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  • 1.
    Anderberg, Staffan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Energy and Cost Efficiency in CNC Machining from a Process Planning Perspective2011In: 9th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing: Sustainable Manufacturing –Shaping Global Value Creation / [ed] Günther Seliger, 2011, p. 383-389Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of process planning as an enabler for cost efficient and environmentally benign CNC machining is investigated in the paper. Specific energy is used as the principal indicator of energy efficient machining and different methods to calculate and estimate this is exemplified and discussed. The interrelation between process planning decisions and production outcome is sketched and process capability can be considered as one factor of green machining. A correlation between total machining cost and total energy use was shown for an experimental case. However, to generalise conclusions, the importance of having reliable data during process planning to make effective decisions should not be underestimated.

  • 2.
    Anderberg, Staffan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Process planning for cnc machining of swedish subcontractors: A web survey2014In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 17, p. 732-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process planning of CNC machining is critical to ensure cost, time and quality parameters of manufacturing operations. At the heart of process planning is, typically the process planner, who must make a multitude of decisions regarding machines, cutting strategies, tools and process parameters etc. Today there are a number of different tools and methods available to aid the process planner. This paper explores today’s industrial use of some of these aids and outlinespotential underlying reasons for the current state. The empirical data is based on a questionnaire survey of Swedish CNC machining sub-contractors. The main conclusion is that despite a long history of development of various aids (CAD/CAM, PLM standards etc.) there is still a large proportion of the industry, which has not yet adopted these aids. By the responding companies 32% do not use any CAM system and only 2% use a PLM system. On the other side of the spectrum is a group of 25% that uses CAM in 75% or more of their planned products. The learning from this survey can be used to better understand the industrial needs and focus research and development efforts.

  • 3.
    Anderberg, Staffan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Production preparation methodology in Swedish metal working industry - a State of the Art investigation2008In: Swedish Production Symposium, Stockholm 18-20 November 2008. Proceedings: The Swedish Production Academy's annual conference / [ed] Bengt Lindberg och Johan Stahre, Stockholm: The Swedish Production Academy , 2008, p. 443-450Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a brief state of the art in the Swedish metal working industry regarding the production preparation process for the machine centre. The article is based on a relationship model from which a questionnaire was developed. The model incorporates the perceived preparation process efficiency, the amount of systematic preparation work, in relation to the companies’ premises as possible causes. The investigation is based on a general hypothesis that a more systematic approach in the preparation process leads to higher preparation process efficiency. This hypothesis was supplemented by two more hypotheses and additional analyses to create an understanding of the situation. The main finding in this investigation is that there appear to be no relationship between increased  ystematic preparation work and perception of higher preparation efficiency. The investigation also indicates that many metal working companies have little knowledge about the performance of their preparation process and that there is an efficiency improvement potential of nearly 30%.

  • 4.
    Beno, Tomas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Isaksson, Marina
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Investigation of Minimal Quantity Cooling Lubrication in Turning of Inconel 7182007In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tribology in Manufacturing Processes: ICTMP 2007, Yokohama, Japan 24-26 September, 2007, p. 281-286Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Beno, Tomas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Isaksson, Marina
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Machining aerospace material with sub-cooled minimal quantity cppling lubrication fluids2009In: World Tribology Congress 2009: Kyoto, Japan, September 6-11, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Global Industrial Development, Scania CV AB, Södertälje.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Pejryd, Lars
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University.
    Manufacturing System Design for Business Value, a Holistic Design Approach2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 50, p. 659-664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When designing and developing manufacturing systems, many aspects need to be considered. Typically, the manufacturing design objectives are specified to achieve certain operational requirements around quality, capacity, cost etc. They are also specified withthe intention to ensure efficient processes related to manufacturing, such as maintenance, logistics, not to mention the main process of manufacturing the actual part. This study proposes that a wider company perspective should be considered during manufacturing system design, to achieve a greater business value. The manufacturing system should be designed to create value to other core business processes, such as product development, marketing, sales and services. This paper also presents examples on value perspectives to consider and how this approach can be implemented.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Global Industrial Development, Scania CV AB, Södertälje.
    Pejryd, Lars
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Consideration of market demand volatility risks, when making manufacturing system investments2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 40, p. 307-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When investing in new manufacturing systems, many aspects must be taken into consideration to ensure a sustainable business. In respect to the financial aspect, both the one-off investment cost and the continuous operational cost must be analysed to ensure that the life-cycle cost perspective is appreciated. However, one detail in the cost analyses that is often overlooked is the composition of fixed and variable cost elements. These details are important to be able to better manage the risk of market demand volatility, and accordingly make appropriateinvestment decisions. This case study demonstrates that when there is a low risk for reduced market demand, investing in a manufacturing system with low variable cost is favourable. However, if there is a high risk for reduced market demand, the importance will instead be to have a low fixed cost, as this will be the dominant cost factor.

  • 8.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Global Industrial Development, Scania CV AB, Södertälje.
    Pejryd, Lars
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Production support model to manage market demand volatility risks2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 57C, p. 664-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the investment selection process during the design of new manufacturing systems, both the technical attributes and the expected financial performance need to be evaluated. To manage the financial risks with market volatility, it is important to understand the composition of fixed and variable cost factors in relation to the expected volume interval. The support model developed in this paper will in a simple and intuitive way visualise the effect on production cost due to changes in market demands. It can also be used to evaluate the volume sensitivity of existing manufacturing systems, even compare systems making different products.

  • 9. Murgau, A.
    et al.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    A Scientific Perspective on Improvement of Transactional Processes2006In: 39th CIRP International Seminar on Manufacturing Systems : the morphology of innovative maufacturing systems: Ljubljana, June 7-9, 2006, p. 473-478Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Pejryd, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Andersson, P.
    Information Back Bone Systems for Virtual Manufacturing, a Comparison of ERP and Engineering Based PLM Systems2006In: 39th CIRP International Seminar on Manufacturing Systems : the morphology of innovative maufacturing systems: Ljubljana, June 7-9, 2006, p. 405-410Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Pejryd, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Örebro University.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Carmignato, Simone
    University of Padova, I 35131 Padova, Italy .
    Computed Tomography as a Tool for Examining Surface Integrity in Drilled Holes in CFRP Composites2014In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 13, p. 43-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In light weight structures the joining of composite materials and of composites to metals are key technologies. A manufacturing method associated with joining is the drilling of holes. The hole creation in CRFP through drilling is associated with several defects related to the process, both on the entry and exit sides of the hole and also with dimensional and surface roughness issues of the hole wall. The detection of damage due to the process is not trivial. Especially interesting is non-destructive methods. In this work X-ray computed tomography is used to determine defects due to drilling of holes in a CFRP composite using twist drills with different geometrical features at different drilling parameters. The results can be used to establish relationship between different geometrical features of drills in combination with cutting parameters and resulting surface integrity of holes. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 12.
    Pejryd, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Isaksson, Marina
    CAPE.
    Machining aerospace materials with room-temperature and cooled minimal-quantity cutting fluids2011In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part B, journal of engineering manufacture, ISSN 0954-4054, E-ISSN 2041-2975, Vol. 225, no 1, p. 74-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Pejryd, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Eriksson, Rebecka
    Bofors Test Center,Karlskoga,.
    X-ray Computed Tomography as a Tool in Joining Process Development2014In: Proceedings of the 6th International Swedish Production Symposium 2014 / [ed] Stahre, Johan, Johansson, Björn & Björkman, Mats, 2014, p. 1-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    3-D information on defects in joints are of great importance. Computed tomography is a method that holds the promise of generating this information. This work shows several examples of application of CT on joining or joining related processes. The detection of foreign material, cracks and porosity is shown as well as the ability to investigate much larger volumes than what is feasible with traditional cut-ups. Some limitations are also discussed.

  • 14.
    Pejryd, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Minimization of chatter in machining by the use of mobile platform technologies2012In: Proceedings of the 5th International Swedish Production Symposium, SPS12: 6th-8th of November 2012 Linköping, Sweden / [ed] Mats Björkman, Linköping, 2012, p. 179-189Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Pejryd, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Repo, Jari
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Machine Tool Internal Encoders as Sensors for the Detection of Tool Wear2012In: Procedia CIRP: 3rd CIRP Conference on Process Machine Interactions, 29-30 October 2012, Nagoya, Japan., 2012, p. 46-51Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tool wear in machining changes the geometry of the cutting edges, which effect the direction and amplitudes of the cutting forcecomponents and the dynamics in the machining process. These changes in the forces and dynamics are picked up by the internalencoders and thus can be used for monitoring of changes in process conditions. This paper presents an approach for the monitoringof a multi-tooth milling process. The method is based on the direct measurement of the output from the position encoders availablein the machine tool and the application of advanced signal analysis methods.

    The paper investigates repeatability of the method developed and how to detect wear in an individual tooth in a milling cutter. Theresults of this work show that various signal features which correlate with tool wear can be extracted from the first few oscillatingcomponents, representing the low-frequency components, of the machine axes velocities. The responses from the position encodersexhibit good repeatability, especially short term repeatability while the long-term repeatability is more unreliable. A worn toothincreases the irregularity in the encoder responses and can be identified at an early stage of the cut.

  • 16.
    Repo, Jari
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Machine tool and process condition monitoring using Poincaré maps2010In: COMA'10, International Conference on Competitive Manufacturing: Stellenbosch, South Africa, 3-5 February 2010, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Repo, Jari
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Measurement method for the identification of individual teeth in milling operations2012In: CIRP - Journal of Manufacturing Science and Technology, ISSN 1755-5817, E-ISSN 1878-0016, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 26-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internal sensors already available in the machine tools may prove to be an interesting approach to monitor the machining process. Accurate determination of the position of the individual tooth on a milling cutter is important to be able to correlate the measured responses from the machine tool position encoders to the tooth or teeth that may be the cause of the response.

    The aim of the work presented in this paper is to develop a measurement method to identify the individual tooth on a milling cutter by their angular position relative to a specified 0-degree direction. If the lower and upper bounds of the cutting zone are known, together with the actual spindle position and the starting time of the cut, it will be possible to track and identify which teeth are within the cutting zone at a given time in the following off-line analysis of the responses. This may simplify the task of finding potential correlations between the state of individual teeth on the milling cutter with measured responses from various sensors during the milling process. The proposed method is based on a reflectance detector and uses accurate position information provided by the position encoders.

    A validation of the measurement method is also presented which shows that the error of the estimated angular position is approximately +/- 0.15 degrees for the validation setup used in this case.

  • 18.
    Wanner, Bertil
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Cutter Exit Effects during Milling of Thin-walled Inconel 7182012In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 590, p. 297-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During milling of thin-walled components, chatter vibrations give rise to process issues. These include dimensional inaccuracy, damaged and scrap parts, and damaged cutting tools. This, in turn, leads to loss of production time with increasing cost as a consequence. This paper identifies the force profile during a single cut milling process. It focuses on the exit and post-exit behavior of the cut and discusses the process dynamics. The force profiles of various tool-to-workpiece positions are analyzed as regards the exit and post exit phases. A standard on-the-market cutter and a specially designed zero rake cutter are used in the investigation. Finally, a time-domain simulation of the force is performed and compared to the experimental results. The study concludes that a small change in exit angle may result in a considerable improvement in cutting behavior. In addition, the tool position should be chosen so that the cutter exits in the least flexible direction possible for the workpiece.

  • 19.
    Wanner, Bertil
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Milling Strategies for Thin-walled Components2012In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 498, p. 177-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent developments in the Aerospace industry have led to thin-walled, reduced-weight engine designs. Due to demands in manufacturing, production speeds and material removal rates (MRR) have increased. As component wall thickness gets thinner, the consequence oftentimes is an increase in chatter vibrations. This paper suggests that a correctly chosen tool-to-workpiece offset geometry may lead to a robust and chatter-free process. The results show the differences in force response for three geometries while varying the overhang of the workpiece. This is part of a concerted effort to develop a robust methodology for the prediction of chatter vibrations during milling operations of thin-walled Aerospace components. This paper outlines certain robust machining practices. It also analyzes the criticality of the choice of offset between tool and workpiece during milling setup as well as the effects that the entry and exit of cut have on system vibrations.

  • 20.
    Wanner, Bertil
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Process Stability Strategies in Milling of Thin-walled Inconel 7182011In: 4th Manufacturing Engineering Society International Conference / [ed] Manufacturing Engineering Society, 2011, p. 1-8-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trends in Aerospace development have led to thin-walled, reduced-weight engine designs. The demands in manufacturing have forced production speeds and material removal rates (MRR) to increase. As component wall thickness gets thinner, the consequence oftentimes is an increase in chatter vibrations. This paper suggests that a correctly chosen tool-to-workpiece offset geometry may lead to a robust and chatter free process. The results show the differences in force response for three geometries while varying the height overhang of the workpiece. This is part of a concerted effort to develop a robust methodology for the prediction of chatter vibrations during milling operations of thin-walled Aerospace components. This paper gives guidelines on how to accomplish robust machining practices. It also answers the following questions: How critical is the choice of offset between tool and workpiece during milling setup? And what effects do the entry and exit of cut have on system vibrations?

  • 21.
    Wanner, Bertil
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Process Stability Strategies in Milling of Thin-walled Inconel 7182012In: The 4th Manufacturing engineering society international conference (MESIC 2011): 21–23 September 2011, Cadiz, Spain / [ed] M. Marcos, J. Salguero, American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2012, Vol. 1431, p. 465-472Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trends in Aerospace development have led to thin-walled, reduced-weight engine designs. The demands in manufacturing have forced production speeds and material removal rates (MRR) to increase. As component wall thickness gets thinner, the consequence oftentimes is an increase in chatter vibrations. This paper suggests that a correctly chosen tool-to-workpiece offset geometry may lead to a robust and chatter free process. The results show the differences in force response for three geometries while varying the height overhang of the workpiece. This is part of a concerted effort to develop a robust methodology for the prediction of chatter vibrations during milling operations of thin-walled Aerospace components. This paper gives guidelines on how to accomplish robust machining practices. It also answers the following questions: How critical is the choice of offset between tool and workpiece during milling setup? And what effects do the entry and exit of cut have on system vibrations?

1 - 21 of 21
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