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  • 1.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm University.
    Edman, Gunnar
    Department of Psychiatry, Research and Development, Danderyd’s Hospital, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Flunitrazepam abuse and personality characteristics inmale forensic psychiatric patients2001In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 103, no 1, p. 27-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sixty male non-psychotic forensic psychiatric patients, aged 16-35 years, were studied after they completed their ordinary forensic psychiatric assessment (FPA). The prevalence of flunitrazepam (FZ) abuse was investigated by using both structured and in-depth interviews with the objective of studying the relationship between the abuse and personality traits. The patient’s characteristics, DSM-IV disorders, and actual sentences were obtained by studying their files. In order to obtain measures on their personality traits, self-report inventories were administered to the patients. Eighteen out of 60 patients were FZ abusers, but only 4 of them received a diagnosis related to the FZ abuse during the ordinary FPA. In almost all cases, however, indications of the FZ abuse were found in the files. No differences in personality traits were found between the groups. The frequency of previous admissions to an FPA and actual sentences of robbery, weapons offenses, narcotic-related offenses, and other crimes, such as theft, among the FZ abusers deviated significantly from forensic non-FZ abusers. Therefore, the FZ abuse per se might be more responsible for their tendency to commit crimes characterized by danger and thrill-seeking, such as robbery, weapons offences, and theft, than personality. The most important conclusion is that assessment of FZ abuse is needed in forensic psychiatry.

  • 2.
    Falk, Örjan
    et al.
    CELAM (Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health), University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sfendla, Anis
    Abdelmalek Essaadi University, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Tetouan, Morocco.
    Brändström, Sven
    Center for Well-being Washington University, School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO, USA.
    Anckarsäter, Henrik
    CELAM (Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health), University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Thomas
    CELAM (Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health), University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kerekes, Nora
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. Swedish Prison and Probation Services, R&E, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Personality and trait aggression profiles of male and female prison inmates2017In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 250, p. 302-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender specific personality profiles in association with the level of aggressive antisocial behavior in offenders have not been previously investigated. In the present study we analyzed data collected from 65 male and 50 female offenders using structured protocols regarding criminal history (by criminal register data), trait aggression (by the Life History of Aggression (LHA) questionnaire), and personality profiles (by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI)). Prison inmates differed significantly on several personality dimensions, most pronouncedly were they characterized with low character maturity (low scores in the Self-Directedness and Cooperativeness dimensions of TCI) when compared to gender and age matched controls of the general population. The majority of offenders scored distinctively high on trait aggression. There were moderate to strong associations between the personality dimensions and each of the subscales of LHA (Aggression, Self-directed Aggression and Antisocial behavior). These associations were stronger in the female offender sample. Trait aggression could be best explained by a model, which included male gender, younger age, high novelty seeking temperament and low character maturity. Our results suggest that therapies aiming at strengthening self-governance and increasing cooperativeness (focusing on character maturity) may alleviate aggressive antisocial behavior in offenders.

  • 3.
    Kerekes, Nora
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Apelqvist, Susanne
    Swedish Prison and Probation Services, R&E, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Fielding, Cecilia
    Swedish Prison and Probation Services, R&E, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Anckarsäter, Henrik
    University of Gothenburg, Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health (CELAM), Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg, Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health (CELAM), Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Prison Adjusted Measure of Aggression (PAMA): Psychometric Characteristics of a New Tool Measuring Change in Aggressive Behaviors in Correctional Settings2018In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 263, p. 130-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for instruments that can be used in correctional settings to measure changes in aggressive behaviors over a limited time period. This study aimed to validate an instrument (the Prison Adjusted Measure of Aggression, PAMA) that assesses specifically the past month’s aggressive behaviors and is adapted for use in correctional facilities. The psychometric properties of the self-rated and interview versions of the PAMA were explored and compared to those of two well-established measures of aggression: The Staff Observation Aggression Scale (SOAS); and the self-rate Aggression Questionnaire-Revised Swedish Version (AQ-RSV). The study group comprised 93 male and 59 female inmates, who were followed for two months. During the study, the prevalence of aggressive acts was observed and reported by SOAS. On two occasions, at monthly intervals, subjects reported their own aggressive behaviors using AQ-RSV and the self-report version of the PAMA; also, a psychologist conducted interviews according to PAMA. This study’s main finding was that the self-rated version of PAMA is a valid measure of different types and dimensions of aggression (physical and verbal aggression, hostility) and has acceptable psychometric properties. Therefore, PAMA could potentially be of value for use in correctional services evaluating aggression managing treatment interventions.

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