Change search
Refine search result
1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Katarina
    et al.
    Sävelången Family Practitioner and Child Health Centre, Alingsås, Sweden.
    Shadloo, Mandana
    Rent-A-Nurse Centre, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Growing as a Human Being€”: Obese Adolescents' Experiences of the Changing Body2016In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 31, no 1, p. e53-e62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the presented study was to describe how obese adolescents experience themselves and their bodies and how their views changed as a result of participation in a weight loss program. A total of five adolescents were interviewed in this qualitative study. Data were analyzed by means of content analysis. One main theme emerged, “Growing as a human being”, which comprised four themes based on 13 sub-themes. Being part of a weight loss program was a time of transition that led not only to weight reduction but also to a higher level of well-being and a feeling of dignity.

  • 2.
    Arakelian, Erebouni
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Rask-Andersen, Anna
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Runeson-Broberg, Roma
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wålinder, Robert
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.
    I Stay: Swedish Specialist Nurses in the Perioperative Context and Their Reasons to Stay at Their Workplace2019In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 633-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To investigate why nurse anesthetists and operating room nurses choose to stay in the same workplace.

    Design Qualitative design.

    Methods Individual interviews were conducted with 15 nurse specialists from four hospitals in Sweden. Two men and 13 women aged between 43 and 63 participated. Data were analyzed with systematic text condensation according to Malterud.

    Findings Three themes were identified. (1) Organizational stability contributed to low staff turnover, with good spirits between colleagues, representing everyone’s equal value and resulting in a feeling of homelikeness. (2) Sustained development in one’s own profession. (3) A humane head nurse who was at hand, who was a facilitator, who knew staff members, and eliminated obstacles for them.

    Conclusions In a nonhierarchical and stable organization with a head nurse with caritative leadership skills, a welcoming working environment with opportunities for professional development is created. Thus, nurse specialists choose to stay, contributing to organizational development.

  • 3.
    Arakelian, Erebouni
    et al.
    Uppsala University Hospital,Department of Surgical Sciences, Entrance 70, SE-751 28..
    Swenne, Christine Leo
    Uppsala University, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Box 564, SE-751 22, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Susan
    Skaraborg Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia, SE-541 85, Skövde, Swede.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Faculty of Professional Studies, University of Nordland, 8049, Bodø, Norway..
    von Vogelsang, Ann-Christin
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience,Stockholm, Sweden..
    The meaning of person-centred care in the perioperative nursing context from the patient's perspective: an integrative review2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 17-18, p. 2527-2544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the meaning of person-centred care from the patient's perspective and in the context of perioperative nursing. BACKGROUND: Person-centred care (PCC) is used but not defined in the perioperative context. The concept indicates an interest in the patient's own experience of health, illness, needs and preferences. As with many terms that are frequently used, there is a tendency for person-centred care to mean different things to different people in different contexts. METHODS: A two-part search strategy was employed; firstly, a computerized database search of PubMed and CINAHL, using Medical Subject Headings and free terms to search articles dating from 2004 to 2014, and secondly, a hand-search of those articles' reference lists was performed. Twenty-three articles were selected and an integrative review was conducted. RESULTS: Four themes were discovered: 'Being recognized as a unique entity and being allowed to be the person you are', 'Being considered important by having one's personal wishes taken into account', 'The presence of a perioperative nurse is calming; prevents feelings of loneliness and promotes wellbeing, which may speed up recovery', and 'Being close to and being touched by the perioperative nurse during surgery'. CONCLUSIONS: PCC means respecting the patient as a unique individual, considering the patient's particularities and wishes, and involving the patient in their own care. PCC also implies having access to one's own nurse who is present both physically and emotionally through the entire perioperative process and who guides the patient and follows up postoperatively, guaranteeing that the patient is not alone. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: By having a common understanding of the concept of PCC, the nurse anaesthetists' and theatre nurses' caring actions or concerns will be directed towards the patient', resulting in personalization of care rather than simply defining the concept. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Nord University, Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Bodø, Norge.
    A pathway towards reconciliation and wellbeing: A spouse's experiences of living with a partner diagnosed with early-onset dementia2018In: Nordisk sygeplejeforskning, ISSN 1892-2678, E-ISSN 1892-2686, Vol. 8, no 02, p. 136-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When someone falls ill with dementia it affects the whole family. Therefore, the aim of thisqualitative single case study was to increase understanding of one female spouse´s experiencesof living with a husband/partner diagnosed with early-onset dementia before the ageof 40 years. Two open-ended interviews with the female spouse were performed sixmonths apart and analysed for narrative structure and themes. The single case is describedin the form of a story and organised along a time line comprising four phases; «Somethingis wrong», «Becoming aware of what is wrong», «Life is restricted» and «Towards reconciliation».Healthcare professionals should meet spouses with respect, listen to them and providepractical support, thus giving them the opportunity to rest, obtain respite and time ontheir own to enable reconciliation and wellbeing.

  • 5.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Learning to fly with broken wings - forcing a reappraisal of time and space.2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 403-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: When living with a chronic disease, the whole human being is affected and his/her experience of health challenged.AIM: This study had a dual aim: to obtain a new understanding of experiences of the body among persons suffering from the chronic neurological disease multiple sclerosis (MS) and how they come to terms with such experiences.

    METHOD: A total of ten interviews were re-analysed using a hermeneutic approach.

    RESULTS: The experiences of the body were revealed as 'Learning to fly with broken wings', comprising two themes: 'Getting to know the foreign body' and 'Building a new living space', both requiring reappraisal of time and space.

    CONCLUSION: Living with a chronic disease such as MS means learning to fly with broken wings, which involves subordination to the body leading to a higher level of integration in the process of becoming towards health and well-being.

  • 6.
    Lögde, Ann
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulleråkersv. 40, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Nord University, Faculty of Nursing and Heath Sciences, 8049 Bodö, Norway.
    Broberg, Roma Runesson
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulleråkersv. 40, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rask-Andersen, Anna
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulleråkersv. 40, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wålinder, Robert
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulleråkersv. 40, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Arakelian, Erebouni
    Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Surgical Sciences, Entrance 70, 1st Floor, 751 85 SE Uppsala, Sweden.
    I am quitting my job: Specialist nurses in perioperative context and their experiences of the process and reasons to quit their job2018In: International Journal for Quality in Health Care, ISSN 1353-4505, E-ISSN 1464-3677, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 313-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of specialist nurses in operating theatres is a serious problem. The aim of this study was to describe reasons why specialist nurses in perioperative care chose to leave their workplaces and to describe the process from the thought to the decision. Twenty specialist nurses (i.e. anaesthesia, NA, and operating room nurses) from seven university- and county hospitals in Sweden participated in qualitative individual in-depth interviews. Data were analysed by systematic text condensation. We identified four themes of reasons why specialist nurses quitted their jobs: the head nurses' betrayal and dismissive attitude, and not feeling needed; inhumane working conditions leading to the negative health effects; not being free to decide about one's life and family life being more important than work; and, colleagues' diminishing behaviour. Leaving one's job was described as a process and specialist nurses had thought about it for some time. Two main reasons were described; the head nurse manager's dismissive attitude and treatment of their employees and colleagues' mistreatment and colleagues' diminishing behaviour. Increasing knowledge on the role of the head nurse managers in specialist nurses' decision making for leaving their workplace, and creating a friendly, non-violent workplace, may give the opportunity for them to take action before it is too late.

  • 7.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Alsén, Pia
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Patients' Variations of Reflection About and Understanding of Long-term Illness: Impact of Illness Perception on Trust in Oneself or Others2017In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 11, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients' understanding of their illness is of great importance for recovery. Lacking understanding of the illness is linked with the patients' level of reflection about and interest in understanding their illness. Objective: To describe patients’ variations of reflection about and understanding of their illness and how this understanding affects their trust in themselves or others. Method: The study is based on the “Illness perception” model. Latent content analysis was used for the data analysis. Individual, semi-structured, open-ended and face-to-face interviews were conducted with patients (n=11) suffering from a long-term illness diagnosed at least six months prior to the interview. Data collection took place in the three primary healthcare centres treating the participants. Results: The results show variations in the degree of reflection about illness. Patients search for deeper understanding of the illness for causal explanations, compare different perspectives for preventing complication of their illness, trust healthcare providers, and develop own strategies to manage life. Conclusion: Whereas some patients search for deeper understanding of their illness, other patients are less reflective and feel they can manage the illness without further understanding. Patients' understanding of their illness is related to their degree of trust in themselves or others. Patients whose illness poses an existential threat are more likely to reflect more about their illness and what treatment methods are available.

  • 8.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Alsén, Pia
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Strategies for healthcare professionals to facilitate patient illness understanding.2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 23-24, p. 4696-4706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe how healthcare professionals facilitate patient illness understanding.

    BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals and patients differ in their illness understanding. If the information provided by healthcare professionals is not adapted to the patient's daily life it may be unusable for the patient. Previous research has found that healthcare professionals should individualise the information to enable the patient to apply the knowledge to the personal situation and to develop illness understanding. However, little is known of how healthcare professionals can facilitate patient illness understanding.

    METHOD: A qualitative descriptive study based on individual, semi-structured, open-ended and face-to-face interviews was conducted with healthcare professionals (n=11) concerning how they facilitate patients illness understanding. Three health centres were involved during the period of March to November 2014. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: The result identified a continuous and collaborative process with three strategies used by healthcare professionals to facilitate the patient's illness understanding: 1) assess the patient's illness understanding, 2) interact with the patient to develop illness understanding, and 3) support the patient's personal development for illness understanding. The steps in the process depend on each other.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results of our analysis indicate that healthcare professionals can use the continuous and collaborative process to enhance the patient's self-care ability and turn his or her knowledge into action for improving illness understanding.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The three continuous and collaborative process strategies involving pedagogical approaches can create conditions for healthcare professionals to obtain a holistic view of the patient's life and to be a key resource for person-centred care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Rejnö, Åsa
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Stroke Unit, Skaraborg Hospital, 541 85 Skövde, Sweden.
    Nordin, Per
    The Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development, Skövde, Sweden.
    Forsgren, Susanne
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Sundell, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Health Sciences.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Nord University, Faculty of Professional Studies, Bodø, Norway.
    Nursing students’ attendance at learning activities in relation to attainment and passing courses: a prospective quantitative study2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 50, no March, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Students' motivation and ways of engaging in their schoolwork are important for their performance, including passing exams. Attendance at learning activities has also been argued to be of major importance, although no causal relationship with passing exams has been established in nursing education.

    Objectives

    The aim of this study was to describe the impact of attendance at nonmandatory learning activities on attainment, in terms of passing or failing of exams, in nursing education courses including both mandatory and non-mandatory activities.

    Design

    A prospective quantitative design.

    Setting

    The nursing education programme at a Swedish university.

    Participants

    Nursing students (n = 361) from two courses and four classes within the nursing programme.

    Methods

    Attendance was registered at every non-mandatory teaching activity by asking the students to note their attendance on a list. Data such as sex, age, and whether the students had passed the exam were also collected for each course and each semester separately.

    Results

    Increased participation was associated with an increasing proportion of students passing the exam. The chance of passing the exam increased by 13% for every additional learning occasion attended. Logistic regression showed an OR of 5.4 for an attendance of 100%.

    Conclusions

    An increase in attendance gave a higher proportion of exam passes. Encouraging students to attend non-mandatory learning activities could be of value, and potentially contribute to an increased graduation rate for nursing students.

  • 10.
    Robertz, A C
    et al.
    Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic Uddevalla, NU Hospital Group, Region Västra Götaland, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Tactile massage as a nursing intervention in child and adolescent psychiatry: nurses' experiences2016In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 502-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE SUBJECT?: There is little research on the implementation of tactile massage in child and adolescent psychiatry that describes children's and adolescents' experiences and outcomes. There is also limited knowledge of providing tactile massage in child and adolescent psychiatry. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This paper describes 10 nurses' experiences of tactile massage as a nursing intervention in child and adolescent psychiatry. The nurses considered tactile massage a non-verbal nursing intervention that could complement other available treatments. It reveals their reflections on the impact of tactile massage on their nursing and on themselves as a person, including the belief that they had developed deepened self-reflection and attentiveness. The nurses highlighted the importance of providing a trusting environment and collaborating with the children and adolescents. They both experienced and observed that tactile massage triggered various physical and mental processes in the children and adolescents, such as improvement in sleep disturbances, an ability to relax in body and mind and a deeper connectedness with their own bodies and feelings. The nurses described instructing next of kin in the use of tactile massage, which they believed could serve as a tool at home, mainly as a way for next of kin to help their children to relax, fall asleep more easily and to deepen connectedness. However, the nurses stressed the need to consider if it was appropriate or desired by the children and adolescents. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Tactile massage addresses the individual's emotional and physiological responses and could therefore bring holistic nursing to child and adolescent psychiatry. It could also help nurses in child and adolescent psychiatry to develop their attentiveness and sensitivity in acknowledging the needs of children and adolescents in psychiatric care.

    ABSTRACT:

    Introduction There is limited research on tactile massage in child and adolescent psychiatry and no studies investigating experiences of providing tactile massage in child and adolescent psychiatry were found. Aim The aim was therefore to describe nurses' experiences of providing tactile massage as a nursing intervention in child and adolescent psychiatry. Method Ten nurses trained in tactile massage and employed at five different child and adolescent psychiatry clinics in Sweden participated in a qualitative study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis. Results Three categories emerged from the analysis. 'Confirming body and mind', 'Building a trusting relationship' and 'Instructing next of kin in tactile massage'. Attentiveness to and respect for the integrity of the children and adolescents were essential for creating a trusting relationship with them. Tactile massage was found to trigger various physical and mental processes in the children and adolescents. The nurses reflected on the impact of tactile massage on their nursing and on themselves as a person, stating that it had led to the development of self-reflection and attentiveness. Implications for practice Tactile massage addresses the individual's emotional and physiological responses and could therefore bring holistic nursing to child and adolescent psychiatry. It might also enhance attentiveness and sensitivity on the part of child and adolescent psychiatry nurses when acknowledging the needs of children and adolescents in psychiatric care.

  • 11.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    A source of strength - nurses’ perspective of the perioperative dialogue.2003In: Journal of Nursing Management, no 11, p. 250-257Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Being altered by the unexpected: Understanding the perioperative patient's experience2014In: International Journal of Nursing Practice, ISSN 1322-7114, E-ISSN 1440-172X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 433-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper focuses on the process of understanding the patient in the context of perioperative caring and reports a story narrated by a perioperative nurse as well as her emerging understanding of the patient prior to surgery at an operating department. This qualitative case study had a dual purpose; firstly, to describe how the perioperative nurse's understanding of the patient emerged and, secondly, to establish how the researcher interpreted the situation. As a perioperative nurse and researcher, the author is both the narrator and interpreter. To date we have rarely discussed the fact that, in a perioperative context, the patient might feel ashamed of his/her body, even before arriving at the operating department. This new understanding emerged from the hermeneutical dialogue in the present study.

  • 13.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Den perioperativa dialogen: en möjlighet till hälsa och välbefinnande2005In: Upplevelser, säkerhet och hälsa, Uppsala, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Evidens i det perioperativa vårdandet: att se och synliggöra det som är vårdandets sak.2005In: Människan i det perioperativa vårdandet: antropologisk och etisk reflektion / [ed] Lindwall, Lillemor & Post, Iréne von, Karlstad: Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap, Avd för religionsvetenskap , 2005, p. 55-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Meanings of suffering from the perspective of nurse leaders2012In: Sailing to the future, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meanings of suffering from the perspective of nurse leaders. Background: Nursing leadership has previously been investigated by several researchers in terms of general characteristics, for example different leadership styles, quality of leadership and job satisfaction. However, there are few studies focusing on suffering and the meaning of being a nurse leader in a perioperative context. Aim: To capture and interpret the maning of suffering from the perspective of nurse leaders. Method: This study was guided by Gadamer's (1989) hermeneutic philosophy. Ten nurse leaders from operating departments in various hospitals in Sweden participated in interviews with open-ended questions. The understanding was achieved by interpreting the interview text in a circular process, moving from the whole of the text to the individual parts and vice versa, known as the hermeneutic circle. Results: A main theme of suffering emerged as learning and non-learning. Suffering as learning comprised: "struggling to come to terms with being misunderstood", "struggling to patiently wait to be allowed to help", "struggling to manage daily tasks" and "struggling to be worthy of the trust of superiors". Suffering as non-learning comprised; "feeling alone when in charge", "feeling guilty abour not managing daily tasks", "felling mistrusted by superiors", "feeling unfairly criticized", "feeling humiliated due to loss of responsibiblities" and "feeling unable to help". Implications for Nursing Management A greater understanding of nurse leaders' suffering and need of support is necessary.

  • 16.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Nurses perspective of the perioperative dialogue2003In: Vårdalinstitutets konferens "Advanced health care sciences of tomorrow", Lund, 5-6 November, 2003., 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To describe nurse anaesthetists and theatre nurses experiences of working with the perioperative dialogue.

    Background

    A new way of working in the perioperative context is the perioperative dialogue model, which is the meeting between the nurse and the patient before, during and after a patient’s surgery.

    Method

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 nurses, trained in working with the perioperative dialogue. Data were analysed according to grounded theory.

    Findings

    One core category, source of strength, and two main categories, walking together and creating a caring relation, were defined. These represented factors in developing nurses work and professional competence. The nurses became more committed to their work when they came to know the person beyond the character of the patient.

    Conclusions

    The perioperative dialogue is a source of strength to the nurses. It is necessary that the organization supports nurses in this new way of working.

  • 17.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    The common world: a model of the perioperative dialogue, its ethos and characteristic structural caring principles2010In: International Journal for Human Caring, ISSN 1091-5710, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose for this paper was to explore, on the basis of a previous research program, the foundations of caring associated with the ethos in the common world of the perioperative dialog. Ahermeneutic approach grounded in caring science was employed, in which ethos represents the ultimate meaning of caring. This approach resulted in a model comprising the caring properties and characteristic structural caring principles. As a guiding principle of the common world, ethos revealed a deeper principle of order, the responsibility of the face--"Here I am." 

  • 18.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    The common world: the responsibility of the face - "here I am"2011In: The 3rd NORNA Congress (The Nordic Operating Room Nurses Association), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. This research was based on previous qualitative research consisting of five sub studies, in which a hermeneutic approach was employed to identify how caring becomes visible in clinical praxis and how it is carried out in the context of a Swedish research programme.

    The aim of the research was to explore the ethical foundations of caring in the perioperative dialogue and culture on the basis of previous research and philosophical literature, as well as to focus on ethos as a vital part in the common world of the perioperative dialogue.

    Methodology. The research employed a hermeneutic approach grounded in the perspective of the humanistic caring tradition of caring science, where ethos confers the ultimate meaning to the caring context.

    Results. This approach resulted in a theoretical model comprising the caring properties and characteristic caring principles of the perioperative dialogue structure. As a guiding principle for the perioperative common world, ethos revealed a deeper principle of structure; the responsibility of the face – “here I am”. The inner core of caring can be approached through communion, which forms a continuous whole in the patient’s and nurse’s common world and leads to health for the participants.

  • 19.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    The perioperative dialogue: coherence in a continuous whole2006In: Perioperative care, on the shores of excellence, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional way of working in Swedish perioperative care, from the nurse anaesthetist’ and theatre nurse’s perspective, means that they will meet the patient at only one occasion, where they often are unprepared for the character of a patient’s worries or particular wishes. When the same nurse meets  the patient at three different occasions in a perioperative dialogue, i.e. a pre-, intra-, and postoperative conversation, the nurse has an opportunity to receive better knowledge about the goals of the patient.

    Aim

    The overall aim for the project was to identify expressions for health and well-being, which became evident through patients’ as well as nurse anaesthetists and theatre nurses’ experiences from the perioperative dialogue. 

    Methodology: The research is based on two studies where semi-structured interviews were carried out, with 18 patients and 20 nurses. Data from the interviews were analysed according to grounded theory.

    Results

    The results showed, that by using the perioperative dialogue, a continuity of care is created, both from a patient and nurse perspective. The continuity of the patient’s relationship with the nurse, and the nurse’s relationship with the patient, forms a coherent whole. When the nurse creates a caring relationship and involves the patient into the activities surrounding the surgery, the situation becomes more understandable, manageable and meaningful to the patient. Health and well-being for patients is promoted when nurses give them time and make them part of what is going to happen. Health and well-being for the nurses is promoted when they are allowed to care for the patient throughout the perioperative process. In the perioperative dialogue, the patient, in his or her relationship with the nurse, is guaranteed the responsibility of his or her own recovery and the movement towards health and wholeness. In the relationship with the patient, the nurse becomes responsible for creating a whole, a coherent whole.

    Conclusions

    The perioperative dialogue promotes the process of becoming in health and well-being through continuity of care and the sense of coherence, both for the patient and the nurse.

  • 20.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    What constitutes caring in the perioperative culture from the perspective of nurse leaders?2009In: What constitutes caring in the perioperative culture from the perspective of nurse leaders? / [ed] Den 5:e kongressen för ’European Operating Room Den 5:e kongressen för ’European Nurses Association, 17-19 april, Copenhagen, Denmark., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Berggren, Ingela
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Nursing students' perspectives on the patient and the impact of the nursing culture: a meta-synthesis2012In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 771-781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore and interpret how nursing students develop their understanding of the patient as a human being.

    Background

    Understanding the patient is the main characteristic of good, caring performance. In addition, nurse leaders play an active role in creating a culture in which nursing students can flourish and improve.

    Method

    This meta-synthesis was based on Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnography.

    Results

    The overarching metaphor was interpreted as the nursing students' capacity for compassion. Two central metaphors were revealed, based on how nursing students developed their understanding of the patient as a human being. These central metaphors were labelled ‘The open door’, comprising seven key metaphors and ‘The closed door’ based on two key metaphors.

    Conclusion

    During practical training, the students observed both virtuous and unkind nurses. Virtue is a skill that can be taught, but not all students were able to learn it. Some students acquired the ability to reflect on ethical issues, while others did not. Therefore, good role models are of major importance.

    Implication for nursing management

    The nurse leader should function as a facilitator in the students' efforts to gain the capacity to face the suffering patient and to develop an understanding of the patient's situation.

  • 22.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Berggren, Ingela
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, undergraduate level. Centre for Women’s, Family and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Kongsberg.
    Barbosa da Silva, António
    Ansgar College and Theological Seminary, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Experiences of Spirituality and Spiritual Values in the Context of Nursing: An Integrative Review2014In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 8, p. 64-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spirituality is often mistakenly equated with religion but is in fact a far broader concept. The aim of this integrative review was to describe experiences of the positive impact of spirituality and spiritual values in the context of nursing. The analysis was guided by Whittemore and Knafl’s integrative review method. The findings revealed seven themes: ‘Being part of a greater wholeness’, ‘Togetherness − value based relationships’, ‘Developing inner strength’, ‘Ministering to patients’, ‘Maintaining one’s sense of humanity’, ‘Viewing life as a gift evokes a desire to ‘give back’’ and ‘Achieving closure − life goes on’. It is difficult to draw definite conclusions, as spirituality involves many perspectives on various levels of awareness. However, spirituality was considered more inclusive, fluid and personal. Furthermore, it emerged that spirituality and spiritual values in the context of nursing are closely intertwined with the concept of caring.

  • 23.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Suffering and suffering with the other: the perspective of perioperative nurse leaders2012In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 278-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To capture and interpret meanings of suffering from the perspective of perioperative nurse leaders.Background There are few studies focusing on suffering and the meaning of being a nurse leader in a perioperative context.Method Hermeneutic interpretation of interviews with nurse leaders.Results A main theme of suffering emerged as learning and non-learning. Suffering as learning comprised struggling to come to terms with being misunderstood, struggling to wait patiently to be allowed to help, struggling to manage daily tasks and struggling to be worthy of the trust of superiors. Suffering as non-learning comprised feeling alone when in charge, feeling guilty about not managing dailytasks, feeling mistrusted by superiors, feeling unfairly criticized,  feeling humiliated owing to loss of responsibilities and feeling unable to help. Conclusion Suffering is good when the mission of caring is mastered and the nurse leader feels recognized as unique and trustable, leading to his or her sense of dignity being preserved. Suffering is evil when the mission of caring is threatened, whenquestioned and not considered a unique and trustable person, leading to loss of dignity.Implications for nursing management Nurse leaders suffering needs to be acknowledged and a caring culture that permeates the entire organization should be developed.

  • 24.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Hallberg, Lillemor
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences.
    Ringsberg, Karin
    Nordiska Högskolan för folkhälsovetenskap, Göteborg.
    Von Post, Irene
    Abo Akademi University, Department of Caring Science.
    The nurse has time for me: the perioperative dialogue from the perspective of patients2003In: Journal of Advanced Perioperative Care, ISSN 1470-5664, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 77-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to describe patients' experience of the perioperative dialogue. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 18 patients, seven men and 11 women aged 20 to 76 years, with whom perioperative dialogues had been held. Data were collected and analysed according to grounded theory. FINDINGS; A core category: 'making time for me'; two main categories: 'comforting me' and 'becoming involved'; with three subcategories each: 'easing my mind by talking with the nurse', 'instilling faith within me', and 'having confidence in the nurse'; and 'being considered a resource', 'establishing a sense of communion', and 'making me feel that I am a human being', emerged from the data. The time with the nurse was experienced as comforting and made the patients feel involved in the perioperative procedures. When the nurse made time to talk with them they felt eased, were made more confident and gained faith in the success of their operation. When the patients were considered to be a resource, they felt that they were unique human beings, and this helped to establish a sense of communion with the nurses. CONCLUSION: The perioperative dialogue allowed the patients time with the nurse and was experienced by them as having a positive effect on the healing process and recovery. 

  • 25.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    von Post, Irene
    Åbo Akademi.
    Eriksson, Katie
    Åbo Akadem.
    The development of caring in the perioperative culture: Nurse leaders' perspective on the struggle to retain sight of the patient2007In: Nursing Administration Quarterly, ISSN 0363-9568, E-ISSN 1550-5103, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 312-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on Swedish nurse leaders and is aimed at achieving a more complete and differentiated understanding of what constitutes caring in the perioperative culture as well as their knowledge and responsibility for the development of caring. Interviews with open-ended questions were conducted with 10 nurse leaders, in which they described their experiences of developing perioperative caring. The interpretation process was based on Gadamer's philosophy of hermeneutics. The findings indicate that developing a perioperative caring culture is a struggle to retain sight of the patient, a process that includes the following 6 phases: (1) when the nurse leaders understood perioperative caring as a process, the nurse's and patient's shared world became obvious to them; (2) safeguarding the patient's position as a unique human being; (3) safeguarding the nurse's welfare by creating a compassionate atmosphere; (4) promoting an idea means never giving up; (5) attaching importance to being trustworthy; and (6) being involved in a dynamic interaction, comprising communion and reciprocity. The most important goal of nursing leadership is to safeguard the welfare of the suffering patient and the relationship between the nurse leader and nursing staff, based on the motive of caritas derived from the idea of humanistic caring. 

  • 26.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    von Post, Iréne
    Eriksson, Katie
    The expression of caring within the perioperative dialogue: a hermeneutic study2007In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 44, p. 905-915Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    von Post, Iréne
    Eriksson, Katie
    The perioperative dialogue: holistic nursing in practice2007In: Holistic Nursing Practice, ISSN 0887-9311, E-ISSN 1550-5138, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 292-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a synthesis of 2 qualitative studies focusing on patients', anesthetists', and operating-room nurses' experiences of the perioperative dialogue and employing grounded theory as the method of analysis. The aim of the synthesis was to achieve a new holistic understanding of health in the perioperative dialogue. The synthesis highlights the importance of being in communion in a continuous whole due to continuity of care for the creation of health in both patients and nurses.

  • 28.
    Solbakken, Rita
    et al.
    Nord University, Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Bodø, Norway.
    Bergdahl, Elisabeth
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Bondas, Terese
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    International Nursing: Caring in Nursing Leadership : A Meta-ethnography From the Nurse Leader's Perspective.2018In: Nursing Administration Quarterly, ISSN 0363-9568, E-ISSN 1550-5103, Vol. 42, no 4, p. E1-E19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To explore and derive new conceptual understanding of nurse leaders' experiences and perceptions of caring in nursing.

    RESEARCH QUESTION: What is caring in nursing leadership from the nurse leaders' perspectives? There is a paucity of theoretical studies of caring in nursing leadership. Noblit and Hares interpretative meta-ethnography was chosen because of its interpretative potential for theory development. Caring in nursing leadership is a conscious movement between different "rooms" in the leader's "house" of leadership. This emerged as the metaphor that illustrates the core of caring in nursing leadership, presented in a tentative model. There are 5 relation-based rooms: The "patient room," where nurse leaders try to avoid patient suffering through their clinical presence; the "staff room," where nurse leaders trust and respect each other and facilitate dialogue; the "superior's room," where nurse leaders confirm peer relationships; the "secret room," where the leaders' strength to hang on and persist is nurtured; and the "organizational room," where limited resources are continuously being balanced. Caring in nursing leadership means nurturing and growing relationships to safeguard the best nursing care. This presupposes that leaders possess a consciousness of the different "rooms." If rooms are not given equal attention, movement stops, symbolizing that caring in leadership stops as well. One room cannot be given so much attention that others are neglected. Leaders need solid competence in nursing leadership to balance multiple demands in organizations; otherwise, their perceptiveness and the priority of "ministering to the patients" can be blurred.

  • 29.
    Winneby, Ewa
    et al.
    SHD, FyrBoDal, Uddevalla.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Feeling rejected or invited: Experiences of persons seeking care advice at the Swedish Healthcare Direct organization2014In: Japan Journal of Nursing Science, ISSN 1742-7932, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 87-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Swedish Healthcare Direct is an organization staffed by registered nurses who act as telenurses and assess callers’ need for care, taking both medical and personal aspects into account. They direct the care seeker to: emergency care (level I), a care center on duty (level II), their regular doctor (level III), or provide advice about self-care strategies (level IV). In this assessment process, the nurse and care seeker should reach mutual agreement. The aim and focus of the present study was to elucidate the care seeker’s situation and experiences of the care received after being triaged and directed to level II, although the telenurse in fact assessed their medical problems as corresponding to level III. Methods A total of eight recent Swedish Healthcare Direct users were interviewed in this qualitative study. Data were analyzed by means of content analysis. Results Three themes emerged – “feeling trapped”, “feeling disrespected”, and “feeling invited” – comprising seven subthemes. Conclusion Care seekers experienced suffering as well as struggling to be allowed to be a patient. When not met by an ethically correct stance, they continued to seek care. In contrast, when they encountered commitment and an ethically correct attitude, their health process began and they had no further need for contact.

1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf