Change search
Refine search result
1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Ferreira Magalhães, Ana Catarina
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Cederqvist, L.
    SKB AB, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Robotic Friction Stir Welding of complex geometry and mixed materials2018In: 50th International Symposium on Robotics, ISR 2018, VDE Verlag GmbH , 2018, p. 35-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state process for joining materials which has demonstrated advantages compares with other methods which include joining of mixed materials, hard to weld alloys and consistent and high quality. This paper presents a study of robotic FSW initiated by Volvo Skövde plant to join an insert workpiece of extruded aluminium with a cylinder block of aluminium casting. A three-stage procedure was decided to determine the feasibility to apply robotic FSW. The stages included study of welding the mixed materials, weld along the complex joint line with holes and channels close to the joint, and finally welding the cylinder block. The results based on preliminary analysis indicate that the final tests were successful and the process is feasible for the challenging case study. However, further studies are recommended in order to identify the operating parameters window, tool design, and control of the process in order to optimize productivity and quality. © VDE VERLAG GMBH

  • 2.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Feedback Control of Robotic Friction Stir Welding2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process has been under constant developmentsince its invention, more than 20 years ago. Whereas most industrial applicationsuse a gantry machine to weld linear joints, there are applications which consistof complex three-dimensional joints, requiring more degrees of freedom fromthe machines. The use of industrial robots allows FSW of materials alongcomplex joint lines. There is however one major drawback when using robotsfor FSW: the robot compliance. This results in vibrations and insufficient pathaccuracy. For FSW, path accuracy is important as it can cause the welding toolto miss the joint line and thereby cause welding defects.The first part of this research is focused on understanding how welding forcesaffect the FSW robot accuracy. This was first studied by measuring pathdeviation post-welded and later by using a computer vision system and laserdistance sensor to measure deviations online. Based on that knowledge, a robotdeflection model has been developed. The model is able to estimate thedeviation of the tool from the programmed path during welding, based on thelocation and measured tool forces. This model can be used for online pathcompensation, improving path accuracy and reducing welding defects.A second challenge related to robotic FSW on complex geometries is thevariable heat dissipation in the workpiece, causing great variations in the weldingtemperature. Especially for force-controlled robots, this can lead to severewelding defects, fixture- and machine damage when the material overheats.First, a new temperature method was developed which measures thetemperature at the interface of the tool and the workpiece, based on the thermoelectriceffect. The temperature information is used as input to a closed-looptemperature controller. This modifies primarily the rotational speed of the tooland secondarily the axial force. The controller is able to maintain a stablewelding temperature and thereby improve the weld quality and allow joining ofgeometries which were impossible to weld without temperature control.Implementation of the deflection model and temperature controller are twoimportant additions to a FSW system, improving the process robustness,reducing the risk of welding defects and allowing FSW of parts with highlyvarying heat dissipation.

  • 3.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Robotic Friction Stir Welding for Flexible Production2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a modern welding process that joins materials by frictional heat, generated by a rotating tool. Unlike other welding processes, the material never melts, which is beneficial for the weld properties. FSW is already widely adopted in several industries but the applications are limited to simple geometries like straight lines or circular welds, mostly in aluminium. The welding operation is performed by rigid FSW machines, which deliver excellent welds but puts limitations on the system in terms of flexibility and joint geometries. Therefore, several research groups are working on the implementation of the FSW process on industrial robots. A robot allows welding of three-dimensional geometries and increases the flexibility of the whole system. The high process forces required for FSW, in combination with the limited stiffness of the robot brings some extra complexity to the system.  The limitations of the robot system are addressed in this licentiate thesis.

    One part of the thesis studies the effect of robot deflections on the weld quality. A sensor-based solution is presented that measures the path deviation and compensates this deviation by modifying the robot trajectory. The tool deviation is reduced to an acceptable tolerance and root defects in the weld are hereby eliminated. The sensor-based method provided better process understanding, leading to a new strategy that uses existing force-feedback for path compensations of the tool. This method avoids extra sensors and makes the system less complex. Another part of this work focuses on the extra complexity to maintain a stable welding process on more advanced geometries. A model is presented that allows control of the heat input in the process by control of the downforce. Finally, the robot’s limitations in terms of maximal hardness of the materials to be welded are investigated. Parameter tuning and implementation of preheating are proposed to allow robotic FSW of superalloys.

  • 4.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Three-dimensional friction stir welding of inconel 718 using the ESAB Rosio FSW-Robot2013In: ASM Proceedings of the International Conference: Trends in Welding Research, Chicago, IL, 2013, p. 829-833Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robotic Friction Stir Welding (FSW) facilitates for increased welding flexibility, and allows for studies of forces in three dimensions without having the high cost of a stiff 5-axes FSW machine. Recent developments in tool materials and welding equipment motivate this study on FSW of high-strength alloys by a robot in a three dimensional workspace. New concepts of aircraft engines suggest higher temperatures to increase engine efficiency, requiring more durable materials such as the nickel-based alloy 718. The ESAB Rosio™ FSW robot, used in this study, can deliver up to 15kN downforce and 90Nm torque. This is sufficient for welding high-strength alloys of limited thickness. This study focuses on the process forces during friction stir welding of Inconel 718 with thickness up to 3mm in butt-joint configuration. A newly developed threaded Poly-Crystalline Boron Nitride (PCBN) tool with convex shoulder is used in a local argon-shielded atmosphere. Initial tests are performed in a stiff FSW machine in position controlled mode. The measured process forces in position control are later on used as parameters on the force-controlled robot. Different backing bar materials are investigated with the aim to decrease the risk of root defects. Tool steel and regular inconel backing bars are proven to be too soft for this purpose and alternatives are suggested. The optimal welding parameters are tuned to combine a good weld quality with the process forces that can be obtained by the robot. Preheating is used to further decrease the need of high process forces. Copyright © 2013 ASM International® All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Deflection model for robotic friction stir welding2014In: Industrial robot, ISSN 0143-991X, E-ISSN 1758-5791, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 365-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims to present a deflection model to improve positional accuracy of industrial robots. Earlier studies have demonstrated the lack of accuracy of heavy-duty robots when exposed to high external forces. One application where the robot is pushed to its limits in terms of forces is friction stir welding (FSW). This process requires the robot to deliver forces of several kilonewtons causing deflections in the robot joints. Especially for robots with serial kinematics, these deflections will result in significant tool deviations, leading to inferior weld quality. Design/methodology/approach - This paper presents a kinematic deflection model, assuming a rigid link and flexible joint serial kinematics robot. As robotic FSW is a process which involves high external loads and a constant welding speed of usually below 50 mm/s, many of the dynamic effects are negligible. The model uses force feedback from a force sensor, embedded on the robot, and predicts the tool deviation, based on the measured external forces. The deviation is fed back to the robot controller and used for online path compensation. Findings - The model is verified by subjecting an FSW tool to an external load and moving it along a path, with and without deviation compensation. The measured tool deviation with compensation was within the allowable tolerance for FSW. Practical implications - The model can be applied to other robots with a force sensor. Originality/value - The presented deflection model is based on force feedback and can predict and compensate tool deviations online.

  • 6.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Thermoelectric method for temperature measurement in friction stir welding2013In: Science and technology of welding and joining, ISSN 1362-1718, E-ISSN 1743-2936, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 541-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research within friction stir welding (FSW) has demonstrated that online control of welding parameters can improve the mechanical properties and is necessary for certain applications to guarantee a consistent weld quality. One approach to control the process is by adapting the heat input to maintain a stable welding temperature, within the specified operating boundaries. This requires accurate in-process temperature measurements. This paper presents a novel method to measure the temperature at the interface of the FSW tool and workpiece. The method is based on the thermoelectric effect between dissimilar materials. The measurements are compared to thermocouple measurements and to a physical model and show good correspondence to each other. Experiments demonstrate that the method can quickly detect temperature variations, due to geometrical variations of the workpiece or due to parameter changes. This allows use of the method for online control of robotic FSW.

  • 7.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Temperature control of robotic friction stir welding using the thermoelectric effect2014In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 70, no 1-4, p. 375-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction stir welding (FSW) of non-linear joints receives an increasing interest from several industrial sectors like automotive, urban transport and aerospace. A force-controlled robot is particularly suitable for welding complex geometries in lightweight alloys. However, complex geometries including three-dimensional joints, non-constant thicknesses and heat sinks such as clamps cause varying heat dissipation in the welded product. This will lead to changes in the process temperature and hence an unstable FSW process with varying mechanical properties. Furthermore, overheating can lead to a meltdown, causing the tool to sink down into the workpiece. This paper describes a temperature controller that modifies the spindle speed to maintain a constant welding temperature. A newly developed temperature measurement method is used which is able to measure the average tool temperature without the need for thermocouples inside the tool. The method is used to control both the plunging and welding operation. The developments presented here are applied to a robotic FSW system and can be directly implemented in a production setting.

  • 8.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Surface Quality and Strength in Robotic Friction Stir Welding of Thin Automotive Aluminium Alloys2011In: The 4th International Swedish Production Symposium / [ed] Jan-Eric Ståhl, The Swedish Production Academy , 2011, p. 554-562Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a novel method for joining materials without using consumablesand without melting the materials. It uses a rotating tool that creates frictionalheat and mixes the materials mechanically together. Robotic application of FSW allowsthree-dimensional welding of light-weight metals in e.g. the automotive industry. TheStiRoLight project is driven by Saab Automobile AB and performed at University Westfor investigation of robotic FSW of three-dimensional welding seams. It aims to introduceFSW in the automotive production line. This paper describes the effect of penetrationdepth of the FSW tool during force controlled robotic welding of thin (< 2 mm) aluminium inoverlap configuration. The influence of pin length on strength of welded aluminium sheetsis investigated using tensile and peel tests. The main limiting factor for penetration depthis the surface quality on the backside of the weld, which often is important in automotiveapplications. Further, the roughness of the plates on the backside is measured and relatedto pin length and backing bar properties. This paper shows a relation between penetrationdepth and tensile strength, and suggests an optimal pin length to guarantee a good weldquality while maintaining an acceptable surface quality. The influence of sheet thicknesstolerance is also discussed. Knowledge is fed back to designers and manufacturingengineers to facilitate for use in production with guaranteed product quality.

  • 9.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Oqueka, Jens
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Investigation of path compensation methods for robotic friction stir welding2012In: Industrial robot, ISSN 0143-991X, E-ISSN 1758-5791, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 601-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Friction stir welding (FSW) is a novel method for joining materials without using consumables and without melting the materials. The purpose of this paper is to present the state of the art in robotic FSW and outline important steps for its implementation in industry and specifically the automotive industry.

    Design/methodology/approach – This study focuses on the robot deflections during FSW, by relating process forces to the deviations from the programmed robot path and to the strength of the obtained joint. A robot adapted for the FSW process has been used in the experimental study. Two sensor-based methods are implemented to determine path deviations during test runs and the resulting welds were examined with respect to tensile strength and path deviation.

    Findings – It can be concluded that deflections must be compensated for in high strengths alloys. Several strategies can be applied including online sensing or compensation of the deflection in the robot program. The welding process was proven to be insensitive for small deviations and the presented path compensation methods are sufficient to obtain a strong and defect-free welding joint.

    Originality/value – This paper demonstrates the effect of FSW process forces on the robot, which is not found in literature. This is expected to contribute to the use of robots for FSW. The experiments were performed in a demonstrator facility which clearly showed the possibility of applying robotic FSW as a flexible industrial manufacturing process.

  • 10.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System. TWI Ltd, Cambridge, UK.
    Martin, Jonathan
    TWI Ltd, Cambridge, UK.
    Wei, Sam
    TWI Ltd, Cambridge, UK.
    Robotic Stationary Shoulder FSW: benefits and limitations2016In: Conference proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Friction Stir Welding, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Soron, Mikael
    ESAB Welding AB .
    Three-dimensional friction stir welding of Iconel 718 using the ESAB Rosio FSW-robot2012In: Trends in Welding Research: Proceedings of the International Conference on Trends in Welding Research, June 4-8, 2012, Hilton Chicago/Indian Lakes ResortChicago, Illinois, USA / [ed] Tarasankar DebRoy, Stan A. David, John N. DuPont, Toshihiko Koseki, Harry K. Bhadeshia, Ohio: ASM International, 2012, p. 829-833Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Soron, Mikael
    ESAB Welding AB .
    Cederqvist, Lars
    Influence of side-tilt angle on process forces and lap joint strength in robotic friction stir welding2012In: Proceedings 9th International friction stir welding symposium, Huntsville, AL, USA, 15th to 17th of May 2012, 2012, p. CD-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Soron, Mikael
    ESAB Welding AB .
    Ilar, Torbjörn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Friction stir welding with robot for light vehicle design2010In: Proceedings from the 8th International Friction Stir Welding Symposium: Timmendorfer Strand, Germany 18-20 May 2010, The Welding Institute , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing weight is one of the enablers to design more environmentally friendly vehicles. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) supports low weight design through its capability to join different combinations of light weight materials, e.g. different aluminium alloys, but also through its possibilities in producing continuous joints. StiRoLight is a recently started project for robotised FSW for joining of light weight materials emphasising on the vehicle industry, an industry with a long-time experience of robotic welding. The first task involves investigation of force feedback for maintaining the desired contact force. Another important aspect in robotised FSW is the compliance of the robot, which may result in deviations from the pre-programmed path as a result of the high process forces experienced during the welding operation. The further exploration of three-dimensional FSW seams and definition of the process windows will be part of further research within this project.

  • 14.
    Ferreira Magalhães, Ana Catarina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Cederqvist, L.
    SKB AB, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Håkansson, Emil
    Volvo Cars, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ossiansson, Bruno
    Volvo Cars, Skövde, Sweden.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    A Friction Stir Welding case study using Temperature Controlled Robotics with a HPDC Cylinder Block and dissimilar materials joining2019In: Journal of Manufacturing Processes, ISSN 1526-6125, Vol. 46, p. 177-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The automotive industry is going through a radical transformation from combustion engines to fully electric propulsion, aiming at improving key performance indicators related to efficiency, environmental sustainability and economic competitiveness. In this transition period, it is important to continue the innovation of combustion engines for e.g. plug-in hybrid vehicles. This led Volvo Cars to pursue radically new manufacturing processes such as Friction Stir Welding (FSW). The work presented in this paper is a case study whereby feasibility of using FSW to join a reinforcement element into the aluminium casted Cylinder Block was studied. The complex geometry of the joint required a flexible five-axis manipulator, i.e. an industrial robot, as well as advanced process control, i.e. temperature feedback control, in order to maintain a consistent weld quality throughout the whole component. The process was successfully demonstrated in a lab environment and offers a cost-efficient solution while maintaining the durability and higher efficiency. The outcome of this study shows the great potential of implementing the FSW process in combination with High Pressure Die Casted components, such a Cylinder Block. © 2019 The Society of Manufacturing Engineers

  • 15.
    Ferreira Magalhães, Ana Catarina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems. TWI Ltd. Cambridge, UK.
    Martin, J
    TWI Ltd. Cambridge, UK.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    In-situ temperature measurement in friction stir welding of thick section aluminium alloys2019In: Journal of Manufacturing Processes, ISSN 1526-6125, Vol. 39, p. 12-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a reliable joining technology with a wide industrial uptake. However, several fundamentals of the process such as the temperature inside the stirred zone of the weld and its influence on mechanical properties, are not yet fully understood. This paper shows a method for accurate temperature measurements in multiple locations around the tool, to identify the location of the peak temperature, the temperature variations between the advancing and the retreating side of the tool and its relation to the tool geometry. Both standardised thermocouples in the FSW tool and the novel "tool-workpiece thermocouple" method were used to record temperatures.Bead-on-plate welds in 20 mm thickness AA6082-T6 were produced while the temperatures were measured in three locations on the FSW tool: at the shoulder outer diameter, at the transition from shoulder to probe and at the probe tip. It was found that the hottest point in the stirred zone was 607 °C and was located at the transition between the shoulder and probe, on the retreating-trailing side of the tool. The lowest temperature was found at the probe tip on the retreating-leading side of the tool.The results offer a better understanding of the temperature distribution around a FSW tool. The method presented can be applied to verification of thermal simulation models, tool design optimization, quality assurance and temperature feedback control.

  • 16.
    Silva, Ana
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Analysis of Plunge and Dwell Parameters of Robotic FSW Using TWT Temperature Feedback Control2016In: Proceedings of 11th International Symposium on Friction Stir Welding, Cambridge, UK, 2016, p. 1-11Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction stir welding (FSW) and variants of the process have generated high interest in many industries due to its several advantages such as low distortion, superior mechanical properties over arc welding and the possibility of joining dissimilar materials. Increased complexity of industrial applications require a better control of the welding process in order to guarantee a consistent weld quality. This can be achieved by implementing feedback control based on sensor measurements. Previous studies have demonstrated a direct effect of weld temperature on the mechanical properties of FSW joints, [1], and therefore, temperature is chosen as primary process variable in this study.A new method for temperature measurement in FSW referred to as the Tool-WorkpieceThermocouple (TWT) method has recently been developed by De Backer. The TWT method is based on thermoelectric effect and allows accurate, fast and industrially suitable temperature monitoring during welding, without the need for thermocouples inside the tool [2].This paper presents an application of the TWT method for optimisation of the initial weld phases, plunge and dwell, operation in conventional FSW, which can also be applied to friction stir spot welding (FSSW). An analysis of the operation parameters by using feedback temperature control is presented aiming to better control of the initial weld phases through temperature feedback.

    The introduction of the TWT temperature sensor provides additional process information during welding. Fast data acquisition gives opportunity to differentiate different process phases: contact of probe tip with workpiece surface; plunge phase; dwell phase. This would be followed by tool retraction for FSSW or tool traverse phase for FSW.The effect of the plunge parameters on weld temperature and duration of each phase were studied for the purpose of optimising the process with respect to process (i) robustness, (ii)time, (iii) robot deflection and (iv) quality. By using temperature feedback, it is possible to control the plunge phase to reach a predefined weld temperature, avoiding overheating of the material, which is known to have a detrimental influence on mechanical properties. The work presented in this paper is an important step in the optimization of robotic FSSW and FSW.

  • 17.
    Silva, Ana
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Cooling rate effect on temperature controlled FSW process2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A continuous trend towards more demanding jointgeometries is imposed across various manufacturingindustries. During Friction Stir Welding (FSW) of suchcomplex geometries, the surrounding environment playsan important role on the final weld quality, especially inthermal aspects. In order to guarantee a consistent weldquality for different conditions, in-process weldingparameter adaptation is needed.This paper studies the effect of the cooling rate onmechanical properties for temperature controlled FSW byusing different backing bar materials. A new temperaturesensor solution, the Tool-Workpiece Thermocouple(TWT) method [1], was applied to measure thetemperature during welding. A FSW-robot equipped withtemperature and force feedback control was used, whererotation speed was varied to maintain a constant weldingtemperature. AA7075-T6 lap joints were performed withand without temperature control. The cooling rate duringwelding was acquired and macrographs and mechanicalproperties were evaluated for each weld. The rotationspeed offered a fast response promoting the heat inputnecessary to weld at the set temperature. Temperaturecontrolled welds presented a better behaviour undertensile loads. The results prove that temperature controlusing the TWT method is suitable to achieve higher jointquality and provides a fast setup of optimal parameters fordifferent environments.The work presented is an important step in the processoptimization through feedback control which willconsider not only the operational parameters of theprocess as such but also the resulting quality of the joint.

  • 18.
    Silva, Ana
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Temperature measurements during friction stir welding2017In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 88, no 9-12, p. 2899-2908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing industrial demand for lighter, more complex and multi-material components supports the development of novel joining processes with increased automation and process control. Friction stir welding (FSW) is such a process and has seen a fast development in several industries.This welding technique gives the opportunity of automation and online feedback control, allowing automatic adaptation to environmental and geometrical variations of the component.Weld temperature is related to the weld quality and therefore proposed to be used for feedback control. For this purpose, accurate temperature measurements are required. This paper presents an overview of temperature measurement methods applied to the FSW process. Three methods were evaluated in this work: thermocouples embedded in the tool, thermocouples embedded in the workpiece and the tool-workpiece thermocouple(TWT) method. The results show that TWT is an accurate and fast method suitable for feedback control of FSW.

  • 19.
    Silva, Ana
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    TWT method for temperature measurement during FSW process2015In: The 4th international Conference on scientific and technical advances on friction stir welding & processing, San Sebastian, Spain, 2015, p. 95-98Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction stir weld (FSW) has generated a high interest in many industry segments in the past 20 years. Along with new industrial challenges, more complex geometries and high quality demands, a better control of the welding process is required. New approaches using temperature controlled welding have been proposed and revealed good results. However, few temperature measurement methods exist which are accurate, fast and industrially suitable. A new and simple sensor solution, the Tool-Workpiece Thermocouple (TWT) method, based on the thermoelectric effect was recently developed.This paper presents a calibration solution for the TWT method where the TWT temperature is compared to calibrated thermocouples inside the tool. The correspondence between both methods is shown. Furthermore, a calibration strategy in different aluminium alloys is proposed, which is based on plunge iterations. This allows accurate temperature monitoring during welding, without the need for thermocouples inside the tool.

  • 20.
    Silva, Ana
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Welding Temperature during FSW of 5 mm thickness AA6082-T62017In: 5th international conference on scientific and technical advances on friction stir welding & processing, Metz, France, 11-13 October 2017., 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Soron, Mikael
    et al.
    ESAB Welding AB .
    De Backer, Jeroen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Ilar, Torbjörn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    A local model for online path corrections in friction stir welding2010In: INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ADVANCES ON FRICTION STIR WELDING AND PROCESSING. Program.http://www.polytech-lille.fr/IMG/pdf/program.pdf, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has always been associated with high forces and rigid machines Today’s trends towards joining of more complex structures in e.g. the automotive and aerospace industry, the applications require machinery with increased dexterity and flexibility, which cannot be achieved with the traditional FSW systems. But the introduction of more flexible machines, with more complex workspace capacity, will lead to undesired tool path deviations and in worst case a weld seam with inferior quality. In this study an industrial robot system is used to emphasise the need to compensate for the deviations caused by the high lateral forces resulting from the FSW process. A local model to compensate for such deviations is implemented, evaluated and compared to uncompensate welds in terms of quality and reliability.

1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf