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  • 1.
    Andersson, Åsa
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Korp, Helena
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Work Integrated Learning from the Perspective of Internationalization2012In: The European Conference on Educational Research 2012: The Need for Educational Research to Champion Freedom, Education and Development for All, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this presentation is on work integrated learning in higher education that takes place in a cultural context different to that which the student is accustomed to. In higher education internationalization is often stated as a central vision both in relation to education and research. This is commonly expressed in policy documents in statements such as working for an open and border crossing university and having a distinct international perspective in all forms of higher education. The research project “Work integrated learning from the perspective of internationalization” is designed to highlight some of the conditions that surround such visions by examining learning in international settings from students' experiences of practice-related activities abroad. This involves activities that are directly work-oriented or field work carried out within the framework of a university course and / or a bachelor thesis. In the project we are thereby examining students' situated learning and thus highlight the contextual practice community they can access in an international environment. This includes both specific and more general aspects of learning in which different aspects are highlighted. Specific training related to special education programs focus on the development of professional identity while generally learning affects students from all programs in which learning outcomes such as wider perspectives and critical thinking are included.Our research focus is of exploratory nature where the approach is to examine students’ experiences of practice-related learning from the perspective of internationalization. This is being researched from three relating aspects. • Emotional and identity transformational aspects of learning. What does it mean to be in a relatively unknown social environment and there be faced with work-related tasks? What kind of interpretations and understandings of the situations occur? • Communicative aspects of students' practice-oriented learning – the importance of language and cultural codes. • Comparative aspects of students’ learning – the importance of comparisons for perspective taking and development of knowledge.Previous researched has been done on students’ practice-related learning in the field of work integrated learning. The forms of practice-oriented learning are of various kinds. It may be learning through the use of practical training related to establishing a profession-specific knowledge and identity. Other forms are the use of direct working connections or cultural settings outside the university through project work in course moments and / or for a bachelor thesis. What is common to these various forms is an endeavor of higher education to make the arena and cultural settings outside the university to a direct part in students’ learning. Given that the internationalization of higher education has increased, it is important also to examine students’ learning in various international contexts. The relevance of this can be found in theories of learning particularly those focusing on the contextual meaning from the idea that learning originates from the experience of interaction with the environment. Social aspects such as the relational and dialogic qualities are central already in the work of Vygotsky (1962) but according to Cooper (2008), it is only recently that this has been researched from an international perspective.

    Method

    The study is based on qualitative interviews with post graduate students who have completed internship or field work abroad. We have conducted in depth interviews using a guide with thematic questions focusing on emotional, communicative and comparative aspects of work integrated learning abroad. When processing the raw information the interviews were digitally-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The sample includes 12 in depth interviews, three students from each four different departments (social work, teacher, health promoter, cultural studies and engineering) at a smaller Swedish university. Another category of material is the interviewed student’s written reports from their field work. A content-analysis is performed on all parts of the material according to the three mentioned aspects. The analysis is abductive, which means that it uses theoretical concepts in making sense of the material, but is also sensitive to the participants' own ways of conceptualizing their experiences and learning. Common as well as unique features in the students' stories will be presented and discussed and considered in regard to the students' personal, institutional and cultural contexts.

    Expected Outcomes

    Preliminary analysis suggest in line with previous studies that the interviewed students' experiences of practice-related learning in a different cultural context show linkage with the phenomenon of sojourning which means taking up temporary residence in another culture. The previous, more linear psychological explanatory model of "adapting" the self in a new country to study or work does not suffice to explain the students' various experiences and learning in their field of study/professional development or on a more general. Our primary analysis of the material rather indicate that these processes are best understood as a complex web of shifting links between mastery of communication, social interaction and personal development. It is the management of this web which gives the result of cross-cultural adaptation and renegotiation of the "identity". As previous studies in the field have shown, personal, educational and psychological factors are as important as organizational and social-cultural factors for influencing the learning outcome (Qing et al 2010). And when it comes to identity formation practice related learning abroad also shows deeply personal transformative possibilities (Ryanand & Viete 2009).

    References

    Cooper, G. (2008) "Assessing International Learning Experiences: A Multi-Institutional Collaboration". In: Phi Kappa Phi Forum/ Vol. 88 Qing, G., Schweisfurthb, M. & Daya, C. (2010) "Learning and growing in a 'Foreign' Context: Intercultural Experiences of International Students" In: A Journal of Comparative & International Education. Vol.40, No. 1. Ryan, J. & Viete, R. (2009) “Respectful interactions: learning with international students in the English-speaking academy”. In: Teaching in Higher Education, Vol. 14, No. 3 Vygotsky, L. (1962) Thought and language. Cambridge: MA: M IT press

  • 2.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Att få pengarna att räcka till som de brukar: Barns och ungas perspektiv på föräldrars arbetslöshet2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is about the ways in which children in families with previous economic stability experience and adapt to substantially decreased household income as a consequence of a parent's/parents' unemployment. While much is known about children growing up in poor families, and how they understand and act in relation to the family's economic situation, little is known about children who suddenly find themselves living in economic adversity. In the context of post-financial crisis Sweden where in the late 2000s/early 2010s large numbers of families with previously stable incomes found themselves in economic adversity, the objective of the research is to investigate how children and young people experience substantial decreases in household income as a consequence of parental unemployment. In particular focus is directed to the ways in which they reason about and respond to the family's new economic circumstances. Interviews with children (N=45) whose parents had previously been in long-term employment but lost their jobs were carried out. Drawing on national data provided by the National Transition Fund for Blue-collar Workers (TSL) and (ii) the Local Transition fund for white-collar staff in the private sector (TRS), five municipalities in the west of Sweden with the highest numbers of transition grants were initially identified for recruitment of families subjected to unemployment during the years of 2010-2013.The interview data was analysed using thematic content analysis (Broun & Clark2006) with focus directed to children's agency (Kuczinski 2003). While the results are largely in line with previous research on children living in long-termpoor families, that is to say that parents put children´s needs first, children take responsibility for the family situation by not financial demands on the parentsone major difference emerged. None of the types of self-excluding behavior characteristic of avoidance-oriented strategies was found. Unlike children living in poverty where self-exclusion and the avoidance of exposure to stigmatizing situations where resource disparities are highlighted are common, the children in the current study did not regard parental unemployment and the family's loss of income as a source of shame. Rather, they expressed awareness of how macroeconomic forces had impacted on their lives and, as active agents, developedstrategies that enabled them to adjust to the family's new economic reality. The implications of this result indicate that social workers working with children insuch situations need to reconsider interpretations of behavior that are rooted inthe assumption that economic adversity generates shame and stigma.

  • 3.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Children's agency in interprofessional collaboration2015In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 50-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is currently little research into social welfare interventions where children's agency has been in focus and, in particular, a lack of research on children's experiences and perceptions of interprofessional collaboration. Findings from studies that have looked at children's perceptions of opportunities to influence the support they receive have tended to show how they lack power and influence. Drawing on Kuczynski, Harach, and Bernardini's (1999) three principles for investigating and understanding children's agency, the purpose of this study is, in a Swedish context, to explore children's perceptions of their agentic capacity to influence who works with them when many different professionals are involved in providing support. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 28 children in receipt of support in the form of either home-based interventions, foster or institutional care. The results revealed that, for the older children, perceptions of the exercise of agency involved both the exclusion of certain professionals from the collaborating group as well as the identification of those perceived as being able to help. Additionally, the children's agency could be seen to be implicated in their perceptions of actively making decisions to acquiesce in collaborative solutions. For the younger children, agency was revealed in the way that they interpreted the situations involving collaborating professionals, recognising that it is primarily parents who decide about contact with different 'helpers'. The study provides important insights from the child's perspective into the ways in which, through their agency, children are active in defining and re-defining their own 'organisational chart' of collaboration. Limitations are discussed and proposals for future research are made.

  • 4.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Children's agency in interprofessional collaborative meetings in child welfare work2016In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 502-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of children's agency can be used to understand how children actively shape their lives. While in social work there is a growing body of research on how children experience meetings that involve collaborating professionals, little is known about the ways in which they exert an influence.The purpose of the study is, in a Swedish context, to investigate children's perceptions of their agentic capacity in regulating participation and exerting an influence on outcomes in interprofessional collaborative meetings. Interviews were carried out with 28 children in receipt of social services support. Findings revealed that children perceive professionals' talk as restricting opportunities for input. They also perceive that they have the capacity to exercise agency by (i) conforming to expectations by feigning boredom and seeming disengaged, but at the same time paying close attention; (ii) by using exit strategies; and (iii) by developing 'in-situ' strategies to end meetings. Rather than, as previously suggested, being powerless in such circumstances, the children tell how they carefully assess situations, and, from a position of apparent subordination, talk of ways of acting that reveal their agentic capacity. These insights are of importance for practitioners who are encouraged to look beyond behaviours that first meet the eye.

  • 5.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Intra professional collaboration between social pedagogues and social services case workers around children at risk2010In: Learning to fly: social pedagogy in a contemporary society / [ed] Eriksson, Lisbeth, Winman, Thomas, Göteborg: Daidalos , 2010, p. 224-246Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Learning ‘at work’ during socialwork education: an example of practice learningopportunities from Sweden2005In: Journal of Practice Teaching in Health and Social Work, ISSN 1746-6105, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 6-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to describe and analyse the learning processes of Swedish social work students during and after periods of workplace-based learning. The article describes the process in which the practice learning opportunities that the students have been involved in are reflected upon, discussed, problematised and theorised, both in a series of workshops and via the process of the narrativedescription of critical incidents. Practice learning opportunities form an integralpart of studies of social work in the Social Pedagogy program at the University of Trollhättan/Uddevalla in Sweden where a reflective approach to both campus and practice learning has been developed. In presenting the analysis of the reflective approach to studies of social work the article draws on both Scandinavian and international research and presents Säljö’s theory of situated learning and Nielsen & Kvale’s theory of Mesterlaerer  in the analysis of the critical incident narratives of two individual social work students.

  • 7.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Lärande på "arbetsplatsen" i socialpedagogisk utbildning2004In: Arbetsintegrerat lärande / [ed] Theliander, Jan, Grundén, Kerstin, Mårdén, Björn och Thång, Per-Olof, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2004, 1, p. 123-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Lärares samarbete med socialtjänsten2011In: Läraryrket: ett mångfacetterat uppdrag / [ed] Henry, Alastair, Gurdal, Sevtap, Asplund Carlsson, Maj, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2011, 1, p. 209-226Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Organizing for agency: rethinking the conditions for children's participation in service provision2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no sup1, article id 1564515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the organization of child care services, constraints restrict the potential for children's participation in the formation and delivery of support programmes. These constraints involve the prioritization of risk management, poor understandings of what participation entails, and entrenched socio-cultural perspectives of children as vulnerable and requiring protection. However, when children's participation is recognized as an imperative, both morally and as a means of enhancing service efficiency, and when organizational visions and practice ideologies uphold the importance of children's involvement in decision-making, spaces for children's agency can become part of everyday practice routines. Drawing on three examples of organizational innovations in child-directed social work, this article explores the benefits involved in "organizing for children's agency".

  • 10.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Shifting Subordination: Co-located interprofessional collaboration betweenteachers and social workers2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to describe and analyse the practice processes involved in colocated interprofessional collaboration. The study took place in a resource school where social workers and teachers collaborate on an everyday basis around children who are both in receiptof special educational support and interventions from social services. The research questioncentres on the division of labour and the explicit notions and implicit assumptions thatunderpin it. Further, the organisational conditions that influence the division of labour, theprocess involved in the selection of pupils, and the processes of maintenance anddevelopment of professional identities in a close collaborative context are all examined.

    The study is a qualitative case study of interprofessional collaboration. Through interviews with the teachers and social workers, and via participatory observation of their professionalpractice, empirical data has been generated. This has been used to examine processes ofcollaborative collaboration in accordance with a thematic analytical scheme. A theoretical framework based on theories of the sociology of professions (Abbot, 1988; Evetts, 2006b) and drawing also on the work of Hasenfeld (2010a) on human serviceorganisations and Lipsky (1980) on street level bureaucrats, in conjunction with Strauss’ (1978) theory of negotiations, has been used in analysing the empirical data.

    The results indicate that the intake process functions primarily to legitimise collaborationfrom an organisational and professional perspective. Further, the teachers and social workerscreate what are termed common and separate grounds for practice. The concept of common grounds describes the processes in which common collaborative relationships are created, such as, forexample, the construction of interchangeability and a common practice ideology. Separate grounds, on the other hand, involves situations in which social workers and teachers are engaged in defining and specifying their profession-specific roles in the context of their  everyday work. Another means of maintaining and reinforcing a profession-specific professional identity in co-located collaborative contexts is the use of the spatial design. The results also point to three particular characteristics in the construction of co-located interprofessional collaboration. First, professionals are engaged in what can be termed a form of  shifting subordination as a means of both legitimising and developing their professional identities. Shifting subordination is a strategy used to reduce and avoid professional conflict around roles and working tasks. Secondly, they are engaged in constructing a shared professional identity as a means to meet the organization’s imperative of ‘getting the job done’. Thirdly, there is the characteristic of interdependence which shapes the negotiation processes involved in the division of labour.

  • 11.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    The concept of active citizenship, social skills and youth life styles2006In: Towards Active Citizenship -: Friskie programme as a professional mehtod for guidance., Turku: Turku University of applied science , 2006, p. 18-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Upplevelser av ekonomisk utsatthet: barns och ungas aktörskap och strategier2018In: Barn- och ungdomsvetenskap: grundläggande perspektiv / [ed] Johansson, Thomas; Sorbring, Emma, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, p. 597-607Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Young people´s experiences of parental unemployment and economic adversity2016In: Nordic Youth Research Symposium: Youth Moves – Voices – Spaces – Subjectivities, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2016, p. 40-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While much is known about young people growing up in poor families, and how they experience the familys economic situation, little is known about young people who suddenly find themselves living in economic adversity. In the context of post-financial crisisSweden, where in the late 2000s/early 2010s large numbers of families with previously stable incomes found themselves in economic adversity, the objective of this research is to investigate how young people experience substantial decreases in household income as a consequence of parental unemployment. Adopting an agency perspective, focus is directed to the ways in which they reason about and respond to the family s new economic circumstances. Interviews with children and young people (N=45) whose parents had previously been in long-term employment but lost their jobs during the period 2010-2013 were carried out. While the results are largely in line with research on children and young people living in long-term poor families some difference emerged. In the current study self-excluding behaviour characteristic of avoidance-oriented strategies was not found. Unlike young people living in poverty where self-exclusion and the avoidance of exposure to situations where resource disparities are highlighted are common, the young people in the current study did not regard parental unemployment and the familys loss of income as stigmatizing. Rather, they expressed awareness of how macro-economic forces had impacted on their lives and, as active agents, developed strategies that enabled them to adjust to the familys new economic reality and even saw several positive outcomes with parent´s unemployment. The implications of this result indicate that socialworkers working with young people in families affected by periodic, rather than longterm unemployment need to reconsider interpretations of behavior that are rooted in the assumption that economic adversity generates stigma and shame.

  • 14.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Young Peoples Strategies for Handling Economic Adversity: Extending the Research Agenda2016In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 309-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As an extension of the research into strategies for handling economic adversity of young people in poor families, this study examines strategy use in the context of middle-income families affected by unemployment. Interviews with 39 young people in previously comfortably-off families where one or both of the parents had become unemployed were conducted. The purpose was to explore how, in a Swedish context, young people think about and respond to situations following a drastic reduction in family income. Results indicate that while the strategies used by these young people are generally similar to those in poor families, no use of avoidance-oriented strategies was found. This, it is argued, is because parental unemployment and financial adversity are not perceived as stigmatizing.

  • 15.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Molin, Martin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Epilog: Socialpedagogisk handling: förutsättningar, utmaningar och möjligheter2018In: Socialpedagogisk handling: i teori och praktik / [ed] Martin Molin & Anette Bolin, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2018, p. 185-188Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Att organisera stöd så att barns och ungas aktörskap tas till vara2018In: Barn- och ungdomsvetenskap: grundläggande perspektiv / [ed] Johansson, Thomas & Sorbring, Emma, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, p. 638-651Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Consequences of Availability of 'extended´ Pupil Welfare Interventions2016In: Nordic Youth Research Symposium: Youth Moves – Voices – Spaces – Subjectivities, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2016, p. 59-59Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children and young people living in families with alcohol misuse, violence or a parents psychiatric illness are commonly regarded as a group at risk of developing social and health problems, but also at risk of failing in school. Teachers, school social workers and other relevant staff all have important roles to play in identifying pupils within this target group. However research demonstrates that this process can be prolonged and professionals fail to identify young people at risk in early stages. This presentation offers an evaluation of the project Extended In-Depth Pupil Welfare (2013 2015) funded by the Swedish Public Health Agency. The research questions are: Does availability influence willingness to seek and accept support? , and In what way does this support influence school performance? In this presentation focus is directed to findings emerging from data with children and young people (N=88) who has received interventions. Statistics on grades (grade 7-9) and school absence and interviews (N=20). Thematic analysis has been adopted and the interview data was coded and closely analyzed by identifying increasinglevels of abstraction in the material. The result indicate that the children and young people perceive they can control whether, and if so, when they want to receive support from the support team (self-referrals). This, they report, contributes to a willingness to both emotionally and cognitively engage in the preRepuls program and in the counselling provided. Also three affordances facilitating childrens and young people´sself-referrals is identified: (i) the day-to-day presence of the social workers enables investment in relationships, (ii) team members use communication technologies in domains familiar to the children, and (iii) the social workers practice is visible. A further resultis also that grades are improved, often pointing to subjects such as Swedish, Maths and English and decreased absence from school.

  • 18.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Consequences of Availability of 'extended' Pupil Welfare interventions: Effects on School Performance2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Children living in families with alcohol or drug misuse, violence or a parent's psychiatric illness are commonly regarded as a group at risk of developing social and health problems, but also at risk of failing in school. In Sweden social services have the responsibility to intervene to change the situation for such children (National Board of Health and Welfare, 2013). Teachers, school social workers and other relevant staff all have important roles to play in identifying pupils within this target group (Backlund, 2007). However research demonstrates that this process can be prolonged. Nor is it unusual that parents and/or pupils are unwilling to accept support until the home situation becomes very serious and/or where the pupil's school achievements have deteriorated in a serious way (SOU 2010).This presentation offers an evaluation of an ongoing project 'Extended In-Depth Pupil Welfare' (2013–2015) funded by the Swedish Public Health Agency and which is one of sixteen projects aimed at children and young people within this target group in the national program 'Developing New Evidenced Methods for Prevention and Interventions'. The 'Extended In-Depth Pupil Welfare' project is based on the hypothesis that, by making established evidence-proven intervention methods normally offered by social services in social service settings available for pupils and their parents in a school setting, children and parents may be more willing to accept/or seek support at an earlier stage than had the interventions been available through normal social services channels. The research questions are: 'Does availability influence willingness to seek and accept support?', and 'In what way does this support influence school performance?'In recent decades a great deal of attention has been directed to the creation and implementation of effective interventions designed to adress the needs of pupils at risk of failing academically (Allen-Meares, Montgomery & Kim, 2013; Dube & Orpinas, 2009). Interventions operate at a number of levels. While Tier 1 interventions are at the whole school level, Tier 2 interventions address specific groups and individuals (Allen-Meares et al., 2013). In Sweden a multitude of collaborative joint ventures by social services and schools at both tiers have emerged in recent years (SOU, 2010). A national evaluation of a government sponsored program comprising more than one hundred collaborative projects revealed that collaboration is in great need of development. Further, a majority of teachers report that collaboration with social services, child psychiatry, the police and other agencies is, in different ways, unsatisfactory (Danermark, Englund & Germundsson, 2010). From this point of departure the 'Extended In-Depth Pupil Welfare' project is based on the assumption that if the school is the sole stakeholder in providing support interventions, actions can be more effectively directed in ways that best fit the school's organization and impact most directly on pupils' school achievement. For example, research demonstrates that when social services and schools are both stakeholders, the process of identifying and supporting pupils in need is not only unnecessarily time-consuming, but also less effective (Bolin 2011).Focusing on an interprofessional staff group comprising two teachers and two social workers based on-site in a medium sized primary/secondary school, and comparing pupils' and parents' perceptions of the availability of pupil welfare support with similar parental/pupil perceptions at another school used as a control, the objectives of this research is to theoretically analyse and critically evaluate the impact on school performance of on-site extended pupil welfare support. In this presentation focus is directed to findings emerging from interview data with pupils at the intervention school, and on their perceptions of the impact that the work of the interprofessional support team has had on their approaches to school work.Methodology, Methods, Research Instruments or Sources UsedIn addition to assessing pupils' achievement (encapsulated in subject grades) the study also focuses on the perception the pupils have of the impact on school performance of on-site social welfare support, and it is these findings that are presented here. Individual interviews have been carried out with participating pupils and their parents. The rationale behind this choice is that interviews are contextualised and can thus provide depth and detail (as opposed to questionnaire based approaches), and are to be preferred when 'why' and 'how' questions have been posed (Flyvbjerg, 2007). The interviews with pupils were carried out using a semi-structured guide, as is recommended for interviews with children (Docherty & Sandelowski, 1999). The guide consisted of a series of open questions pertaining to the pupil's understanding of the process of receiving support; the pupil's perception of the impact of the intervention with regard to school performance; out-of-school activities and activities in the family, and if positive changes are experienced, how enduring the pupil perceives such changes to be. The interviews with the pupils took place in a municipality community hall or in a room at the school. When processing the raw information the interviews were digitally-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data was processed using NVIVO 10. Each interview transcript was entered as a single case, with twenty cases in total. The approach adopted when analysing the empirical data has been inspired by what Patton (2002) describes as thematic analysis and involves the recognition of patterns. Data was coded and closely analyzed by identifying increasing levels of abstraction in the material (Braun & Clarke, 2006). Conclusions, Expected Outcomes or FindingsPreliminary results indicate that pupils see encounters with the on-site interprofessional support team as impacting on their attendance, approaches to school work and achievement. This, as the pupils report, is in part due to the experience in lessons of being able to keep away from conflicts with other pupils and teachers. Previously a consequence of being involved in conflicts meant the pupil having to leave lessons. Pupils also speak of experiencing an increased capacity for subject goal attainment. A majority of the interviewees estimate that they have improved their grade in at least two or three subjects, often pointing to core subjects such as Swedish, Maths and English. Further, the results indicate that the pupils perceive they can control whether, and if so, when they want to receive support from the support team. This, they report, contributes to a willingness to both emotionally and cognitively engage in the program and in the counselling provided. They describe that this engagement gives them tools to better focus on subject learning in class, to take control of their emotions and not to initiate conflicts or respond violently in peer relations in the classroom. A particularly interesting finding is that pupils do not perceive that support from the onsite team is attached to any sense of stigma, shame or embarrassment. Indeed, some pupils' accounts indicate that, when receiving support from the team, they feel much more comfortable about talking about problems they experience in the home such as, for example, violence or parents' alcohol misuse. However, some negative experiences of receiving support from the onsite team are revealed. For example, pupils perceive that the staff are not as immediately available as they would like them to be, and that support is not sufficiently 'on-demand', thus causing causes them anxiety and feelings of reduced self-worth

  • 19.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Consequences of availability of social work support in a school context: 'Extended' pupil welfare interventions and effects on school performance2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children living in families with alcohol misuse, violence or a parent’s psychiatric illness are not only commonly regarded as a group at risk of developing social problems, but also at risk of failing in school. Teachers and school social workers have important roles to play in identifying these pupils. However research demonstrates that this process can be prolonged. Nor is it unusual that parents and/or pupils are unwilling to accept support until the home situation becomes serious and/or where the pupil’s school achievements have deteriorated.This presentation is based on an evaluation of the project ‘Extended In-Depth Pupil Welfare’ funded by the Swedish Public Health Agency´s national program ‘Developing New Evidenced Methods for Prevention and Interventions’. The project is based on the hypothesis that, by making established evidence-proven intervention methods normally offered by social services in social service settings available for pupils and their parents in a school setting, children and parents may be more willing to both seek and accept support at an earlier stage than had such interventions been available through normal social services channels. The research questions are: ‘Does availability influence willingness to seek and accept support?’, and ‘In what way does this support influence school performance?’ The empirical base for this presentation draws on (i) data from a survey of parents (N=137) and pupils (N=49) pre- and post-project that focused on perceptions of the availability of support from pupil welfare and socials services, (ii) data on school performance with regard to pupils in receipt of interventions (N=86), and (iii) individual interviews (N=20) with pupils who received interventions. Results indicate that the availability of social workers plays an important role for children’s motivation to seek/or accept support. Pupils regard encounters with the on-site interprofessional support team as impacting on their attendance, approaches to school work and achievement.

  • 20.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    När många vill "hjälpa till": Barns och ungdomars erfarenheter av interprofessionellt samarbete inom den sociala barnavården2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of children's agency can be used to understand how children actively shape their lives. While in social work there is a growing body of research on how children experience meetings that involve collaborating professionals, little is known about the ways in which they exert an influence and the strategies they use. The purpose of the study was, in a Swedish context, to explore children's perceptions of their agentic capacity to influence who works with them when many different professionals are involved in providing support. Secondly, the aim was to investigate the perceptions of their agentic capacity in regulating their participation and exerting an influence on outcomes in interprofessional collaborative meetings. Interviews were carried out with 28 children in receipt of social services support. The results revealed that, for the older children, perceptions of the exercise of agency involved both the exclusion of certain professionals from the collaborating group as well as the identification of those perceived asbeing able to help. Additionally, the children's agency could be seen to be implicated in their perceptions of actively making decisions to acquiesce in collaborative solutions. For the younger children agency was revealed in the way that they interpreted the situations involving collaborating professionals, recognizing that it is primarily parents who decide about contact with different 'helpers". Findings with regards to the second aim revealed that children perceive professionals' talk as restricting opportunities for input. They also perceive they have capacity to exercise agency by (i) conforming to expectations by pretending to be bored and disengaged, butat the same time paying close attention to what is going on, alert to important details concerning them, (ii) by using exit strategies, and (iii) by developing 'in-situ' strategies to end meetings believed to be of little value. Rather than, as previously suggested, being powerless in such circumstances, the children talk of how they carefully assess situations, and, from a position of apparent subordination, talk of ways of acting that reveal their agentic capacity. These insights are of importance for practitioners, who are encouraged to look beyond behaviours that first meet the eye.This research has been funded by the Swedish Children's Welfare Foundation Sweden (Stiftelsen Allmänna Barnhuset)

  • 21.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    The self-referral affordances of school-based social work support: a case study2017In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 869-881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    School-based social work can reach children at risk through the promotion of children’s participation in seeking support. Drawing on Gibson’s theory of affordances, the aim of this interview-based study was to identify affordances for self-referral associated with school-based social work support. Results reveal three affordances facilitating children’s self-initiated contact: (i) the day-to-day presence of social workers in the school environment supports investment in relationships, (ii) use of communication technologies facilitates contact and (iii) the visibility of the social workers’ practice encourages contact-initiation. Common to all three affordances are the accessibility of the social workers, and the generation of trust.

  • 22.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ymefors, Mattias
    Teambaserat skolsocialt arbete: fördjupad och utökad elevhälsa2017In: Skolsocialt arbete: Skolan som plats för och del i det sociala arbetet / [ed] Backlund, Åsa, Högdin, Sara & Weitz, Ylva Spånberger (red.), Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2017, p. 183-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Bowen, Erica
    et al.
    Coventry University, England.
    Walker, Kate
    Coventry University, England.
    Mawer, Matthew
    Coventry University, England.
    Holdsworth, Emma
    Coventry University, England.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Helsing, Bo
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Leen, Eline
    Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen, Germany.
    Held, Paul
    Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen, Germany.
    Awouters, Valère
    Limburg Catholic University College, Belgium.
    Jans, Sebastiaan
    Limburg Catholic University College, Belgium.
    "It’s like you're actually playing as yourself": Development and preliminary evaluation of 'Green Acres High'€™, a serious game-based primary intervention to combat adolescent dating violence2014In: Psychosocial Intervention, ISSN 1132-0559, E-ISSN 2173-4712, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 43-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an overview of the development of 'Green Acres High', a serious game-based primary intervention to raise awareness of and change attitudes towards dating violence in adolescents, and an analysis of how adolescents described their experience of playing this game. Transcripts from focus group data were analysed using thematic analysis. The global theme that was developed, Assessment of the game, was represented by two organising themes, Positive assessment: Pedagogical Underpinnings andNegative Assessment: Functionality Limitations and Frustrations. These represented the fact that overall the learning experience was positive based on the pedagogical principles and content that could be embedded in this digital game but that technical issues with the game needed to be addressed as these could impinge on the learning experience of the adolescents. It was seen that using a serious game was a valid and meaningful way for adolescents to learn about dating violence and that this is a viable alternative or adjunct to traditional teaching methods.

  • 24.
    Fog, Elsebeth
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Friskie Arbetsbok: ett socialpedagogiskt verktyg för arbete med ungdomar och unga vuxna2007In: Meningsskapande och delaktighet: vår tids socialpedagogik, Göteborg: Daidalos , 2007, p. 209-224Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Fog, Elsebeth
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    How to gain Social Pedagogic Competencies from Work Integrated Learning2009In: Journal européen d'éducation sociale : revue semestrielle de la FESET = European journal of social education : a bi-annual periodical of FESET, ISSN 1810-4789, no 16/17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Föräldraresursen: att samverka för stöd till föräldrar2017Report (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Molin, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Den socialpedagogiska handlingsdimensionen: centrala begrepp2018In: Socialpedagogisk handling: i teori och praktik / [ed] Martin Molin & Anette Bolin, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2018, p. 10-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Molin, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Bolin, AnetteUniversity West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Socialpedagogisk handling: i teori och praktik2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This anthology describes and discusses what characterizes social pedagogical action in theory and practice. Initially a brief introduction to some common ways of theoretically approaching the concept of action will be provided, but with particular focus on the importance of the act in social pedagogy. After that, seven chapters will follow written by colleagues (in some cases accompanied by representatives of social pedagogue practitioners) at the Department of Social Work and Social Pedagogy at the University West in Trollhättan, Sweden. The authors, presented in more detail in connection with each chapter, have long experience of teaching at the Social Pedagogical Program and researching questions with relevance of social pedagogy. The seven chapters give the reader different perspectives on "social pedagogical action" with a stamp in the respective authors' field of interest. In this way there is an exhibition of several social pedagogical arenas that can fertilize each other in different ways. The various chapters also represent, to some extent, social education such as research, education and practice. In the introduction of anthology, an overview is given of the contents of the seven chapters' contributions. Finally, the editors of the anthology reflect on the conditions, challenges and opportunities that are required for organizing social pedagogical action.

  • 29.
    Ryding, Jennie
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Changing attitudes to dating violence: a game based intervention2016In: Nordic Youth Research Symposium: Youth Moves – Voices – Spaces – Subjectivities, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2016, p. 123-123Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of dating violence is increasing, and effective prevention and intervention methods are needed to address this growing social problem. The use of online, game-based intervention programs opens up new possibilities for large-scale interventions through social work as well as individual outreach work. The aim of this EU project was to design a primary intervention using innovative Serious Games technologies aimed at raising awareness and knowledge about the nature and consequences of dating violence behaviours, as well as providing education regarding the appropriateness of responses to dating conflict scenarios, and avenues for help-seeking for those directly and indirectly affected by these issues. Swedish youths (N=12), aged 17-18, who took part in the intervention programme were interviewed in focus groups. The aim of the study was to examine young people s experience of the online game-based intervention programme.The interpretation of the results was based on theories of learning through digital media. The study indicates that young people s perception is that they are engaged by and learn about dating violence through online games. Using a serious game method in a school setting offers social workers an effective method of working with dating violence, both from the perspective of prevention and intervention. It is clear that young people today belong to the digital-gaming generation. New methods need to be used to attract their attention and to make social learning possible in an interesting and interactive way. Socialworkers can use games to increase the motivation of players so that, through motivation, knowledge can be acquired and attitudes be changed.

  • 30.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Attitudes towards dating violence among young people2016In: Nordic Youth Research Symposium: Youth Moves – Voices – Spaces – Subjectivities, 2016, p. 71-71Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescent dating violence refers to interpersonal violence which occurs during young people s romantic relationships. Although current research has focused primarily on physical and sexual violence, it is typically agreed that such violence reflects a range of behaviours that includes physical, sexual, and psychological violence, and coercive control. Current international prevalence estimates vary considerably due to variations in definition, but broadly suggest that between 10% - 30% of both adolescent girls and boys experience physical violence in dating relationships. The aim of the study was to examine young people s attitudes toward dating violence. Swedish, British, German and Dutch young people (N=86), aged 12-18, were interviewed in focus groups. Four superordinate themes were identified from thematic analyses: gender identities, television as the educator, perceived acceptability of dating violence, and the decision to seek help/tell someone. Although violence in relationships was generally not condoned, when violence was used by females, was unintended (despite its consequences), or was in retaliation for infidelity, violence was perceived as acceptable. Young peoples indicated that their views were stereotypical and based solely on stereotypical television portrayals of violence in relationships. Stereotypical beliefs and portrayals generate barriers for victimized males to seek help because of fear of embarrassment. Our findings provide further support for double standards of perceptions of violence used by males and females with female violence perceived as less serious and consequently more acceptable than that of males.Furthermore, as a consequence of the above finding, young peoples reported that males would be too embarrassed to approach anyone for help with this issue.

  • 31.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Exempel 4: Ett utökat och fördjupat barn- och elevhälsoarbete2019In: Samverkansforskning: att främja barns och ungas välfärd / [ed] Lena Nilsson & Emma Sorbring (red.), Stockholm: Liber, 2019, p. 57-65Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skolans identifiering av barn i gråzonen2017In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 94, no 4, p. 477-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel genomlyses projektet Team Agera som ingår i Folkhälsomyndighetens nationella satsning på stöd till barn i riskmiljöer. Team Agera är en tvärprofessionell, utökad och fördjupad elevhälsa. Syftet med verksamheten är att erbjuda insatser som av tradition erbjudits av socialtjänsten, i ett försök att öka tillgängligheten av stöd till barn och familjer. Insatserna fokuseras på: 1) barn i familjer med missbruksproblem eller psykisk ohälsa, eller där våld förekommer samt 2) barn med psykisk ohälsa. Genom att arbeta förebyggande är målet att tidigare och i ökad utsträckning hitta de barn och familjer som av olika anledningar är i behov av hjälp och stöd. I artikeln ligger fokus på att besvara frågan: På vilket sätt kan en verksamhet som Team Agera möjliggöra en ökad potential att agera i den så kallade gråzon som utgörs av elever och föräldrar som annars "trillar utanför" systemet, alternativt inte får hjälp och stöd förrän långt efter det att behoven uppkommit?

  • 33.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Team Agera: Ett utökat och fördjupat barn- och elevhälsoarbete genom tvärprofessionell samverkan2016Report (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Team Agera: Ett utökat och fördjupat barn- och elevhälsoarbete genom tvärprofessionell samverkan2016Report (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bowen, Erica
    Kunskapsspel i interventions- och preventionsinsatser2016In: Socialt arbete och internet: att förstå och hantera sociala problem på nya arenor / [ed] Kristian Daneback & Emma Sorbring, Stockholm: Liber, 2016, 1, p. 197-214Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ryding, Jennie
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    A Game-based Intervention: a technical tool for social workers to combat Adolescent Dating-Violence2015In: Advances in Social Work, ISSN 1527-8565, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 125-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dating violence prevalence is increasing and effective prevention and intervention methods are needed in order to adress this growing social problem. The use of on-line game-based intervention programmes open ups new possibilities for social worker practice of interventions on a large scale. The purpose of this study was to examine young people´s experiences of a on line game-based intervention programme designed to adress dating-violence among youths. Swedish youths that took part in the intervention programme were interviewed in focus-groups. Results indicate that the use of a game as an intervention method for this socially sensitive topic was perceived as positive by the young people, seeing it as a new, engaging and interesting method. The findings from the study indicate that on-line game-based programme addressing dating violence between young people has the potential to be used as a technical tool in social work practice.

  • 37.
    Sorbring, Emma
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Bolin, Anette
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ymefors, Mattias
    Grästorps kommun, Grästorp, Sverige.
    "Att sänka tröskeln och ge den långa berättelsen plats": Om ett skolhälsoarbete där tillvaratagandet av barns och ungas eget aktörskap bidrar till att fler får stöd och hjälp2017In: Barnbladet, ISSN 0349-1994, no 5, p. 24-27Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 37 of 37
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