en studie om hur olika yrkesprofessioners arbete påverkas då spelberoende, 'Internet Gaming Disorder', blir en diagnos.2018Inngår i: Nya vägar, nya perspektiv: Barn- och ungdoms nätverket i samarbete med Tema barn, Linkopings universitet, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2018, s. 8-8Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    Idag arbetar flera verksamheter på olika sätt med de diagnoser som finns och påverkar barn och ungdomar i skolan. Nya diagnoser tillkommer då och då, och sommaren 2018 informerade Världshälsoorganisationen (WHO) om att TV-spelberoende nu klassas som en diagnos, s.k. Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD). TV-spel av olika karaktär är frekvent använda av barn och ungdomar och i Sverige spelar 87 % av barn 9-12 år varje dag. Spelberoende är omdiskuterat och kan ses som ett eget problem eller en följd av andra problem. Avsaknaden av forskning inom området innebar att American Pyschiatric Association uppmanade till mer forskning om Internet Gaming Disorder och med en IGD-diagnos från WHO kommer mer kunskap inom området att behövas. Syftet med föreliggande studie är att följa hur elevhälsans, socialtjänstens och hälso- och sjukvårdens arbete förändras i och med en ny diagnos och vilket lärande som därigenom kommer till stånd. Vidare ska studien undersöka hur förhållningssättet till barns och ungdomars aktörskap ser ut vid ny diagnos.

  • 14.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier. Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Parenting Across Cultures: Parental attributions, attitudes and behaviour2013Licentiatavhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Previously studies in parenting have mainly been conducted in Western countries. Not uncommonly results from such studies are used to describe general, worldwide trends. In an attempt to make the field of parenting research more culturally heterogeneous, an international research project, Parenting Across Cultures, was started. The project includes nine participant countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and USA) and its purpose is to examine parenting across cultures. This thesis is based on reports from parent participants. The aim of Study I was to investigate mothers’ and fathers’ (77 participants from each group) attributions and attitudes in Sweden. The results revealed that Swedish parents are more polarized in their attitudes than in their attributions, they think more alike for parenting attitudes and there was greater variability for parenting attributions, particularly regarding uncontrollable success, as opposed to attributions regarding adult- or child-controlled failure. Regarding attitudes, mothers and fathers reported more progressive than authoritarian attitudes. Fathers reported higher adult-controlled failure and child-controlled failure attributions than mothers. In Study II the aim was to assess whether mothers’ and fathers’ self-reports of acceptance-rejection, warmth, and hostility/rejection/neglect of their children differ in the nine countries. A total of 1996 parents (998 mothers and 998 fathers) participated in the study. Mothers and fathers reported high acceptance and warmth and low rejection and hostility/rejection/neglect (HRN) of their children in all nine countries. Despite the overwhelmingly high levels of acceptance and low levels of rejection across all countries, and despite our use of statistical controls for parental age, education, social desirability, and child age, some systematic differences between countries emerged. In summary, parents in the studies report higher similarity about parenting in some cases, for example concerning acceptance and warmth and hostility/rejection/neglect, but lower in others, such as the Swedish parents’ reports about attributions.

  • 15.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    When it becomes a diagnosis: a study of professionals’ work after Internet Gaming Disorder, IGD, becomes a diagnosis2019Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Today various professionals’ work involves diagnosing children and youth. This affects children and youth in different ways, among them, their performance in school. A new diagnosis can be both positive and negative. Those who support a diagnosis claim that without one, it is difficult to help people with problems or do research. But a negative aspect can be that people who receive a diagnosis can be stigmatised and suffer from lower self-esteem.

    In 2018, the World Health Organisation put out a statement clarifying that too much gaming would now be classified as Internet Gaming Disorder. 87 % of Swedish children aged 9-12 play different games on the Internet or in other settings every day. Excessive gaming has long been discussed and can be seen as a problem in itself or as a problem related to something else. There is not much research into gaming disorder and with this new diagnosis more knowledge is required.

    The purpose of this study is to interview different professional groups who work with children and youths: student health professionals (e.g. school nurses), social services (e.g. family support) and child psychiatry. The aim is to gain more knowledge about how these professionals’ work changes when a new diagnosis is classified. What do they learn and how do they collaborate? Another aim is to study which approach they take in regard to children’s agency after a new diagnosis. 

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Bacikova-Sleskova, Maria
    University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik, Košice (SVK).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Community series in the consequences of COVID-19 on the mental well-being of parents, children and adolescents, volume II: Editorial2023Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 14, s. 1-2Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Bolin, Anette
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Föräldraresursen: att samverka för stöd till föräldrar2017Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Einarsson, Isak
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skåne, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Boson, Karin
    Department of Psychology, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences (NOR).
    Claesdotter-Knutsson, Emma
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skåne, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Adolescents’ Perceptions of a Relapse Prevention Treatment for Problematic Gaming: A Qualitative Study2023Inngår i: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 11, nr 17, s. 2366-2366Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the increasing prevalence of problematic gaming, in 2013, the diagnosis “Internetgaming disorder (IGD)” was included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5) as a potential diagnosis. With a new diagnosis, it is important to determine treatment options. The importance of the parent–child relationship has been emphasised in problematic gaming and its treatment. This study aims to provide more knowledge about adolescents’ perceptions of a treatment for problematic gaming and understand whether such treatment may have a bearing on the parent–child relationship. We conducted individual interviews with nine adolescents who completed a treatment for problematic gaming. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis revealed three themes.

    Theme 1: adolescents’ experiences of the new treatment;

    Theme 2: adolescents’ perceptions of the effect of the treatment on their gaming behaviour; and

    Theme 3: adolescents’ perceptions of changes in their parent–child relationships.

    The adolescents viewed the treatment as a way of gaining control of their gaming, a process in which a therapist played an integral part. For the majority of the adolescents in our study, the main effects of treatment were gaining insight into how their gaming and gaming-related behaviours affected other parts of their lives. The participants felt that the treatment improved their relationship with their parents through reducing everyday conflicts. This new knowledge can be used for the development of future interventions involving children and adolescents.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.
    Parental perceptions of children’s agency: Parental warmth, school achievement and adjustment2016Inngår i: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 186, nr 8, s. 1203-1211Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined Swedish mothers’ and fathers’ warmth towards their children in relation to their children's agency. It also examined the longitudinal relation between agency and children's externalising, internalising, and school achievement. Swedish children's mothers and fathers (N = 93) were interviewed at three time points (when children were 8, 9, and 10 years old) about their warmth towards their children, children's agency, and children's externalising and internalising behaviours and school achievement. Parental warmth at Time 1 was significantly correlated with child agency at Time 2, which was significantly correlated with child externalising and internalising behaviours and academic achievement at Time 3. There were no differences between girls and boys. Results from this study indicate that Swedish parents’ warmth is directly related to subsequent perceptions of children's agency, which in turn are related to subsequently lower child externalising and internalising problems and higher academic achievement. These findings held in the context of a three-year longitudinal study and for both boys and girls, suggesting the importance of child agency in the link between parental warmth and children's adjustment.

  • 20.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Children's agency in parent-child, teacher-pupil and peer relationship contexts2018Inngår i: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, nr sup1, artikkel-id 1565239Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to examine children's perception of their agency in different relationship contexts. Historically, most studies conducted in Sweden concerning children's agency, in relation to their self-efficacy and perceptions of their effectiveness as agents, have been carried out in school situations or other institutional organizations. Past research has shown that children'sagency has positive links to health, school achievement and/or adjustment. Method: Interviews were conducted with 103 10-year-old Swedish children to examine three relationship contexts: parent-child, teacher-pupil, and peer relations. Vignettes about the different contexts were presented to the children and their answers were analysed with thematic analysis. Results: The results show that children think of their agency differently depending upon which relationship context they find themselves in. Most perceived agency are found insituations with peers, and children perceive they have the least agency with teachers. In situations with parents, children think they would react with more resistance than with peers and teachers. It is mainly with other children that they would show assertiveness and try to find asolution together, while they would be more emotional and perceive less power with adults. Conclusion: We conclude that children make adistinction in their perception of agency depending upon the relationship context. These findings can be relevant for helping children receive more agency in all contexts, which might have apositive impact on health and adjustment.

  • 21.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Cultural values, parenting and child adjustment in Sweden2024Inngår i: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, s. 1-9Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To examine whether mothers' and fathers' individualism, collectivism and conformity values are significantly related to parenting behaviours and child adjustment during middle childhood, mothers (n = 95), fathers (n = 72) and children (n = 98) in Sweden were interviewed when children were, on average, 10 years old. Mothers' collectivism was significantly correlated with mothers' and fathers' higher expectations for children's family obligations. Fathers' collectivism was significantly correlated with mothers' and fathers' higher warmth and with fathers' higher expectations for children's family obligations. Fathers' conformity values were significantly correlated with fewer child internalising problems. Fathers' higher collectivism was associated with more paternal warmth even after taking into account the other cultural values, child gender and fathers' education. Our findings indicate that individual-level cultural values are correlated with some aspects of parenting and child adjustment in Sweden.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Education and Parenting in Sweden2019Inngår i: School Systems, Parent Behavior, and Academic Achievement: An International Perspective / [ed] Sorbring, Emma; Lansford, Jennifer E., Springer, 2019, s. 95-109Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish children's rights to school and a childhood were discussed as early as 1900 and today nearly all (99.9%) Swedish children from the age of six attend comprehensive school for ten years. Comprehensive school, both private and public, is free of charge and compulsory for everyone. In general, Sweden is described as a country where young people are perceived as individuals with agency, both in the family and in school. It is expected that students should be treated with respect and taught about their rights and how to practice them. Teachers are supposed to encourage young people's agency by, for example, letting them take responsibility and be involved in decisions about the school work and their lives. This is related to the goal of teaching young people more about how to become citizens and about democratic values in society. Although Swedish schools have a high interest in students' own agency and their mental health, politics put pressure on the schools to achieve higher academic success among students. This chapter presents the current Swedish education system and its challenges when it comes to maintaining high values concerning students' mental health and, simultaneously, striving for better academic results, focusing particularly on families belonging to the lower socioeconomic class and with a migration background.

  • 23.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och organisationsstudier.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Swedish Children's Beliefs about Agency in Family, School and Peer Situations2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine children's beliefs with regard to their agency (i.e., to know and predict your own actions and the consequences of them), in different contexts (family, school and peer-situations). Interviews were conducted with 103 ten-year-old Swedish children. Vignettes were presented to the children and their answers were written down for subsequent thematic analysis. Children think of their agency differently depending upon which context they find themselves in. The contexts where children believe most in their agency are found in situations with peers, and the contexts where they believe least in their agency are experienced with teachers. In situations with parents children think they would react with more resistance than with peers and teachers.

  • 24.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och organisationsstudier.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och organisationsstudier.
    Swedish children’s beliefs about agency in family, school and peer situationsManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 25.
    Henry, Alastair
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.
    Inledning2011Inngår i: Läraryrket: ett mångfacetterat uppdrag / [ed] Henry, Alastair, Gurdal, Sevtap, Asplund Carlsson, Maj, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2011, 1, s. 11-17Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 26.
    Henry, Alastair
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Gurdal, SevtapHögskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.Asplund Carlsson, MajHögskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Läraryrket: ett mångfacetterat uppdrag2011Collection/Antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 27.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Ander, Birgitta
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Adolescent smoking, alcohol use, inebriation, and use of narcotics during the Covid-19 pandemic.2022Inngår i: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 10, nr 1, artikkel-id 44Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to investigate how general family relations, reported changes in family interaction and involvement with peers during the Covid-19 pandemic, and following rules and recommendations during the pandemic relate to adolescent smoking, alcohol use, inebriation, and use of narcotics during Covid-19.

    METHODS: An online national survey of Swedish adolescents (n = 1818) aged 15-19 years was conducted in June 2020. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to predict adolescents' reported change in substance use during the pandemic. Person-oriented analyses, were used to identify clusters of participants characterized by similar patterns of substance use following ANOVA analysis with Scheffe post hoc tests testing differences between clusters in terms of family relations, reported changes in family interaction and involvement with peers during the Covid-19 pandemic, and following rules and recommendations during the pandemic.

    RESULTS: Higher general family conflict, increased involvement with peers, a strained relationship with parents, and less compliance with rules and restrictions during the pandemic predicted a reported increase in adolescent substance use during this period. The grouping of scores for adolescent smoking, alcohol use, inebriation, and use of narcotics resulted in a six-cluster solution. One cluster (n = 767) either did not use or had decreased use of substances during the Covid-19 pandemic. Five other clusters, thus risk clusters, had retained or increased use of substances during the pandemic. Poor general family relations, increased peer involvement, and difficulties to conform to the rules and restrictions during the covid-19 pandemic were characteristics of risk clusters.

    CONCLUSIONS: Most of adolescents in our study did not increase their substance use during the pandemic. However, adolescents with poor family relations who turn to peers during stressful times and who have difficulty following the government's rules and restrictions, are at risk of increased substance use during the pandemic. This is a potential threat both to adolescents themselves and others in their surroundings which is why at-risk adolescents and their families need more attention from public health and social services during this time of crisis.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    BMC Psychology
  • 28.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Ander, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping,.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Reported Changes in Adolescent Psychosocial Functioning during the COVID-19 Outbreak2021Inngår i: Adolescents, E-ISSN 2673-7051, nr 1, s. 10-20Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    What effect the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has had on adolescents’ psychosocial functioning is currently unknown. Using the data of 1767 (50.2% female and 49.8 male) adolescents in Sweden, we discuss adolescents’ thoughts and behaviors around the COVID-19 outbreak, as well as reported changes in substance use, everyday life, relations, victimization, and mental health during the outbreak. Results showed that (a) the majority of adolescents have been complying with regulations from the government; (b) although most adolescents did not report changes in their psychosocial functioning, a critical number reported more substance use, conflict with parents, less time spent with peers, and poorer control over their everyday life; and (c) the majority of adolescents have experienced less victimization, yet poorer mental health, during the COVID-19 outbreak. Adolescent girls and adolescents in distance schooling were likely to report negative changes in their psychosocial functioning during the COVID-19 outbreak. Based on these findings, we suggest that society should pay close attention to changes in adolescents’ psychosocial functioning during times of crisis.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Ander, Birgitta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Ungdomars vardag och psykiska hälsa under COVID-19-pandemin2021Inngår i: BarnBladet, s. 16-19Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 30.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi. Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Einarsson, Isak
    Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic, Region Skåne, Malmö (SWE).
    Werner, Marie
    Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic, Region Skåne, Lund (SWE).
    André, Frida
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Håkansson, Anders
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Malmö Addiction Center and Competence Center Addiction, Region Skåne, Malmö (SWE).
    Claesdotter-Knutsson, Emma
    Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic, Region Skåne, Lund (SWE); Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Relapse Prevention Therapy for Problem Gaming or Internet Gaming Disorder in Swedish Child and Youth Psychiatric Clinics: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial2023Inngår i: JMIR Research Protocols, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 12, s. e44318-e44318Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Although gaming is a common arena where children socialize, an increasing number of children are exhibiting signs of problem gaming or internet gaming disorder. An important factor to the development of problem gaming is parent-child relationships. A cognitive behavioral therapy-based form of treatment, labeled relapse prevention, has been developed as a treatment for child and adolescent problem gaming or internet gaming disorder. However, no study has evaluated the effect of this treatment among Swedish children and youth nor the role of the parent-child relationships in this treatment.

    Objective:

    This study aims (1) to evaluate a relapse prevention treatment for patients showing signs of problem gaming or internet gaming disorder recruited from child and youth psychiatric clinics and (2) to test whether the quality of parent-child relationships plays a role in the effect of relapse prevention treatment and vice versa-whether the relapse prevention treatment has a spillover effect on the quality of parent-child relationships. Moreover, we explore the carer's attitudes about parent-child relationships and child gaming, as well as experiences of the treatment among the children, their carers, and the clinicians who carried out the treatment.

    Methods:

    This study is a 2-arm, parallel-group, early-stage randomized controlled trial with embedded qualitative components. Children aged 12-18 years who meet the criteria for problem gaming or internet gaming disorder will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either intervention (relapse prevention treatment) or control (treatment as usual), with a total of 160 (80 + 80) participants. The primary outcomes are measures of gaming and gambling behavior before and after intervention, and the secondary outcomes include child ratings of parent-child communication and family functioning. The study is supplemented with a qualitative component with semistructured interviews to capture participants' and clinicians' experiences of the relapse prevention, as well as attitudes about parent-child relationships and parenting needs in carers whose children completed the treatment.

    Results:

    The trial started in January 2022 and is expected to end in December 2023. The first results are expected in March 2023.

    Conclusions:

    This study will be the first randomized controlled trial evaluating relapse prevention as a treatment for child and adolescent problem gaming and internet gaming disorder in Sweden. Since problem behaviors in children interact with the family context, investigating parent-child relationships adjacent to the treatment of child problem gaming and internet gaming disorder is an important strength of the study. Further, different parties, ie, children, carers, and clinicians, will be directly or indirectly involved in the evaluation of the treatment, providing more knowledge of the treatment and its effect. Limitations include comorbidity in children with problem gaming and internet gaming disorder and challenges with the recruitment of participants.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 31.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Rothenberg, W. Andrew
    Duke University, Duke Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA): University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Mailman Center for Child Development, Miami, FL, USA (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London, UK (GBR).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Amherst, MA, USA (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology , Rome, Italy (ITA) .
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA (USA) ; King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia (SAU).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Department of Psychology, Bogota,Colombia (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand (THA).
    Peña Alampay, Liane
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, 1000 Metro Manila National Capital Region, Philippines (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Department of Special Education, Zarqa, Jordan (JOR); Counseling, Special Education, and Neuroscience Division, Emirates College for Advanced Education, Abu Dhabi, UAE (ARE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples Federico II, Department of Humanistic Studies, Napoli, Italy (ITA).
    Cross-Cultural Examination of Links between Parent-Adolescent Communication and Adolescent Psychological Problems in 12 Cultural Groups.2020Inngår i: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 49, nr 6, s. 1225-1244Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Internalizing and externalizing problems increase during adolescence. However, these problems may be mitigated by adequate parenting, including effective parent-adolescent communication. The ways in which parent-driven (i.e., parent behavior control and solicitation) and adolescent-driven (i.e., disclosure and secrecy) communication efforts are linked to adolescent psychological problems universally and cross-culturally is a question that needs more empirical investigation. The current study used a sample of 1087 adolescents (M = 13.19 years, SD = 0.90, 50% girls) from 12 cultural groups in nine countries including China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States to test the cultural moderation of links between parent solicitation, parent behavior control, adolescent disclosure, and adolescent secrecy with adolescent internalizing and externalizing problems. The results indicate that adolescent-driven communication, and secrecy in particular, is intertwined with adolescents' externalizing problems across all cultures, and intertwined with internalizing problems in specific cultural contexts. Moreover, parent-driven communication efforts were predicted by adolescent disclosure in all cultures. Overall, the findings suggest that adolescent-driven communication efforts, and adolescent secrecy in particular, are important predictors of adolescent psychological problems as well as facilitators of parent-adolescent communication.

  • 32.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Zietz, Susannah
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Bacchini, Dario
    niversity of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    NICHD & UNICEF, New York, NY (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Zhuhai (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno (KEN).
    Junla, Daranee
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    niversity of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA 7 Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA (USA) King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (SAU).
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad de San Buenaventura, Bogotá (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Parenting, Adolescent Sensation Seeking, and Subsequent Substance Use: Moderation by Adolescent Temperament2023Inngår i: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 52, nr 6, s. 1235-1254Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Although previous research has identified links between parenting and adolescent substance use, little is known about therole of adolescent individual processes, such as sensation seeking, and temperamental tendencies for such links. To testtenets from biopsychosocial models of adolescent risk behavior and differential susceptibility theory, this study investigatedlongitudinal associations among positive and harsh parenting, adolescent sensation seeking, and substance use and testedwhether the indirect associations were moderated by adolescent temperament, including activation control, frustration,sadness, and positive emotions. Longitudinal data reported by adolescents (n = 892; 49.66% girls) and their mothers fromeight cultural groups when adolescents were ages 12, 13, and 14 were used. A moderated mediation model showed thatparenting was related to adolescent substance use, both directly and indirectly, through sensation seeking. Indirectassociations were moderated by adolescent temperament. This study advances understanding of the developmental pathsbetween the contextual and individual factors critical for adolescent substance use across a wide range of cultural contexts.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, (USA).
    Rothenberg, W. Andrew
    Duke University, Duke Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC,(USA).
    Riley, Jillian
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (USA).
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Department of Psychology, Bogota,Colombia (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand (TAI).
    Peña Alampay, Liane
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, 1000 Metro Manila National Capital Region, Philippines (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Department of Special Education, Zarqa,(JOR); Counseling, Special Education, and Neuroscience Division, Emirates College for Advanced Education, Abu Dhabi, (UAE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples Federico II, Department of Humanistic Studies, Napoli, Italy (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, (USA); UNICEF, New York, NY, (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London, UK (GBR).
    Chang, Lei
    Department of Psychology,University of Macau, Macau (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Amherst, MA, (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology , Rome, Italy (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University, Department of Maternal and Child Health & Adolescent Health, Chongqing, China (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University, Global Health Research Center, Kunshan, China (CHN).
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, (USA).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand (THA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA (USA); King Abdulaziz University (JOR).
    Longitudinal Trajectories of Four Domains of Parenting in Relation to Adolescent Age and Puberty in Nine Countries2021Inngår i: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 92, nr 4, s. e493-e512Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Children, mothers, and fathers in 12 ethnic and regional groups in nine countries (N = 1,338 families) were interviewed annually for 8 years (Mage child = 8-16 years) to model four domains of parenting as a function of child age, puberty, or both. Latent growth curve models revealed that for boys and girls, parents decrease their warmth, behavioral control, rules/limit-setting, and knowledge solicitation in conjunction with children's age and pubertal status as children develop from ages 8 to 16 across a range of diverse contexts, with steeper declines after age 11 or 12 in three of the four parenting domains. National, ethnic, and regional differences and similarities in the trajectories as a function of age and puberty are discussed.

  • 34.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Duke University, Durham, (USA).
    Rothenberg, W. Andrew
    Duke University, Durham, (USA).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Department of Psychology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education (ARE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Neapel, (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau (MAC).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome, (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University (CHN).
    Morgenstern, Glen
    Duke University, Durham, (USA).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza” (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University (THA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University (USA) and King Abdulaziz University (SAU).
    Uribe Tirado, L.M.
    Department of Psychology, Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín 050001, (COL).
    Compliance with Health Recommendations and Vaccine Hesitancy During the COVID Pandemic in Nine Countries2022Inngår i: Prevention Science, ISSN 1389-4986, E-ISSN 1573-6695, s. 1-15Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Longitudinal data from the Parenting Across Cultures study of children, mothers, and fathers in 12 cultural groups in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the USA; N = 1331 families) were used to understand predictors of compliance with COVID-19 mitigation strategies and vaccine hesitancy. Confidence in government responses to the COVID pandemic was also examined as a potential moderator of links between pre-COVID risk factors and compliance with COVID mitigation strategies and vaccine hesitancy. Greater confidence in government responses to the COVID pandemic was associated with greater compliance with COVID mitigation strategies and less vaccine hesitancy across cultures and reporters. Pre-COVID financial strain and family stress were less consistent predictors of compliance with COVID mitigation strategies and vaccine hesitancy than confidence in government responses to the pandemic. Findings suggest the importance of bolstering confidence in government responses to future human ecosystem disruptions, perhaps through consistent, clear, non-partisan messaging and transparency in acknowledging limitations and admitting mistakes to inspire compliance with government and public health recommendations. © 2022, Society for Prevention Research.

  • 35.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Duke University, Durham, (ÜSA).
    Rothenburg, W. Andrew
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, (USA).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, L.M.
    Department of Psychology, Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín 050001, (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, S.
    Department of Psychology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education (ARE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Neapel, (ITA).
    Bornstein, M.H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD 20810, (USA), UNICEF, New York, NY 10001, (USA), Institute for Fiscal Studies, London WC2R 2PP, (GBR).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau (MAC).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome, (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Liu, Qin
    Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Global Health Research Center, Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan 215300, (CHN).
    Malone, Patric S.
    Duke University (USA).
    Oburu, Paul
    Department of Psychology, Maseno University, Maseno (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma "LA Sapienza" (ITA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University (USA) and King Abdulaziz University (SAU).
    Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals: Evidence from the Longitudinal Parenting Across Cultures Project2021Inngår i: Sustainable Human Development: Evidence from longitudinal studies in childhood and adolescence, Bristol: Bristol University Press , 2021, s. 89-112Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 36.
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    et al.
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Skinner, Ann T
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Macau (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma "La Sapienza,"Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University, Durham, NC. (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma "La Sapienza,"Rome (ITA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, (USA), and King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (SAU).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples "Federico II," Naples (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H
    Eunice Kennedy ShriverNational Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA, UNICEF, New York, USA, and Institute for Fiscal Studies, London (GBR).
    Pre-pandemic psychological and behavioral predictors of responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in nine countries.2021Inngår i: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, s. 1-16Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, adolescents (N = 1,330; Mages = 15 and 16; 50% female), mothers, and fathers from nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, United States) reported on adolescents' internalizing and externalizing problems, adolescents completed a lab-based task to assess tendency for risk-taking, and adolescents reported on their well-being. During the pandemic, participants (Mage = 20) reported on changes in their internalizing, externalizing, and substance use compared to before the pandemic. Across countries, adolescents' internalizing problems pre-pandemic predicted increased internalizing during the pandemic, and poorer well-being pre-pandemic predicted increased externalizing and substance use during the pandemic. Other relations varied across countries, and some were moderated by confidence in the government's handling of the pandemic, gender, and parents' education.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Cambridge
  • 37.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, U.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.
    Tryggvason, Nina
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för socialpedagogik och sociologi. Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för socialt arbete och socialpedagogik.
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA .
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Peña Alampay, Liana
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, 1000 Metro Manila National Capital Region, Philippin.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Hashemite University,Emirates College for Advanced Education. Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood,, Zarqa, Jordan, and Health and Special Education Division, , Abu Dhabi, UAE .
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Department of Psychology, Caserta, Italy .
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research Program in Developmental Neuroscience, Bethesda, MD, USA .
    Chang, Lei
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Educational Psychology, Hong Kong, China .
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Psychology, Blacksburg, VA, USA .
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA .
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA .
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya .
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA .
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand .
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia .
    Physical Aggression, Relational Aggression, and Endorsement of Reactive Aggression in Nine Countrie: Paper presented at 2015 SRCD Biennial meeting, Philadelphia, USA2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 38.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Zietz, Susannah
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Department of Special Education, Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Bacchini, Dario
    Department of Humanistic Studies, University of Naples “Federico II”,Naples (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda (USA);UNICEF, New York (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London (GBR) .
    Chang, Lei
    Department of Psychology, University of Macau, Macau (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Department of Psychology, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Liu, Qin
    Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (USA).
    Long, Qian
    Global Health Research Center, Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Department of Psychology, Maseno University, Maseno (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Department of Psychology, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Peace Culture Foundation, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia (USA);Department of Psychology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (SAU) .
    Tirado, Liliana Mariana Uribe
    Department of Psychology, Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Department of Psychology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Department of Psychology, Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City (PHL).
    Culture and social change in mothers' and fathers' individualism, collectivism and parenting attitudes2021Inngår i: Social Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-0760, Vol. 10, nr 12, artikkel-id 459Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultures and families are not static over time but evolve in response to social transformations, such as changing gender roles, urbanization, globalization, and technology uptake. Historically, individualism and collectivism have been widely used heuristics guiding cross-cultural comparisons, yet these orientations may evolve over time, and individuals within cultures and cultures themselves can have both individualist and collectivist orientations. Historical shifts in parents' attitudes also have occurred within families in several cultures. As a way of understanding mothers' and fathers' individualism, collectivism, and parenting attitudes at this point in history, we examined parents in nine countries that varied widely in country-level individualism rankings. Data included mothers' and fathers' reports (N = 1338 families) at three time points in China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. More variance was accounted for by within-culture than between-culture factors for parents' individualism, collectivism, progressive parenting attitudes, and authoritarian parenting attitudes, which were predicted by a range of sociodemographic factors that were largely similar for mothers and fathers and across cultural groups. Social changes from the 20th to the 21st century may have contributed to some of the similarities between mothers and fathers and across the nine countries.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    MDPI
  • 39.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Zietz, Susannah
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA (USA); UNICEF, New York, NY, USA (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London, UK (GBR).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Amherst, MA, USA (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology , Rome, Italy (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University, Department of Maternal and Child Health & Adolescent Health, Chongqing, China (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University, Global Health Research Center, Kunshan, China (CHN).
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA (USA); King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah. Saudi Arabia (SAU).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Department of Psychology, Bogota, Colombia (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Department of Special Education, Zarqa, Jordan (JOR); Counseling, Special Education, and Neuroscience Division, Emirates College for Advanced Education, Abu Dhabi, UAE (ARE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples Federico II, Department of Humanistic Studies, Napoli, Italy (ITA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China (CHN).
    Opportunities and peer support for aggression and delinquency during adolescence in nine countries.2020Inngår i: New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, ISSN 1520-3247, E-ISSN 1534-8687, Vol. 2020, nr 172, s. 73-88Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study tested culture-general and culture-specific aspects of adolescent developmental processes by focusing on opportunities and peer support for aggressive and delinquent behavior, which could help account for cultural similarities and differences in problem behavior during adolescence. Adolescents from 12 cultural groups in 9 countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States) provided data at ages 12, 14, and 15. Variance in opportunities and peer support for aggression and delinquency, as well as aggressive and delinquent behavior, was greater within than between cultures. Across cultural groups, opportunities and peer support for aggression and delinquency increased from early to mid-adolescence. Consistently across diverse cultural groups, opportunities and peer support for aggression and delinquency predicted subsequent aggressive and delinquent behavior, even after controlling for prior aggressive and delinquent behavior. The findings illustrate ways that international collaborative research can contribute to developmental science by embedding the study of development within cultural contexts.

  • 40.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    et al.
    Sapienza University of Rome, (ITA).
    Zuffiano, Antonio
    Sapienza University of Rome (ITA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, (ÜSA).
    Thartori, Eriona
    Sapienza University of Rome (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau (MAC).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst (USA).
    Giunta, Laura Di
    Sapienza University of Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University; (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, (KEN).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University and King Abdulaziz University, (SAU).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University (THA).
    Maria Uribe Tirado, Liliana
    Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellin; (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University (THA).
    Al-Hassan, Suha
    Hashemite University, Jordan and Emirates College for Advanced Education, Abu Dhabi (ARE).
    Pena Alampay, Liane
    Ateneo de Manila University; (PHL).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II” (ITA).
    Positive Youth Development: Parental Warmth, Values, and Prosocial Behavior in 11 Cultural Groups2021Inngår i: Journal of youth development, ISSN 2325-4017, Vol. 16, nr 2-3, SI, s. 379-401Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The current cross-cultural study aimed to extend research on parenting and children’s prosocial behavior by examining relations among parental warmth, values related to family obligations (i.e., children’s support to and respect for their parents, siblings, and extended family), and prosocial behavior during the transition to adolescence (from ages 9 to 12). Mothers, fathers, and their children (N = 1107 families) from 8 countries including 11 cultural groups (Colombia; Rome and Naples, Italy; Jordan; Kenya; the Philippines; Sweden; Thailand; and African Americans, European Americans, and Latin Americans in the United States) provided data over 3 years in 3 waves (M-age of child in wave 1 = 9.34 years, SD = 0.75; 50.5% female). Overall, across all 11 cultural groups, multivariate change score analysis revealed positive associations among the change rates of parental warmth, values related to family obligations, and prosocial behavior during late childhood (from age 9 to 10) and early-adolescence (from age 10 to 12). In most cultural groups, more parental warmth at ages 9 and 10 predicted steeper mean-level increases in prosocial behavior in subsequent years. The findings highlight the prominent role of positive family context, characterized by warm relationships and shared prosocial values, in fostering children’s positive development in the transition to adolescence. The practical implications of these findings are discussed.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41.
    Pena Alampay, Liane
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City (PHL).
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Center for Child and Family Policy,Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Nyanza (KEN).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (USA);Institute for Fiscal Studies, London,(GBR).
    Chang, Lei
    Universita di Roma Sapienza Facolta di Psicologia 2, Taipa, Macau (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst (USA).
    Rothenberg, W. Andrew
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma "La Sapienza", Roma, Lazio (ITA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia (USA); King Abdulaziz University (SAU).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Suthep, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, Lilliana M.
    Universidad de San Buenaventura - Medellín, Medellin (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Suthep, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR); Emirates College for Advanced Education( ARE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples Federico II, Naples (ITA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma "La Sapienza", Roma, Lazio (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Change in Caregivers’ Attitudes and Use of Corporal Punishment Following a Legal Ban: A Multi-Country Longitudinal Comparison2022Inngår i: Child Maltreatment, ISSN 1077-5595, E-ISSN 1552-6119, Vol. 27, nr 4, s. 561-571Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined whether a policy banning corporal punishment enacted in Kenya in 2010 is associated with changes in Kenyan caregivers’ use of corporal punishment and beliefs in its effectiveness and normativeness, and compared to caregivers in six countries without bans in the same period. Using a longitudinal study with six waves of panel data (2008-2016), mothers (N = 1086) in Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Thailand, and United States reported household use of corporal punishment and beliefs about its effectiveness and normativeness. Random intercept models and multi-group piecewise growth curve models indicated that the proportion of corporal punishment behaviors used by the Kenyan caregivers decreased post-ban at a significantly different rate compared to the caregivers in other countries in the same period. Beliefs of effectiveness of corporal punishment were declining among the caregivers in all sites, whereas the Kenyan mothers reported increasing perceptions of normativeness of corporal punishment post-ban, different from the other sites. While other contributing factors cannot be ruled out, our natural experiment suggests that corporal punishment decreased after a national ban, a shift that was not evident in sites without bans in the same period.

  • 42.
    Putnick, Diane L.
    et al.
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, USA .
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, USA .
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China .
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA .
    Malone, Patrick S.
    University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul O.
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya .
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Rome University “La Sapienza,” Rome, Italy.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, the Philippines .
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan .
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy .
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Agreement in Mother and Father Acceptance-Rejection, Warmth, and Hostility/Rejection/ Neglect of Children Across Nine Countries2012Inngår i: Cross-cultural research, ISSN 1069-3971, E-ISSN 1552-3578, Vol. 46, nr 3, s. 191-223Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors assessed whether mothers' and fathers' self-reports of acceptance-rejection, warmth, and hostility/rejection/neglect (HRN) of their preadolescent children differ cross-nationally and relative to the gender of the parent and child in 10 communities in 9 countries, including China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States (N = 998 families). Mothers and fathers in all countries reported a high degree of acceptance and warmth, and a low degree of HRN, but countries also varied. Mothers reported greater acceptance of children than fathers in China, Italy, Sweden, and the United States, and these effects were accounted for by greater self-reported warmth in mothers than in fathers in China, Italy, the Philippines, Sweden, and Thailand and less HRN in mothers than in fathers in Sweden. Fathers reported greater warmth than mothers in Kenya. Mother and father acceptance-rejection were moderately correlated. Relative levels of mother and father acceptance and rejection appear to be country specific. © 2012 SAGE Publications.

  • 43.
    Risenfors, Signild
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.
    Kategoriseringar om kultur och etnicitet2011Inngår i: Läraryrket : ett mångfacetterat uppdrag / [ed] Henry, Alastair, Gurdal, Sevtap, Asplund Carlsson, Maj, Lund: Studenlitteratur , 2011, 1, s. 125-136Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 44.
    Risenfors, Signild
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för psykologi och organisationsstudier.
    Korankurser som föreningsverksamhet? : En undersökning bland muslimska föreningar i Västra Götalandsregionen 2011Rapport (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    Islam uppfattas fortfarande som en ny företeelse i Europa trots att muslimer har funnits nästan lika länge i Europa som i Mellanöstern. Det som är nytt är istället den invandring av muslimer som ägt rum på senare tid till Europa. När det gäller Sverige är islam däremot en relativt ny företeelse; 1930 räknade man till ca 15 muslimer i Sverige och 2008 uppskattades antalet till ca 110 000 stycken. I och med den nya invandringen har olika muslimska grupperingar mötts i icke-muslimska kontexter, vilket bidragit till att en mer komplex tolkningstradition av Koranen växt fram. De muslimska föreningarna är en sådan plats där tolkning av Koranen sker.

    Målet med föreliggande studie är att bidra till mer kunskap om korankurser i Västra Götalandsregionen genom en beskrivning av föreningarna och av deras korankurser.

    Syftet är att lokalisera muslimska föreningar i regionen för att därefter ta reda på i vilken utsträckning, samt med vilka resurser och material, dessa föreningar bedriver korankurser för barn och ungdomar.

    Resultatet visar att många av föreningarna fungerar som både religiösa och sociala mötesplatser. Föreningarnas organisation ser olika ut, men de flesta hör till en paraplyorganisation. Somliga har kontakter med ett hemland och samarbetar med lokala föreningar på orten samt studieförbund som Sensus, Ibn Rushd och ABF.

    1Ibn Rushd är ett muslimskt studieförbund som startats med stöd från bland annat Sensus, ettstudieförbund som särskilt lyfter fram livsfrågor, mångfald och globala frågor.

    Korankurserna som riktar sig till barn består av koranläsning och diskussion av innehåll men också av social samvaro med utflykter. Verksamheten är organiserad utifrån svensk föreningslivsmodell vilket i vissa fall skapar problem för föreningar som inte räknar medlemsantalet utifrån antal personer utan familjer. I samtalet med representanter för de muslimska föreningarna lyfter man fram integration som ett angeläget arbete för föreningen. Genom att vara en länk mellan medlemmarna och svenska samhället ser representanterna sig som en viktig del i att hjälpa till med integrationen. 

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 45.
    Rothenberg, W. Andrew
    et al.
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA), University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (USA).
    Bizzego, Andrea
    University of Trento, Trento (ITA).
    Esposito, Gianluca
    University of Trento, Trento (ITA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples "Federico II", Naples (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland (USA); UNICEF, New York, New York (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Zhuhai (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma "La Sapienza", Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University, Suzhou (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma "La Sapienza", Rome (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA (USA); King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (SAU).
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad de San Buenaventura, Bogotá (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Pena
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon (PHL).
    Predicting Adolescent Mental Health Outcomes Across Cultures: A Machine Learning Approach2023Inngår i: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 52, nr 8, s. 1595-1619Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescent mental health problems are rising rapidly around the world. To combat this rise, clinicians and policymakers need to know which risk factors matter most in predicting poor adolescent mental health. Theory-driven research has identified numerous risk factors that predict adolescent mental health problems but has difficulty distilling and replicating these findings. Data-driven machine learning methods can distill risk factors and replicate findings but have difficulty interpreting findings because these methods are atheoretical. This study demonstrates how data- and theory-driven methods can be integrated to identify the most important preadolescent risk factors in predicting adolescent mental health. Machine learning models examined which of 79 variables assessed at age 10 were the most important predictors of adolescent mental health at ages 13 and 17. These models were examined in a sample of 1176 families with adolescents from nine nations. Machine learning models accurately classified 78% of adolescents who were above-median in age 13 internalizing behavior, 77.3% who were above-median in age 13 externalizing behavior, 73.2% who were above-median in age 17 externalizing behavior, and 60.6% who were above-median in age 17 internalizing behavior. Age 10 measures of youth externalizing and internalizing behavior were the most important predictors of age 13 and 17 externalizing/internalizing behavior, followed by family context variables, parenting behaviors, individual child characteristics, and finally neighborhood and cultural variables. The combination of theoretical and machine-learning models strengthens both approaches and accurately predicts which adolescents demonstrate above average mental health difficulties in approximately 7 of 10 adolescents 3-7 years after the data used in machine learning models were collected.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 46.
    Rothenberg, W Andrew
    et al.
    Duke University Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham (USA); University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    Duke University Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham (USA).
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples "Federico II,", Naple (ITA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Macau (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma "La Sapienza,", Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Kisumu (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma "La Sapienza,", Rome (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia (USA); King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (SAU).
    Bornstein, Marc H
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda (USA); UNICEF, New York (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London (GBR).
    The Intergenerational Transmission of Maladaptive Parenting and its Impact on Child Mental Health: Examining Cross-Cultural Mediating Pathways and Moderating Protective Factors2023Inngår i: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 54, s. 870-890Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a sample of 1338 families from 12 cultural groups in 9 nations, we examined whether retrospectively remembered Generation 1 (G1) parent rejecting behaviors were passed to Generation 2 (G2 parents), whether such intergenerational transmission led to higher Generation 3 (G3 child) externalizing and internalizing behavior at age 13, and whether such intergenerational transmission could be interrupted by parent participation in parenting programs or family income increases of > 5%. Utilizing structural equation modeling, we found that the intergenerational transmission of parent rejection that is linked with higher child externalizing and internalizing problems occurs across cultural contexts. However, the magnitude of transmission is greater in cultures with higher normative levels of parent rejection. Parenting program participation broke this intergenerational cycle in fathers from cultures high in normative parent rejection. Income increases appear to break this intergenerational cycle in mothers from most cultures, regardless of normative levels of parent rejection. These results tentatively suggest that bolstering protective factors such as parenting program participation, income supplementation, and (in cultures high in normative parent rejection) legislative changes and other population-wide positive parenting information campaigns aimed at changing cultural parenting norms may be effective in breaking intergenerational cycles of maladaptive parenting and improving child mental health across multiple generations.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Springer
  • 47.
    Rothenberg, W Andrew
    et al.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, (USA); University of Miami Miller, School of Medicine, Miami, FL,(USA).
    Skinner, Ann T
    Duke University, Durham, NC, (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    Duke University, Durham, NC, (USA).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II,”, Napoli, (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H
    NICHD, Bethesda, MD, (USA) UNICEF, New York, NY, (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London, (GBR).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Taipa, (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, (USA): Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, Helsinki, (FIN).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza,”, Rome, (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University, Durham, NC, (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Junla, Daranee
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, (THA).
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan, (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza,”, Rome, (ITA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, (USA); King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah,(SAU).
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellin, (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Manila, (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Abu Dhabi Early Childhood Authority, Abu Dhabi, (ARE); Hashemite University, Zarqa,(JOR).
    How adolescents' lives were disrupted over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic: A longitudinal investigation in 12 cultural groups in 9 nations from March 2020 to July 2022.2024Inngår i: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, s. 1-17Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    It is unclear how much adolescents' lives were disrupted throughout the COVID-19 pandemic or what risk factors predicted such disruption. To answer these questions, 1,080 adolescents in 9 nations were surveyed 5 times from March 2020 to July 2022. Rates of adolescent COVID-19 life disruption were stable and high. Adolescents who, compared to their peers, lived in nations with higher national COVID-19 death rates, lived in nations with less stringent COVID-19 mitigation strategies, had less confidence in their government's response to COVID-19, complied at higher rates with COVID-19 control measures, experienced the death of someone they knew due to COVID-19, or experienced more internalizing, externalizing, and smoking problems reported more life disruption due to COVID-19 during part or all of the pandemic. Additionally, when, compared to their typical levels of functioning, adolescents experienced spikes in national death rates, experienced less stringent COVID-19 mitigation measures, experienced less confidence in government response to the COVID-19 pandemic, complied at higher rates with COVID-19 control measures, experienced more internalizing problems, or smoked more at various periods during the pandemic, they also experienced more COVID-19 life disruption. Collectively, these findings provide new insights that policymakers can use to prevent the disruption of adolescents' lives in future pandemics.

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  • 48.
    Rothenburg, W. Andrew
    et al.
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, (USA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education (ARE).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Neapel, (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau (MAC).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002, (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome, (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza” (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University (USA).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University (THA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University (USA) and King Abdulaziz University (SAU).
    Uribe Tirado, L.M.
    Department of Psychology, Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín 050001, (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Department of Psychology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Predicting child aggression: The role of parent and child endorsement of reactive aggression across 13 cultural groups in 9 nations.2023Inngår i: Aggressive Behavior, ISSN 0096-140X, E-ISSN 1098-2337, Vol. 49, nr 3, s. 183-197Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Parent and child endorsement of reactive aggression both predict the emergence of child aggression, but they are rarely studied together and in longitudinal contexts. The present study does so by examining the unique predictive effects of parent and child endorsement of reactive aggression at age 8 on child aggression at age 9 in 1456 children from 13 cultural groups in 9 nations. Multiple group structural equation models explored whether age 8 child and parent endorsement of reactive aggression predicted subsequent age 9 child endorsement of reactive aggression and child aggression, after accounting for prior child aggression and parent education. Results revealed that greater parent endorsement of reactive aggression at age 8 predicted greater child endorsement of aggression at age 9, that greater parent endorsement of reactive aggression at age 8 uniquely predicted greater aggression at age 9 in girls, and that greater child endorsement of reactive aggression at age 8 uniquely predicted greater aggression at age 9 in boys. All three of these associations emerged across cultures. Implications of, and explanations for, study findings are discussed.

  • 49.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    et al.
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University Durham, NC,(USA ).
    Pena Alampay, Liane
    Ateno de Manila University, Manila (PHL).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, NC (USA).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples, Fedrico II, Naples (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Development, Rockville (USA).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza", Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Durham NC (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Sapienza University of Rome, Rome (ITA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia (USA).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Private Practice (THA).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Parenting During Adolescence as a Moderator of Links Between COVID-19 Disruption and Reported Changes in Parents’ and Young Adults’ Adjustment in Five Countries2021Inngår i: SRCD 2021 Virtual Biennial Meeting, 2021Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    ntroductionThe COVID-19 pandemic has presented families around the world with extraordinary challenges related to physical and mental health, economic security, social support, and education. This study capitalizes on a longitudinal, cross-national study of parenting and adolescent development to investigate the protective effects of elements of family functioning present during adolescence, and mother, father, and youth responses three years later about their experiences during the pandemic.Study PopulationData were collected from 484 families in five countries (Italy, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States) with reports from mothers, fathers, and adolescents. Data were collected when youths were approximately 17 (Time 1) and 20 (Time 2) years old.MethodsAt Time 1, trained interviewers facilitated oral, written, or online interviews in participants’ homes or community locations, and participants were interviewed separately to maintain confidentiality among family members. We collected parent and youth reports of parental monitoring, youth reports of disclosure and supportive parenting, and parent reports of destructive conflict. At Time 2, interviews were conducted online or by telephone due to COVID-19 restrictions. Parents and youths completed a short measure of experiences related to COVID-19, including perceived level of personal disruption, confidence in government response to the pandemic, and questions about changes in internalizing and externalizing behaviors now as compared to before the COVID-19 outbreak.We examined three research questions:1. At Time 2, is the level of personal disruption associated with self-reported changes in internalizing and externalizing behaviors for mothers, fathers, and youths?2. At Time 2, is the level of confidence in the government response to the pandemic associated with self-reported changes in internalizing and externalizing behaviors for mothers, fathers, and youths?3. Do higher levels of parental monitoring, youth disclosure, and supportive parenting, and lower levels of destructive conflict during adolescence (Time 1) moderate the Time 2 associations between pandemic disruption and changes in adjustment for mothers, fathers, and youths?ResultsA multigroup path analyses revealed that higher levels of reported disruption during the pandemic are related to increases in internalizing and externalizing behavior after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic for mothers, fathers, and young adults in all five countries with the exception of two associations in Thailand. Confidence in the government’s response was not consistently related to changes in adjustment. Parental monitoring, youth disclosure, and lower levels of destructive parent-adolescent conflict reported by mothers, fathers, and adolescents three years prior to the pandemic buffered the association between disruption during the pandemic and reported changes in internalizing (Figure 1) and externalizing behaviors (Figure 2) in youths and mothers in all countries with two site-specific exceptions. No significant moderation effects were found for father adjustment.

  • 50.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avdelningen för psykologi, pedagogik och sociologi. Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya (KEN).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand (THA).
    Dyadic Coping, Parental Warmth, and Adolescent Externalizing Behavior in Four Countries2022Inngår i: Journal of Family Issues, ISSN 0192-513X, E-ISSN 1552-5481, Vol. 43, nr 1, s. 237-258Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

     This study examined parental warmth as a mediator of relations between mothers’ and fathers’ perceptions of dyadic coping and adolescent externalizing outcomes. Data from 472 adolescents, mothers, and fathers were collected over a three-year period from families in China, Kenya, Sweden, and Thailand. For mothers in all four sites and fathers in three sites, better parental dyadic coping at youth age 13 years predicted higher levels of parental warmth at youth age 14 years. For mothers in all four sites, higher levels of maternal warmth were in turn related to less youth externalizing behavior at the age of 15 years, and higher levels of dyadic coping at youth age 13 years were related to less youth externalizing behavior at the age of 15 years indirectly through maternal warmth. Emotional Security Theory helps explain the process by which dyadic coping is related to adolescent externalizing behavior. The results have important implications for parent- and family-based interventions.

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