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  • 1.
    Alampay, Liane Pena
    et al.
    Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines..
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, USA..
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, USA..
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Universita di Roma La Sapienza, Italy..
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, MD, USA..
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, China..
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA..
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Universita di Roma La Sapienza, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, USA..
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, USA..
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Kenya..
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Universita di Roma La Sapienza, Italy..
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Thailand..
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana M.
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Colombia..
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Jordan, and Emirates College for Advanced Education, UAE..
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Italy..
    Severity and justness do not moderate the relation between corporal punishment and negative child outcomes: A multicultural and longitudinal study2017In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 41, no 4, 491-502 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is strong evidence of a positive association between corporal punishment and negative child outcomes, but previous studies have suggested that the manner in which parents implement corporal punishment moderates the effects of its use. This study investigated whether severity and justness in the use of corporal punishment moderate the associations between frequency of corporal punishment and child externalizing and internalizing behaviors. This question was examined using a multicultural sample from eight countries and two waves of data collected one year apart. Interviews were conducted with 998 children aged 7–10 years, and their mothers and fathers, from China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Thailand, and the United States. Mothers and fathers responded to questions on the frequency, severity, and justness of their use of corporal punishment; they also reported on the externalizing and internalizing behavior of their child. Children reported on their aggression. Multigroup path models revealed that across cultural groups, and as reported by mothers and fathers, there is a positive relation between the frequency of corporal punishment and externalizing child behaviors. Mother-reported severity and father-reported justness were associated with child-reported aggression. Neither severity nor justness moderated the relation between frequency of corporal punishment and child problem behavior. The null result suggests that more use of corporal punishment is harmful to children regardless of how it is implemented, but requires further substantiation as the study is unable to definitively conclude that there is no true interaction effect.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Åsa
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Lundin, Linda
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Adolescents' self-defining internet experiences2015In: Technology and youth: growing up in a digital world / [ed] Kinney, David A., Bass, Loretta, Blair, Sampson Lee, Neff Claster, Patricia, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015, 105-131 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractPurposeThe purpose of this study was to investigate how young women and men perceive the Internet as a phenomenon and what role and meaning they ascribe to the Internet as an arena for defining themselves and for shaping their identity.Methodology/approachThe empirical data consist of narratives written by Swedish adolescents. Using content analysis the analysis was carried out in three steps: (1) finding categories and themes, (2) calculation of statistical differences in category frequencies, (3) a theoretically informed interpretation of central themes, using Bourdieu's concept of different forms of capital, and Giddens' concept of "pure relations."FindingsThe narratives exemplify how computer literacy and technological competence can be converted into social, cultural, and symbolic capital. Gender differences occur both in statistical differences between category frequencies in girls' and boys' narratives and in the interpretation of central themes. But there are also several examples that show more complex and contradictory tendencies, exceeding or transformative of gender differences and hierarchy.Originality/valueThis study considers adolescents' own perspectives on an arena of great importance. The analyses have been performed both qualitatively and quantitatively, which gives a nuanced picture of young people's self-defining experiences on the Internet.

  • 3.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Erlandssson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Voices on risk-taking : Young women and men in an existential and social world 2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     

    The present study was influenced by existential - and gender aspects on young people's everyday lives with the aim to shed light on the complexity of the phenomenon of risk-taking, the meaning and purpose of adolescent risk-taking in a traditional sense (e.g. smoking and drug using) and in noisy environments (e.g. discotheques and rock concerts). The intention was to identify possible new ways of understanding young people's experiences and apprehensions about different risk behaviours by the use of qualitative method; The Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Sixteen adolescents (8 men/8 women, aged 15-19) were interviewed, 4 in separate interviews and 12 in focus groups. The analysis revealed two dimensions: "Social identity" and "Existential identity" and six superordinate themes of the phenomena of risk-taking. The two dimensions and the six super-ordinate themes were equal for women and men, while the sub-themes were found to be gender-related. The interviewees' responses revealed social (gender) - and existential considerations which affected the participants in many areas of their daily lives. The study implies that one of the challenges for the preventive strategies is to be able to talk about risk-taking in terms of both threat and development, and not as a case of either or. 

  • 4.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Widen, Stephen E.
    Örebro University, Institute for Disability Research, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Risks and music - Patterns among young women and men in Sweden2011In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 13, no 53, 310-319 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Music and high levels of sound have not traditionally been associated with risk-taking behaviors. Loud music may intensify and bring more power and meaning to the musical experience, but it can at the same time be harmful to hearing. The present study aims to increase the knowledge about young women′s and men′s risk judgement and behaviour by investigating patterns in adolescent risk activities among 310 adolescents aged 15-20 (143 women; 167 men). The Australian instrument ARQ was used with additional questions on hearing risks and a factor analysis was conducted. The main results showed that the factor structure in the judgement and behavior scale for Swedish adolescents was rather different from the factor structure in the Australian sample. Also, the factor structure was not similar to the Australian sample split on gender. The results are discussed from a gender- and existential perspective on risk taking, and it is emphasized that research on risk behavior needs to reconceptualize stereotypical ideas about gender and the existential period in adolescence.

  • 5.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Consequences of Availability of 'extended´ Pupil Welfare Interventions2016In: Nordic Youth Research Symposium: Youth Moves – Voices – Spaces – Subjectivities, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2016, 59-59 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children and young people living in families with alcohol misuse, violence or a parents psychiatric illness are commonly regarded as a group at risk of developing social and health problems, but also at risk of failing in school. Teachers, school social workers and other relevant staff all have important roles to play in identifying pupils within this target group. However research demonstrates that this process can be prolonged and professionals fail to identify young people at risk in early stages. This presentation offers an evaluation of the project Extended In-Depth Pupil Welfare (2013 2015) funded by the Swedish Public Health Agency. The research questions are: Does availability influence willingness to seek and accept support? , and In what way does this support influence school performance? In this presentation focus is directed to findings emerging from data with children and young people (N=88) who has received interventions. Statistics on grades (grade 7-9) and school absence and interviews (N=20). Thematic analysis has been adopted and the interview data was coded and closely analyzed by identifying increasinglevels of abstraction in the material. The result indicate that the children and young people perceive they can control whether, and if so, when they want to receive support from the support team (self-referrals). This, they report, contributes to a willingness to both emotionally and cognitively engage in the preRepuls program and in the counselling provided. Also three affordances facilitating childrens and young people´sself-referrals is identified: (i) the day-to-day presence of the social workers enables investment in relationships, (ii) team members use communication technologies in domains familiar to the children, and (iii) the social workers practice is visible. A further resultis also that grades are improved, often pointing to subjects such as Swedish, Maths and English and decreased absence from school.

  • 6.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Consequences of Availability of 'extended' Pupil Welfare interventions: Effects on School Performance2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Children living in families with alcohol or drug misuse, violence or a parent's psychiatric illness are commonly regarded as a group at risk of developing social and health problems, but also at risk of failing in school. In Sweden social services have the responsibility to intervene to change the situation for such children (National Board of Health and Welfare, 2013). Teachers, school social workers and other relevant staff all have important roles to play in identifying pupils within this target group (Backlund, 2007). However research demonstrates that this process can be prolonged. Nor is it unusual that parents and/or pupils are unwilling to accept support until the home situation becomes very serious and/or where the pupil's school achievements have deteriorated in a serious way (SOU 2010).This presentation offers an evaluation of an ongoing project 'Extended In-Depth Pupil Welfare' (2013–2015) funded by the Swedish Public Health Agency and which is one of sixteen projects aimed at children and young people within this target group in the national program 'Developing New Evidenced Methods for Prevention and Interventions'. The 'Extended In-Depth Pupil Welfare' project is based on the hypothesis that, by making established evidence-proven intervention methods normally offered by social services in social service settings available for pupils and their parents in a school setting, children and parents may be more willing to accept/or seek support at an earlier stage than had the interventions been available through normal social services channels. The research questions are: 'Does availability influence willingness to seek and accept support?', and 'In what way does this support influence school performance?'In recent decades a great deal of attention has been directed to the creation and implementation of effective interventions designed to adress the needs of pupils at risk of failing academically (Allen-Meares, Montgomery & Kim, 2013; Dube & Orpinas, 2009). Interventions operate at a number of levels. While Tier 1 interventions are at the whole school level, Tier 2 interventions address specific groups and individuals (Allen-Meares et al., 2013). In Sweden a multitude of collaborative joint ventures by social services and schools at both tiers have emerged in recent years (SOU, 2010). A national evaluation of a government sponsored program comprising more than one hundred collaborative projects revealed that collaboration is in great need of development. Further, a majority of teachers report that collaboration with social services, child psychiatry, the police and other agencies is, in different ways, unsatisfactory (Danermark, Englund & Germundsson, 2010). From this point of departure the 'Extended In-Depth Pupil Welfare' project is based on the assumption that if the school is the sole stakeholder in providing support interventions, actions can be more effectively directed in ways that best fit the school's organization and impact most directly on pupils' school achievement. For example, research demonstrates that when social services and schools are both stakeholders, the process of identifying and supporting pupils in need is not only unnecessarily time-consuming, but also less effective (Bolin 2011).Focusing on an interprofessional staff group comprising two teachers and two social workers based on-site in a medium sized primary/secondary school, and comparing pupils' and parents' perceptions of the availability of pupil welfare support with similar parental/pupil perceptions at another school used as a control, the objectives of this research is to theoretically analyse and critically evaluate the impact on school performance of on-site extended pupil welfare support. In this presentation focus is directed to findings emerging from interview data with pupils at the intervention school, and on their perceptions of the impact that the work of the interprofessional support team has had on their approaches to school work.Methodology, Methods, Research Instruments or Sources UsedIn addition to assessing pupils' achievement (encapsulated in subject grades) the study also focuses on the perception the pupils have of the impact on school performance of on-site social welfare support, and it is these findings that are presented here. Individual interviews have been carried out with participating pupils and their parents. The rationale behind this choice is that interviews are contextualised and can thus provide depth and detail (as opposed to questionnaire based approaches), and are to be preferred when 'why' and 'how' questions have been posed (Flyvbjerg, 2007). The interviews with pupils were carried out using a semi-structured guide, as is recommended for interviews with children (Docherty & Sandelowski, 1999). The guide consisted of a series of open questions pertaining to the pupil's understanding of the process of receiving support; the pupil's perception of the impact of the intervention with regard to school performance; out-of-school activities and activities in the family, and if positive changes are experienced, how enduring the pupil perceives such changes to be. The interviews with the pupils took place in a municipality community hall or in a room at the school. When processing the raw information the interviews were digitally-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data was processed using NVIVO 10. Each interview transcript was entered as a single case, with twenty cases in total. The approach adopted when analysing the empirical data has been inspired by what Patton (2002) describes as thematic analysis and involves the recognition of patterns. Data was coded and closely analyzed by identifying increasing levels of abstraction in the material (Braun & Clarke, 2006). Conclusions, Expected Outcomes or FindingsPreliminary results indicate that pupils see encounters with the on-site interprofessional support team as impacting on their attendance, approaches to school work and achievement. This, as the pupils report, is in part due to the experience in lessons of being able to keep away from conflicts with other pupils and teachers. Previously a consequence of being involved in conflicts meant the pupil having to leave lessons. Pupils also speak of experiencing an increased capacity for subject goal attainment. A majority of the interviewees estimate that they have improved their grade in at least two or three subjects, often pointing to core subjects such as Swedish, Maths and English. Further, the results indicate that the pupils perceive they can control whether, and if so, when they want to receive support from the support team. This, they report, contributes to a willingness to both emotionally and cognitively engage in the program and in the counselling provided. They describe that this engagement gives them tools to better focus on subject learning in class, to take control of their emotions and not to initiate conflicts or respond violently in peer relations in the classroom. A particularly interesting finding is that pupils do not perceive that support from the onsite team is attached to any sense of stigma, shame or embarrassment. Indeed, some pupils' accounts indicate that, when receiving support from the team, they feel much more comfortable about talking about problems they experience in the home such as, for example, violence or parents' alcohol misuse. However, some negative experiences of receiving support from the onsite team are revealed. For example, pupils perceive that the staff are not as immediately available as they would like them to be, and that support is not sufficiently 'on-demand', thus causing causes them anxiety and feelings of reduced self-worth

  • 7.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Consequences of availability of social work support in a school context: 'Extended' pupil welfare interventions and effects on school performance2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children living in families with alcohol misuse, violence or a parent’s psychiatric illness are not only commonly regarded as a group at risk of developing social problems, but also at risk of failing in school. Teachers and school social workers have important roles to play in identifying these pupils. However research demonstrates that this process can be prolonged. Nor is it unusual that parents and/or pupils are unwilling to accept support until the home situation becomes serious and/or where the pupil’s school achievements have deteriorated.This presentation is based on an evaluation of the project ‘Extended In-Depth Pupil Welfare’ funded by the Swedish Public Health Agency´s national program ‘Developing New Evidenced Methods for Prevention and Interventions’. The project is based on the hypothesis that, by making established evidence-proven intervention methods normally offered by social services in social service settings available for pupils and their parents in a school setting, children and parents may be more willing to both seek and accept support at an earlier stage than had such interventions been available through normal social services channels. The research questions are: ‘Does availability influence willingness to seek and accept support?’, and ‘In what way does this support influence school performance?’ The empirical base for this presentation draws on (i) data from a survey of parents (N=137) and pupils (N=49) pre- and post-project that focused on perceptions of the availability of support from pupil welfare and socials services, (ii) data on school performance with regard to pupils in receipt of interventions (N=86), and (iii) individual interviews (N=20) with pupils who received interventions. Results indicate that the availability of social workers plays an important role for children’s motivation to seek/or accept support. Pupils regard encounters with the on-site interprofessional support team as impacting on their attendance, approaches to school work and achievement.

  • 8.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Hjälpsökande bland barn- och unga i riskmiljöer2018In: Barn- och ungdomsvetenskap / [ed] Johansson, Thomas; Sorbring, Emma, Liber, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    När många vill "hjälpa till": Barns och ungdomars erfarenheter av interprofessionellt samarbete inom den sociala barnavården2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of children's agency can be used to understand how children actively shape their lives. While in social work there is a growing body of research on how children experience meetings that involve collaborating professionals, little is known about the ways in which they exert an influence and the strategies they use. The purpose of the study was, in a Swedish context, to explore children's perceptions of their agentic capacity to influence who works with them when many different professionals are involved in providing support. Secondly, the aim was to investigate the perceptions of their agentic capacity in regulating their participation and exerting an influence on outcomes in interprofessional collaborative meetings. Interviews were carried out with 28 children in receipt of social services support. The results revealed that, for the older children, perceptions of the exercise of agency involved both the exclusion of certain professionals from the collaborating group as well as the identification of those perceived asbeing able to help. Additionally, the children's agency could be seen to be implicated in their perceptions of actively making decisions to acquiesce in collaborative solutions. For the younger children agency was revealed in the way that they interpreted the situations involving collaborating professionals, recognizing that it is primarily parents who decide about contact with different 'helpers". Findings with regards to the second aim revealed that children perceive professionals' talk as restricting opportunities for input. They also perceive they have capacity to exercise agency by (i) conforming to expectations by pretending to be bored and disengaged, butat the same time paying close attention to what is going on, alert to important details concerning them, (ii) by using exit strategies, and (iii) by developing 'in-situ' strategies to end meetings believed to be of little value. Rather than, as previously suggested, being powerless in such circumstances, the children talk of how they carefully assess situations, and, from a position of apparent subordination, talk of ways of acting that reveal their agentic capacity. These insights are of importance for practitioners, who are encouraged to look beyond behaviours that first meet the eye.This research has been funded by the Swedish Children's Welfare Foundation Sweden (Stiftelsen Allmänna Barnhuset)

  • 10.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    The self-referral affordances of school-based social work support: a case study2017In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 20, no 6, 869-881 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    School-based social work can reach children at risk through the promotion of children’s participation in seeking support. Drawing on Gibson’s theory of affordances, the aim of this interview-based study was to identify affordances for self-referral associated with school-based social work support. Results reveal three affordances facilitating children’s self-initiated contact: (i) the day-to-day presence of social workers in the school environment supports investment in relationships, (ii) use of communication technologies facilitates contact and (iii) the visibility of the social workers’ practice encourages contact-initiation. Common to all three affordances are the accessibility of the social workers, and the generation of trust.

  • 11.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ymefors, Mattias
    Teambaserat skolsocialt arbete: fördjupad och utökad elevhälsa2017In: Skolsocialt arbete: Skolan som plats för och del i det sociala arbetet / [ed] Åsa Backlund, Ylva Spånberger Weitz & Sara Högdin (red.), Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2017, 183-194 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Bornstein, Marc H
    et al.
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, USA..
    Putnick, Diane L
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, USA..
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan..
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Rome University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy..
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Macau, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA..
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome, Italy..
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA..
    Malone, Patrick S
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA..
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya..
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Rome University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy..
    Skinner, Ann T
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA..
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand..
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Rome University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy..
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Rome, Italy.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Mixed blessings: parental religiousness, parenting, and child adjustment in global perspective.2017In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 58, no 8, 880-892 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Most studies of the effects of parental religiousness on parenting and child development focus on a particular religion or cultural group, which limits generalizations that can be made about the effects of parental religiousness on family life.

    METHODS: We assessed the associations among parental religiousness, parenting, and children's adjustment in a 3-year longitudinal investigation of 1,198 families from nine countries. We included four religions (Catholicism, Protestantism, Buddhism, and Islam) plus unaffiliated parents, two positive (efficacy and warmth) and two negative (control and rejection) parenting practices, and two positive (social competence and school performance) and two negative (internalizing and externalizing) child outcomes. Parents and children were informants.

    RESULTS: Greater parent religiousness had both positive and negative associations with parenting and child adjustment. Greater parent religiousness when children were age 8 was associated with higher parental efficacy at age 9 and, in turn, children's better social competence and school performance and fewer child internalizing and externalizing problems at age 10. However, greater parent religiousness at age 8 was also associated with more parental control at age 9, which in turn was associated with more child internalizing and externalizing problems at age 10. Parental warmth and rejection had inconsistent relations with parental religiousness and child outcomes depending on the informant. With a few exceptions, similar patterns of results held for all four religions and the unaffiliated, nine sites, mothers and fathers, girls and boys, and controlling for demographic covariates.

    CONCLUSIONS: Parents and children agree that parental religiousness is associated with more controlling parenting and, in turn, increased child problem behaviors. However, children see religiousness as related to parental rejection, whereas parents see religiousness as related to parental efficacy and warmth, which have different associations with child functioning. Studying both parent and child views of religiousness and parenting are important to understand the effects of parental religiousness on parents and children.

  • 13.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    et al.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research, Bethesda.
    Putnick, Diane L.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research, Bethesda.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC,.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza’, Faculty of Psychology, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC,.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Thailand.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza’, Faculty of Psychology, Italy.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome ‘Foro Italico’, Department of Education Sciences, Italy.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, Quezon, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, Jordan.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Department of Psychology, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza’, Faculty of Psychology, Italy.
    Chang, Lei
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Educational Psychology, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Psychology, Blacksburg, VA, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza’, Faculty of Psychology, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC,.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    University of South Carolina, Department of Psychology, Columbia, SC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Psychology, Kenya.
    Mother and father socially desirable responding in nine countries: Two kinds of agreement and relations to parenting self-reports2015In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 50, no 3, 174-185 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We assessed 2 forms of agreement between mothers’ and fathers’ socially desirable responding in China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand and the United States (N = 1110 families). Mothers and fathers in all 9 countries reported socially desirable responding in the upper half of the distribution, and countries varied minimally (but China was higher than the cross-country grand mean and Sweden lower). Mothers and fathers did not differ in reported levels of socially desirable responding, and mothers’ and fathers’ socially desirable responding were largely uncorrelated. With one exception, mothers’ and fathers’ socially desirable responding were similarly correlated with self-perceptions of parenting, and correlations varied somewhat across countries. These findings are set in a discussion of socially desirable responding, cultural psychology and family systems.

  • 14.
    Bowen, Erica
    et al.
    Coventry University.
    Holdsworth, Emma
    Coventry University.
    Leen, Eline
    University of Erlangen.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Helsing, Bo
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Jaans, Sebastian
    Limbourg Catholic University.
    Awouters, Valere
    Limbourg Catholic University.
    Northern European Adolescent Attitudes Toward Dating Violence2013In: Violence and Victims, ISSN 0886-6708, E-ISSN 1945-7073, Vol. 28, no 4, 619-634 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A focus group methodology was used to examine attitudes toward dating violence among 86 adolescents (aged 12-17) from four northern European countries (England, Sweden, Germany, and Belgium). Four superordinate themes were identified from thematic analyses: gender identities, television as the educator, perceived acceptability of dating violence, and the decision to seek help/tell someone. Although violence in relationships was generally not condoned, when violence was used by females, was unintended (despite its consequences), or was in retaliation for infidelity, violence was perceived as acceptable. Adolescents indicated that their views were stereotypical and based solely on stereotypical television portrayals of violence in relationships. Stereotypical beliefs and portrayals generate barriers for victimized males to seek help because of fear of embarrassment.

  • 15. Bowen, Erica
    et al.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Meeting adolescents 'where they're at': the use of technology to prevent violence and abuse in adolescent romantic relationships2017In: Eliminating gender-based violence / [ed] A. Taket & B.R. Crisp (red), Abingdon: Routledge, 2017, 54-67 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Bowen, Erica
    et al.
    Coventry University, England.
    Walker, Kate
    Coventry University, England.
    Mawer, Matthew
    Coventry University, England.
    Holdsworth, Emma
    Coventry University, England.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Helsing, Bo
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Leen, Eline
    Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen, Germany.
    Held, Paul
    Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen, Germany.
    Awouters, Valère
    Limburg Catholic University College, Belgium.
    Jans, Sebastiaan
    Limburg Catholic University College, Belgium.
    "It’s like you're actually playing as yourself": Development and preliminary evaluation of 'Green Acres High'€™, a serious game-based primary intervention to combat adolescent dating violence2014In: Psychosocial Intervention, ISSN 1132-0559, E-ISSN 2173-4712, Vol. 23, no 1, 43-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an overview of the development of 'Green Acres High', a serious game-based primary intervention to raise awareness of and change attitudes towards dating violence in adolescents, and an analysis of how adolescents described their experience of playing this game. Transcripts from focus group data were analysed using thematic analysis. The global theme that was developed, Assessment of the game, was represented by two organising themes, Positive assessment: Pedagogical Underpinnings andNegative Assessment: Functionality Limitations and Frustrations. These represented the fact that overall the learning experience was positive based on the pedagogical principles and content that could be embedded in this digital game but that technical issues with the game needed to be addressed as these could impinge on the learning experience of the adolescents. It was seen that using a serious game was a valid and meaningful way for adolescents to learn about dating violence and that this is a viable alternative or adjunct to traditional teaching methods.

  • 17. Daneback, Kristian
    et al.
    Sorbring, EmmaUniversity West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Socialt arbete och internet: att förstå och hantera sociala problem på nya arenor2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    et al.
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, China.
    Giunta, Laura Di
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Medellín, Colombia.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome “Foro Italico”, Rome, Italy.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Within- and between-person and group variance in behavior and beliefs in cross-cultural longitudinal data2017In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This study grapples with what it means to be part of a cultural group, from a statistical modeling perspective. The method we present compares within- and between-cultural group variability, in behaviors in families. We demonstrate the method using a cross-cultural study of adolescent development and parenting, involving three biennial waves of longitudinal data from 1296 eight-year-olds and their parents (multiple cultures in nine countries). Family members completed surveys about parental negativity and positivity, child academic and social-emotional adjustment, and attitudes about parenting and adolescent behavior. Variance estimates were computed at the cultural group, person, and within-person level using multilevel models. Of the longitudinally consistent variance, most was within and not between cultural groups—although there was a wide range of between-group differences. This approach to quantifying cultural group variability may prove valuable when applied to quantitative studies of acculturation.

  • 19. Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    et al.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    The association between parental warmth and control in thirteen cultural groups2011In: Journal of family psychology, ISSN 0893-3200, E-ISSN 1939-1293, Vol. 25, no 5, 790-794 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of the current study was to investigate potential cross-cultural differences in the covariation between two of the major dimensions of parenting behavior: control and warmth. Participants included 1,421 (51% female) 7- to 10-year-old (M = 8.29, SD = .67 years) children and their mothers and fathers representing 13 cultural groups in nine countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and North and South America. Children and parents completed questionnaires and interviews regarding mother and father control and warmth. Greater warmth was associated with more control, but this association varied widely between cultural groups.

  • 20.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    et al.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Skinner, AnnT.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai 50000, Thailan.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza, Department of Psychology,’ 00118 Rome, Italy.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome ‘Foro Italico,’ 00121 Rome, Italy.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, 1000 Metro Manila National Capital Region, Philippine.
    Al-Hassan, Suha
    Hashemite University, Department of Special Education, 13133 Hashemite, Jordan.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Faculty of Psychology, 80121 Napoli NA, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza, Department of Psychology,’ 00118 Rome, Italy.
    Bornstein, MarcH.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD 20810.
    Chang, Lei
    Department of Psychology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Psychology, Blacksburg, VA 24060.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, 00118 Rome, Italy.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, 40105 Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, 00118 Rome, Italy.
    Hostile attributional bias and aggressive behavior in global context2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 30, 9310-9315 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested a model that children’s tendency to attribute hostile intent to others in response to provocation is a key psychological process that statistically accounts for individual differences in reactive aggressive behavior and that this mechanism contributes to global group differences in children’s chronic aggressive behavior problems. Participants were 1,299 children (mean age at year 1 = 8.3 y; 51% girls) from 12 diverse ecological-context groups in nine countries worldwide, followed across 4 y. In year 3, each child was presented with each of 10 hypothetical vignettes depicting an ambiguous provocation toward the child and was asked to attribute the likely intent of the provocateur (coded as benign or hostile) and to predict his or her own behavioral response (coded as nonaggression or reactive aggression). Mothers and children independently rated the child’s chronic aggressive behavior problems in years 2, 3, and 4. In every ecological group, in those situations in which a child attributed hostile intent to a peer, that child was more likely to report that he or she would respond with reactive aggression than in situations when that same child attributed benign intent. Across children, hostile attributional bias scores predicted higher mother- and child-rated chronic aggressive behavior problems, even controlling for prior aggression. Ecological group differences in the tendency for children to attribute hostile intent statistically accounted for a significant portion of group differences in chronic aggressive behavior problems. The findings suggest a psychological mechanism for group differences in aggressive behavior and point to potential interventions to reduce aggressive behavior.

  • 21.
    Duell, Natasha
    et al.
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, PA, United States .
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, PA, United States .
    Chein, Jason
    Temple University, Department of Psychology, PA, United States .
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    ashemite University, Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, HJordan .
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Department of Psychology, Italy .
    Lei, Chang
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, Macau .
    Chaudhary, Nandita
    University of Dheli, Department of Human Development and Childhood Studies, Lady Irwin College, India .
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma, Department of Psychology, Italy .
    Dodge, Kenneth .A
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, NC, United States .
    Fanti, Kostas A.
    University of Cyprus, Department of Psychology,Cyprus .
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, NC, United States .
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, NC, United States .
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Kenya .
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma, Department of Psychology, Italy .
    Skinner, AnnT.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, NC, United States .
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Tapanya, Somabt
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Thailand .
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, France .
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, Philippines .
    Interaction of reward seeking and self-regulation in the prediction of risk taking: A cross-national test of the dual systems model2016In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 52, no 10, 1593-1605 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present analysis, we test the dual systems model of adolescent risk taking in a cross-national sample of over 5,200 individuals aged 10 through 30 (M = 17.05 years, SD = 5.91) from 11 countries. We examine whether reward seeking and self-regulation make independent, additive, or interactive contributions to risk taking, and ask whether these relations differ as a function of age and culture. To compare across cultures, we conduct 2 sets of analyses: 1 comparing individuals from Asian and Western countries, and 1 comparing individuals from low- and high-GDP countries. Results indicate that reward seeking and self-regulation have largely independent associations with risk taking and that the influences of each variable on risk taking are not unique to adolescence, but that their link to risk taking varies across cultures. © 2016 American Psychological Association.

  • 22.
    Duell, Natasha
    et al.
    Temple University, Department of Psychology,Philadelphia, USA.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University,Department of Psychology, Philadelphia, PA, USA and King Abdulaziz University.
    Icenogle, Grace
    Temple University, Department of Psychology,Philadelphia, USA.
    Chein, Jason
    Temple University, Department of Psychology,Philadelphia, USA.
    Chaudhary, Nandita
    University of Delhi, Department of Human Development and Childhood Studies, Lady Irwin College, New Delhi, India..
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma, "La Sapienza", Department of Psychology, Roma, RM, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA..
    Fanti, Kostas A.
    University of Cyprus, Department of Psychology, Kallipoleos, Cyprus..
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA..
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya..
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma, "La Sapienza", Department of Psychology, Roma, RM, Italy.
    Skinner, Anne T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand..
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia .
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, Metro Manila, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education, Al Zafranah, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Takash, Hanan M. S.
    Hashemite University, Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, Zarqa, Jordan..
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Department of Psychology, Caserta, CE, Italy .
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology,Zhuhai Shi, China..
    Age patterns in risk taking across the world2017In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiological data indicate that risk behaviors are among the leading causes of adolescent morbidity and mortality worldwide. Consistent with this, laboratory-based studies of age differences in risk behavior allude to a peak in adolescence, suggesting that adolescents demonstrate a heightened propensity, or inherent inclination, to take risks. Unlike epidemiological reports, studies of risk taking propensity have been limited to Western samples, leaving questions about the extent to which heightened risk taking propensity is an inherent or culturally constructed aspect of adolescence. In the present study, age patterns in risk-taking propensity (using two laboratory tasks: the Stoplight and the BART) and real-world risk taking (using self-reports of health and antisocial risk taking) were examined in a sample of 5,227 individuals (50.7% female) ages 10-30 (M = 17.05 years, SD = 5.91) from 11 Western and non-Western countries (China, Colombia, Cyprus, India, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the US). Two hypotheses were tested: (1) risk taking follows an inverted-U pattern across age groups, peaking earlier on measures of risk taking propensity than on measures of real-world risk taking, and (2) age patterns in risk taking propensity are more consistent across countries than age patterns in real-world risk taking. Overall, risk taking followed the hypothesized inverted-U pattern across age groups, with health risk taking evincing the latest peak. Age patterns in risk taking propensity were more consistent across countries than age patterns in real-world risk taking. Results suggest that although the association between age and risk taking is sensitive to measurement and culture, around the world, risk taking is generally highest among late adolescents

  • 23.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Inledning: Perspektiv på ungdomars vardag2008In: Ung på 2000-talet: perspektiv på ungdomars vardag, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2008, 1-8 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Sorbring, EmmaUniversity West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Ung på 2000-talet: perspektiv på ungdomars vardag2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Parental perceptions of children’s agency: Parental warmth, school achievement and adjustment2016In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 186, no 8, 1203-1211 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined Swedish mothers’ and fathers’ warmth towards their children in relation to their children's agency. It also examined the longitudinal relation between agency and children's externalising, internalising, and school achievement. Swedish children's mothers and fathers (N = 93) were interviewed at three time points (when children were 8, 9, and 10 years old) about their warmth towards their children, children's agency, and children's externalising and internalising behaviours and school achievement. Parental warmth at Time 1 was significantly correlated with child agency at Time 2, which was significantly correlated with child externalising and internalising behaviours and academic achievement at Time 3. There were no differences between girls and boys. Results from this study indicate that Swedish parents’ warmth is directly related to subsequent perceptions of children's agency, which in turn are related to subsequently lower child externalising and internalising problems and higher academic achievement. These findings held in the context of a three-year longitudinal study and for both boys and girls, suggesting the importance of child agency in the link between parental warmth and children's adjustment.

  • 26.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Swedish Children's Beliefs about Agency in Family, School and Peer Situations2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine children's beliefs with regard to their agency (i.e., to know and predict your own actions and the consequences of them), in different contexts (family, school and peer-situations). Interviews were conducted with 103 ten-year-old Swedish children. Vignettes were presented to the children and their answers were written down for subsequent thematic analysis. Children think of their agency differently depending upon which context they find themselves in. The contexts where children believe most in their agency are found in situations with peers, and the contexts where they believe least in their agency are experienced with teachers. In situations with parents children think they would react with more resistance than with peers and teachers.

  • 27.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Swedish children’s beliefs about agency in family, school and peer situationsIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Hallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy. Department of Psychology University of Gothenburg.
    Skoog, Therese
    Center for Developmental Research, School of Law , Psychology, and Social Work, Örebro University , Örebro , Sweden.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Adolescents’ Sexual Activity Offline and Online: A Longitudinal StudyIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Huang, Li
    et al.
    Tuskegee University, AL, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    University of South Carolina, SC, USA.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, NC, USA.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, VA, USA;.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza,’ Rome, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza,’ Rome, Italy.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    fEunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, MD, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza,’ Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza,’ Rome, Italy; kUniversidad de San Buenaventura, Medellin, Colombia.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome ‘Foro Italico,’ Rome, Italy.
    Alampay, Liane
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy.
    Measurement invariance of discipline in different cultural contexts2012In: Family Science, ISSN 1942-4639, Vol. 2, no 3, 212-219 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The measurement invariance of mother-reported use of 18 discipline strategies was examined in samples from 13 different ethnic/cultural groups in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States). Participants included approximately 100–120 mothers and their children aged seven to 10 years from each group. The results of exploratory factor analyses and multi-group categorical confirmatory factor analyses (MCCFA) indicated that a seven-factor solution was feasible across the cultural groups, as shown by marginally sufficient evidence for configural and metric invariance for the mother-reported frequency on the discipline interview. This study makes a contribution on measurement invariance to the parenting literature, and establishes the mother-report aspect of the discipline interview as an instrument for use in further cross-cultural research on discipline.

  • 30.
    Icenogle, Grace
    et al.
    Temple University.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University and King Abdulaziz University.
    Olino, Thomas.M.
    Temple University.
    Shulman, Elizabeth.P.
    Brock University.
    Chein, Jason
    Temple University.
    Alampay, Liane P.
    Ateneo de Manila University.
    Al-Hassan, Suha.M.
    Hashemite University.
    Takash, Hanan S.
    Hashemite University.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau.
    Chaudhary, Nandita
    University of Delhi.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Universit  a di Roma.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University.
    Fanti, Kostas A.
    University of Cyprus.
    Lansford, Jennifer .E
    Duke University.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Universita a di Roma.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana M.
    Universidad San Buenaventura.
    Puberty Predicts Approach But Not Avoidance on the Iowa Gambling Task in a Multinational Sample2017In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 88, no 5, 598-1614 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the dual systems model of adolescent risk taking, sensation seeking and impulse control follow different developmental trajectories across adolescence and are governed by two different brain systems. The authors tested whether different underlying processes also drive age differences in reward approach and cost avoidance. Using a modified Iowa Gambling Task in a multinational, cross-sectional sample of 3,234 adolescents (ages 9-17; M = 12.87, SD = 2.36), pubertal maturation, but not age, predicted reward approach, mediated through higher sensation seeking. In contrast, age, but not pubertal maturation, predicted increased cost avoidance, mediated through greater impulse control. These findings add to evidence that adolescent behavior is best understood as the product of two interacting, but independently developing, brain systems. © 2016 The Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  • 31.
    Korp, Helena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Gymnasiet, en skola för alla: men på olika villkor2008In: Ung på 2000-talet: perspektiv på ungdomars vardag, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2008, 133-148 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32. Lansford, J.E.
    et al.
    Godwin, J.
    Al-Hassan, S.M.
    Bacchini, D.
    Bombi, A.S.
    Bornstein, M.H.
    Chang, L.
    Chen, B.-B.
    Deater-Deckard, K.
    Di Giunta, L.
    Dodge, K.A.
    Malone, P.S.
    Oburu, P.
    Pastorelli, C.
    Skinner, A.T.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, L.
    Tapanya, S.
    Alampay, L.P.
    Uribe Tirado, L.M.
    Zelli, A.
    Longitudinal associations between parenting and youth adjustment in twelve cultural groups: Cultural normativeness of parenting as a moderator2017In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To examine whether the cultural normativeness of parents' beliefs and behaviors moderates the links between those beliefs and behaviors and youths' adjustment, mothers, fathers, and children (N = 1,298 families) from 12 cultural groups in 9 countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States) were interviewed when children were, on average, 10 years old and again when children were 12 years old. Multilevel models examined 5 aspects of parenting (expectations regarding family obligations, monitoring, psychological control, behavioral control, warmth/affection) in relation to 5 aspects of youth adjustment (social competence, prosocial behavior, academic achievement, externalizing behavior, internalizing behavior). Interactions between family level and culture-level predictors were tested to examine whether cultural normativeness of parenting behaviors moderated the link between those behaviors and children's adjustment. More evidence was found for within- than between-culture differences in parenting predictors of youth adjustment. In 7 of the 8 instances in which cultural normativeness was found to moderate the link between parenting and youth adjustment, the link between a particular parenting behavior and youth adjustment was magnified in cultural contexts in which the parenting behavior was more normative

  • 33. Lansford, J.E.
    et al.
    Godwin, J.
    Bornstein, M.H.
    Chang, L.
    Deater-Deckard, K.
    Di Giunta, L.
    Dodge, K.A.
    Malone, P.S.
    Oburu, P.
    Pastorelli, C.
    Skinner, A.T.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, L.
    Tapanya, S.
    Alampay, L.P.
    Uribe Tirado, L.M.
    Al-Hassan, S.M.
    Bacchini, D.
    Reward sensitivity, impulse control, and social cognition as mediators of the link between childhood family adversity and externalizing behavior in eight countries2017In: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, Vol. 20, no 5, 1675-1688 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using data from 1,177 families in eight countries (Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States), we tested a conceptual model of direct effects of childhood family adversity on subsequent externalizing behaviors as well as indirect effects through psychological mediators. When children were 9 years old, mothers and fathers reported on financial difficulties and their use of corporal punishment, and children reported perceptions of their parents' rejection. When children were 10 years old, they completed a computerized battery of tasks assessing reward sensitivity and impulse control and responded to questions about hypothetical social provocations to assess their hostile attributions and proclivity for aggressive responding. When children were 12 years old, they reported on their externalizing behavior. Multigroup structural equation models revealed that across all eight countries, childhood family adversity had direct effects on externalizing behaviors 3 years later, and childhood family adversity had indirect effects on externalizing behavior through psychological mediators. The findings suggest ways in which family-level adversity poses risk for children's subsequent development of problems at psychological and behavioral levels, situated within diverse cultural contexts.

  • 34.
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    et al.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Department of Psychology, Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City 1108, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha
    Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, The Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115, Jordan.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, 81100 Caserta, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Faculty of Psychology, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Child and Family Research Program in Developmental Neuroscience, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    Department of Educational Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Department of Psychology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.
    Giunta, Laura Di
    Faculty of Psychology, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno University, Maseno 40105, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Faculty of Psychology, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Runyan, Desmond K.
    Department of Social Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Faculty of Psychology, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    Deptartment of Education Sciences, “Foro Italico”, University of Rome, 00135 Rome, Italy.
    Corporal Punishment of Children in Nine Countries as a Function of Child Gender and Parent Gender2010In: International Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 1687-9759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a global perspective on corporal punishment by examining differences between mothers' and fathers' use of corporal punishment with daughters and sons in nine countries. Methods. Interviews were conducted with 1398 mothers, 1146 fathers, and 1417 children (age range =7 to 10 years) in China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. Results. Across the entire sample, 54% of girls and 58% of boys had experienced mild corporal punishment, and 13% of girls and 14% of boys had experienced severe corporal punishment by their parents or someone in their household in the last month. Seventeen percent of parents believed that the use of corporal punishment was necessary to rear the target child. Overall, boys were more frequently punished corporally than were girls, and mothers used corporal punishment more frequently than did fathers. There were significant differences across countries, with reports of corporal punishment use lowest in Sweden and highest in Kenya. Conclusion. This work establishes that the use of corporal punishment is widespread, and efforts to prevent corporal punishment from escalating into physical abuse should be commensurately widespread.

  • 35.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, China.
    Chen, Bin-Bin
    Fudan University.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza", Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy .
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Icenogle, Grace
    Temple University.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia .
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome “Foro Italico”, Rome, Italy.
    Parenting and Positive Adjustment for Adolescents in Nine Countries: Novel Approaches and Findings from Europe, Asia, Africa and America2017In: Well-Being of Youth and Emerging Adults across Cultures: Novel Approaches and Findings from Europe, Asia, Africa and America / [ed] Dimitrova, Radosveta, Springer International Publishing , 2017, 235-248 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes the theoretical background, methodology, and select empirical findings from the Parenting Across Cultures project, a longitudinal study of mothers, fathers, and youth in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and United States). The design of the study is well suited to addressing questions regarding within-family, between-family within-country, and between-country predictors of youth outcomes. Positive development may be characterized in unique ways in different countries, but adjustment outcomes such as social competence, prosocial behavior, and academic achievement also share features and parenting predictors in different countries. Combining emic (originating within a culture) and etic (originating outside a culture) approaches, operationalizing culture, and handling measurement invariance are challenges of international research. Understanding culturally specific and generalizable features of positive youth development as well as how youth are socialized in ways to promote positive adjustment are advantages of comparative international research.

  • 36.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Duke University.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and HumanDevelopment.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples.
    Bombi, Anna S.
    Università di Roma La Sapienza.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau.
    Chen, Bin-Bin
    Fudan University.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma La Sapienza.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University and King Abdulaziz University; Sombat Tapanya, Chiang Mai University.
    Alampay, Liane P.
    Ateneo de Manila University.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana M.
    Universidad San Buenaventura.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico.
    How International Research on Parenting Advances Understanding of Child Development2016In: Child Development Perspectives, ISSN 1750-8592, E-ISSN 1750-8606, Vol. 10, no 3, 202-207 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    nternational research on parenting and child development can advance our understanding of similarities and differences in how parenting is related to children's development across countries. Challenges to conducting international research include operationalizing culture, disentangling effects within and between countries, and balancing emic and etic perspectives. Benefits of international research include testing whether findings regarding parenting and child development replicate across diverse samples, incorporating cultural and contextual diversity to foster more inclusive and representative research samples and investigators than has typically occurred, and understanding how children develop in proximal parenting and family and distal international contexts.

  • 37.
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    et al.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome “Foro Italico”, Department of Education Sciences, Rome, Italy.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Emirates College for Advanced Education. Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan, and Health and Special Education Division, , Abu Dhabi, UAE.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Department of Psychology, Caserta, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Bornstein, Marc H
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research Program in Developmental Neuroscience, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    Hong Kong Institute of Education, Department of Psychological Studies, Hong Kong, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Psychology, Blacksburg, VA, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Education Psychology, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Mothers', fathers' and children's perceptions of parents' expectations about children's family obligations in nine countries.2016In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 51, no 5, 366-374 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's family obligations involve assistance and respect that children are expected to provide to immediate and extended family members and reflect beliefs related to family life that may differ across cultural groups. Mothers, fathers and children (N = 1432 families) in 13 cultural groups in 9 countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand and United States) reported on their expectations regarding children's family obligations and parenting attitudes and behaviours. Within families, mothers and fathers had more concordant expectations regarding children's family obligations than did parents and children. Parenting behaviours that were warmer, less neglectful and more controlling as well as parenting attitudes that were more authoritarian were related to higher expectations regarding children's family obligations between families within cultures as well as between cultures. These international findings advance understanding of children's family obligations by contextualising them both within families and across a number of diverse cultural groups in 9 countries.

  • 38.
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    et al.
    Duke University.
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza.
    Bornstein, Marc H
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.
    Chang, Lei
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma La Sapienza.
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University.
    Malone, Patrick S
    Duke University.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza.
    Skinner, Ann T
    Duke University.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University.
    Individual, family, and culture level contributions to child physical abuse and neglect: A longitudinal study in nine countries.2015In: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, Vol. 27, no 4 Pt 2, 1417-1428 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study advances understanding of predictors of child abuse and neglect at multiple levels of influence. Mothers, fathers, and children (N = 1,418 families, M age of children = 8.29 years) were interviewed annually in three waves in 13 cultural groups in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States). Multilevel models were estimated to examine predictors of (a) within-family differences across the three time points, (b) between-family within-culture differences, and (c) between-cultural group differences in mothers' and fathers' reports of corporal punishment and children's reports of their parents' neglect. These analyses addressed to what extent mothers' and fathers' use of corporal punishment and children's perceptions of their parents' neglect were predicted by parents' belief in the necessity of using corporal punishment, parents' perception of the normativeness of corporal punishment in their community, parents' progressive parenting attitudes, parents' endorsement of aggression, parents' education, children's externalizing problems, and children's internalizing problems at each of the three levels. Individual-level predictors (especially child externalizing behaviors) as well as cultural-level predictors (especially normativeness of corporal punishment in the community) predicted corporal punishment and neglect. Findings are framed in an international context that considers how abuse and neglect are defined by the global community and how countries have attempted to prevent abuse and neglect.

  • 39.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, U.
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA .
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia .
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    Foro Italico University of Rome, Department of Education Sciences, Rome, It.
    Peña Alampay, Liana
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, 1000 Metro Manila National Capital Region, Philippin.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Hashemite University,Emirates College for Advanced Education. Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood,, Zarqa, Jordan, and Health and Special Education Division, , Abu Dhabi, UAE .
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Department of Psychology, Caserta, Italy .
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza", Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Ital.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research Program in Developmental Neuroscience, Bethesda, MD, USA .
    Chang, Lei
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Educational Psychology, Hong Kong, China .
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Psychology, Blacksburg, VA, USA .
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza", Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy .
    Dodge, Kenneth
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA .
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA .
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya .
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza', Department of Psychology, 00118 Rome, Italy .
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA .
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand .
    Mothers', Fathers', and Early Adolescents' Expectations about Family Obligations in Nine Countries: Paper presented at 2015 SRCD Biennial meeting, Philadelphia, USA2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    et al.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy.
    Sharma, Chinmayi
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy.
    Malone, Patrick.S.
    University of South Carolina, Department of Psychology.
    Woodlief, Darren
    University of South Carolina, Department of Psychology.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Kenya .
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Rome University La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, .
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Thailand .
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Rome University La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, .
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Department of Education Sciences in Sport and Physical Activity, .
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Jordan .
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, Philippines .
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Department of Psychology, .
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Rome University La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, .
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development, United States .
    Chang, Lei
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Educational Psychology, , Hong Kong .
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Tech, Department of Psychology, United States .
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Department of Psychology,.
    Corporal Punishment, Maternal Warmth, and Child Adjustment: A Longitudinal Study in Eight Countries2014In: Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology (Print), ISSN 1537-4416, E-ISSN 1537-4424, Vol. 43, no 4, 670-685 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two key tasks facing parents across cultures are managing children’s behaviors (and misbehaviors) and conveying love and affection. Previous research has found that corporal punishment generally is related to worse child adjustment, whereas parental warmth is related to better child adjustment. This study examined whether the association between corporal punishment and child adjustment problems (anxiety and aggression) is moderated by maternal warmth in a diverse set of countries that vary in a number of sociodemographic and psychological ways. Interviews were conducted with 7- to 10-year-old children (N = 1,196; 51% girls) and their mothers in 8 countries: China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Thailand, and the United States. Follow-up interviews were conducted 1 and 2 years later. Corporal punishment was related to increases, and maternal warmth was related to decreases, in children’s anxiety and aggression over time; however, these associations varied somewhat across groups. Maternal warmth moderated the effect of corporal punishment in some countries, with increases in anxiety over time for children whose mothers were high in both warmth and corporal punishment. The findings illustrate the overall association between corporal punishment and child anxiety and aggression as well as patterns specific to particular countries. Results suggest that clinicians across countries should advise parents against using corporal punishment, even in the context of parent-child relationships that are otherwise warm, and should assist parents in finding other ways to manage children’s behaviors. © 2014 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  • 41.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, United States.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, United States.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Giunta, Laura D.
    Rome University 'La Sapienza'.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, United States.
    Malone, Patrick. S.
    University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Kisumu, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Rome University 'La Sapienza', Rome, Italy.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana M.
    Rome University 'La Sapienza', Rome, Italy.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome 'Foro Italico', Rome, Italy.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Peña Alampay, Liane
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silva
    Rome University 'La Sapienza', Rome, Italy.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, United States.
    Chang, Lei
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Boys' and Girls' Relational and Physical Aggression in Nine Countries2012In: Aggressive Behavior, ISSN 0096-140X, E-ISSN 1098-2337, Vol. 38, no 4, 298-308 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distinguishing between relational and physical aggression has become a key feature of many developmental studies in North America and Western Europe, but very little information is available on relational and physical aggression in more diverse cultural contexts. This study examined the factor structure of, associations between, and gender differences in relational and physical aggression in China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. Children ages 7-10 years (N = 1,410) reported on their relationally and physically aggressive behavior. Relational and physical aggression shared a common factor structure across countries. In all nine countries, relational and physical aggression were significantly correlated (average r = .49). Countries differed in the mean levels of both relational and physical aggression that children reported using and with respect to whether children reported using more physical than relational aggression or more relational than physical aggression. Boys reported being more physically aggressive than girls across all nine countries; no consistent gender differences emerged in relational aggression. Despite mean-level differences in relational and physical aggression across countries, the findings provided support for cross-country similarities in associations between relational and physical aggression as well as links between gender and aggression. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 42.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, U.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tryggvason, Nina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA .
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    Foro Italico University of Rome, Department of Education Sciences, Rome, It.
    Peña Alampay, Liana
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, 1000 Metro Manila National Capital Region, Philippin.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Hashemite University,Emirates College for Advanced Education. Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood,, Zarqa, Jordan, and Health and Special Education Division, , Abu Dhabi, UAE .
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Department of Psychology, Caserta, Italy .
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza", Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Ital.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research Program in Developmental Neuroscience, Bethesda, MD, USA .
    Chang, Lei
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Educational Psychology, Hong Kong, China .
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Psychology, Blacksburg, VA, USA .
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza", Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy .
    Dodge, Kenneth
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA .
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA .
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya .
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza', Department of Psychology, 00118 Rome, Italy .
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA .
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand .
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia .
    Physical Aggression, Relational Aggression, and Endorsement of Reactive Aggression in Nine Countrie: Paper presented at 2015 SRCD Biennial meeting, Philadelphia, USA2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    et al.
    Duke University.
    Woodlief, Darren
    University of South Carolina.
    Malone, Patrick S
    University of South Carolina.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Rome University La Sapienza.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University.
    Tirado, Liliana.Maria Uribe
    Rome University La Sapienza.
    Zelli, Arnoldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples.
    Bombi, Anna Silva
    Rome University La Sapienza.
    Bornstein, Marc H
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.
    Chang, Lei
    Chinese University of Hong Kong.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Tech.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University.
    A longitudinal examination of mothers’ and fathers’ social information processing biases and harsh discipline in nine countries2014In: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, Vol. 26, no 3, 561-573 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined whether parents’ social information processing was related to their subsequent reports of their harsh discipline. Interviews were conducted with mothers (n = 1,277) and fathers (n = 1,030) of children in 1,297 families in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States), initially when children were 7 to 9 years old and again 1 year later. Structural equation models showed that parents’ positive evaluations of aggressive responses to hypothetical childrearing vignettes at Time 1 predicted parents’ self-reported harsh physical and nonphysical discipline at Time 2. This link was consistent across mothers and fathers, and across the nine countries, providing support for the universality of the link between positive evaluations of harsh discipline and parents’ aggressive behavior toward children. The results suggest that international efforts to eliminate violence toward children could target parents’ beliefs about the acceptability and advisability of using harsh physical and nonphysical forms of discipline. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014.

  • 44.
    Leen, Eline
    et al.
    University of Erlangen-Nuremburg, Institute of Learning Innovation.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Mawer, Matt
    Coventry University, Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences.
    Holdsworth, Emma
    Coventry University, Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences.
    Helsing, Bo
    University of Erlangen-Nuremburg, Institute of Learning Innovation.
    Bowen, Erica
    Coventry University, Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences.
    Prevalence, dynamic risk factors and the efficacy of primary interventions for adolescent dating violence: An international review2013In: Aggression and Violent Behavior, ISSN 1359-1789, E-ISSN 1873-6335, Vol. 18, no 1, 159-174 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescent dating violence is a pressing international issue: yet, there have been few attempts to collate the international evidence regarding this phenomenon. This article reviews contemporary evidence from Europe and North America on prevalence, dynamic risk factors, and the efficacy of intervention programs for adolescent dating violence. Prevalence findings suggest that victimization rates are comparable across Europe and North America. Although individual studies report differing prevalences, the overall hierarchy of violence types - in which psychological/emotional violence is most and sexual violence least prevalent - is consistent across almost all investigations. Four dynamic risk factors for perpetration are identified: peer influence, substance use, psychological adjustment and competencies, and attitudes towards violence. Peer influences and attitudes towards violence appear to be the most extensively evidenced factors in the literature. Nine existing intervention programs are identified, all located within North America. Intervention results are mixed, with some evaluations reporting significant long-term benefits while others report positive intervention effects dissipate throughout follow-up. Tentative analysis suggests that programs focused on behavioral change may elicit sustainable effects more readily. However, this is difficult to ascertain with no data on program repetitions and variations across intervention pedagogy and sample. Concerns with existing research and interventions and possible future directions are discussed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 45. Löfgren-Mårtenson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Molin, Martin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    "Tangled up in blue": Views of parents and professionals on internet use for sexual purposes among young people with intellectual disabilities2015In: Journal of Sexual Medicine, ISSN 1743-6095, E-ISSN 1743-6109, Vol. 12, no suppl 5, SI, 347-347 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46. Löfgren-Mårtenson, Lotta
    et al.
    Molin, Martin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Del@ktig på internet: om internetanvändande bland unga med intellektuell funktionsnedsättning2016In: Socialt arbete och internet: att förstå och hantera sociala problem på nya arenor / [ed] Kristian Daneback & Emma Sorbring, Stockholm: Liber, 2016, 1, 47-59 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Löfgren-Mårtenson, Lotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies, Nordenskiöldsgatan 8, Malmö, Sweden.
    Molin, Martin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Experiences of the Internet, Sexuality and Intellectual Disability among Parents and Professionals2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Löfgren-Mårtenson, Lotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies, Nordenskiöldsgatan 8, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Molin, Martin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    "Tangled Up in Blue" (T@ngled): Views of Parents and Professionals on Internet Use for Sexual Purposes Among Young People with Intellectual Disabilities2015In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 33, no 4, 533-544 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aim to examine parents' and professionals' views on the usage of Internet for love and sexual purposes among young people with intellectual disabilities (18-€“20 years) in Sweden. Five semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with professionals (n = 8) working on special programmes in upper secondary schools and with parents (n = 5). The interviews were analysed with thematic analysis and the theory of sexual scripts were guiding the process. The results show that the Internet is seen as a social arena with complex challenges; for love and sexuality, for sexual conduct, and for sexual risk and opportunities. Young people with intellectual disabilities are looked upon as more vulnerable than other youth. However, the result also show that parents view the risk of their adolescent of being lonely as greater than the risk of being abused or mislead. A Net-script consisting of rules is geared towards the young people with intellectual disability. Nevertheless, a change to a more flexible and nuanced Net-script is shown while the group of young persons with intellectual disabilities are seen as more heterogeneous than earlier. In-depth knowledge about parents’ and professionals’ perspectives on the Internet and sexuality is important since the young people live in a dependency situation towards their surroundings. In addition, the surroundings’ attitudes and behaviour are essential for the young peoples’ access of support and opportunities to develop their own capacity and to experience love and sexuality. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  • 49.
    Molin, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Editorial: Internet use and disability2017In: Cyberpsychology : Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, ISSN 1802-7962, E-ISSN 1802-7962, Vol. 11, no 1Special IssueArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Molin, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Löfgren- Mårtenson, Lotta
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Risks and opportunities in new emancipatory landscapes?: On young people with intellectual disabilities, Internet use and identification processes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although research on young peoples identity formation processes on the Internet is a growing field, there are few studies that illustrate conditions for pupils with intellectual disabilities (ID). Recent Scandinavian studies have indicated that there is a new generation of young people with ID who has developed alternative ways of relating to issues of participation and identity. It's about how they choose to present themselves and how they navigate the various social media. By presenting themselves through descriptions of their own interests and personal characteristics instead of exposing the disability so-called alternative identities can be developed, where disability is not necessarily put in focus. Young people with ID often have different degrees of communicative constraints, which on the one hand implicates that the value of new social arenas can be of great importance. On the other hand, the use of the Internet could also be problematic in different contexts. An on-going Swedish research project aims to investigate these processes based on the perspectives of young people with ID, school staff and parents. In a pilot study based on focus group interviews we found that professionals (teachers, n=8) expressed a concern that young people will get hurt and end up in undesirable situations (such as being cheated or abused), while parents (n=5) mainly consider the Internet as a possible future venue for the development of new and on-going social relations. This paper presentation will report preliminary findings from interviews conducted with young people in upper secondary special programme for pupils with ID (n=30). The experiences of the informants will be discussed in relation to results from the pilot study and relative to a conceptual framework of social identity,participation and emancipation.

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