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  • 1.
    Barimani, Mia
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Re tsius väg 13 A, SE:17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Rosander, M.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Berlin, A,
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Childbirth and parenting preparation in antenatal classes2018In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 57, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: to describe topics (1) presented by midwives' during antenatal classes and the amount of time spent on these topics and (2) raised and discussed by first-time parents and the amount of time spent on these topics. Design: qualitative; data were gathered using video or tape recordings and analysed using a three-pronged content analysis approach, i.e., conventional, summative, and directed analyses. Setting and participants: 3 antenatal courses in 2 antenatal units in a large Swedish city; 3 midwives; and 34 course participants. Findings: class content focused on childbirth preparation (67% of the entire antenatal course) and on parenting preparation (33%). Childbirth preparation facilitated parents' understanding of the childbirth process, birthing milieu, the partner's role, what could go wrong during delivery, and pain relief advantages and disadvantages. Parenting preparation enabled parents to (i) plan for those first moments with the newborn; (ii) care for/physically handle the infant; (iii) manage breastfeeding; (iv) manage the period at home immediately after childbirth; and (v) maintain their relationship. During the classes, parents expressed concerns about what could happened to newborns. Parents' questions to midwives and discussion topics among parents were evenly distributed between childbirth preparation (52%) and parenting preparation (48%). Key conclusions: childbirth preparation and pain relief consumed 67% of course time. Parents particularly reflected on child issues, relationship, sex, and anxiety. Female and male participants actively listened to the midwives, appeared receptive to complex issues, and needed more time to ask questions. Parents appreciated the classes yet needed to more information for managing various post-childbirth situations. Implications for practice: while midwifery services vary among hospitals, regions, and countries, midwives might equalise content focus, offer classes in the second trimester, provide more time for parents to talk to each other, allow time in the course plan for parents to bring up new topics, and investigate: (i) ways in which antenatal course development and planning can improve; (ii) measures for evaluating courses; (iii) facilitator training; and (iv) parent satisfaction surveys.

  • 2.
    Barimani, Mia
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Wikström, Anna
    Karolinska institutet.
    Rosander, Michael
    Linköpings organisation.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Berlin, Anita
    Karolinska institutet.
    Facilitating and inhibiting factors in transition to parenthood: ways in which health professionals can support parents2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, p. 537-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The transition to parenthood is an overwhelming life event. From a theoretical perspective, tran- sition to parenthood is a developmental transition that contains certain phases and patterns.

    Aim: This study aim was twofold (i) discover, describe and comprehend transitional conditions that parents per- ceive as facilitating and inhibiting during transition to parenthood and to (ii) use that knowledge to develop recommendations for professional interventions that sup- port and facilitate transition to parenthood.

    Design: Meleis transition theory framed the study’s deduc- tive qualitative approach – from planning to analysis. Methods: In a secondary analysis, data were analysed (as per Meleis transition theory) from two studies that implemented interviews with 60 parents in Sweden between 2013 and 2014. Interview questions dealt with parents’ experiences of the transition to parenthood – in relation to experiences with parent-education groups, professional support and continuity after childbirth. Ethical issues: A university research ethics board has approved the research.

    Results: These factors facilitated transition to parenthood: perceiving parenthood as a normal part of life; enjoying the child’s growth; being prepared and having knowledge; experiencing social support; receiving professional support, receiving information about resources within the health care; participating in well-functioning parent-education groups; and hearing professionals comment on gender dif- ferences as being complementary. These factors inhibited transition to parenthood: having unrealistic expectations; feeling stress and loss of control; experiencing breastfeed- ing demands and lack of sleep; facing a judgmental attitude about breastfeeding; being unprepared for reality; lacking information about reality; lacking professional support and information; lacking healthcare resources; participating in parent-education groups that did not function optimally; and hearing professionals accentuate gender differences in a problematic way.

    Conclusion: Transition theory is appropriate for helping professionals understand and identify practices that might support parents during transition to parenthood. The study led to certain recommendations that are important for professionals to consider. 

  • 3.
    Berlin, Anita
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Rosander, Michael
    Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Barimani, Mia
    Department of Women and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Walk the talk: Leader behavior in parental education groups2018In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 173-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expectant and new parents are offered parental education groups as a way to support their transition to parenthood. Group leadership in these groups has been found to be challenging. Using a qualitative and summative design, the aim of the present study was to investigate how health professionals describe their role in parental education groups compared to their actual behavior. Thirteen health professional leaders in antenatal and child health services were interviewed. These descriptions were compared with the leaders' actual behavior in video and audio-recordings of 16 different group sessions. The results revealed that regardless of how the leaders described their role, they acted as experts and left little time to parents for discussions and active participation. In particular, leaders who described themselves as discussion leaders did not "walk the talk"; that is, they did not do what they said they do when leading groups. That could be explained by lack of professional awareness, group leadership, and pedagogical skills. In order to provide high-quality parental support, leaders need training in group leadership and pedagogy combined with supervision and support on a regular basis.

  • 4.
    Berlin, Anita
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Rosander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping, Sweden.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Linköping University, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning,Linköping, Sweden.
    Törnkvist, Lena
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barimani, Mia
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Academic Primary Care Centre, Region Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fatherhood group sessions: a descriptive and summative qualitative study2020In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 1094-1102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this qualitative study of fatherhood group sessions offered as part of child health care services for new parents was to examine the activities, roles, and topics initiated by the leader and describe fathers' participation. Eight new fathers took part in three audio and video recorded sessions led by a male leader. Three qualitative content analysis approaches were used to analyze data. The analysis showed that the group leader took on four leadership roles, mainly that of discussion leader, but also expert, friend, and organizer. When the group leader acted as discussion leader, fathers participated by discussing challenges and changes in their new situation. Challenges were related to raising the child, partner relationships, everyday life, and gender equality. Fathers also discussed changes in their partner relationships and an increased focus on practicalities in daily life. Fatherhood groups can help new fathers form social networks and can create space for fathers to work through challenging topics, such as gender equality in parenting. The discussion leader's choice of role is crucial to creating the space for such discussions.

  • 5.
    Boo, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Thorsten, Anja
    Linköpings universitet.
    Att anpassa undervisning: till individ och grupp i klassrummet2017Book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ekström, Sara
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Hermansson, Anna
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Ögren Jansson, Marie
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Lundström, Marita
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Micro-teaching i Grundlärarprogrammet: Ett utvecklings- och forskningsprojekt för att stödja lärarstudenter att utveckla yrkesspecifik kunskap i matematik2023In: Abstracts för Decemberkonferensen Institutionen för individ och samhälle 13 december 2023, Trollhättan, Sweden, Trollhättan, 2023, p. 1-1Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vid matematikutbildningen i lärarprogrammen vid Högskolan Väst (HV) genomförs ett utvecklings- och forskningsprojekt (med flera delstudier) för att stödja lärarstudenter att utveckla specifik yrkeskunskap som förbereder dem för undervisningens komplexitet. Kontexten i den här studien är förskoleklassen, den skolform som ska knyta samman förskolans och skolans pedagogik. I en granskning av undervisningen i förskoleklassen (Skolinspektionen, 2015) framkom att endast en fjärdedel av eleverna får en undervisning som motsvarar läroplanens övergripande mål för kunskaper. Det finns därför ett stort behov av att utveckla undervisningen i förskoleklass. Detta gäller särskilt undervisningen i matematik.

    Teoretisk utgångspunkt i projektet är Banduras teori om självtillit i att undervisa (1997). Forskningen behandlar individens föreställningar om sin kompetens och inte den reella undervisningsförmågan. Det finns dock en tydlig koppling mellan lärares uppfattningar om sin kompetens och vad deras elever presterar. I studien undersöker vi lärarstudenters tilltro till deras egen förmåga att undervisa i matematik och hur den förändras när studenterna får genomföra micro-teaching inför sin VFU (Pekdağ et al., 2020).

    Studien inleddes med att studenterna fick undervisning i matematik och därefter med handledningsstöd planera en matematiklektion. Lärarutbildare och studentkollegor gav feedback via ett strukturerat observationsprotokoll i ett intilliggande hybridklassrum. Samma undervisningssession genomfördes sedan på VFU där läraren observerade och gav feedback. Datainsamling har skett genom fokusgrupper för att fånga studenternas upplevelse av micro-teaching och om/hur den förändrat deras tillit till att undervisa i matematik. Teoretiskt analysverktyg är fyra aspekter som stöd för utveckling av självtillit (Bandura, 1997).

    Generellt upplevde studenterna micro-teaching som lärorikt och vill gärna möta liknande upplägg igen. Kontinuerlig återkoppling på ett begränsat innehåll upplevdes positivt. Studenterna tyckte tekniken med micro-teaching var en bra lärsituation, som blandade teori och praktik samt gav dem nya perspektiv på deras egen undervisning, en “levande kunskap”.

  • 7.
    Forsell, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping Univeristy, Linköping.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Chiriac, Eva Hammar
    Linköping University, Linköping.
    Teachers’ perceived challenges in group work assessment2021In: Cogent Education, E-ISSN 2331-186X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. -16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Group work assessment is a challenging and complex practice for teachers. This study focuses on the challenges teachers perceive before and after participating in a group work assessment project that emphasizes individual assessment. By conducting a qualitative thematic analysis of twelve interviews with six teachers at upper secondary schools in Sweden, several challenges could be identified. The most prominent challenge concerning group work assessment is how to discern students’ individual performance within groups. This challenge has consequences for both the validity and the fairness of the assessment. Further, teachers experienced challenges with (un)fairness in group work assessment, in terms of both achieving fairness and having to deal with students’ emotions regarding perceived unfairness. The results also show how teachers perceive inadequate conditions, such as a lack of time and methods, and generate challenges in their practice, which is also related to reliability.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Forsell, Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Pedagogik och didaktik.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande.
    Group Work Assessment: Assessing Social Skills at Group Level2020In: Small Group Research, ISSN 1046-4964, E-ISSN 1552-8278, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 87-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Group work assessment is often described by teachers as complex and challenging, with individual assessment and fair assessment emerging as dilemmas. The aim of this literature review is to explore and systematize research about group work assessment in educational settings. This is an integrated research area consisting of research combining group work and classroom assessment. A database search was conducted, inspired by the guidelines of the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses). The analysis and categorization evolved into a typology consisting of five themes: (a) purpose of group work assessment, (b) what is assessed in group work, (c) methods for group work assessment, (d) effects and consequences of group work assessment, and (e) quality in group work assessment. The findings reveal that research in the field of group work assessment notably focuses on social skills and group processes. Peer assessment plays a prominent role and teachers as assessors are surprising absences in the reviewed research.

  • 9.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Bedömning vid grupparbete2020In: Handbok för grupparbete: att skapa fungerande grupparbeten i undervisning / [ed] Hammar Chiriac, Eva, Hempel, Anders, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2020, p. 277-288Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Föräldragrupper inom barnhälsovården: Forskning, tillämpning och metoder2022In: Vårdmagasinet Hälsa, ISSN 2003-1165, no 1, p. 18-20Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Föräldrastöd i grupp inom primärvården för blivande och nyblivna föräldrar2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I Sverige finns Föräldrastöd i grupp för blivande och nyblivna föräldrar i primärvårdens regi som leds av barnmorskor och BVC-sköterskor. Nationella målen med föräldragrupperna är att stödja föräldraskapet, öka kunskap om barns utveckling och ge föräldrar möjlighet till sociala nätverk med andra föräldrar med barn i samma ålder. Ungefär 70 % av alla blivande och nyblivna föräldrar deltar, flertalet är kvinnor.

    I ett mångårigt tvärvetenskapligt forskningsprojekt med forskare inom pedagogik, psykologi och vårdvetenskap har forskning bedrivits som fokuserar ledarskap, pedagogik och gruppdynamik i föräldragrupperna. Vidare studeras om en intervention i form av bl. a. en utbildningsinsats kan stärka sjuksköterskor som gruppledare och hur de kan skapa en stödjande inlärningsmiljö i föräldragrupper. I presentationen kommer några resultat från projektet att presenteras.

  • 12.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Individual feedback in connection with cooperativelearning – a possible way to support individualaccountability2021In: Acadmia LettersArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research shows that very few studies concerning assessment in connection with cooperative learning (CL) has been conducted (van Aalst, 2013; Forsell et al., 2020). Accordingly,very little theoretical knowledge or useful tools have been provided to assist teachers in thissignificant but difficult task. Besides, teachers often express feelings of uncertainty about howto make group work assessments (Ross & Rolheiser, 2003) and a special challenge seems tobe how to disentangle the individual from the joint work when assessing (Forsell et., al 2020).Consequently, there is a need to develop theoretical knowledge and instruments for assessingin connection with CL (van Aalst, 2013; Johnson & Johnson, 2004). However, research ismaking progress and some promising findings, as well as practical tools, are beginning toemerge (e.g. Bookhart, 2013; Johnson & Johnson, 2004). Recent research also indicates thatteachers’ feedback to the students may support students ability to work more independently inCL and thereby gain more equal opportunities in the their work (Forslund Frykedal & HammarChiriac, 2018). Assessment in connection with CL can also be about the quest for equitabilityproviding students with equal educational opportunity, as students tend to find assessment inconnection with CL unjust (Forslund Frykedal & Hammar Chiriac, 2016).One way for teachers to assess students during CL is to provide the students with formativeassessment, by employing feedback. The objective in this paper is to explore and problematize if teachers’ formative assessment, by way of written feedback, on students’ individualwork during CL supports or impedes student’s further work with the task, hence guiding orhampering the students’ possibility for individual accountability

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    Academia Letters
  • 13.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Lärarstudenters förutsättningar att utveckla yrkesspecifika kunskaper: En studie av matematikdidaktikutbildningen i Förskollärar- och Grundlärarprogrammets tre inriktningar2023In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 2, p. 187-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to investigate how the courses in didactics of mathematics in preschool and primary teacher education create conditions for preservice teachers to develop professional knowledge in an interactive learning process that integrates the knowledge domains of mathematical subject knowledge and pedagogical mathematical knowledge. An analysis of 20 course documents and 8 focus group interviews with students have been done. The results show that the intentions in the documents create conditions for the students to develop mathematical subject knowledge. Still, they were given inferior conditions for pedagogical mathematical knowledge. In the focus groups, perceptions emerged among the participants about a changed view of mathematics during the education, from being an abstract theoretical subject to a subject to be explored and discovered through various practical exercises and activities. As support for transferring their newly discovered perception, it is important that the students participate in core practices to bridge the gap between theoretical and practical knowledge in teacher education. The continued development of such core practices, in which student teachers can integrate professional knowledge and skills into their education, is an important implication of this study.

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    fulltext
  • 14.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Barimani, M.
    Allmänmedicin och primärvård, Institutionen för Neurobiologi, vårdvetenskap och samhälle, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Att leda föräldragrupper på mödrahälsovården ur ett föräldrastödsperspektiv2022In: Reproduktiv hälsa: barnmorskans kompetensområde / [ed] Lindgren, H., Christensson, K. & Dykes, A.-K., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, 2., p. 424-434Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping,Sweden.
    Barimani, Mia
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rosander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping,Sweden.
    Berlin, Anita
    Karolinska Institute, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Parents' reasons for not attending parental education groups in antenatal and child health care: A qualitative study2019In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 17-18, p. 3330-3338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To explore expectant and new parents' reasons not to partici ‐pate in parental education (PE) groups in antenatal care or child health care.

    Background: In Sweden, expectant and new parents are offered PE groups in antena‐tal care and in child health care. Although many parents feel unprepared for parent ‐hood, an urgent task is to attract parents to attend the PE groups.

    Design: A total of 915 parents with children aged 0 to 21 months answered a web questionnaire with open questions about (a) reasons not to participate; (b) anything that could change their mind; and (c) parenting support instead of PE groups. This was analysed using content analysis. The study follows the SRQR guidelines.

    Results: Parents expressed private reasons for not attending PE groups. Some par ‐ents also asked for more heterogeneity regarding content and methods, as well as accommodation of parents' different interests. Other parents asked for like‐minded individuals who were in similar situation to themselves. Lack of information or invita ‐tions from antenatal care or child health care, or that PE groups were unavailable, were additional reasons for not participating in groups.

    Conclusions: Reasons for not attending PE groups were multifaceted from personal,self‐interested and norm‐critical reasons, to that the groups were not available or that the parents were not aware of their existence.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Parents of today are a diverse group with different in ‐terests and needs. Nevertheless, all parents need to feel included in a way that makes participation in PE groups relevant for them. Thus, it is important for leaders to be aware of structures and norms, and to be able to create a group climate and a peda ‐gogy of acceptance where group members value each other's differences. However,to attract parents to participate in PE groups, it is necessary for clinical practice to work on individual, group and organisational levels.

  • 16.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Berlin, Anita
    Omvårdnad, Institutionen för neurobiologi, vårdvetenskap och samhälle, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm Sverige ..
    Barimani, Mia
    Allmänmedicin och primärvård, Institutionen för Neurobiologi, vårdvetenskap och samhälle, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sverige..
    Föräldragrupper inom mödra- och barnhälsovård: Forskning, tillämpning och metoder om ledarskap för välfungerande grupper2021Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här texten vänder sig till er som leder eller ska leda föräldragrupper. Med föräldragrupper menar vi de grupper som fungerar som stöd för blivande och nyblivna föräldrar, dvs. det handlar om föräldragrupper på mödrahälsovården (MHV) för blivande föräldrar som leds av barnmorskor och föräldragrupper inom barnhälso­vården (BHV) för nyblivna föräldrar som leds av barnsjuksköterskor eller distrikts­sköterskor. Texten är uppdelad på 7 kapitel. I det första kapitlet tar vi upp de stödjande aktivi­te­ter som riktas till blivande och nya föräldrar. Kapitel ett omfattar också vad övergången till vad föräldraskap innebär, både det som kan vara fysiskt och psykiskt påfrestande men också utvecklande. Vi kommer även in på grupper av nya föräldrar som kan behöva extra stöd, t.ex. ensamstående, samkönade, unga föräldrar och föräldrar som inte pratar svenska. I kapitel två flyttar vi fokus till vad det är som ska stödjas–barnens och föräldrarnas behov. Kapitel tre behandlar föräldrarnas förväntningar och tankar om föräldra­grupper–vad vill föräldrar att för­äldragrupper ska ta upp och hur vill de att de ska genomföras. I kapitel fyra riktas till ledaren och ledarrollen. Vi kommer in på olika förhållningssätt kopplat till att vara ledare, men också att skapa förutsättningar för ett lärande för deltagande föräldrar. Vi granskar hur den profession­ella rollen ser ut, men också svårigheterna med att uppfylla alla de förväntningar som finns på ledare för föräldragrupper. Femte kapitlet tar upp hur gruppen fungerar och vad som kan underlätta, men också försvåra arbetet med en grupp. Det handlar bl.a. om hur man skapar trygghet, om roller, normer och strukturer i en föräldragrupp. Vi avslutar med två kapitel som har fokus på strategier och metoder för att lättare kunna tackla potentiella problem och svårigheter, som man kan uppleva finns i föräldragrupper, och istället vända det till något positivt. I dessa två kapitel beskriver vi kooperativt lärande och kollegial handledning och ger också konkreta idéer på hur dessa två metoder eller strategier kan tillämpas på föräldra­gruppen.

  • 17.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping.
    Formative Written Feedback asa means for Promoting Collaboration and Individual Accountability2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Group work can provide students with valuable opportunities for cooperative learning both of knowledge and abilities related to academic factors and of collaborative skills. However, the requirement from the curriculum to assess students’ knowledge andability individually in group work is a challenging and complex task for teachers. In addition, research on group work assessment in educational context is a neglected research area, and especially individual group work assessment. Accordingly, little theoretical knowledge or useful tools have been provided to assist teachers in this important but difficult task. A special challenge, compared to traditional assessment in education, seems to be how to discern individual knowledge from the joint work when assessing. One way for teachers to assess students during group work, and simultaneously promote their further work and learning, is to provide them with individual formative assessment, by employing feedback. Recent studies indicates that teachers’ feedback to the students also may support individual accountability,i.e., facilitates students’ ability to work more independently in group work where everyone is responsible for their part of the work but also for the group's joint assignments. Against this backdrop, the aim of this presentation is to explore and problematize in what way teachers’ formative written feedback, on students’ individual work during group work promotes or impedes collaboration and individual accountability.

    Social Interdependence Theory emphasizing positive interdependence as means for promoting collaboration as well as individual accountability for well-functioning groupwork, together with Shute’s (2008) guidelines for useful feedback, are utilized as overarching theoretical perspectives. Shute claims that there are several types of feedback that can be delivered and a large variability of the effects for the students. Useful feedback depends, according to Shute (2008), on motive, opportunity and means, that is, meet the student’s needs and is given when the student is prepared to use the feedback. 

    The study focuses on written formative feedback as means for formative assessment. Data were obtained through 149 feedback documents from six teachers. Feedback was given during a group work assignment when students were working on the individual part of the common group task. The teachers were asked to use their own.

    The results display that the written feedback to the students includes comments on following levels: individual (“you”), group (“your group) and “not distinct” (not possibleto discern which level). Furthermore, the results display that the teachers convey feedback in manageable units, focusing on the task to enhance the quality of the work or to promote collaboration and individual accountability. Thus, the paper contributes with relevant Nordic educational research by presenting theoretical knowledge on the sparsely researched area concerning written individual feedback as a means for formative assessment in connection with group work assessment.

  • 18.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Linköpings universitet.
    Kooperativt lärande som interaktiv pedagogisk metod vid arbete i grupp2018In: VILÄR abstraktbok, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2018, p. 8-9Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kooperativt lärande är en interaktiv pedagogisk metod i grupp där samarbete medtydlig struktur och gemensamt mål är grundläggande förutsättningar för lärandet. Följande centrala element behöver skapas i gruppen för att stödja lärprocesserna;gruppmedlemmarna (1) är ömsesidigt beroende av varandra, (2) stödjer varandra,(3) tar individuellt ansvar och (4) utvecklar sociala kompetens i samarbetet. Dessutom behövs en fortlöpande diskussion i gruppen om det gemensamma arbetet (Johnson & Johnson, 2013). Kooperativt lärande har sitt ursprung i USA men används i utbildningssammanhang runt om i världen. Metoden är användbar i olika lärandesammanhang, från skola och högre utbildning till arbetslivet. Det finns liknande interaktiva pedagogiska metoder varav några exempel är ”collaborative learning”, ”peer-learning” och ”problem-based learning”. Det som framförallt skiljer kooperativt lärande från övriga är tydligt definierade samarbetsmönster som kallas strukturer.

    Syftet med presentationen är att visa hur kommunikationen påverkar samarbetet igrupper som arbetar med kooperativt lärande som pedagogisk metod. Analys av inspelade videofilmer från arbete i grupp utgör empiriskt material. Den här studien har studerat kommunikation som en viktig del av kooperativt lärande. Resultatet visar att läraren i sin kommunikation till gruppen både stödjer och hindrar gruppens samarbete. När läraren ställer elaborerande frågor till gruppen eller ”passar tillbaka” till gruppen att själva fundera vidare ger det gruppen större möjligheter till att ta ansvar över arbetet och diskutionerna. Genom att direkt besvara gruppens frågor, eller omedelbart bekräfta rätt eller fel, motverkar läraren gruppens möjlighet att utveckla samarbetet. På liknande sätt kan kommunikationen bland gruppmedlemmarna både stödja och hindra gruppens samarbete. I studien vänder gruppmedlemmarna oftare till läraren med frågor i stället för att diskutera i gruppen.

    Sammanfattningsvis visar studien att om kooperativt lärande ska utvecklas behöver framförallt lärare men också gruppmedlemmar vara medvetna om vikten av att decentrala elementen i den pedagogiska metoden blir stöd för kommunikation och samarbete i gruppen.

  • 19.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Student collaboration in group work: Inclusion as active participation2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Group work is an educational mode that promotes both learning and socialization among students, and students’ engagement and participation in the group work has proven to be important. Empirical research conducted on the implementation of inclusive and collaborative processes in group work is sparse. Based on social psychological perspective we will in this study focus on inclusive and collaborative processes when students are working in small groups.

     

    The aim of the study was to investigate and describe students’ inclusive and collaborative processes in group work and how the teacher supports or impedes these transactions.

     

    Social Interdependence Theory (Johnson & Johnson, 2002), one of the dominant influences on Cooperative learning, was utilized as the theoretical perspective overarching the study. Data were obtained through observations made from video-recording 500 minutes of group work undertaken in one Year 5 classroom at a municipal school in Sweden and were analysed using thematic analysis (Braun & Clark, 2006). Part of Black-Hawkins (2010, 2013) framework of participation was used to define inclusion and for the analysis of inclusive and collaborative processes.

     

    The results suggest that students’ active participation in the analytical discussions around the group task and discussions around group work structures, together with the teacher’s more defined feedback and avoidance of the traditional authoritative role are examples on prerequisites for group work to be enacted in an inclusive and collaborative manner. These prerequisites give the students opportunities to be accountable both for the individual and the group’s collective work. 

  • 20.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Student Collaboration in Group Work: Inclusion as Participation2018In: International journal of disability, development and education, ISSN 1034-912X, E-ISSN 1465-346X, Vol. 65, p. 183-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Group work is an educational mode that promotes learning and socialisation among students. In this study, we focused on the inclusive processes when students work in small groups. The aim was to investigate and describe students’ inclusive and collaborative processes in group work and how the teacher supported or impeded these transactions. Social Interdependence Theory was utilised as the theoretical perspective overarching the study. The observational data employed were collected by video-recording group work. A part of Black-Hawkins framework of participation was used to define inclusion and for the analysis of inclusive and collaborative processes. The results suggest that students’ active participation in the discussions around the group work structures and analytical discussions, together with the teacher’s more defined feedback and avoidance of the traditional authoritative role, are examples of prerequisites for group work to be enacted in an inclusive manner.

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  • 21.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköpings universitet.
    To make the unknown know: Assessment in group work among students2017In: Journal of Education Research, ISSN 1935-052X, Vol. 10, p. 149-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When group work is used as pedagogical practice in compulsory schools, teachers are expected to assess each student’s individual knowledge even if learning has been gained in interaction with other students. This can be particularly challenge for teachers, i.e., the dilemma of reconciling the demands for individual assessment while fulfilling the demand to teach cooperation abilities through group work. Earlier studies concerning group work as classroom activity (Forslund Frykedal & Hammar Chiriac, 2010, 2011; Hammar Chiriac & Forslund Frykedal, 2011) reveal that assessment is a highly relevant but challenging factor when organising group work in educational settings. To our knowledge, assessment in group work is a rather neglected research area with very little attention being paid to research about this phenomenon. Previous research therefore provides little theoretical knowledge or useful tools to assist teachers in resolving these apparently conflicting demands. The main focus in this chapter is to present and elucidate our current knowledge about assessment in group work. Some of the aspects considered and problematized in this chapter are:

     

    • Purpose of the assessment;
    • What is assessed;
    • How the assessment is carried out;
    • Which level is in focus – individual level, group level or both;
    • How the feedback is implemented; and
    • Who is assessing – teacher, students or both.

     

    Furthermore, an empirically grounded model with the purpose of clarifying different aspects of group assessment will be presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded with some pedagogical implications being suggested.

     

  • 22.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rosander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping, Sweden.
    Efficacy beliefs and interdependence when being assessed working in a group2019In: Educational Studies, ISSN 0013-1946, E-ISSN 1532-6993, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 509-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate factors that can predict collective efficacy in student work groups year 5 and 8 at compulsory school and to see if there are gender and year differences for efficacy beliefs and aspects of interdependence. A total of 283 completed questionnaires were analysed. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to predict collective efficacy and 2 × 2 ANOVA was used to analyse gender and year differences and interactions for following five factors: collective efficacy, self-efficacy, negative interdependence, positive interdependence and importance of good assessment and marks. The result showed that independent of gender, year and school, self-efficacy, positive and negative interdependence predicted collective efficacy in connection with group work assessment. The result also showed that there were better conditions for cooperation in year 5 compared to year 8. Additionally, it was significantly more important for girls than boys to achieve good assessment and marks.

  • 23.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Rosander, Michael
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Barimani, Mia
    Academic Primary Care Centre, Region Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Belin, Anita
    e Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Cooperative learning in parental education groups: child healthcare nurses’ views on their work asleaders and on the groups2021In: Children's health care, ISSN 0273-9615, E-ISSN 1532-6888, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 20-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New parents are offered parental education groups as a way to support their transition to parenthood. Interactive approaches in these groups are of importance, but studies have reported a lack of activities that support interaction. Cooperative learning is a structured method when working with groups and based on five elements essential to maximizing the cooperative potential of groups. The aim was to investigate the leadership skills of child healthcare nurses as leaders for parental education groups, their ideas about creating conditions for wellfunctioning groups, and what is required to achieve this. The results were analyzed and discussed using social interdependence theory as a framework and especially the five elements of cooperative learning. Further, the study used a qualitative descriptive design, and eight qualitative interviews were analyzed deductively using thematic analysis. The results showed that in their narratives the nurses display vocational knowledge and describe conditions important for their groups from a cooperative learning perspective. Nevertheless, the results indicate that the nurses had difficulty explicitly instructing parents to use their personal experiences and social skills to get groups to function effectively. Knowledge developed in the workplaces from the experience of leading groups is mostly implicit, and formal knowledge and awareness of leadership is necessary for development of the role.

  • 24.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rosander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping, Sweden.
    Barimani, Mia
    Stockholm County Council, Academic Primary Care Centre, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Berlin, Anita
    Karolinska Institute, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Child health care nurses' use of teaching practices and forms of knowledge episteme, techne and phronesis when leading parent education groups2020In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 4, article id e12366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores child health care nurses' pedagogical knowledge when supporting parents in their parenthood using various teaching practices, that is how to organise and process the content during parent education groups in primary health care. The aim is to identify teaching practices used by child health care nurses and to analyse such practices with regard to Aristotle's three forms of knowledge to comprehensively examine child health care nurses' use of knowledge in practice. A qualitative methodological design alongside the analysis of video-recordings was used. The results showed that child health care nurses used four teaching practices: lecturing, demonstration, conversation and supervision. Their use of episteme was prominent, but they also seemed to master techne in combination with episteme during the first three teaching practices. During the conversation teaching practice, the child health nurses rarely succeeded. Consequently, they missed opportunities to identify mothers' expressed concerns and to act in the best interests of both the mothers and their infants by the use of phronesis. In health care, however, theoretical episteme is superordinate to productive knowledge or phronesis, which also became evident in this study. Nevertheless, more interactive pedagogical practices are needed if more use of phronesis is to become a reality in parent education groups.

  • 25.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rosander, Michael
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Barimani, Mia
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Berlin, Anita
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Leaders' limitations and approaches to creating conditions for interaction and communication in parental groups: A qualitative study2019In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 147-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe and understand parental group (PG) leaders' experiences of creating conditions for interaction and communication. The data consisted of 10 interviews with 14 leaders. The transcribed interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. The results showed that the leaders' ambition was to create a parent-centred learning environment by establishing conditions for interaction and communication between the parents in the PGs. However, the leaders' experience was that their professional competencies were insufficient and that they lacked pedagogical tools to create constructive group discussions. Nevertheless, they found other ways to facilitate interactive processes. Based on their experience in the PG, the leaders constructed informal socio-emotional roles for themselves (e.g. caring role and personal role) and let their more formal task roles (e.g. professional role, group leader and consulting role) recede into the background, so as to remove the imbalance of power between the leaders and the parents. They believed this would make the parents feel more confident and make it easier for them to start communicating and interacting. This personal approach places them in a vulnerable position in the PG, in which it is easy for them to feel offended by parents' criticism, questioning or silence.

  • 26.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Group work assessment intervention project: A methodological perspective2022In: Cogent Education, E-ISSN 2331-186X, Vol. 9, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The assessment of individual knowledge and abilities should be frequently undertaken when learning is developed in interactions with other students, such as in group work and/or cooperative learning. Previous research reveals that group work assessment is a neglected research area, and this applies in particular to group work assessment interventions studies. The focus of this article is methodological, and its aim is to provide a reflective and critical account of a group work assessment intervention project, and the implications of the different choices made in this process. The intervention project that was scrutinized had a mixed-method longitudinal quasi-experimental design, and interventions in the form of shorter educational sessions were central to the project. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected, analyzed, and compiled. The methodological issues discussed and problematized were the importance of (a) establishing collaboration with teachers; (b) well-thought-out and delimited methodological choices, and subsequent consequences; and (c) including both teachers and students to secure successful effects of the interventions. As a result of the study, it was concluded that intervention could be beneficial as a means of increasing the scientific knowledge in relation to intervention studies, and also to the emerging discourse on group work assessment.

  • 27.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping (SWE).
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Individual group work assessment in cooperative learning: possibilities and challenges2023In: Contemporary global perspectives on cooperative learning: applications across educational contexts / [ed] Robyn M. Gillies, Barbara Millis & Neil Davidson, Routledge, 2023, p. 94-108Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary of the book:

    This volume captures contemporary global developments in cooperative learning (CL) across varied educational contexts, levels, and disciplines. Cooperative learning is widely recognized as a pedagogical practice that promotes socialization and learning among students, from kindergarten to tertiary education and across different subject domains. With chapters from contributors throughout the Global North and South, this comprehensive volume offers a wide-ranging perspective and addresses a range of cooperative learning pedagogies including relational, online, and peer learning, STAD, the Jigsaw model, and dialogic talk. The chapters draw on novel empirical research and theory to highlight best practices in cooperative learning, whilst also considering the challenges, limitations, and factors which drive or inhibit learner engagement and success. Consistent attention is given to the pivotal role of the educator in implementing cooperative learning to maximum benefit to enhance students’ affective, social, cognitive, and metacognitive learning. Thus, this book will appeal to scholars and researchers across a variety of subjects; and will provide an additional benefit to in-service and pre-service educators who already practice cooperative learning in their classrooms, as well as those who are interested in implementing the model. 

  • 28.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    et al.
    Psykologi, Filosofiska fakulteten, Linköpings universitet.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi, Linköpings universitet.
    Intervention as a means to improving assessment practice in cooperative learning: Session 5, Workshop Saturday 15:30 to 17:002019In: Cooperative Learning in Far-East Asia and the World: Achieving and Sustaining Excellence, 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this workshop is to provide an opportunity for delegates to participate in an intervention aimed at enhancing assessment skills in cooperative learning. Differentiating assessment of individuals' intellectual abilities, academic and social skills from that of the whole group's achievements when using cooperative learning instruction is, according to earlier research, a challenge for teachers (e.g., Forslund Frykedal & Hammar Chiriac, 2011; Ross & Rolheiser, 2003). In this workshop participants will take part in, discuss and reflect upon objects and methods concerning assessment in cooperative learning, by using, the Social Interdependence Theory's five elements; (a) interdependence, (b) accountability, (c) promotive interaction, (d) interpersonal and small group skills, and (e) group processes, when reviewing and discerning assessable objects in a cooperative situation. The discerned objects will then be presented, discussed and reflected upon in cross-groups. Additionally, participation in the workshop also includes peer-assessment of group-members' abilities and skills in terms of "two stars and a wish". During this interactive workshop, participants will work in different constellations, such as pairs, small groups and cross-groups, giving experiences in the interdependence between CL and assessment. It's an exercise giving delegates assessment tools useful in pedagogical practice.

  • 29.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping, Sweden.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Teacher´s Talk about Group Work Assessment before and after Participation in An Intervention2019In: Creative Education, ISSN 2151-4755, E-ISSN 2151-4771, Vol. 10, no 9, article id 95471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that teachers use an indistinct vocabulary, employ few concepts, and expose an embryonic professional language when talking about group work assessment, thus indicating a lack of a professional language. Building on Granström´s three different modes of language use everyday, pseudo-meta- and meta-language, the purpose of this article was to examine the teachers use of languages when talking about group work assessment. Specifically, if and how teachers use of modes of languages are influenced by them partaking in 1) a study about assessment in group work and 2) in an intervention in form of a short educational session. Data were gathered from interviews with eight teachers working in years five and eight in five Swedish compulsory schools and analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. The results revealed that all of the teachers use Granstöms mode of languages to a varying degree when talking about assessment in cooperative situations. A core finding was that intervention in the form of a short education influenced the teachers way of talking in a positive way. By participating in the intervention, the teachers developed and expanded their mode of language, thereby promoting the use of a common professional language about group work assessment.

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  • 30.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköpings universitet.
    Lärares ledarskap vid grupparbete2020In: Handbok för grupparbete: att skapa fungerande grupparbeten i undervisning / [ed] Hammar Chiriac, Eva, Hempel, Anders, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2020, p. 185-201Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning Linköping University.
    Rosander, Michael
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning Linköping University.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning Linköping University.
    An Educational Intervention to Increase Efficacy and Interdependence in Group Work2019In: Education Quarterly Reviews, E-ISSN 2621-5799, p. 435-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated whether an intervention, in the form of short educational sessions, influenced pupils' experiences of group work or cooperative learning (CL). The hypothesis tested was that an intervention for teachers and pupils would lead to pupils' increased (a) collective efficacy, (b) self-efficacy and, (c) positive interdependence, as well as (d) less negative interdependence. The participants were pupils from years 5 and 8 in three compulsory schools in Sweden, working in 22 groups divided into one intervention group and one control group (11 work groups in each condition). Data were collected through a questionnaire before and after participation in the study and analysed using a repeated measure ANOVA and 2×2 ANOVA. The results showed an increased collective efficacy, self-efficacy and positive interdependence and a reduction of negative interdependence. The conclusion is that the intervention provided for teachers and pupils did have an effect, thus promoting successful working as a group.

  • 32.
    Rosander, Michael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping, Sweden..
    Berlin, Anita
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping, Sweden..
    Barimani, Mia
    Academic Primary Care Centre, Region Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm, Sweden. .
    Maternal depression symptoms during the first 21 months after giving birth2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 606-615, article id 1403494820977969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The first year after childbirth involves a major transition for women, which can accentuate inadequacies and feelings of powerlessness, making them vulnerable to depression. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and frequency of maternal postpartum depressive symptoms at different times after giving birth (0-21 months).

    METHODS: Data were collected cross-sectionally using a web questionnaire containing the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). A total of 888 mothers with children in the age range 0-21 months responded.

    RESULTS: The results showed different levels of depression over the range of months included in the study. The overall prevalence using EPDS ⩾ 12 was 27.8%. There were higher levels at 9-12 months and 17-21 months. The highest levels of symptoms of depression were found at nine, 12, and 17 months after birth, and the lowest levels at two and 16 months.

    CONCLUSIONS: Many mothers experience symptoms of depression after giving birth that can continue well beyond the child's first year. We have identified different levels of depression at different points in time after giving birth, with highs and lows throughout the first 21 months. This highlights a need to screen for depression more than once during the first years, as well as a closer cooperation between midwives and child healthcare nurses in supporting mothers in the transition to motherhood. This is an important aspect of public health, which not only involves mothers with symptoms of depression, but also their ability to care for their child and a possible negative impact on the child's development.

  • 33.
    Rosander, Michael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping,Sweden.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping,Sweden.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping,Sweden.
    Attitudes towards being assessed in group work: The effects of self-efficacy and collective efficacy moderated by a short educational intervention2020In: Psychology in the Schools, ISSN 0033-3085, Vol. 57, no 9, p. 1404-1416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Being assessed in group work is a balance between cooperation and competition. Self-efficacy and collective efficacy are important concepts in understanding how group work progresses and what attitudes assessment evokes. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of a short educational intervention on the association between efficacy beliefs and attitudes towards being assessed in group work. In a randomized, controlled study of 22 pupil work groups, half of them got a short educational intervention. The work groups were formed for this study. The pupils answered a questionnaire before the intervention and after doing group work for 3 to 6 weeks with a study-specific task. A moderated mediation analysis showed that attitudes towards being assessed in group work significantly are related to self-efficacy mediated through perceived collective efficacy and that this relationship is stronger in the intervention group. In the context of work group assessment, we have shown that self-efficacy and collective efficacy are two separate, but related concepts that are dependent on each other when it comes to pupil attitudes towards group work assessment, and that a relatively short educational intervention to teachers and pupils had an effect on the attitude. However, the older girls’ attitude towards group work assessment was the least positive of all, which may indicate that the intervention depends on gender and age.

  • 34.
    Roumbanis-Viberg, Anna
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping (SWE).
    Hashemi, Sylvana Sofkova
    Department of Pedagogical, Curricular and Professional Studies, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE); School of Education, Humanities and Social Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad (SWE) .
    The teacher educator's perceptions of professional agency: a paradox of enabling and hindering digital professional development in higher education2021In: Education Inquiry, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate professional agency in the context of higher education as manifested in Swedish teacher educators' perceptions regarding their working life in a digital society and to seek to obtain insights on salient factors influencing professional agency and identity. Eighteen semi-structured interviews with teacher educators working at four different universities were analysed using directed content analysis. The theoretical perspective taken is a subject-centred socio-cultural approach to professional agency. This is an approach where the social context (the socio-cultural conditions) and individuals' agency (professional subjects) are mutually constitutive but analytically separate. Agency is something that is exercised, and in this study, professional agency was explored in the work context, in teaching practice and in relation to the professional identity. The results of this study not only confirm the complexity of being a professional TE in the times of digitalisation but more importantly demonstrate a paradox in the TE's perceived high agency that both enables and hinders self-development (the individual) as well as development of the working community, the organisation, and the university. The study implies that considerations and understanding of the TE's autonomy and perceived agency are significant for professional and work development.

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  • 35.
    Roumbanis-Viberg, Anna
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Sofkova Hashemi, Sylvana
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Institutionen för didaktik och pedagogisk profession, Utbildningsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Göteborgs universitet.
    Teacher educators' perceptions of their profession in relation to the digitalization of society2019In: Journal of Praxis in Higher Education, no 1, p. 87-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study takes an exploratory approach to investigating Swedish teacher educators' perceptions regarding their profession in relation to the digitalization of society and education, including higher education. Eighteen semi-structured interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings show that the teache reducators perceive digitalization on a scale that ranges from simply using tools to being part of a technology-initiated revolution of educational institutions and society. From this range of digital developments emanate individual, group, and organizational requirements/demands, needs, and consequences for being, that is, personal experiences of how digitalization affects the work, and acting, that is, doing something in response to the demands of using and teaching with digital technology. The teacher educator is situated primarily in being with the requirements for working professionally and acting as a teacher, which creates tensions and challenges for the individual and the professional self. Teacher educators require support to strengthen their professional identity, to facilitate activities for professional development, and to stimulate reflective practice. A further difficulty is the lack of relevant policies and strategies. This study highlights the complex challenge of teaching and learning simultaneously in a profession that implicates autonomy and responsibility of its practitioners. This creates limitations for the teacher educators to move from being to acting.

  • 36.
    Roumbanis-Viberg, Anna
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Sofkova Hashemi, Sylvana
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    The Teacher Educator’s Perceptions of Professional Agency Pre-Covid: the Paradox of Enabling and Hindering Digital Professional Development in Higher Education2021In: (Re)imagining & Remaking Teacher Education / [ed] Mhairi Beaton,Tatjana Bicjutko, Diola Bijlhout, Birger Brevik, Cornelia Connolly, Katarzyna Brzosko-Barratt, Miroslava Cernochova, Chandrika Devarakonda, Joanna Dobkowska, Dobromir Dziewulak, Onur Ergunay, Eskisehir Osmangazi, Maria Assunção Flores, Mercé Gisbert,Lorraine Harbison, Ellen Beate Hellne-Halvorsen, Pilar Ibáñez-Cubillas, Kalina Jastrzębowska, Hanneke Jones, Cendel Karaman, Steinar Karstensen, Anna Kowalewska, Virginia Larraz, Laurinda Leite, Caro Lemeire, Monique Leygraaf, Joanna Madalińska-Michalak, Urszula Markowska-Manista, Deirdre Murphy, Marino Elizabeth Oldham, Davide Parmigiani, Marta Pietrusińska, Marlena Plebańska, David Powell, José G. Puerta, Blerim Saqipi, Olena Shyyan, Borge Skåland, Ronny Smet, Marek Smulczyk, Milan Stojkovic, Agnieszka Szplit, Jan Kochanowski, Elizabeth White, Anna Zielińska, & Małgorzata Żytko, Association for Teacher Education in Europe (ATEE) , 2021, p. 193-194Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In digital working life, the individual must take increasingly more responsibility for constructing their way forward. It is up to the individual, in general, to seek knowledge and to learn - to learn for work and life (Eteläpelto, Vähäsantanen, Hökkä, & Paloniemi, 2013; Roumbanis Viberg, Forslund Frykedal, & Hashemi Sofkova, 2019). The aim of this study was to investigate professional agency in the context of higher education as manifested in Swedish teacher educators’ perceptions regarding their working life in a digital pre-Covid society, and to seek to obtain insights on salient factors influencing professional agency and identity. Eighteen semi-structured interviews with teacher educators working at four different universities were analyzed using directed content analysis.The theoretical perspective taken is a subject-centered socio-cultural approach to professional agency (Eteläpelto et al., 2013). This is an approach in which the social context (the socio-cultural conditions) and individuals’ agency (professional subjects) are mutually constitutive but analytically separate. Agency is something that is exercised, and in this study professional agency was explored in the work context, in teaching practice and in relation to professional identity. The results of this study not only confirm the complexity of being a professional TE in these times of digitalization, but more importantly demonstrate a paradox in the TEs perceived high agency that both enables and hinders self-development (the individual) as well as the development of the working community, the organization, and the university. The TEs feel they have professional autonomy and space, which in this study gave rise to exercising agency mainly to keep their current teacher identity and manage their practice. The study implies that considerations and understandings of the TE’s autonomy and perceived agency are significant for the professional and work development.

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  • 37.
    Zwedberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University, Department for Health Promotion Science, Lindtstedtsvägen 8, Stockholm 114 86, Sweden; Karolinska University hospital, Solna. Children´s & Women´s Health Theme PA Pregnancy Care and Delivery, Karolinska Universitetsjukhuset Solna, Karolinska vägen, Solna 171 76, Sweden.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Linköping University, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning,Linköping, Sweden.
    Rosander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning,Linköping, Sweden.
    Berlin, Anita
    The Division of Nursing Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Barimani, Mia
    The Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Academic Primary Care Centre, Region Stockholm, Solnavägen 1 E, 113 65, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Midwives' experiences as preceptors and the development of good preceptorships in obstetric units2020In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 87, article id 102718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study midwives' experience in their role as a preceptor and their perception on how to best support midwifery students in obstetrics units. Obstetric units are an important learning area for student midwives but knowledge on how to become a good midwife preceptor is limited. Design: This qualitative study explores midwife preceptors' experience of supervising midwifery students in three obstetric units in Sweden. Following ethical approval seventeen midwife preceptors were inter- viewed and data were analysed thematically. Findings: Thematic analysis of the interviews resulted in the identification of two themes and five sub- themes: (1) self-efficacy in the preceptor role which involves (a) being confident in the professional posi- tion and (b) having the support of management and colleagues and (2) supporting the student to attain self-confidence and independence which entails (a) helping the student to grow, (b) facilitating reflection in learning situations, and (c) "taking a step back". Key conclusion: Good preceptorship occurs when midwives achieve full self-efficacy, when they master the preceptor role, and when they have enhanced their abilities to help, the student reach confidence and independence. Implications for practice: Health care organisations needs to develop and support midwifery preceptor- ships

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