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  • 1.
    Gråsjö, Urban
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Law, Politics and Economics.
    Jansson, Elisabeth
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lindh, Kristina
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lundh-Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media Production.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Experience Design: Understanding the Role of Technology for Virtual Experiences2006In: Proceedings of 29th Information System Research Seminar in Scandinavia, IRIS 29: Paradigms, Politics, Paradoxes, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New technologies have always teased the imagination of avant-garde artists on how to challenge existing cultural paradigms. For instance, experience design for the creative industries of today provides exciting challenges with a potential to innovate practices and creating new ways of interaction between the artist and her audience. In an ongoing research project we aim at framing the design space for virtual experiences. The paper presents and discusses the role of technology in such context and use three ongoing case studies where ICT has been used to augment and support consumers of cultural experiences. The analysis shows how technology-driven interventions are less oriented towards radical change compared to interventions that are rooted in their nondigital origins.

  • 2.
    Jansson, Elisabeth
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Entrepreneurship as a Paradox: A Romantic-Ironic History of a Deviant Entrepreneurship2008In: Uddevalla Symposium 2008: Spatial Dispersed Production and Network Governance: Revised papers presented at the 11th Uddevalla Symposium, 15-17 May, 2008, Kyoto, Japan / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2008, p. 347-358Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to embrace entrepreneurship as a paradox and to additionally show how an anomaly can be the foundation as well as the energy for the paradoxical, entrepreneurial process. In this paper I present, analyze and interpret two empirical cases and their stories. The theoretical contribution of the present study is the fact that we enrich our understanding of entrepreneurship as a paradox by grasping it in a romatic ironic-manner. The study ends in the following significant and illustrative paradoxes that also can be seen as conclusions: Entrepreneurship requires deviance - but also at the same time demands belonging, in the sense that entrepreneurship can be regarded as acting between endogenous self-fulfillment and exogenous purpuses. In addition, the basis of the here illustrated phenomenon is to become entrepreneurial. In the name of the romantic irony you can only become an entrepreneur, you can not be one. As soon as one thinks of oneself as an entrepreneur one ceases to be one. Conclusively, entrepreneurship is - and will become - a never-ending endeavor in which "becoming entrepreneurs" acts in-between and thereby are limited by, as well as delivered by society´s and discourse´s expectations.

  • 3.
    Siverbo, Sven
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Andersson, Morgan
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Galan, Nataliya
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Hellman, Stefan
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Jansson, Elisabeth
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Lindh, Kristina
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Myhrman, Linnea
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Nehls, Eddy
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Staxäng Torbäck, Louise
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Svensson, Ann
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    #metoo-management2018Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Just over a year ago the #metoo movement began, which is a reminder that there are faults in society even if everything looks fine on the surface. There are many signs that #metoo is not a passing phenomenon. This is not a coordinated action with a clear goal, nor is there any one leader of the movement. The #metoo movement is self-organized, a way to make visible what over basically all of human history has been silenced, denied and trivialized, even though everyone has known about it. This report takes a look at the #metoo movement's impact on organisations from a management perspective. We are interested in the phenomenon of "#metoo management", which we define as organisations' work to prevent and deal with sexual harassment (or assault) as a result of the #metoo movement. The primary purpose of the report is to find out if #metoo management exists. The second purpose is to investigate how organisations work with #metoo management. A third purpose is to explain why organisations choose to work with #metoo management in different ways. Based on interviews with representatives of ten organisations, in several cases quite different, we have determined that the #metoo movement has indeed given rise to #metoo management. More precisely, #metoo management refers to a number of different measures and activities. Organisations have restated and specified their policies about sexual harassment. The programs have been given renewed distribution at workplaces and additional measures for program compliance have been taken. Procedures for complaint processing have been developed, trainings have been initiated and risk factors have been identified and reduced. Not least, the occurrence of problems with sexual harassment has been quantified. Somewhat surprisingly, we noted that there was no example that the programs against sexual harassment were evaluated and that plans were lacking for reducing dependency relationships between supervisors and employees in the organisations where these were significant. It is important to emphasize that there are significant differences between organisations in how intensively the work with #metoo management has been pursued. The differences seem to depend on several different factors. One is that the incidence of sexual harassment varies, and another is that organisations make varying assessments of how much damage publicized cases would have on the employer's brand. Additional explanations for the intensity of the work are differences in how ambitious the process was prior to the #metoo movement, and that in certain organisations there is greater awareness of risk factors than in others. Finally, the organisation's size and visibility appear to play a role in that those that are more closely monitored have greater reason to avoid problems that attract negative attention.

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